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fix usage examples and more to use new invocations

Signed-off-by: Carl Lerche <carllerche@mac.com>
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commit f44a0b1d524064a2e919cd10d3013db680af9b17 1 parent 6958eac
Roman Dittert romdi authored Carl Lerche committed
Showing with 173 additions and 173 deletions.
  1. +1 −1  actionmailer/README
  2. +1 −1  actionmailer/lib/action_mailer/base.rb
  3. +2 −2 activerecord/lib/active_record/migration.rb
  4. +1 −1  activesupport/lib/active_support/core_ext/kernel/debugger.rb
  5. +1 −1  activesupport/lib/active_support/whiny_nil.rb
  6. +9 −9 railties/README
  7. +3 −3 railties/guides/source/3_0_release_notes.textile
  8. +3 −3 railties/guides/source/action_mailer_basics.textile
  9. +1 −1  railties/guides/source/active_support_core_extensions.textile
  10. +1 −1  railties/guides/source/activerecord_validations_callbacks.textile
  11. +29 −29 railties/guides/source/command_line.textile
  12. +6 −6 railties/guides/source/debugging_rails_applications.textile
  13. +14 −14 railties/guides/source/generators.textile
  14. +13 −13 railties/guides/source/getting_started.textile
  15. +5 −5 railties/guides/source/migrations.textile
  16. +8 −8 railties/guides/source/performance_testing.textile
  17. +14 −14 railties/guides/source/plugins.textile
  18. +5 −5 railties/guides/source/rails_on_rack.textile
  19. +4 −4 railties/guides/source/testing.textile
  20. +8 −8 railties/lib/generators/rails/app/templates/README
  21. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/controller/USAGE
  22. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/generator/USAGE
  23. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/generator/templates/USAGE.tt
  24. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/helper/USAGE
  25. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/integration_test/USAGE
  26. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/mailer/USAGE
  27. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/metal/USAGE
  28. +2 −2 railties/lib/generators/rails/migration/USAGE
  29. +2 −2 railties/lib/generators/rails/model/USAGE
  30. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/observer/USAGE
  31. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/performance_test/USAGE
  32. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/plugin/USAGE
  33. +3 −3 railties/lib/generators/rails/resource/USAGE
  34. +4 −4 railties/lib/generators/rails/scaffold/USAGE
  35. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/scaffold_controller/USAGE
  36. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/session_migration/USAGE
  37. +1 −1  railties/lib/generators/rails/stylesheets/USAGE
  38. +1 −1  railties/lib/rails/commands/console.rb
  39. +6 −6 railties/lib/rails/commands/plugin.rb
  40. +2 −2 railties/lib/rails/generators/actions.rb
  41. +4 −4 railties/lib/rails/generators/base.rb
  42. +1 −1  railties/lib/rails/rack/debugger.rb
  43. +5 −5 railties/test/generators/actions_test.rb
  44. +1 −1  railties/test/isolation/abstract_unit.rb
2  actionmailer/README
View
@@ -101,7 +101,7 @@ Example:
This Mailman can be the target for Postfix or other MTAs. In Rails, you would use the runner in the
trivial case like this:
- ./script/runner 'Mailman.receive(STDIN.read)'
+ rails runner 'Mailman.receive(STDIN.read)'
However, invoking Rails in the runner for each mail to be received is very resource intensive. A single
instance of Rails should be run within a daemon if it is going to be utilized to process more than just
2  actionmailer/lib/action_mailer/base.rb
View
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ module ActionMailer #:nodoc:
#
# To use Action Mailer, you need to create a mailer model.
#
- # $ script/generate mailer Notifier
+ # $ rails generate mailer Notifier
#
# The generated model inherits from ActionMailer::Base. Emails are defined by creating methods
# within the model which are then used to set variables to be used in the mail template, to
4 activerecord/lib/active_record/migration.rb
View
@@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ def initialize(name)
# The Rails package has several tools to help create and apply migrations.
#
# To generate a new migration, you can use
- # script/generate migration MyNewMigration
+ # rails generate migration MyNewMigration
#
# where MyNewMigration is the name of your migration. The generator will
# create an empty migration file <tt>timestamp_my_new_migration.rb</tt> in the <tt>db/migrate/</tt>
@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ def initialize(name)
# MyNewMigration.
#
# There is a special syntactic shortcut to generate migrations that add fields to a table.
- # script/generate migration add_fieldname_to_tablename fieldname:string
+ # rails generate migration add_fieldname_to_tablename fieldname:string
#
# This will generate the file <tt>timestamp_add_fieldname_to_tablename</tt>, which will look like this:
# class AddFieldnameToTablename < ActiveRecord::Migration
2  activesupport/lib/active_support/core_ext/kernel/debugger.rb
View
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
module Kernel
unless respond_to?(:debugger)
- # Starts a debugging session if ruby-debug has been loaded (call script/server --debugger to do load it).
