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Merge branch 'master' of github.com:lifo/docrails

Conflicts:
	activesupport/lib/active_support/callbacks.rb
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commit d8b8c0ef8717508c01ab21687666941008413906 2 parents a395c22 + 1a9766f
@vijaydev vijaydev authored
Showing with 120 additions and 89 deletions.
  1. +52 −37 actionmailer/lib/action_mailer/base.rb
  2. +1 −1  activerecord/README.rdoc
  3. +1 −0  activerecord/lib/active_record/migration.rb
  4. +4 −4 activerecord/lib/active_record/reflection.rb
  5. +3 −0  activerecord/lib/active_record/relation/query_methods.rb
  6. +4 −0 activerecord/lib/rails/generators/active_record/migration/migration_generator.rb
  7. +1 −1  activesupport/lib/active_support/callbacks.rb
  8. +1 −0  activesupport/lib/active_support/core_ext/string/conversions.rb
  9. +1 −1  activesupport/lib/active_support/core_ext/string/inflections.rb
  10. +8 −0 activesupport/lib/active_support/ordered_options.rb
  11. +1 −1  guides/assets/images/icons/README
  12. +1 −2  guides/source/3_0_release_notes.md
  13. +1 −1  guides/source/4_0_release_notes.md
  14. +2 −2 guides/source/action_controller_overview.md
  15. +5 −5 guides/source/active_model_basics.md
  16. +1 −1  guides/source/active_record_querying.md
  17. +1 −1  guides/source/active_support_core_extensions.md
  18. +1 −1  guides/source/asset_pipeline.md
  19. +1 −1  guides/source/credits.html.erb
  20. +8 −4 guides/source/development_dependencies_install.md
  21. +9 −14 guides/source/getting_started.md
  22. +1 −1  guides/source/initialization.md
  23. +3 −2 guides/source/migrations.md
  24. +1 −1  guides/source/routing.md
  25. +3 −3 guides/source/security.md
  26. +5 −5 railties/lib/rails/generators/rails/model/USAGE
View
89 actionmailer/lib/action_mailer/base.rb
@@ -398,7 +398,7 @@ def register_interceptors(*interceptors)
# Register an Observer which will be notified when mail is delivered.
# Either a class or a string can be passed in as the Observer. If a string is passed in
- # it will be <tt>constantize</tt>d.
+ # it will be +constantize+d.
def register_observer(observer)
delivery_observer = (observer.is_a?(String) ? observer.constantize : observer)
Mail.register_observer(delivery_observer)
@@ -412,12 +412,20 @@ def register_interceptor(interceptor)
Mail.register_interceptor(delivery_interceptor)
end
+ # Returns the name of current mailer. This method is also being used as a path for a view lookup.
+ # If this is an anonymous mailer, this method will return +anonymous+ instead.
def mailer_name
@mailer_name ||= anonymous? ? "anonymous" : name.underscore
end
+ # Allows to set the name of current mailer.
attr_writer :mailer_name
alias :controller_path :mailer_name
+ # Sets the defaults through app configuration:
+ #
+ # config.action_mailer.default { from: "no-reply@example.org" }
+ #
+ # Aliased by ::default_options=
def default(value = nil)
self.default_params = default_params.merge(value).freeze if value
default_params
@@ -429,13 +437,15 @@ def default(value = nil)
# Receives a raw email, parses it into an email object, decodes it,
# instantiates a new mailer, and passes the email object to the mailer
- # object's +receive+ method. If you want your mailer to be able to
- # process incoming messages, you'll need to implement a +receive+
- # method that accepts the raw email string as a parameter:
+ # object's +receive+ method.
+ #
+ # If you want your mailer to be able to process incoming messages, you'll
+ # need to implement a +receive+ method that accepts the raw email string
+ # as a parameter:
#
# class MyMailer < ActionMailer::Base
# def receive(mail)
- # ...
+ # # ...
# end
# end
def receive(raw_mail)
@@ -446,10 +456,12 @@ def receive(raw_mail)
end
end
- # Wraps an email delivery inside of Active Support Notifications instrumentation. This
- # method is actually called by the <tt>Mail::Message</tt> object itself through a callback
- # when you call <tt>:deliver</tt> on the Mail::Message, calling +deliver_mail+ directly
- # and passing a Mail::Message will do nothing except tell the logger you sent the email.
+ # Wraps an email delivery inside of ActiveSupport::Notifications instrumentation.
