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ActionController::Base Summary documentation rewrite. Closes #4900. […

…kevin.clark@gmail.com]

git-svn-id: http://svn-commit.rubyonrails.org/rails/trunk@4290 5ecf4fe2-1ee6-0310-87b1-e25e094e27de
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commit dd5397a57c39da78f22e0fec517ff6e5ede7628a 1 parent 4d007ce
Marcel Molina authored
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2  actionpack/CHANGELOG
@@ -1,5 +1,7 @@
*SVN*
+* ActionController::Base Summary documentation rewrite. Closes #4900. [kevin.clark@gmail.com]
+
* Fix text_helper.rb documentation rendering. Closes #4725. [Frederick Ros]
* Fixes bad rendering of JavaScriptMacrosHelper rdoc (closes #4910) [Frederick Ros]
View
10 actionpack/Rakefile
@@ -46,8 +46,12 @@ Rake::RDocTask.new { |rdoc|
rdoc.title = "Action Pack -- On rails from request to response"
rdoc.options << '--line-numbers' << '--inline-source'
rdoc.template = "#{ENV['template']}.rb" if ENV['template']
- rdoc.rdoc_files.include('README', 'RUNNING_UNIT_TESTS', 'CHANGELOG')
- rdoc.rdoc_files.include('lib/**/*.rb')
+ if ENV['DOC_FILES']
+ rdoc.rdoc_files.include(ENV['DOC_FILES'].split(/,\s*/))
+ else
+ rdoc.rdoc_files.include('README', 'RUNNING_UNIT_TESTS', 'CHANGELOG')
+ rdoc.rdoc_files.include('lib/**/*.rb')
+ end
}
# Create compressed packages
@@ -144,4 +148,4 @@ task :release => [ :package ] do
puts release_command
system(release_command)
end
-end
+end
View
110 actionpack/lib/action_controller/base.rb
@@ -49,13 +49,15 @@ def initialize(message = nil)
end
end
- # Action Controllers are made up of one or more actions that performs its purpose and then either renders a template or
- # redirects to another action. An action is defined as a public method on the controller, which will automatically be
- # made accessible to the web-server through a mod_rewrite mapping. A sample controller could look like this:
+ # Action Controllers are the core of a web request in Rails. They are made up of one or more actions that are executed
+ # on request and then either render a template or redirect to another action. An action is defined as a public method
+ # on the controller, which will automatically be made accessible to the web-server through Rails Routes.
+ #
+ # A sample controller could look like this:
#
# class GuestBookController < ActionController::Base
# def index
- # @entries = Entry.find_all
+ # @entries = Entry.find(:all)
# end
#
# def sign
@@ -64,26 +66,17 @@ def initialize(message = nil)
# end
# end
#
- # GuestBookController.template_root = "templates/"
- # GuestBookController.process_cgi
- #
- # All actions assume that you want to render a template matching the name of the action at the end of the performance
- # unless you tell it otherwise. The index action complies with this assumption, so after populating the @entries instance
- # variable, the GuestBookController will render "templates/guestbook/index.rhtml".
+ # Actions, by default, render a template in the <tt>app/views</tt> directory corresponding to the name of the controller and action
+ # after executing code in the action. For example, the +index+ action of the +GuestBookController+ would render the
+ # template <tt>app/views/guestbook/index.rhtml</tt> by default after populating the <tt>@entries</tt> instance variable.
#
- # Unlike index, the sign action isn't interested in rendering a template. So after performing its main purpose (creating a
- # new entry in the guest book), it sheds the rendering assumption and initiates a redirect instead. This redirect works by
- # returning an external "302 Moved" HTTP response that takes the user to the index action.
+ # Unlike index, the sign action will not render a template. After performing its main purpose (creating a
+ # new entry in the guest book), it initiates a redirect instead. This redirect works by returning an external
+ # "302 Moved" HTTP response that takes the user to the index action.
#
# The index and sign represent the two basic action archetypes used in Action Controllers. Get-and-show and do-and-redirect.
# Most actions are variations of these themes.
#
- # Also note that it's the final call to <tt>process_cgi</tt> that actually initiates the action performance. It will extract
- # request and response objects from the CGI
- #
- # When Action Pack is used inside of Rails, the template_root is automatically configured and you don't need to call process_cgi
- # yourself.
- #
# == Requests
#
# Requests are processed by the Action Controller framework by extracting the value of the "action" key in the request parameters.
@@ -101,9 +94,9 @@ def initialize(message = nil)
#
# == Parameters
#
- # All request parameters, whether they come from a GET or POST request, or from the URL, are available through the params hash.
- # So an action that was performed through /weblog/list?category=All&limit=5 will include { "category" => "All", "limit" => 5 }
- # in params.
+ # All request parameters, whether they come from a GET or POST request, or from the URL, are available through the params method
+ # which returns a hash. For example, an action that was performed through <tt>/weblog/list?category=All&limit=5</tt> will include
+ # <tt>{ "category" => "All", "limit" => 5 }</tt> in params.
#
# It's also possible to construct multi-dimensional parameter hashes by specifying keys using brackets, such as:
#
@@ -116,12 +109,12 @@ def initialize(message = nil)
#
# == Sessions
#
- # Sessions allows you to store objects in memory between requests. This is useful for objects that are not yet ready to be persisted,
+ # Sessions allows you to store objects in between requests. This is useful for objects that are not yet ready to be persisted,
# such as a Signup object constructed in a multi-paged process, or objects that don't change much and are needed all the time, such
# as a User object for a system that requires login. The session should not be used, however, as a cache for objects where it's likely
# they could be changed unknowingly. It's usually too much work to keep it all synchronized -- something databases already excel at.