+ # Starts a debugging session if ruby-debug has been loaded (call rails server --debugger to do load it).
def debugger
message = "\n***** Debugger requested, but was not available: Start server with --debugger to enable *****\n"
defined?(Rails) ? Rails.logger.info(message) : $stderr.puts(message)
2  activesupport/lib/active_support/whiny_nil.rb
View
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
# classes in NilClass::WHINERS the error message suggests which could be the
# actual intended class:
#
-# $ script/runner nil.destroy
+# $ rails runner nil.destroy
# ...
# You might have expected an instance of ActiveRecord::Base.
# ...
18 railties/README
View
@@ -29,14 +29,14 @@ link:files/vendor/rails/actionpack/README.html.
1. At the command prompt, start a new Rails application using the <tt>rails</tt> command
and your application name. Ex: <tt>rails myapp</tt>
-2. Change directory into myapp and start the web server: <tt>script/server</tt> (run with --help for options)
+2. Change directory into myapp and start the web server: <tt>rails server</tt> (run with --help for options)
3. Go to http://localhost:3000/ and get "Welcome aboard: You're riding the Rails!"
4. Follow the guidelines to start developing your application
== Web Servers
-By default, Rails will try to use Mongrel if it's installed when started with script/server, otherwise
+By default, Rails will try to use Mongrel if it's installed when started with <tt>rails server</tt>, otherwise
Rails will use WEBrick, the webserver that ships with Ruby. But you can also use Rails with a variety of
other web servers.
@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ suitable for development and deployment of Rails applications. If you have Ruby
getting up and running with mongrel is as easy as: <tt>gem install mongrel</tt>.
More info at: http://mongrel.rubyforge.org
-Other ruby web servers exist which can run your rails application, however script/server does
+Other ruby web servers exist which can run your rails application, however <tt>rails server</tt> does
not search for them or start them. These include {Thin}[http://code.macournoyer.com/thin/], {Ebb}[http://ebb.rubyforge.org/], and Apache with {mod_rails}[http://www.modrails.com/].
For production use, often a web/proxy server such as {Apache}[http://apache.org], {Nginx}[http://nginx.net/], {LiteSpeed}[http://litespeedtech.com/], {Lighttpd}[http://www.lighttpd.net/] or {IIS}[http://www.iis.net/] is
@@ -168,22 +168,22 @@ model. Here you'll have all parts of the application configured, just like it is
application is running. You can inspect domain models, change values, and save to the
database. Starting the script without arguments will launch it in the development environment.
-To start the console, just run <tt>script/console</tt> from the application directory.
+To start the console, just run <tt>rails console</tt> from the application directory.
Options:
* Passing the <tt>-s, --sandbox</tt> argument will rollback any modifications made to the database.
* Passing an environment name as an argument will load the corresponding environment.
- Example: <tt>script/console production</tt>.
+ Example: <tt>rails console production</tt>.
More information about irb can be found at link:http://www.rubycentral.com/pickaxe/irb.html
== dbconsole
-You can go to the command line of your database directly through <tt>script/dbconsole</tt>.
+You can go to the command line of your database directly through <tt>rails dbconsole</tt>.
You would be connected to the database with the credentials defined in database.yml.
Starting the script without arguments will connect you to the development database. Passing an
-argument will connect you to a different database, like <tt>script/dbconsole production</tt>.
+argument will connect you to a different database, like <tt>rails dbconsole production</tt>.
Currently works for mysql, postgresql and sqlite.
== Description of Contents
@@ -250,7 +250,7 @@ app/views/layouts
app/helpers
Holds view helpers that should be named like weblogs_helper.rb. These are generated
- for you automatically when using script/generate for controllers. Helpers can be used to
+ for you automatically when using <tt>rails generate</tt> for controllers. Helpers can be used to
wrap functionality for your views into methods.
config
@@ -277,7 +277,7 @@ script
Helper scripts for automation and generation.
test
- Unit and functional tests along with fixtures. When using the script/generate scripts, template
+ Unit and functional tests along with fixtures. When using the <tt>rails generate</tt> scripts, template
test files will be generated for you and placed in this directory.
vendor
6 railties/guides/source/3_0_release_notes.textile
View
@@ -39,8 +39,8 @@ h4. script/* replaced by script/rails
The new <tt>script/rails</tt> replaces all the scripts that used to be in the <tt>script</tt> directory. You do not run <tt>script/rails</tt> directly though, the +rails+ command detects it is being invoked in the root of a Rails application and runs the script for you. Intended usage is:
<shell>
-rails console # => ./script/console
-rails g scaffold post title:string # => ./script/generate scaffold post title:string
+rails console # => ./script/rails console
+rails g scaffold post title:string # => ./script/rails generate scaffold post title:string
</shell>
Run rails --help for a list of all the options.