+ #
+ # This method is actually called by the Mail::Message object itself
+ # through a callback when you call +:deliver+ on the Mail::Message,
+ # calling +deliver_mail+ directly and passing a Mail::Message will do
+ # nothing except tell the logger you sent the email.
def deliver_mail(mail) #:nodoc:
ActiveSupport::Notifications.instrument("deliver.action_mailer") do |payload|
set_payload_for_mail(payload, mail)
@@ -475,7 +487,7 @@ def set_payload_for_mail(payload, mail) #:nodoc:
payload[:mail] = mail.encoded
end
- def method_missing(method_name, *args)
+ def method_missing(method_name, *args) # :nodoc:
if respond_to?(method_name)
new(method_name, *args).message
else
@@ -512,17 +524,18 @@ def method_missing(*args)
end
end
+ # Returns the name of the mailer object.
def mailer_name
self.class.mailer_name
end
- # Allows you to pass random and unusual headers to the new <tt>Mail::Message</tt> object
- # which will add them to itself.
+ # Allows you to pass random and unusual headers to the new Mail::Message
+ # object which will add them to itself.
#
# headers['X-Special-Domain-Specific-Header'] = "SecretValue"
#
- # You can also pass a hash into headers of header field names and values, which
- # will then be set on the Mail::Message object:
+ # You can also pass a hash into headers of header field names and values,
+ # which will then be set on the Mail::Message object:
#
# headers 'X-Special-Domain-Specific-Header' => "SecretValue",
# 'In-Reply-To' => incoming.message_id
@@ -578,22 +591,22 @@ def attachments
# Both methods accept a headers hash. This hash allows you to specify the most used headers
# in an email message, these are:
#
- # * <tt>:subject</tt> - The subject of the message, if this is omitted, Action Mailer will
- # ask the Rails I18n class for a translated <tt>:subject</tt> in the scope of
+ # * +:subject+ - The subject of the message, if this is omitted, Action Mailer will
+ # ask the Rails I18n class for a translated +:subject+ in the scope of
# <tt>[mailer_scope, action_name]</tt> or if this is missing, will translate the
- # humanized version of the <tt>action_name</tt>
- # * <tt>:to</tt> - Who the message is destined for, can be a string of addresses, or an array
+ # humanized version of the +action_name+
+ # * +:to+ - Who the message is destined for, can be a string of addresses, or an array
# of addresses.
- # * <tt>:from</tt> - Who the message is from
- # * <tt>:cc</tt> - Who you would like to Carbon-Copy on this email, can be a string of addresses,
+ # * +:from+ - Who the message is from
+ # * +:cc+ - Who you would like to Carbon-Copy on this email, can be a string of addresses,
# or an array of addresses.
- # * <tt>:bcc</tt> - Who you would like to Blind-Carbon-Copy on this email, can be a string of
+ # * +:bcc+ - Who you would like to Blind-Carbon-Copy on this email, can be a string of
# addresses, or an array of addresses.
- # * <tt>:reply_to</tt> - Who to set the Reply-To header of the email to.
- # * <tt>:date</tt> - The date to say the email was sent on.
+ # * +:reply_to+ - Who to set the Reply-To header of the email to.
+ # * +:date+ - The date to say the email was sent on.
#
- # You can set default values for any of the above headers (except :date) by using the <tt>default</tt>
- # class method:
+ # You can set default values for any of the above headers (except +:date+)
+ # by using the ::default class method:
#
# class Notifier < ActionMailer::Base
# default from: 'no-reply@test.lindsaar.net',
@@ -605,17 +618,19 @@ def attachments
# as part of the headers hash or use the <tt>headers['name'] = value</tt>
# method.
#
- # When a <tt>:return_path</tt> is specified as header, that value will be used as the 'envelope from'
- # address for the Mail message. Setting this is useful when you want delivery notifications
- # sent to a different address than the one in <tt>:from</tt>. Mail will actually use the
- # <tt>:return_path</tt> in preference to the <tt>:sender</tt> in preference to the <tt>:from</tt>
- # field for the 'envelope from' value.
+ # When a +:return_path+ is specified as header, that value will be used as
+ # the 'envelope from' address for the Mail message. Setting this is useful
+ # when you want delivery notifications sent to a different address than the
+ # one in +:from+. Mail will actually use the +:return_path+ in preference
+ # to the +:sender+ in preference to the +:from+ field for the 'envelope
+ # from' value.
