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1 1 h2. Caching with Rails: An overview
2 2
3   -Everyone caches. This guide will teach you what you need to know about
4   -avoiding that expensive round-trip to your database and returning what you
5   -need to return to those hungry web clients in the shortest time possible.
  3 +This guide will teach you what you need to know about avoiding that expensive round-trip to your database and returning what you need to return to the web clients in the shortest time possible.
6 4
7 5 After reading this guide, you should be able to use and configure:
8 6
@@ -15,14 +13,9 @@ endprologue.
15 13
16 14 h3. Basic Caching
17 15
18   -This is an introduction to the three types of caching techniques that Rails
19   -provides by default without the use of any third party plugins.
  16 +This is an introduction to the three types of caching techniques that Rails provides by default without the use of any third party plugins.
20 17
21   -To start playing with testing you'll want to ensure that
22   -+config.action_controller.perform_caching+ is set
23   -to +true+ if you're running in development mode. This flag is normally set in the
24   -corresponding config/environments/*.rb and caching is disabled by default
25   - for development and test, and enabled for production.
  18 +To start playing with testing you'll want to ensure that +config.action_controller.perform_caching+ is set to +true+ if you're running in development mode. This flag is normally set in the corresponding +config/environments/*.rb+ and caching is disabled by default for development and test, and enabled for production.
26 19
27 20 <ruby>
28 21 config.action_controller.perform_caching = true
@@ -30,16 +23,9 @@ config.action_controller.perform_caching = true
30 23
31 24 h4. Page Caching
32 25
33   -Page caching is a Rails mechanism which allows the request for a generated
34   -page to be fulfilled by the webserver (i.e. apache or nginx), without ever having to go through the
35   -Rails stack at all. Obviously, this is super-fast. Unfortunately, it can't be
36   -applied to every situation (such as pages that need authentication) and since
37   -the webserver is literally just serving a file from the filesystem, cache
38   -expiration is an issue that needs to be dealt with.
  26 +Page caching is a Rails mechanism which allows the request for a generated page to be fulfilled by the webserver (i.e. apache or nginx), without ever having to go through the Rails stack at all. Obviously, this is super-fast. Unfortunately, it can't be applied to every situation (such as pages that need authentication) and since the webserver is literally just serving a file from the filesystem, cache expiration is an issue that needs to be dealt with.
39 27
40   -So, how do you enable this super-fast cache behavior? Simple, let's say you
41   -have a controller called +ProductsController+ and an +index+ action that lists all
42   -the products
  28 +So, how do you enable this super-fast cache behavior? Simple, let's say you have a controller called +ProductsController+ and an +index+ action that lists all the products
43 29
44 30 <ruby>
45 31 class ProductsController < ActionController
@@ -53,25 +39,13 @@ class ProductsController < ActionController
53 39 end
54 40 </ruby>
55 41
56   -The first time anyone requests +/products+, Rails will generate a file
57   -called +products.html+ and the webserver will then look for that file before it
58   -passes the next request for +/products+ to your Rails application.
  42 +The first time anyone requests +/products+, Rails will generate a file called +products.html+ and the webserver will then look for that file before it passes the next request for +/products+ to your Rails application.
59 43
60   -By default, the page cache directory is set to +Rails.public_path+ (which is
61   -usually set to the +public+ folder) and this can be configured by
62   -changing the configuration setting +config.action_controller.page_cache_directory+.
63   -Changing the default from +public+ helps avoid naming conflicts, since you may
64   -want to put other static html in +public+, but changing this will require web
65   -server reconfiguration to let the web server know where to serve the cached
66   -files from.
  44 +By default, the page cache directory is set to +Rails.public_path+ (which is usually set to the +public+ folder) and this can be configured by changing the configuration setting +config.action_controller.page_cache_directory+. Changing the default from +public+ helps avoid naming conflicts, since you may want to put other static html in +public+, but changing this will require web server reconfiguration to let the web server know where to serve the cached files from.
67 45
68   -The Page Caching mechanism will automatically add a +.html+ extension to
69   -requests for pages that do not have an extension to make it easy for the
70   -webserver to find those pages and this can be configured by changing the
71   -configuration setting +config.action_controller.page_cache_extension+.
  46 +The Page Caching mechanism will automatically add a +.html+ extension to requests for pages that do not have an extension to make it easy for the webserver to find those pages and this can be configured by changing the configuration setting +config.action_controller.page_cache_extension+.