@@ -557,4 +557,4 @@ h3. Credits
See the "full list of contributors to Rails":http://contributors.rubyonrails.org/ for the many people who spent many hours making Rails 3. Kudos to all of them.
-Rails 3.0 Release Notes were compiled by "Mikel Lindsaar":http://lindsaar.net.
+Rails 3.0 Release Notes were compiled by "Mikel Lindsaar":http://lindsaar.net.
6 railties/guides/source/action_mailer_basics.textile
View
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ h4. Walkthrough to Generating a Mailer
h5. Create the Mailer
<shell>
-./script/generate mailer UserMailer
+rails generate mailer UserMailer
create app/mailers/user_mailer.rb
invoke erb
create app/views/user_mailer
@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@ Let's see how we would go about wiring it up using an observer.
First off, we need to create a simple +User+ scaffold:
<shell>
-$ script/generate scaffold user name:string email:string login:string
+$ rails generate scaffold user name:string email:string login:string
$ rake db:migrate
</shell>
@@ -333,7 +333,7 @@ Receiving and parsing emails with Action Mailer can be a rather complex endeavou
* Implement a +receive+ method in your mailer.
-* Configure your email server to forward emails from the address(es) you would like your app to receive to +/path/to/app/script/runner 'UserMailer.receive(STDIN.read)'+.
+* Configure your email server to forward emails from the address(es) you would like your app to receive to +/path/to/app/script/rails runner 'UserMailer.receive(STDIN.read)'+.
Once a method called +receive+ is defined in any mailer, Action Mailer will parse the raw incoming email into an email object, decode it, instantiate a new mailer, and pass the email object to the mailer +receive+ instance method. Here's an example:
2  railties/guides/source/active_support_core_extensions.textile
View
@@ -1805,7 +1805,7 @@ Rails hijacks +LoadError.new+ to return a +MissingSourceFile+ exception:
$ ruby -e 'require "nonexistent"'
...: no such file to load -- nonexistent (LoadError)
...
-$ script/runner 'require "nonexistent"'
+$ rails runner 'require "nonexistent"'
...: no such file to load -- nonexistent (MissingSourceFile)
...
</shell>
2  railties/guides/source/activerecord_validations_callbacks.textile
View
@@ -44,7 +44,7 @@ class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
end
</ruby>
-We can see how it works by looking at some script/console output:
+We can see how it works by looking at some +rails console+ output:
<shell>
>> p = Person.new(:name => "John Doe")
58 railties/guides/source/command_line.textile
View
@@ -58,7 +58,7 @@ Without any prodding of any kind, +server+ will run our new shiny Rails app:
<shell>
$ cd commandsapp
-$ ./script/server
+$ rails server
=> Booting WEBrick...
=> Rails 2.2.0 application started on http://0.0.0.0:3000
=> Ctrl-C to shutdown server; call with --help for options
@@ -76,8 +76,8 @@ h4. +generate+
The +generate+ command uses templates to create a whole lot of things. You can always find out what's available by running +generate+ by itself. Let's do that:
<shell>
-$ ./script/generate
-Usage: ./script/generate generator [options] [args]
+$ rails generate
+Usage: rails generate generator [options] [args]
...
...
@@ -95,17 +95,17 @@ Using generators will save you a large amount of time by writing *boilerplate co
Let's make our own controller with the controller generator. But what command should we use? Let's ask the generator:
-INFO: All Rails console utilities have help text. As with most *NIX utilities, you can try adding +--help+ or +-h+ to the end, for example +./script/server --help+.
+INFO: All Rails console utilities have help text. As with most *NIX utilities, you can try adding +--help+ or +-h+ to the end, for example +rails server --help+.
<shell>
-$ ./script/generate controller
-Usage: ./script/generate controller ControllerName [options]
+$ rails generate controller
+Usage: rails generate controller ControllerName [options]
...
...
Example:
- ./script/generate controller CreditCard open debit credit close
+ rails generate controller CreditCard open debit credit close
Credit card controller with URLs like /credit_card/debit.
Controller: app/controllers/credit_card_controller.rb
@@ -114,7 +114,7 @@ Example:
Test: test/functional/credit_card_controller_test.rb
Modules Example:
- ./script/generate controller 'admin/credit_card' suspend late_fee
+ rails generate controller 'admin/credit_card' suspend late_fee
Credit card admin controller with URLs /admin/credit_card/suspend.
Controller: app/controllers/admin/credit_card_controller.rb
@@ -126,7 +126,7 @@ Modules Example:
Ah, the controller generator is expecting parameters in the form of +generate controller ControllerName action1 action2+. Let's make a +Greetings+ controller with an action of *hello*, which will say something nice to us.