#
- # If you do not pass a block to the +mail+ method, it will find all templates in the
- # view paths using by default the mailer name and the method name that it is being
- # called from, it will then create parts for each of these templates intelligently,
- # making educated guesses on correct content type and sequence, and return a fully
- # prepared Mail::Message ready to call <tt>:deliver</tt> on to send.
+ # If you do not pass a block to the +mail+ method, it will find all
+ # templates in the view paths using by default the mailer name and the
+ # method name that it is being called from, it will then create parts for
+ # each of these templates intelligently, making educated guesses on correct
+ # content type and sequence, and return a fully prepared Mail::Message
+ # ready to call +:deliver+ on to send.
#
# For example:
#
@@ -650,8 +665,8 @@ def attachments
# format.html { render text: "<h1>Hello Mikel!</h1>" }
# end
#
- # Which will render a <tt>multipart/alternative</tt> email with <tt>text/plain</tt> and
- # <tt>text/html</tt> parts.
+ # Which will render a +multipart/alternative+ email with +text/plain+ and
+ # +text/html+ parts.
#
# The block syntax also allows you to customize the part headers if desired:
#
View
2  activerecord/README.rdoc
@@ -175,7 +175,7 @@ by relying on a number of conventions that make it easy for Active Record to inf
complex relations and structures from a minimal amount of explicit direction.
Convention over Configuration:
-* No XML-files!
+* No XML files!
* Lots of reflection and run-time extension
* Magic is not inherently a bad word
View
1  activerecord/lib/active_record/migration.rb
@@ -668,6 +668,7 @@ def copy(destination, sources, options = {})
copied
end
+ # Determines the version number of the next migration.
def next_migration_number(number)
if ActiveRecord::Base.timestamped_migrations
[Time.now.utc.strftime("%Y%m%d%H%M%S"), "%.14d" % number].max
View
8 activerecord/lib/active_record/reflection.rb
@@ -493,7 +493,7 @@ class ThroughReflection < AssociationReflection #:nodoc:
delegate :foreign_key, :foreign_type, :association_foreign_key,
:active_record_primary_key, :type, :to => :source_reflection
- # Gets the source of the through reflection. It checks both a singularized
+ # Returns the source of the through reflection. It checks both a singularized
# and pluralized form for <tt>:belongs_to</tt> or <tt>:has_many</tt>.
#
# class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -507,8 +507,7 @@ class ThroughReflection < AssociationReflection #:nodoc:
# end
#
# tags_reflection = Post.reflect_on_association(:tags)
- #
- # taggings_reflection = tags_reflection.source_reflection
+ # tags_reflection.source_reflection
# # => <ActiveRecord::Reflection::AssociationReflection: @macro=:belongs_to, @name=:tag, @active_record=Tagging, @plural_name="tags">
#
def source_reflection
@@ -524,7 +523,8 @@ def source_reflection
# end
#
# tags_reflection = Post.reflect_on_association(:tags)
- # taggings_reflection = tags_reflection.through_reflection
+ # tags_reflection.through_reflection
+ # # => <ActiveRecord::Reflection::AssociationReflection: @macro=:has_many, @name=:taggings, @active_record=Post, @plural_name="taggings">
#
def through_reflection
@through_reflection ||= active_record.reflect_on_association(options[:through])
View
3  activerecord/lib/active_record/relation/query_methods.rb
@@ -340,6 +340,9 @@ def reorder!(*args) # :nodoc:
# User.where(name: "John", active: true).unscope(where: :name)
# == User.where(active: true)
#
+ # This method is applied before the default_scope is applied. So the conditions
+ # specified in default_scope will not be removed.
+ #
# Note that this method is more generalized than ActiveRecord::SpawnMethods#except
# because #except will only affect a particular relation's values. It won't wipe
# the order, grouping, etc. when that relation is merged. For example:
View
4 activerecord/lib/rails/generators/active_record/migration/migration_generator.rb
@@ -14,6 +14,10 @@ def create_migration_file
protected
attr_reader :migration_action, :join_tables
+ # sets the default migration template that is being used for the generation of the migration
+ # depending on the arguments which would be sent out in the command line, the migration template
+ # and the table name instance variables are setup.
+
def set_local_assigns!