#
- # You can place objects in the session by using the <tt>session</tt> hash accessor:
+ # You can place objects in the session by using the <tt>session</tt> method, which accesses a hash:
#
# session[:person] = Person.authenticate(user_name, password)
#
@@ -129,17 +122,24 @@ def initialize(message = nil)
#
# Hello #{session[:person]}
#
- # Any object can be placed in the session (as long as it can be Marshalled). But remember that 1000 active sessions each storing a
- # 50kb object could lead to a 50MB memory overhead. In other words, think carefully about size and caching before resorting to the use
- # of the session.
- #
# For removing objects from the session, you can either assign a single key to nil, like <tt>session[:person] = nil</tt>, or you can
# remove the entire session with reset_session.
#
+ # By default, sessions are stored on the file system in <tt>RAILS_ROOT/tmp/sessions</tt>. Any object can be placed in the session
+ # (as long as it can be Marshalled). But remember that 1000 active sessions each storing a 50kb object could lead to a 50MB store on the filesystem.
+ # In other words, think carefully about size and caching before resorting to the use of the session on the filesystem.
+ #
+ # An alternative to storing sessions on disk is to use ActiveRecordStore to store sessions in your database, which can solve problems
+ # caused by storing sessions in the file system and may speed up your application. To use ActiveRecordStore, uncomment the line:
+ #
+ # config.action_controller.session_store = :active_record_store
+ #
+ # in your <tt>environment.rb</tt> and run <tt>rake db:sessions:create</tt>.
+ #
# == Responses
#
# Each action results in a response, which holds the headers and document to be sent to the user's browser. The actual response
- # object is generated automatically through the use of renders and redirects, so it's normally nothing you'll need to be concerned about.
+ # object is generated automatically through the use of renders and redirects and requires no user intervention.
#
# == Renders
#
@@ -161,9 +161,9 @@ def initialize(message = nil)
# def search
# @results = Search.find(params[:query])
# case @results
- # when 0 then render :action=> "no_results"
- # when 1 then render :action=> "show"
- # when 2..10 then render :action=> "show_many"
+ # when 0 then render :action => "no_results"
+ # when 1 then render :action => "show"
+ # when 2..10 then render :action => "show_many"
# end
# end
#
@@ -171,32 +171,21 @@ def initialize(message = nil)
#
# == Redirects
#
- # Redirecting is what actions that update the model do when they're done. The <tt>save_post</tt> method shouldn't be responsible for also
- # showing the post once it's saved -- that's the job for <tt>show_post</tt>. So once <tt>save_post</tt> has completed its business, it'll
- # redirect to <tt>show_post</tt>. All redirects are external, which means that when the user refreshes his browser, it's not going to save
- # the post again, but rather just show it one more time.
- #
- # This sounds fairly simple, but the redirection is complicated by the quest for a phenomenon known as "pretty urls". Instead of accepting
- # the dreadful being that is "weblog_controller?action=show&post_id=5", Action Controller goes out of its way to represent the former as
- # "/weblog/show/5". And this is even the simple case. As an example of a more advanced pretty url consider
- # "/library/books/ISBN/0743536703/show", which can be mapped to books_controller?action=show&type=ISBN&id=0743536703.
- #
- # Redirects work by rewriting the URL of the current action. So if the show action was called by "/library/books/ISBN/0743536703/show",
- # we can redirect to an edit action simply by doing <tt>redirect_to(:action => "edit")</tt>, which could throw the user to
- # "/library/books/ISBN/0743536703/edit". Naturally, you'll need to setup the routes configuration file to point to the proper controller
- # and action in the first place, but once you have, it can be rewritten with ease.
- #
- # Let's consider a bunch of examples on how to go from "/clients/37signals/basecamp/project/dash" to somewhere else:
+ # Redirects are used to move from one action to another. For example, after a <tt>create</tt> action, which stores a blog entry to a database,
+ # we might like to show the user the new entry. Because we're following good DRY principles (Don't Repeat Yourself), we're going to reuse (and redirect to)
+ # a <tt>show</tt> action that we'll assume has already been created. The code might look like this:
#
- # redirect_to(:action => "edit") =>
- # /clients/37signals/basecamp/project/dash
- #
- # redirect_to(:client_name => "nextangle", :project_name => "rails") =>
- # /clients/nextangle/rails/project/dash
- #
- # Those redirects happen under the configuration of:
+ # def create
+ # @entry = Entry.new(params[:entry])
+ # if @entry.save
+ # # The entry was saved correctly, redirect to show
+ # redirect_to :action => 'show', :id => @entry.id
+ # else
+ # # things didn't go so well, do something else
+ # end
+ # end
#
- # map.connect 'clients/:client_name/:project_name/:controller/:action'
+ # In this case, after saving our new entry to the database, the user is redirected to the <tt>show</tt> method which is then executed.
#
# == Calling multiple redirects or renders
#
@@ -214,15 +203,6 @@ def initialize(message = nil)
# render :action => "overthere" # won't be called unless monkeys is nil
# end
#
- # == Environments
- #
- # Action Controller works out of the box with CGI, FastCGI, and mod_ruby. CGI and mod_ruby controllers are triggered just the same using:
- #
- # WeblogController.process_cgi
- #
- # FastCGI controllers are triggered using:
- #
- # FCGI.each_cgi{ |cgi| WeblogController.process_cgi(cgi) }
class Base
DEFAULT_RENDER_STATUS_CODE = "200 OK"
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