<shell>
-$ ./script/generate controller Greetings hello
+$ rails generate controller Greetings hello
exists app/controllers/
exists app/helpers/
create app/views/greetings
@@ -157,10 +157,10 @@ Then the view, to display our nice message (in +app/views/greetings/hello.html.e
<p><%= @message %></p>
</html>
-Deal. Go check it out in your browser. Fire up your server. Remember? +./script/server+ at the root of your Rails application should do it.
+Deal. Go check it out in your browser. Fire up your server. Remember? +rails server+ at the root of your Rails application should do it.
<shell>
-$ ./script/server
+$ rails server
=> Booting WEBrick...
</shell>
@@ -173,13 +173,13 @@ INFO: With a normal, plain-old Rails application, your URLs will generally follo
"What about data, though?", you ask over a cup of coffee. Rails comes with a generator for data models too. Can you guess its generator name?
<shell>
-$ ./script/generate model
-Usage: ./script/generate model ModelName [field:type, field:type]
+$ rails generate model
+Usage: rails generate model ModelName [field:type, field:type]
...
Examples:
- ./script/generate model account
+ rails generate model account
creates an Account model, test, fixture, and migration:
Model: app/models/account.rb
@@ -187,7 +187,7 @@ Examples:
Fixtures: test/fixtures/accounts.yml
Migration: db/migrate/XXX_add_accounts.rb
- ./script/generate model post title:string body:text published:boolean
+ rails generate model post title:string body:text published:boolean
creates a Post model with a string title, text body, and published flag.
</shell>
@@ -197,7 +197,7 @@ But instead of generating a model directly (which we'll be doing later), let's s
Let's set up a simple resource called "HighScore" that will keep track of our highest score on video games we play.
<shell>
-$ ./script/generate scaffold HighScore game:string score:integer
+$ rails generate scaffold HighScore game:string score:integer
exists app/models/
exists app/controllers/
exists app/helpers/
@@ -244,13 +244,13 @@ $ rake db:migrate
INFO: Let's talk about unit tests. Unit tests are code that tests and makes assertions about code. In unit testing, we take a little part of code, say a method of a model, and test its inputs and outputs. Unit tests are your friend. The sooner you make peace with the fact that your quality of life will drastically increase when you unit test your code, the better. Seriously. We'll make one in a moment.
-Let's see the interface Rails created for us. ./script/server; http://localhost:3000/high_scores
+Let's see the interface Rails created for us. rails server; http://localhost:3000/high_scores
We can create new high scores (55,160 on Space Invaders!)
h4. +console+
-The +console+ command lets you interact with your Rails application from the command line. On the underside, +script/console+ uses IRB, so if you've ever used it, you'll be right at home. This is useful for testing out quick ideas with code and changing data server-side without touching the website.
+The +console+ command lets you interact with your Rails application from the command line. On the underside, +rails console+ uses IRB, so if you've ever used it, you'll be right at home. This is useful for testing out quick ideas with code and changing data server-side without touching the website.
h4. +dbconsole+
@@ -265,7 +265,7 @@ Let's say you're creating a website for a client who wants a small accounting sy
There is such a thing! The plugin we're installing is called "acts_as_paranoid", and it lets models implement a "deleted_at" column that gets set when you call destroy. Later, when calling find, the plugin will tack on a database check to filter out "deleted" things.
<shell>
-$ ./script/plugin install http://svn.techno-weenie.net/projects/plugins/acts_as_paranoid
+$ rails plugin install http://svn.techno-weenie.net/projects/plugins/acts_as_paranoid
+ ./CHANGELOG
+ ./MIT-LICENSE
...
@@ -277,7 +277,7 @@ h4. +runner+
<tt>runner</tt> runs Ruby code in the context of Rails non-interactively. For instance:
<shell>
-$ ./script/runner "Model.long_running_method"
+$ rails runner "Model.long_running_method"
</shell>
h4. +destroy+
@@ -285,7 +285,7 @@ h4. +destroy+
Think of +destroy+ as the opposite of +generate+. It'll figure out what generate did, and undo it. Believe you-me, the creation of this tutorial used this command many times!
<shell>
-$ ./script/generate model Oops
+$ rails generate model Oops
exists app/models/
exists test/unit/
exists test/fixtures/
@@ -294,7 +294,7 @@ $ ./script/generate model Oops
create test/fixtures/oops.yml
exists db/migrate
create db/migrate/20081221040817_create_oops.rb
-$ ./script/destroy model Oops
+$ rails destroy model Oops
notempty db/migrate
notempty db
rm db/migrate/20081221040817_create_oops.rb
@@ -314,7 +314,7 @@ h4. +about+
Check it: Version numbers for Ruby, RubyGems, Rails, the Rails subcomponents, your application's folder, the current Rails environment name, your app's database adapter, and schema version! +about+ is useful when you need to ask for help, check if a security patch might affect you, or when you need some stats for an existing Rails installation.
