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fix and conventions revision in page caching docs

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1 parent c434d20 commit eef46a2e39316bcb3aff6ad6baddf2d5a593cb47 @fxn fxn committed May 7, 2008
Showing with 13 additions and 13 deletions.
  1. +13 −13 actionpack/lib/action_controller/caching/pages.rb
@@ -4,24 +4,24 @@
module ActionController #:nodoc:
module Caching
# Page caching is an approach to caching where the entire action output of is stored as a HTML file that the web server
- # can serve without going through the Action Pack. This is the fastest way to cache your content as opposed to going dynamically
+ # can serve without going through Action Pack. This is the fastest way to cache your content as opposed to going dynamically
# through the process of generating the content. Unfortunately, this incredible speed-up is only available to stateless pages
# where all visitors are treated the same. Content management systems -- including weblogs and wikis -- have many pages that are
# a great fit for this approach, but account-based systems where people log in and manipulate their own data are often less
# likely candidates.
#
- # Specifying which actions to cache is done through the <tt>caches</tt> class method:
+ # Specifying which actions to cache is done through the <tt>caches_page</tt> class method:
#
# class WeblogController < ActionController::Base
# caches_page :show, :new
# end
#
- # This will generate cache files such as weblog/show/5.html and weblog/new.html, which match the URLs used to trigger the dynamic
- # generation. This is how the web server is able pick up a cache file when it exists and otherwise let the request pass on to
- # the Action Pack to generate it.
+ # This will generate cache files such as <tt>weblog/show/5.html</tt> and <tt>weblog/new.html</tt>,
+ # which match the URLs used to trigger the dynamic generation. This is how the web server is able
+ # pick up a cache file when it exists and otherwise let the request pass on to Action Pack to generate it.
#
# Expiration of the cache is handled by deleting the cached file, which results in a lazy regeneration approach where the cache
- # is not restored before another hit is made against it. The API for doing so mimics the options from url_for and friends:
+ # is not restored before another hit is made against it. The API for doing so mimics the options from +url_for+ and friends:
#
# class WeblogController < ActionController::Base
# def update
@@ -36,17 +36,17 @@ module Caching
#
# == Setting the cache directory
#
- # The cache directory should be the document root for the web server and is set using Base.page_cache_directory = "/document/root".
- # For Rails, this directory has already been set to Rails.public_path (which is usually set to RAILS_ROOT + "/public"). Changing
- # this setting can be useful to avoid naming conflicts with files in public/, but doing so will likely require configuring your
+ # The cache directory should be the document root for the web server and is set using <tt>Base.page_cache_directory = "/document/root"</tt>.
+ # For Rails, this directory has already been set to Rails.public_path (which is usually set to <tt>RAILS_ROOT + "/public"</tt>). Changing
+ # this setting can be useful to avoid naming conflicts with files in <tt>public/</tt>, but doing so will likely require configuring your
# web server to look in the new location for cached files.
#
# == Setting the cache extension
#
- # Most Rails requests do not have an extension, such as /weblog/new. In these cases, the page caching mechanism will add one in
- # order to make it easy for the cached files to be picked up properly by the web server. By default, this cache extension is .html.
- # If you want something else, like .php or .shtml, just set Base.page_cache_extension. In cases where a request already has an
- # extension, such as .xml or .rss, page caching will not add an extension. This allows it to work well with RESTful apps.
+ # Most Rails requests do not have an extension, such as <tt>/weblog/new</tt>. In these cases, the page caching mechanism will add one in
+ # order to make it easy for the cached files to be picked up properly by the web server. By default, this cache extension is <tt>.html</tt>.
+ # If you want something else, like <tt>.php</tt> or <tt>.shtml</tt>, just set Base.page_cache_extension. In cases where a request already has an
+ # extension, such as <tt>.xml</tt> or <tt>.rss</tt>, page caching will not add an extension. This allows it to work well with RESTful apps.
module Pages
def self.included(base) #:nodoc:
base.extend(ClassMethods)

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