72 47
73   -In order to expire this page when a new product is added we could extend our
74   -example controller like this:
  48 +In order to expire this page when a new product is added we could extend our example controller like this:
75 49
76 50 <ruby>
77 51 class ProductsController < ActionController
@@ -89,20 +63,13 @@ class ProductsController < ActionController
89 63 end
90 64 </ruby>
91 65
92   -If you want a more complicated expiration scheme, you can use cache sweepers
93   -to expire cached objects when things change. This is covered in the section on Sweepers.
  66 +If you want a more complicated expiration scheme, you can use cache sweepers to expire cached objects when things change. This is covered in the section on Sweepers.
94 67
95 68 Note: Page caching ignores all parameters. For example +/products?page=1+ will be written out to the filesystem as +products.html+ with no reference to the +page+ parameter. Thus, if someone requests +/products?page=2+ later, they will get the cached first page. Be careful when page caching GET parameters in the URL!
96 69
97 70 h4. Action Caching
98 71
99   -One of the issues with Page Caching is that you cannot use it for pages that
100   -require to restrict access somehow. This is where Action Caching comes in.
101   -Action Caching works like Page Caching except for the fact that the incoming
102   -web request does go from the webserver to the Rails stack and Action Pack so
103   -that before filters can be run on it before the cache is served. This allows
104   -authentication and other restriction to be run while still serving the
105   -result of the output from a cached copy.
  72 +One of the issues with Page Caching is that you cannot use it for pages that require to restrict access somehow. This is where Action Caching comes in. Action Caching works like Page Caching except for the fact that the incoming web request does go from the webserver to the Rails stack and Action Pack so that before filters can be run on it before the cache is served. This allows authentication and other restriction to be run while still serving the result of the output from a cached copy.
106 73
107 74 Clearing the cache works in the exact same way as with Page Caching.
108 75
@@ -125,37 +92,19 @@ class ProductsController < ActionController
125 92 end
126 93 </ruby>
127 94
128   -You can also use +:if+ (or +:unless+) to pass a Proc that specifies when the
129   -action should be cached. Also, you can use +:layout => false+ to cache without
130   -layout so that dynamic information in the layout such as logged in user info
131   -or the number of items in the cart can be left uncached. This feature is
132   -available as of Rails 2.2.
  95 +You can also use +:if+ (or +:unless+) to pass a Proc that specifies when the action should be cached. Also, you can use +:layout => false+ to cache without layout so that dynamic information in the layout such as logged in user info or the number of items in the cart can be left uncached. This feature is available as of Rails 2.2.
133 96
134   -You can modify the default action cache path by passing a +:cache_path+ option.
135   -This will be passed directly to +ActionCachePath.path_for+. This is handy for
136   -actions with multiple possible routes that should be cached differently. If
137   -a block is given, it is called with the current controller instance.
  97 +You can modify the default action cache path by passing a +:cache_path+ option. This will be passed directly to +ActionCachePath.path_for+. This is handy for actions with multiple possible routes that should be cached differently. If a block is given, it is called with the current controller instance.
138 98
139   -Finally, if you are using memcached, you can also pass +:expires_in+. In fact,
140   -all parameters not used by +caches_action+ are sent to the underlying cache
141   -store.
  99 +Finally, if you are using memcached, you can also pass +:expires_in+. In fact, all parameters not used by +caches_action+ are sent to the underlying cache store.
142 100
143 101 h4. Fragment Caching
144 102
145   -Life would be perfect if we could get away with caching the entire contents of
146   -a page or action and serving it out to the world. Unfortunately, dynamic web
147   -applications usually build pages with a variety of components not all of which
148   -have the same caching characteristics. In order to address such a dynamically
149   -created page where different parts of the page need to be cached and expired
150   -differently Rails provides a mechanism called Fragment Caching.
  103 +Life would be perfect if we could get away with caching the entire contents of a page or action and serving it out to the world. Unfortunately, dynamic web applications usually build pages with a variety of components not all of which have the same caching characteristics. In order to address such a dynamically created page where different parts of the page need to be cached and expired differently Rails provides a mechanism called Fragment Caching.
151 104
152   -Fragment Caching allows a fragment of view logic to be wrapped in a cache
153   -block and served out of the cache store when the next request comes in.
  105 +Fragment Caching allows a fragment of view logic to be wrapped in a cache block and served out of the cache store when the next request comes in.