@migration_template = "migration.rb"
case file_name
View
2  activesupport/lib/active_support/callbacks.rb
@@ -227,7 +227,7 @@ def compute_identifier(filter)
# Compile around filters with conditions into proxy methods
# that contain the conditions.
#
- # For `set_callback :save, :around, :filter_name, if: :condition':
+ # For `set_callback :save, :around, :filter_name, if: :condition`:
#
# def _conditional_callback_save_17
# if condition
View
1  activesupport/lib/active_support/core_ext/string/conversions.rb
@@ -15,6 +15,7 @@ class String
# "2012-12-13 06:12".to_time # => 2012-12-13 06:12:00 +0100
# "2012-12-13T06:12".to_time # => 2012-12-13 06:12:00 +0100
# "2012-12-13T06:12".to_time(:utc) # => 2012-12-13 05:12:00 UTC
+ # "12/13/2012".to_time # => ArgumentError: argument out of range
def to_time(form = :local)
parts = Date._parse(self, false)
return if parts.empty?
View
2  activesupport/lib/active_support/core_ext/string/inflections.rb
@@ -185,7 +185,7 @@ def tableize
#
# Singular names are not handled correctly.
#
- # 'business'.classify # => "Busines"
+ # 'business'.classify # => "Business"
def classify
ActiveSupport::Inflector.classify(self)
end
View
8 activesupport/lib/active_support/ordered_options.rb
@@ -40,6 +40,14 @@ def respond_to_missing?(name, include_private)
end
end
+ # +InheritableOptions+ provides a constructor to build an +OrderedOptions+
+ # hash inherited from the another hash.
+ #
+ # Use this if you already have some hash and you want to create a new one based on it.
+ #
+ # h = ActiveSupport::InheritableOptions.new({ girl: 'Mary', boy: 'John' })
+ # h.girl # => 'Mary'
+ # h.boy # => 'John'
class InheritableOptions < OrderedOptions
def initialize(parent = nil)
if parent.kind_of?(OrderedOptions)
View
2  guides/assets/images/icons/README
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
Replaced the plain DocBook XSL admonition icons with Jimmac's DocBook
icons (http://jimmac.musichall.cz/ikony.php3). I dropped transparency
-from the Jimmac icons to get round MS IE and FOP PNG incompatibilies.
+from the Jimmac icons to get round MS IE and FOP PNG incompatibilities.
Stuart Rackham
View
3  guides/source/3_0_release_notes.md
@@ -342,7 +342,7 @@ Helpers that do something else, like `cache` or `content_for`, are not affected
* Helpers now output HTML 5 by default.
* Form label helper now pulls values from I18n with a single value, so `f.label :name` will pull the `:name` translation.
* I18n select label on should now be :en.helpers.select instead of :en.support.select.
-* You no longer need to place a minus sign at the end of a ruby interpolation inside an ERb template to remove the trailing carriage return in the HTML output.
+* You no longer need to place a minus sign at the end of a Ruby interpolation inside an ERB template to remove the trailing carriage return in the HTML output.
* Added `grouped_collection_select` helper to Action View.
* `content_for?` has been added allowing you to check for the existence of content in a view before rendering.
* passing `:value => nil` to form helpers will set the field's `value` attribute to nil as opposed to using the default value
@@ -611,4 +611,3 @@ Credits
See the [full list of contributors to Rails](http://contributors.rubyonrails.org/) for the many people who spent many hours making Rails 3. Kudos to all of them.
Rails 3.0 Release Notes were compiled by [Mikel Lindsaar](http://lindsaar.net.)
-
View
2  guides/source/4_0_release_notes.md
@@ -85,7 +85,7 @@ Please refer to the [Changelog](https://github.com/rails/rails/blob/master/railt
* New test locations `test/models`, `test/helpers`, `test/controllers`, and `test/mailers`. Corresponding rake tasks added as well. ([Pull Request](https://github.com/rails/rails/pull/7878))
-* Your app's executables now live in the `bin/` dir. Run `rake rails:update:bin` to get `bin/bundle`, `bin/rails`, and `bin/rake`.
+* Your app's executables now live in the `bin/` directory. Run `rake rails:update:bin` to get `bin/bundle`, `bin/rails`, and `bin/rake`.
* Threadsafe on by default
View
4 guides/source/action_controller_overview.md
@@ -568,10 +568,10 @@ end
Note that while for session values you set the key to `nil`, to delete a cookie value you should use `cookies.delete(:key)`.