<shell>
-$ ./script/about
+$ rails about
About your application's environment
Ruby version 1.8.6 (i486-linux)
RubyGems version 1.3.1
@@ -399,7 +399,7 @@ Many people have created a large number different web servers in Ruby, and many
NOTE: For more details on the Rack integration, see "Rails on Rack":rails_on_rack.html.
-To use a different server, just install its gem, then use its name for the first parameter to +script/server+:
+To use a different server, just install its gem, then use its name for the first parameter to +rails server+:
<shell>
$ sudo gem install mongrel
@@ -412,9 +412,9 @@ Successfully installed mongrel-1.1.5
...
...
Installing RDoc documentation for mongrel-1.1.5...
-$ script/server mongrel
-=> Booting Mongrel (use 'script/server webrick' to force WEBrick)
-=> Rails 2.2.0 application starting on http://0.0.0.0:3000
+$ rails server mongrel
+=> Booting Mongrel (use 'rails server webrick' to force WEBrick)
+=> Rails 3.0.0 application starting on http://0.0.0.0:3000
...
</shell>
@@ -481,7 +481,7 @@ I got assigned some args:
Then we'll make sure it got included in the list of available generators:
<shell>
-$ ./script/generate
+$ rails generate
...
...
Installed Generators
@@ -491,7 +491,7 @@ Installed Generators
SWEET! Now let's generate some text, yeah!
<shell>
-$ ./script/generate tutorial_test arg1 arg2 arg3
+$ rails generate tutorial_test arg1 arg2 arg3
exists public
create public/tutorial.txt
</shell>
12 railties/guides/source/debugging_rails_applications.textile
View
@@ -247,9 +247,9 @@ If you see the message in the console or logs:
Make sure you have started your web server with the option +--debugger+:
<shell>
-~/PathTo/rails_project$ script/server --debugger
-=> Booting Mongrel (use 'script/server webrick' to force WEBrick)
-=> Rails 2.2.0 application starting on http://0.0.0.0:3000
+~/PathTo/rails_project$ rails server --debugger
+=> Booting Mongrel (use 'rails server webrick' to force WEBrick)
+=> Rails 3.0.0 application starting on http://0.0.0.0:3000
=> Debugger enabled
...
</shell>
@@ -472,10 +472,10 @@ class Author < ActiveRecord::Base
end
</ruby>
-TIP: You can use ruby-debug while using script/console. Just remember to +require "ruby-debug"+ before calling the +debugger+ method.
+TIP: You can use ruby-debug while using +rails console+. Just remember to +require "ruby-debug"+ before calling the +debugger+ method.
<shell>
-/PathTo/project $ script/console
+/PathTo/project $ rails console
Loading development environment (Rails 2.1.0)
>> require "ruby-debug"
=> []
@@ -636,7 +636,7 @@ require 'bleak_house' if ENV['BLEAK_HOUSE']
Start a server instance with BleakHouse integration:
<shell>
-RAILS_ENV=production BLEAK_HOUSE=1 ruby-bleak-house ./script/server
+RAILS_ENV=production BLEAK_HOUSE=1 ruby-bleak-house rails server
</shell>
Make sure to run a couple hundred requests to get better data samples, then press +CTRL-C+. The server will stop and Bleak House will produce a dumpfile in +/tmp+:
28 railties/guides/source/generators.textile
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@@ -17,18 +17,18 @@ NOTE: This guide is about Rails generators for versions >= 3.0. Rails generators
h3. First contact
-When you create an application using the +rails+ command, you are in fact using a Rails generator. After that, you can get a list of all available generators by just invoking +script/generate+:
+When you create an application using the +rails+ command, you are in fact using a Rails generator. After that, you can get a list of all available generators by just invoking +rails generate+:
<shell>
$ rails myapp
$ cd myapp
-$ ruby script/generate
+$ rails generate
</shell>
You will get a list of all generators that comes with Rails. If you need a detailed description, for instance about the helper generator, you can simply do:
<shell>
-$ ruby script/generate helper --help
+$ rails generate helper --help
</shell>
h3. Creating your first generator
@@ -50,13 +50,13 @@ Our new generator is quite simple: it inherits from +Rails::Generators::Base+ an
To invoke our new generator, we just need to do:
<shell>
-$ ruby script/generate initializer
+$ rails generate initializer
</shell>
Before we go on, let's see our brand new generator description:
<shell>
-$ ruby script/generate initializer --help
+$ rails generate initializer --help
</shell>
Rails usually is able to generate good descriptions if a generator is namespaced, as +ActiveRecord::Generators::ModelGenerator+, but not in this particular case. We can solve this problem in two ways. The first one is calling +desc+ inside our generator:
@@ -77,7 +77,7 @@ h3. Creating generators with generators
A faster way to create a generator is using the generator's generator:
<shell>
-$ ruby script/generate generator initializer
+$ rails generate generator initializer
create lib/generators/initializer
create lib/generators/initializer/initializer_generator.rb
create lib/generators/initializer/USAGE
@@ -99,9 +99,9 @@ At first, we can notice that we are inheriting from +Rails::Generators::NamedBas
We can see that by invoking the description of this new generator (don't forget to delete the old generator file):
<shell>
-$ ruby script/generate initializer --help
+$ rails generate initializer --help
Usage:
- script/generate initializer NAME [options]
+ rails generate initializer NAME [options]
</shell>
We can also see in our new generator that it has a class method called +source_root+. This method points to where our generator templates will be placed and by default it points to the created directory under +RAILS_APP/lib/generators/initializer/templates+. In order to understand what a generator template means, let's create a file at +RAILS_APP/lib/generators/initializer/templates/initializer.rb+ with the following content:
@@ -128,7 +128,7 @@ end
And let's execute our generator:
<shell>
-$ ruby script/generate initializer foo
+$ rails generate initializer foo
</shell>
We can see that now a initializer named foo was created at +config/initializers/foo.rb+ with the contents of our template. That means that copy_file copied a file in our source root to the destination path we gave. The method +file_name+ is automatically created when we inherit from +Rails::Generators::NamedBase+.