154 106
155   -As an example, if you wanted to show all the orders placed on your website
156   -in real time and didn't want to cache that part of the page, but did want
157   -to cache the part of the page which lists all products available, you
158   -could use this piece of code:
  107 +As an example, if you wanted to show all the orders placed on your website in real time and didn't want to cache that part of the page, but did want to cache the part of the page which lists all products available, you could use this piece of code:
159 108
160 109 <ruby>
161 110 <% Order.find_recent.each do |o| %>
@@ -170,9 +119,7 @@ could use this piece of code:
170 119 <% end %>
171 120 </ruby>
172 121
173   -The cache block in our example will bind to the action that called it and is
174   -written out to the same place as the Action Cache, which means that if you
175   -want to cache multiple fragments per action, you should provide an +action_suffix+ to the cache call:
  122 +The cache block in our example will bind to the action that called it and is written out to the same place as the Action Cache, which means that if you want to cache multiple fragments per action, you should provide an +action_suffix+ to the cache call:
176 123
177 124 <ruby>
178 125 <% cache(:action => 'recent', :action_suffix => 'all_products') do %>
@@ -185,9 +132,7 @@ and you can expire it using the +expire_fragment+ method, like so:
185 132 expire_fragment(:controller => 'products', :action => 'recent', :action_suffix => 'all_products')
186 133 </ruby>
187 134
188   -If you don't want the cache block to bind to the action that called it, You can
189   -also use globally keyed fragments by calling the +cache+ method with a key, like
190   -so:
  135 +If you don't want the cache block to bind to the action that called it, You can also use globally keyed fragments by calling the +cache+ method with a key, like so:
191 136
192 137 <ruby>
193 138 <% cache('all_available_products') do %>
@@ -195,8 +140,7 @@ so:
195 140 <% end %>
196 141 </ruby>
197 142
198   -This fragment is then available to all actions in the +ProductsController+ using
199   -the key and can be expired the same way:
  143 +This fragment is then available to all actions in the +ProductsController+ using the key and can be expired the same way:
200 144
201 145 <ruby>
202 146 expire_fragment('all_available_products')
@@ -204,15 +148,9 @@ expire_fragment('all_available_products')
204 148
205 149 h4. Sweepers
206 150
207   -Cache sweeping is a mechanism which allows you to get around having a ton of
208   -+expire_{page,action,fragment}+ calls in your code. It does this by moving all the work
209   -required to expire cached content into a +ActionController::Caching::Sweeper+
210   -class. This class is an Observer and looks for changes to an object via callbacks,
211   -and when a change occurs it expires the caches associated with that object in
212   -an around or after filter.
  151 +Cache sweeping is a mechanism which allows you to get around having a ton of +expire_{page,action,fragment}+ calls in your code. It does this by moving all the work required to expire cached content into a +ActionController::Caching::Sweeper+ class. This class is an Observer and looks for changes to an object via callbacks, and when a change occurs it expires the caches associated with that object in an around or after filter.
213 152
214   -Continuing with our Product controller example, we could rewrite it with a
215   -sweeper like this:
  153 +Continuing with our Product controller example, we could rewrite it with a sweeper like this:
216 154
217 155 <ruby>
218 156 class ProductSweeper < ActionController::Caching::Sweeper
@@ -244,18 +182,13 @@ class ProductSweeper < ActionController::Caching::Sweeper
244 182 end
245 183 </ruby>
246 184
247   -You may notice that the actual product gets passed to the sweeper, so if we
248   -were caching the edit action for each product, we could add a expire method
249   -which specifies the page we want to expire:
  185 +You may notice that the actual product gets passed to the sweeper, so if we were caching the edit action for each product, we could add a expire method which specifies the page we want to expire:
250 186
251 187 <ruby>
252 188 expire_action(:controller => 'products', :action => 'edit', :id => product)
253 189 </ruby>
254 190
255   -Then we add it to our controller to tell it to call the sweeper when certain
256   -actions are called. So, if we wanted to expire the cached content for the
257   -list and edit actions when the create action was called, we could do the
258   -following:
  191 +Then we add it to our controller to tell it to call the sweeper when certain actions are called. So, if we wanted to expire the cached content for the list and edit actions when the create action was called, we could do the following:
259 192
260 193 <ruby>
261 194 class ProductsController < ActionController
@@ -273,10 +206,7 @@ end
273 206
274 207 h4. SQL Caching
275 208
276   -Query caching is a Rails feature that caches the result set returned by each
277   -query so that if Rails encounters the same query again for that request, it
278   -will use the cached result set as opposed to running the query against the
279   -database again.