-Rendering xml and json data
+Rendering XML and JSON data
---------------------------
-ActionController makes it extremely easy to render `xml` or `json` data. If you've generated a controller using scaffolding, it would look something like this:
+ActionController makes it extremely easy to render `XML` or `JSON` data. If you've generated a controller using scaffolding, it would look something like this:
```ruby
class UsersController < ApplicationController
View
10 guides/source/active_model_basics.md
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ Active Model is a library containing various modules used in developing framewor
### AttributeMethods
-The AttributeMethods module can add custom prefixes and suffixes on methods of a class. It is used by defining the prefixes and suffixes, which methods on the object will use them.
+The AttributeMethods module can add custom prefixes and suffixes on methods of a class. It is used by defining the prefixes and suffixes and which methods on the object will use them.
```ruby
class Person
@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ person.age_highest? # false
### Callbacks
-Callbacks gives Active Record style callbacks. This provides the ability to define the callbacks and those will run at appropriate time. After defining a callbacks you can wrap with before, after and around custom methods.
+Callbacks gives Active Record style callbacks. This provides an ability to define callbacks which run at appropriate times. After defining callbacks, you can wrap them with before, after and around custom methods.
```ruby
class Person
@@ -57,19 +57,19 @@ class Person
def update
run_callbacks(:update) do
- # This will call when we are trying to call update on object.
+ # This method is called when update is called on an object.
end
end
def reset_me
- # This method will call when you are calling update on object as a before_update callback as defined.
+ # This method is called when update is called on an object as a before_update callback is defined.
end
end
```
### Conversion
-If a class defines `persisted?` and `id` methods then you can include `Conversion` module in that class and you can able to call Rails conversion methods to objects of that class.
+If a class defines `persisted?` and `id` methods, then you can include the `Conversion` module in that class and call the Rails conversion methods on objects of that class.
```ruby
class Person
View
2  guides/source/active_record_querying.md
@@ -732,7 +732,7 @@ The `reorder` method overrides the default scope order. For example:
class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
..
..
- has_many :comments, order: 'posted_at DESC'
+ has_many :comments, -> { order('posted_at DESC') }
end
Post.find(10).comments.reorder('name')
View
2  guides/source/active_support_core_extensions.md
@@ -166,7 +166,7 @@ NOTE: Defined in `active_support/core_ext/object/duplicable.rb`.
### `deep_dup`
-The `deep_dup` method returns deep copy of a given object. Normally, when you `dup` an object that contains other objects, ruby does not `dup` them, so it creates a shallow copy of the object. If you have an array with a string, for example, it will look like this:
+The `deep_dup` method returns deep copy of a given object. Normally, when you `dup` an object that contains other objects, Ruby does not `dup` them, so it creates a shallow copy of the object. If you have an array with a string, for example, it will look like this:
```ruby
array = ['string']
View
2  guides/source/asset_pipeline.md
@@ -430,7 +430,7 @@ in scope in development mode regardless of the value of this flag. Changing this
engines. Engines can define assets for precompilation as well. Since the complete environment is not loaded,
engines (or other gems) will not be loaded, which can cause missing assets.
-Capistrano (v2.8.0 and above) includes a recipe to handle this in deployment. Add the following line to `Capfile`:
+Capistrano (v2.15.1 and above) includes a recipe to handle this in deployment. Add the following line to `Capfile`:
```ruby
load 'deploy/assets'
View
2  guides/source/credits.html.erb
@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@ Oscar Del Ben is a software engineer at <a href="http://www.wildfireapp.com/">Wi
<% end %>
<%= author('Tore Darell', 'toretore') do %>
- Tore Darell is an independent developer based in Menton, France who specialises in cruft-free web applications using Ruby, Rails and unobtrusive JavaScript. His home on the internet is his blog <a href="http://tore.darell.no">Sneaky Abstractions</a>.
+ Tore Darell is an independent developer based in Menton, France who specialises in cruft-free web applications using Ruby, Rails and unobtrusive JavaScript. His home on the Internet is his blog <a href="http://tore.darell.no">Sneaky Abstractions</a>.
<% end %>
<%= author('Jeff Dean', 'zilkey') do %>
View
12 guides/source/development_dependencies_install.md
@@ -5,6 +5,10 @@ This guide covers how to setup an environment for Ruby on Rails core development
After reading this guide, you will know:
+* How to set up your machine for Rails development
+* How to run specific groups of unit tests from the Rails test suite
+* How the ActiveRecord portion of the Rails test suite operates
+
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Easy Way
@@ -53,7 +57,7 @@ If you are on Fedora or CentOS, you can run
$ sudo yum install libxml2 libxml2-devel libxslt libxslt-devel
```
-If you have any problems with these libraries, you should install them manually compiling the source code. Just follow the instructions at the [Red Hat/CentOS section of the Nokogiri tutorials](http://nokogiri.org/tutorials/installing_nokogiri.html#red_hat__centos) .