@@ -166,7 +166,7 @@ end
Before we customize our workflow, let's first see how our scaffold looks like:
<shell>
-$ ruby script/generate scaffold User name:string
+$ rails generate scaffold User name:string
invoke active_record
create db/migrate/20091120125558_create_users.rb
create app/models/user.rb
@@ -212,7 +212,7 @@ If we generate another resource on scaffold, we can notice that neither styleshe
To show that, we are going to create a new helper generator that simply adds some instance variable readers. First, we create a generator:
<shell>
-$ ruby script/generate generator my_helper
+$ rails generate generator my_helper
</shell>
After that, we can delete both templates directory and the +source_root+ class method from our new generators, because we are not going to need them. So our new generator looks like the following:
@@ -232,7 +232,7 @@ end
We can try out our new generator by creating a helper for users:
<shell>
-$ ruby script/generate my_helper users
+$ rails generate my_helper users
</shell>
And it will generate the following helper file in app/helpers:
@@ -258,7 +258,7 @@ end
And see it in action when invoking generator once again:
<shell>
-$ ruby script/generate scaffold Post body:text
+$ rails generate scaffold Post body:text
[...]
invoke my_helper
create app/helpers/posts_helper.rb
@@ -343,7 +343,7 @@ Rails::Generators.fallbacks[:shoulda] = :test_unit
Now, if create a Comment scaffold, you will see that shoulda generators are being invoked, and at the end, they are just falling back to test unit generators:
<shell>
-$ ruby script/generate scaffold Comment body:text
+$ rails generate scaffold Comment body:text
invoke active_record
create db/migrate/20091120151323_create_comments.rb
create app/models/comment.rb
26 railties/guides/source/getting_started.textile
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@@ -258,10 +258,10 @@ h3. Hello, Rails!
One of the traditional places to start with a new language is by getting some text up on screen quickly. To do that in Rails, you need to create at minimum a controller and a view. Fortunately, you can do that in a single command. Enter this command in your terminal:
<shell>
-$ script/generate controller home index
+$ rails generate controller home index
</shell>
-TIP: If you're on Windows, or your Ruby is set up in some non-standard fashion, you may need to explicitly pass Rails +script+ commands to Ruby: +ruby script/generate controller home index+.
+TIP: If you're on Windows, or your Ruby is set up in some non-standard fashion, you may need to explicitly pass Rails +script+ commands to Ruby: +rails generate controller home index+.
Rails will create several files for you, including +app/views/home/index.html.erb+. This is the template that will be used to display the results of the +index+ action (method) in the +home+ controller. Open this file in your text editor and edit it to contain a single line of code:
@@ -274,7 +274,7 @@ h4. Starting up the Web Server
You actually have a functional Rails application already - after running only two commands! To see it, you need to start a web server on your development machine. You can do this by running another command:
<shell>
-$ script/server
+$ rails server
</shell>
This will fire up an instance of the Mongrel web server by default (Rails can also use several other web servers). To see your application in action, open a browser window and navigate to +http://localhost:3000+. You should see Rails' default information page:
@@ -323,7 +323,7 @@ h3. Creating a Resource
In the case of the blog application, you can start by generating a scaffolded Post resource: this will represent a single blog posting. To do this, enter this command in your terminal:
<shell>
-$ script/generate scaffold Post name:string title:string content:text
+$ rails generate scaffold Post name:string title:string content:text
</shell>
NOTE. While scaffolding will get you up and running quickly, the "one size fits all" code that it generates is unlikely to be a perfect fit for your application. In most cases, you'll need to customize the generated code. Many experienced Rails developers avoid scaffolding entirely, preferring to write all or most of their source code from scratch.
