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change 'a SQL' to 'an SQL' as suggested by the api documentation guid…

…elines
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commit e72406e2ba3cd3a5d72fea6219f152640e2e7479 1 parent 5430f5b
@jaimeiniesta jaimeiniesta authored fxn committed
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4 activerecord/CHANGELOG
@@ -2039,7 +2039,7 @@ during calendar reform. #7649, #7724 [fedot, Geoff Buesing]
end
end
-* Fixed that schema changes while the database was open would break any connections to a SQLite database (now we reconnect if that error is throw) [David Heinemeier Hansson]
+* Fixed that schema changes while the database was open would break any connections to an SQLite database (now we reconnect if that error is throw) [David Heinemeier Hansson]
* Don't classify the has_one class when eager loading, it is already singular. Add tests. (closes #4117) [Jonathan Viney]
@@ -3554,7 +3554,7 @@ in effect. Added :readonly finder constraint. Calling an association collectio
end
end
-* Fixed that schema changes while the database was open would break any connections to a SQLite database (now we reconnect if that error is throw) [David Heinemeier Hansson]
+* Fixed that schema changes while the database was open would break any connections to an SQLite database (now we reconnect if that error is throw) [David Heinemeier Hansson]
* Don't classify the has_one class when eager loading, it is already singular. Add tests. (closes #4117) [Jonathan Viney]
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4 railties/guides/source/active_record_validations_callbacks.textile
@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@ We can see how it works by looking at some +rails console+ output:
=> false
</shell>
-Creating and saving a new record will send a SQL +INSERT+ operation to the database. Updating an existing record will send a SQL +UPDATE+ operation instead. Validations are typically run before these commands are sent to the database. If any validations fail, the object will be marked as invalid and Active Record will not perform the +INSERT+ or +UPDATE+ operation. This helps to avoid storing an invalid object in the database. You can choose to have specific validations run when an object is created, saved, or updated.
+Creating and saving a new record will send an SQL +INSERT+ operation to the database. Updating an existing record will send an SQL +UPDATE+ operation instead. Validations are typically run before these commands are sent to the database. If any validations fail, the object will be marked as invalid and Active Record will not perform the +INSERT+ or +UPDATE+ operation. This helps to avoid storing an invalid object in the database. You can choose to have specific validations run when an object is created, saved, or updated.
CAUTION: There are many ways to change the state of an object in the database. Some methods will trigger validations, but some will not. This means that it's possible to save an object in the database in an invalid state if you aren't careful.
@@ -382,7 +382,7 @@ class Account < ActiveRecord::Base
end
</ruby>
-The validation happens by performing a SQL query into the model's table, searching for an existing record with the same value in that attribute.
+The validation happens by performing an SQL query into the model's table, searching for an existing record with the same value in that attribute.
There is a +:scope+ option that you can use to specify other attributes that are used to limit the uniqueness check:
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14 railties/guides/source/association_basics.textile
@@ -629,7 +629,7 @@ end
h6(#belongs_to-conditions). +:conditions+
-The +:conditions+ option lets you specify the conditions that the associated object must meet (in the syntax used by a SQL +WHERE+ clause).
+The +:conditions+ option lets you specify the conditions that the associated object must meet (in the syntax used by an SQL +WHERE+ clause).
<ruby>
class Order < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -899,7 +899,7 @@ end
h6(#has_one-conditions). +:conditions+
-The +:conditions+ option lets you specify the conditions that the associated object must meet (in the syntax used by a SQL +WHERE+ clause).
+The +:conditions+ option lets you specify the conditions that the associated object must meet (in the syntax used by an SQL +WHERE+ clause).
<ruby>
class Supplier < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -961,7 +961,7 @@ end
h6(#has_one-order). +:order+
-The +:order+ option dictates the order in which associated objects will be received (in the syntax used by a SQL +ORDER BY+ clause). Because a +has_one+ association will only retrieve a single associated object, this option should not be needed.
+The +:order+ option dictates the order in which associated objects will be received (in the syntax used by an SQL +ORDER BY+ clause). Because a +has_one+ association will only retrieve a single associated object, this option should not be needed.
h6(#has_one-primary_key). +:primary_key+
@@ -1209,7 +1209,7 @@ end
h6(#has_many-conditions). +:conditions+
-The +:conditions+ option lets you specify the conditions that the associated object must meet (in the syntax used by a SQL +WHERE+ clause).
+The +:conditions+ option lets you specify the conditions that the associated object must meet (in the syntax used by an SQL +WHERE+ clause).
<ruby>
class Customer < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -1335,7 +1335,7 @@ The +:offset+ option lets you specify the starting offset for fetching objects v
h6(#has_many-order). +:order+
-The +:order+ option dictates the order in which associated objects will be received (in the syntax used by a SQL +ORDER BY+ clause).
+The +:order+ option dictates the order in which associated objects will be received (in the syntax used by an SQL +ORDER BY+ clause).
<ruby>
class Customer < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -1635,7 +1635,7 @@ end
h6(#has_and_belongs_to_many-conditions). +:conditions+
-The +:conditions+ option lets you specify the conditions that the associated object must meet (in the syntax used by a SQL +WHERE+ clause).
+The +:conditions+ option lets you specify the conditions that the associated object must meet (in the syntax used by an SQL +WHERE+ clause).
<ruby>
class Parts < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -1724,7 +1724,7 @@ The +:offset+ option lets you specify the starting offset for fetching objects v
h6(#has_and_belongs_to_many-order). +:order+
-The +:order+ option dictates the order in which associated objects will be received (in the syntax used by a SQL +ORDER BY+ clause).
+The +:order+ option dictates the order in which associated objects will be received (in the syntax used by an SQL +ORDER BY+ clause).
<ruby>
class Parts < ActiveRecord::Base
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2  railties/guides/source/migrations.textile
@@ -250,7 +250,7 @@ create_table :products do |t|
end
</ruby>
-By default +create_table+ will create a primary key called +id+. You can change the name of the primary key with the +:primary_key+ option (don't forget to update the corresponding model) or if you don't want a primary key at all (for example for a HABTM join table) you can pass +:id => false+. If you need to pass database specific options you can place a SQL fragment in the +:options+ option. For example
+By default +create_table+ will create a primary key called +id+. You can change the name of the primary key with the +:primary_key+ option (don't forget to update the corresponding model) or if you don't want a primary key at all (for example for a HABTM join table) you can pass +:id => false+. If you need to pass database specific options you can place an SQL fragment in the +:options+ option. For example
<ruby>
create_table :products, :options => "ENGINE=BLACKHOLE" do |t|

3 comments on commit e72406e

@hasenstein

"an SQL" is horrible, incorrect English - that's a guideline???

@humanzz

Depends how u read it... SQL as in sequel or S.Q.L :)

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