+If you have any problems with these libraries, you can install them manually by compiling the source code. Just follow the instructions at the [Red Hat/CentOS section of the Nokogiri tutorials](http://nokogiri.org/tutorials/installing_nokogiri.html#red_hat__centos) .
Also, SQLite3 and its development files for the `sqlite3-ruby` gem — in Ubuntu you're done with just
@@ -93,7 +97,7 @@ $ cd actionpack
$ bundle exec rake test
```
-If you want to run the tests located in a specific directory use the `TEST_DIR` environment variable. For example, this will run the tests of the `railties/test/generators` directory only:
+If you want to run the tests located in a specific directory use the `TEST_DIR` environment variable. For example, this will run the tests in the `railties/test/generators` directory only:
```bash
$ cd railties
@@ -133,14 +137,14 @@ $ sudo yum install mysql-server mysql-devel
$ sudo yum install postgresql-server postgresql-devel
```
-After that run:
+After that, run:
```bash
$ rm .bundle/config
$ bundle install
```
-We need first to delete `.bundle/config` because Bundler remembers in that file that we didn't want to install the "db" group (alternatively you can edit the file).
+First, we need to delete `.bundle/config` because Bundler remembers in that file that we didn't want to install the "db" group (alternatively you can edit the file).
In order to be able to run the test suite against MySQL you need to create a user named `rails` with privileges on the test databases:
View
23 guides/source/getting_started.md
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ prerequisites installed:
Rails is a web application framework running on the Ruby programming language.
If you have no prior experience with Ruby, you will find a very steep learning
curve diving straight into Rails. There are some good free resources on the
-internet for learning Ruby, including:
+Internet for learning Ruby, including:
* [Mr. Neighborly's Humble Little Ruby Book](http://www.humblelittlerubybook.com)
* [Programming Ruby](http://www.ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/)
@@ -853,8 +853,7 @@ it look as follows:
```html+erb
<h1>Editing post</h1>
-<%= form_for :post, url: post_path(@post.id) },
-method: :patch do |f| %>
+<%= form_for :post, url: post_path(@post.id), method: :patch do |f| %>
<% if @post.errors.any? %>
<div id="errorExplanation">
<h2><%= pluralize(@post.errors.count, "error") %> prohibited
@@ -934,7 +933,7 @@ appear next to the "Show" link:
<tr>
<td><%= post.title %></td>
<td><%= post.text %></td>
- <td><%= link_to 'Show', post_path %></td>
+ <td><%= link_to 'Show', post_path(post) %></td>
<td><%= link_to 'Edit', edit_post_path(post) %></td>
</tr>
<% end %>
@@ -1076,7 +1075,7 @@ together.
<tr>
<td><%= post.title %></td>
<td><%= post.text %></td>
- <td><%= link_to 'Show', post_path %></td>
+ <td><%= link_to 'Show', post_path(post) %></td>
<td><%= link_to 'Edit', edit_post_path(post) %></td>
<td><%= link_to 'Destroy', post_path(post),
method: :delete, data: { confirm: 'Are you sure?' } %></td>
@@ -1149,19 +1148,17 @@ class CreateComments < ActiveRecord::Migration
create_table :comments do |t|
t.string :commenter
t.text :body
- t.references :post
+ t.references :post, index: true
t.timestamps
end
-
- add_index :comments, :post_id
end
end
```
The `t.references` line sets up a foreign key column for the association between
-the two models. And the `add_index` line sets up an index for this association
-column. Go ahead and run the migration:
+the two models. An index for this association is also created on this column.
+Go ahead and run the migration:
```bash
$ rake db:migrate
@@ -1173,10 +1170,8 @@ run against the current database, so in this case you will just see:
```bash
== CreateComments: migrating =================================================
-- create_table(:comments)
- -> 0.0008s
--- add_index(:comments, :post_id)
- -> 0.0003s
-== CreateComments: migrated (0.0012s) ========================================
+ -> 0.0115s
+== CreateComments: migrated (0.0119s) ========================================
```
### Associating Models
View
2  guides/source/initialization.md
@@ -114,7 +114,7 @@ If we used `s` rather than `server`, Rails will use the `aliases` defined in the
```ruby
when 'server'
- # Change to the application's path if there is no config.ru file in current dir.