@@ -349,7 +349,7 @@ The scaffold generator will build 14 files in your application, along with some
h4. Running a Migration
-One of the products of the +script/generate scaffold+ command is a _database migration_. Migrations are Ruby classes that are designed to make it simple to create and modify database tables. Rails uses rake commands to run migrations, and it's possible to undo a migration after it's been applied to your database. Migration filenames include a timestamp to ensure that they're processed in the order that they were created.
+One of the products of the +rails generate scaffold+ command is a _database migration_. Migrations are Ruby classes that are designed to make it simple to create and modify database tables. Rails uses rake commands to run migrations, and it's possible to undo a migration after it's been applied to your database. Migration filenames include a timestamp to ensure that they're processed in the order that they were created.
If you look in the +db/migrate/20090113124235_create_posts.rb+ file (remember, yours will have a slightly different name), here's what you'll find:
@@ -400,7 +400,7 @@ Now you're ready to start working with posts. To do that, navigate to +http://lo
!images/posts_index.png(Posts Index screenshot)!
-This is the result of Rails rendering the +index+ view of your posts. There aren't currently any posts in the database, but if you click the +New Post+ link you can create one. After that, you'll find that you can edit posts, look at their details, or destroy them. All of the logic and HTML to handle this was built by the single +script/generate scaffold+ command.
+This is the result of Rails rendering the +index+ view of your posts. There aren't currently any posts in the database, but if you click the +New Post+ link you can create one. After that, you'll find that you can edit posts, look at their details, or destroy them. All of the logic and HTML to handle this was built by the single +rails generate scaffold+ command.
TIP: In development mode (which is what you're working in by default), Rails reloads your application with every browser request, so there's no need to stop and restart the web server.
@@ -435,7 +435,7 @@ h4. Using the Console
To see your validations in action, you can use the console. The console is a command-line tool that lets you execute Ruby code in the context of your application:
<shell>
-$ script/console
+$ rails console
</shell>
After the console loads, you can use it to work with your application's models:
@@ -516,7 +516,7 @@ TIP: For more details on the rendering process, see "Layouts and Rendering in Ra
h4. Customizing the Layout
-The view is only part of the story of how HTML is displayed in your web browser. Rails also has the concept of +layouts+, which are containers for views. When Rails renders a view to the browser, it does so by putting the view's HTML into a layout's HTML. The +script/generate scaffold+ command automatically created a default layout, +app/views/layouts/posts.html.erb+, for the posts. Open this layout in your editor and modify the +body+ tag:
+The view is only part of the story of how HTML is displayed in your web browser. Rails also has the concept of +layouts+, which are containers for views. When Rails renders a view to the browser, it does so by putting the view's HTML into a layout's HTML. The +rails generate scaffold+ command automatically created a default layout, +app/views/layouts/posts.html.erb+, for the posts. Open this layout in your editor and modify the +body+ tag:
<erb>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
@@ -859,7 +859,7 @@ h4. Generating a Model
Models in Rails use a singular name, and their corresponding database tables use a plural name. For the model to hold comments, the convention is to use the name Comment. Even if you don't want to use the entire apparatus set up by scaffolding, most Rails developers still use generators to make things like models and controllers. To create the new model, run this command in your terminal:
<shell>
-$ script/generate model Comment commenter:string body:text
+$ rails generate model Comment commenter:string body:text
post:references
</shell>
@@ -953,7 +953,7 @@ h4. Generating a Controller
With the model in hand, you can turn your attention to creating a matching controller. Again, there's a generator for this:
<shell>
-$ script/generate controller Comments index show new edit
+$ rails generate controller Comments index show new edit
</shell>
This creates eight files:
@@ -967,7 +967,7 @@ This creates eight files:
* +test/functional/comments_controller_test.rb+ - The functional tests for the controller
* +test/unit/helpers/comments_helper_test.rb+ - The unit tests for the helper
-The controller will be generated with empty methods and views for each action that you specified in the call to +script/generate controller+:
+The controller will be generated with empty methods and views for each action that you specified in the call to +rails generate controller+:
<ruby>
class CommentsController < ApplicationController
@@ -1052,7 +1052,7 @@ This creates a new +Comment+ object _and_ sets up the +post_id+ field to have th
h4. Building Views
-Because you skipped scaffolding, you'll need to build views for comments "by hand". Invoking +script/generate controller+ will give you skeleton views, but they'll be devoid of actual content. Here's a first pass at fleshing out the comment views.