  209 +Query caching is a Rails feature that caches the result set returned by each query so that if Rails encounters the same query again for that request, it will use the cached result set as opposed to running the query against the database again.
280 210
281 211 For example:
282 212
@@ -296,34 +226,19 @@ class ProductsController < ActionController
296 226 end
297 227 </ruby>
298 228
299   -The second time the same query is run against the database, it's not actually
300   -going to hit the database. The first time the result is returned from the query
301   -it is stored in the query cache (in memory) and the second time it's pulled from memory.
  229 +The second time the same query is run against the database, it's not actually going to hit the database. The first time the result is returned from the query it is stored in the query cache (in memory) and the second time it's pulled from memory.
302 230
303   -However, it's important to note that query caches are created at the start of an action and destroyed at the end of
304   -that action and thus persist only for the duration of the action. If you'd like to store query results in a more
305   -persistent fashion, you can in Rails by using low level caching.
  231 +However, it's important to note that query caches are created at the start of an action and destroyed at the end of that action and thus persist only for the duration of the action. If you'd like to store query results in a more persistent fashion, you can in Rails by using low level caching.
306 232
307 233 h3. Cache Stores
308 234
309   -Rails (as of 2.1) provides different stores for the cached data created by action and
310   -fragment caches. Page caches are always stored on disk.
  235 +Rails provides different stores for the cached data created by action and fragment caches. Page caches are always stored on disk.
311 236
312   -Rails 2.1 and above provide +ActiveSupport::Cache::Store+ which can be used to
313   -cache strings. Some cache store implementations, like +MemoryStore+, are able to
314   -cache arbitrary Ruby objects, but don't count on every cache store to be able
315   -to do that.
  237 +Rails 2.1 and above provide +ActiveSupport::Cache::Store+ which can be used to cache strings. Some cache store implementations, like +MemoryStore+, are able to cache arbitrary Ruby objects, but don't count on every cache store to be able to do that.
316 238
317 239 The default cache stores provided with Rails include:
318 240
319   -1) +ActiveSupport::Cache::MemoryStore+: A cache store implementation which stores
320   -everything into memory in the same process. If you're running multiple Ruby on
321   -Rails server processes (which is the case if you're using mongrel_cluster or
322   -Phusion Passenger), then this means that your Rails server process instances
323   -won't be able to share cache data with each other. If your application never
324   -performs manual cache item expiry (e.g. when you‘re using generational cache
325   -keys), then using +MemoryStore+ is ok. Otherwise, consider carefully whether you
326   -should be using this cache store.
  241 +1) +ActiveSupport::Cache::MemoryStore+: A cache store implementation which stores everything into memory in the same process. If you're running multiple Ruby on Rails server processes (which is the case if you're using mongrel_cluster or Phusion Passenger), then this means that your Rails server process instances won't be able to share cache data with each other. If your application never performs manual cache item expiry (e.g. when you‘re using generational cache keys), then using +MemoryStore+ is ok. Otherwise, consider carefully whether you should be using this cache store.
327 242
328 243 +MemoryStore+ is not only able to store strings, but also arbitrary Ruby objects.
329 244
@@ -333,36 +248,23 @@ should be using this cache store.
333 248 ActionController::Base.cache_store = :memory_store
334 249 </ruby>
335 250
336   -2) +ActiveSupport::Cache::FileStore+: Cached data is stored on the disk, this is
337   -the default store and the default path for this store is +tmp/cache+. Works
338   -well for all types of environments and allows all processes running from the
339   -same application directory to access the cached content. If +tmp/cache+ does not
340   -exist, the default store becomes +MemoryStore+.
341   -
  251 +2) +ActiveSupport::Cache::FileStore+: Cached data is stored on the disk, this is the default store and the default path for this store is +tmp/cache+. Works well for all types of environments and allows all processes running from the same application directory to access the cached content. If +tmp/cache+ does not exist, the default store becomes +MemoryStore+.
342 252
343 253 <ruby>
344 254 ActionController::Base.cache_store = :file_store, "/path/to/cache/directory"
345 255 </ruby>
346 256
347   -3) +ActiveSupport::Cache::DRbStore+: Cached data is stored in a separate shared
348   -DRb process that all servers communicate with. This works for all environments
349   -and only keeps one cache around for all processes, but requires that you run
350   -and manage a separate DRb process.