+ # Change to the application's path if there is no config.ru file in current directory.
# This allows us to run `rails server` from other directories, but still get
# the main config.ru and properly set the tmp directory.
Dir.chdir(File.expand_path('../../', APP_PATH)) unless File.exists?(File.expand_path("config.ru"))
View
5 guides/source/migrations.md
@@ -852,7 +852,7 @@ end
# app/models/product.rb
class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
- validates :flag, presence: true
+ validates :flag, :inclusion => { :in => [true, false] }
end
```
@@ -877,7 +877,8 @@ end
# app/models/product.rb
class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
- validates :flag, :fuzz, presence: true
+ validates :flag, :inclusion => { :in => [true, false] }
+ validates :fuzz, presence: true
end
```
View
2  guides/source/routing.md
@@ -857,7 +857,7 @@ resources :user_permissions, controller: 'admin/user_permissions'
This will route to the `Admin::UserPermissions` controller.
NOTE: Only the directory notation is supported. Specifying the
-controller with ruby constant notation (eg. `:controller =>
+controller with Ruby constant notation (eg. `:controller =>
'Admin::UserPermissions'`) can lead to routing problems and results in
a warning.
View
6 guides/source/security.md
@@ -58,7 +58,7 @@ WARNING: _Stealing a user's session id lets an attacker use the web application
Many web applications have an authentication system: a user provides a user name and password, the web application checks them and stores the corresponding user id in the session hash. From now on, the session is valid. On every request the application will load the user, identified by the user id in the session, without the need for new authentication. The session id in the cookie identifies the session.
-Hence, the cookie serves as temporary authentication for the web application. Everyone who seizes a cookie from someone else, may use the web application as this user – with possibly severe consequences. Here are some ways to hijack a session, and their countermeasures:
+Hence, the cookie serves as temporary authentication for the web application. Anyone who seizes a cookie from someone else, may use the web application as this user – with possibly severe consequences. Here are some ways to hijack a session, and their countermeasures:
* Sniff the cookie in an insecure network. A wireless LAN can be an example of such a network. In an unencrypted wireless LAN it is especially easy to listen to the traffic of all connected clients. This is one more reason not to work from a coffee shop. For the web application builder this means to _provide a secure connection over SSL_. In Rails 3.1 and later, this could be accomplished by always forcing SSL connection in your application config file:
@@ -268,7 +268,7 @@ def legacy
end
```
-This will redirect the user to the main action if he tried to access a legacy action. The intention was to preserve the URL parameters to the legacy action and pass them to the main action. However, it can exploited by an attacker if he includes a host key in the URL:
+This will redirect the user to the main action if he tried to access a legacy action. The intention was to preserve the URL parameters to the legacy action and pass them to the main action. However, it can be exploited by an attacker if he includes a host key in the URL:
```
http://www.example.com/site/legacy?param1=xy&param2=23&host=www.attacker.com
@@ -942,7 +942,7 @@ Or you can remove them.
config.action_dispatch.default_headers.clear
```
-Here is the list of common headers:
+Here is a list of common headers:
* X-Frame-Options
_'SAMEORIGIN' in Rails by default_ - allow framing on same domain. Set it to 'DENY' to deny framing at all or 'ALLOWALL' if you want to allow framing for all website.
View
10 railties/lib/rails/generators/rails/model/USAGE
@@ -46,18 +46,18 @@ Available field types:
`rails generate model photo title:string album:references`
- It will generate an album_id column. You should generate this kind of fields when
- you will use a `belongs_to` association for instance. `references` also support
- the polymorphism, you could enable the polymorphism like this:
+ It will generate an `album_id` column. You should generate these kinds of fields when
+ you will use a `belongs_to` association, for instance. `references` also supports
+ polymorphism, you can enable polymorphism like this:
`rails generate model product supplier:references{polymorphic}`
- For integer, string, text and binary fields an integer in curly braces will
+ For integer, string, text and binary fields, an integer in curly braces will
be set as the limit:
`rails generate model user pseudo:string{30}`
- For decimal two integers separated by a comma in curly braces will be used
+ For decimal, two integers separated by a comma in curly braces will be used
for precision and scale:
`rails generate model product price:decimal{10,2}`
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