351   -
  257 +3) +ActiveSupport::Cache::DRbStore+: Cached data is stored in a separate shared DRb process that all servers communicate with. This works for all environments and only keeps one cache around for all processes, but requires that you run and manage a separate DRb process.
352 258
353 259 <ruby>
354 260 ActionController::Base.cache_store = :drb_store, "druby://localhost:9192"
355 261 </ruby>
356 262
357   -4) +ActiveSupport::Cache::MemCacheStore+: Works like +DRbStore+,
358   -but uses Danga's +memcached+ instead. Rails uses the bundled +memcached-client+ gem by
359   -default. This is currently the most popular cache store for production websites.
  263 +4) +ActiveSupport::Cache::MemCacheStore+: Works like +DRbStore+, but uses Danga's +memcached+ instead. Rails uses the bundled +memcached-client+ gem by default. This is currently the most popular cache store for production websites.
360 264
361 265 Special features:
362 266
363   -* Clustering and load balancing. One can specify multiple memcached servers, and
364   -+MemCacheStore+ will load balance between all available servers. If a server goes
365   -down, then +MemCacheStore+ will ignore it until it goes back online.
  267 +* Clustering and load balancing. One can specify multiple memcached servers, and +MemCacheStore+ will load balance between all available servers. If a server goes down, then +MemCacheStore+ will ignore it until it goes back online.
366 268 * Time-based expiry support. See +write+ and the +:expires_in+ option.
367 269 * Per-request in memory cache for all communication with the +memcached+ server(s).
368 270
@@ -372,20 +274,11 @@ It also accepts a hash of additional options:
372 274 * +:readonly+: a boolean value that when set to true will make the store read-only, with an error raised on any attempt to write.
373 275 * +:multithread+: a boolean value that adds thread safety to read/write operations - it is unlikely you'll need to use this option as the Rails threadsafe! method offers the same functionality.
374 276
375   -The read and write methods of the +MemCacheStore+ accept an options hash too.
376   -When reading you can specify +:raw => true+ to prevent the object being marshaled
377   -(by default this is false which means the raw value in the cache is passed to
378   -+Marshal.load+ before being returned to you.)
379   -
380   -When writing to the cache it is also possible to specify +:raw => true+ means
381   -the value is not passed to +Marshal.dump+ before being stored in the cache (by
382   -default this is false).
  277 +The read and write methods of the +MemCacheStore+ accept an options hash too. When reading you can specify +:raw => true+ to prevent the object being marshaled (by default this is false which means the raw value in the cache is passed to +Marshal.load+ before being returned to you.)
383 278
384   -The write method also accepts an +:unless_exist+ flag which determines whether
385   -the memcached add (when true) or set (when false) method is used to store the
386   -item in the cache and an +:expires_in+ option that specifies the time-to-live
387   -for the cached item in seconds.
  279 +When writing to the cache it is also possible to specify +:raw => true+ means the value is not passed to +Marshal.dump+ before being stored in the cache (by default this is false).
388 280
  281 +The write method also accepts an +:unless_exist+ flag which determines whether the memcached add (when true) or set (when false) method is used to store the item in the cache and an +:expires_in+ option that specifies the time-to-live for the cached item in seconds.
389 282
390 283 <ruby>
391 284 ActionController::Base.cache_store = :mem_cache_store, "localhost"
@@ -393,14 +286,11 @@ ActionController::Base.cache_store = :mem_cache_store, "localhost"
393 286
394 287 5) +ActiveSupport::Cache::SynchronizedMemoryStore+: Like +MemoryStore+ but thread-safe.
395 288
396   -
397 289 <ruby>
398 290 ActionController::Base.cache_store = :synchronized_memory_store
399 291 </ruby>
400 292
401   -6) +ActiveSupport::Cache::CompressedMemCacheStore+: Works just like the regular
402   -+MemCacheStore+ but uses GZip to decompress/compress on read/write.
403   -
  293 +6) +ActiveSupport::Cache::CompressedMemCacheStore+: Works just like the regular +MemCacheStore+ but uses GZip to decompress/compress on read/write.
404 294
405 295 <ruby>
406 296 ActionController::Base.cache_store = :compressed_mem_cache_store, "localhost"
@@ -408,15 +298,13 @@ ActionController::Base.cache_store = :compressed_mem_cache_store, "localhost"
408 298
409 299 7) Custom store: You can define your own cache store (new in Rails 2.1).
410 300
411   -
412 301 <ruby>
413 302 ActionController::Base.cache_store = MyOwnStore.new("parameter")
414 303 </ruby>
415 304
416 305 NOTE: +config.cache_store+ can be used in place of +ActionController::Base.cache_store+ in your +Rails::Initializer.run+ block in +environment.rb+
417 306
418   -In addition to all of this, Rails also adds the +ActiveRecord::Base#cache_key+
419   -method that generates a key using the class name, +id+ and +updated_at+ timestamp (if available).
  307 +In addition to all of this, Rails also adds the +ActiveRecord::Base#cache_key+ method that generates a key using the class name, +id+ and +updated_at+ timestamp (if available).
420 308
421 309 You can access these cache stores at a low level for storing queries and other objects. Here's an example:
422 310
@@ -428,21 +316,11 @@ Rails.cache.read("city") # => "Duckburgh"
428 316
429 317 h3. Conditional GET support
430 318
431   -Conditional GETs are a feature of the HTTP specification that provide a way for web
432   -servers to tell browsers that the response to a GET request hasn't changed
433   -since the last request and can be safely pulled from the browser cache.
  319 +Conditional GETs are a feature of the HTTP specification that provide a way for web servers to tell browsers that the response to a GET request hasn't changed since the last request and can be safely pulled from the browser cache.
434 320
435   -They work by using the +HTTP_IF_NONE_MATCH+ and +HTTP_IF_MODIFIED_SINCE+ headers
436   -to pass back and forth both a unique content identifier and the timestamp of
437   -when the content was last changed. If the browser makes a request where the
438   -content identifier (etag) or last modified since timestamp matches the server’s
439   -version then the server only needs to send back an empty response with a not
440   -modified status.
  321 +They work by using the +HTTP_IF_NONE_MATCH+ and +HTTP_IF_MODIFIED_SINCE+ headers to pass back and forth both a unique content identifier and the timestamp of when the content was last changed. If the browser makes a request where the content identifier (etag) or last modified since timestamp matches the server’s version then the server only needs to send back an empty response with a not modified status.
441 322
442   -It is the server's (i.e. our) responsibility to look for a last modified
443   -timestamp and the if-none-match header and determine whether or not to send
444   -back the full response. With conditional-get support in rails this is a pretty
445   -easy task:
  323 +It is the server's (i.e. our) responsibility to look for a last modified timestamp and the if-none-match header and determine whether or not to send back the full response. With conditional-get support in rails this is a pretty easy task:
446 324
447 325 <ruby>
448 326 class ProductsController < ApplicationController
@@ -465,9 +343,7 @@ class ProductsController < ApplicationController
465 343 end
466 344 </ruby>
467 345
468   -If you don't have any special response processing and are using the default
469   -rendering mechanism (i.e. you're not using respond_to or calling render
470   -yourself) then you’ve got an easy helper in fresh_when:
  346 +If you don't have any special response processing and are using the default rendering mechanism (i.e. you're not using respond_to or calling render yourself) then you’ve got an easy helper in fresh_when:
471 347
472 348 <ruby>
473 349 class ProductsController < ApplicationController
@@ -484,11 +360,7 @@ end
484 360
485 361 h3. Advanced Caching
486 362
487   -Along with the built-in mechanisms outlined above, a number of excellent
488   -plugins exist to help with finer grained control over caching. These include
489   -Chris Wanstrath's excellent cache_fu plugin (more info "here": http://errtheblog.com/posts/57-kickin-ass-w-cachefu) and Evan Weaver's
490   -interlock plugin (more info "here": http://blog.evanweaver.com/articles/2007/12/13/better-rails-caching/). Both
491   -of these plugins play nice with memcached and are a must-see for anyone
  363 +Along with the built-in mechanisms outlined above, a number of excellent plugins exist to help with finer grained control over caching. These include Chris Wanstrath's excellent cache_fu plugin (more info "here": http://errtheblog.com/posts/57-kickin-ass-w-cachefu) and Evan Weaver's interlock plugin (more info "here": http://blog.evanweaver.com/articles/2007/12/13/better-rails-caching/). Both of these plugins play nice with memcached and are a must-see for anyone
492 364 seriously considering optimizing their caching needs.
493 365
494 366 Also the new "Cache money":http://github.com/nkallen/cache-money/tree/master plugin is supposed to be mad cool.

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