+Because you skipped scaffolding, you'll need to build views for comments "by hand". Invoking +rails generate controller+ will give you skeleton views, but they'll be devoid of actual content. Here's a first pass at fleshing out the comment views.
The +views/comments/index.html.erb+ view:
@@ -1214,7 +1214,7 @@ h3. Building a Multi-Model Form
Comments and posts are edited on two separate forms - which makes sense, given the flow of this mini-application. But what if you want to edit more than one thing on a single form? Rails 2.3 offers new support for nested forms. Let's add support for giving each post multiple tags, right in the form where you create the post. First, create a new model to hold the tags:
<shell>
-$ script/generate model tag name:string post:references
+$ rails generate model tag name:string post:references
</shell>
Run the migration to create the database table:
10 railties/guides/source/migrations.textile
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@@ -105,7 +105,7 @@ h4. Creating a Model
The model and scaffold generators will create migrations appropriate for adding a new model. This migration will already contain instructions for creating the relevant table. If you tell Rails what columns you want then statements for adding those will also be created. For example, running
<shell>
-ruby script/generate model Product name:string description:text
+rails generate model Product name:string description:text
</shell>
will create a migration that looks like this
@@ -135,7 +135,7 @@ h4. Creating a Standalone Migration
If you are creating migrations for other purposes (for example to add a column to an existing table) then you can use the migration generator:
<shell>
-ruby script/generate migration AddPartNumberToProducts
+rails generate migration AddPartNumberToProducts
</shell>
This will create an empty but appropriately named migration:
@@ -153,7 +153,7 @@ end
If the migration name is of the form "AddXXXToYYY" or "RemoveXXXFromYYY" and is followed by a list of column names and types then a migration containing the appropriate +add_column+ and +remove_column+ statements will be created.
<shell>
-ruby script/generate migration AddPartNumberToProducts part_number:string
+rails generate migration AddPartNumberToProducts part_number:string
</shell>
will generate
@@ -173,7 +173,7 @@ end
Similarly,
<shell>
-ruby script/generate migration RemovePartNumberFromProducts part_number:string
+rails generate migration RemovePartNumberFromProducts part_number:string
</shell>
generates
@@ -193,7 +193,7 @@ end
You are not limited to one magically generated column, for example
<shell>
-ruby script/generate migration AddDetailsToProducts part_number:string price:decimal
+rails generate migration AddDetailsToProducts part_number:string price:decimal
</shell>
generates
16 railties/guides/source/performance_testing.textile
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@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ h4. Generating Performance Tests
Rails provides a generator called +performance_test+ for creating new performance tests:
<shell>
-script/generate performance_test homepage
+rails generate performance_test homepage
</shell>
This generates +homepage_test.rb+ in the +test/performance+ directory:
@@ -381,19 +381,19 @@ h4. +benchmarker+
Usage:
<shell>
-$ script/performance/benchmarker [times] 'Person.expensive_way' 'Person.another_expensive_way' ...
+$ rails benchmarker [times] 'Person.expensive_way' 'Person.another_expensive_way' ...
</shell>
Examples:
<shell>
-$ script/performance/benchmarker 10 'Item.all' 'CouchItem.all'
+$ rails benchmarker 10 'Item.all' 'CouchItem.all'
</shell>
If the +[times]+ argument is omitted, supplied methods are run just once:
<shell>
-$ script/performance/benchmarker 'Item.first' 'Item.last'
+$ rails benchmarker 'Item.first' 'Item.last'
</shell>
h4. +profiler+
@@ -403,19 +403,19 @@ h4. +profiler+
Usage:
<shell>
-$ script/performance/profiler 'Person.expensive_method(10)' [times] [flat|graph|graph_html]
+$ rails profiler 'Person.expensive_method(10)' [times] [flat|graph|graph_html]
</shell>
Examples:
<shell>
-$ script/performance/profiler 'Item.all'
+$ rails profiler 'Item.all'
</shell>
This will profile +Item.all+ in +RubyProf::WALL_TIME+ measure mode. By default, it prints flat output to the shell.
<shell>
-$ script/performance/profiler 'Item.all' 10 graph
+$ rails profiler 'Item.all' 10 graph
</shell>
This will profile +10.times { Item.all }+ with +RubyProf::WALL_TIME+ measure mode and print graph output to the shell.
@@ -423,7 +423,7 @@ This will profile +10.times { Item.all }+ with +RubyProf::WALL_TIME+ measure mod
If you want to store the output in a file:
<shell>
-$ script/performance/profiler 'Item.all' 10 graph 2> graph.txt
+$ rails profiler 'Item.all' 10 graph 2> graph.txt
</shell>
h3. Helper Methods
28 railties/guides/source/plugins.textile
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@@ -39,9 +39,9 @@ The examples in this guide require that you have a working rails application. T
gem install rails
rails yaffle_guide
cd yaffle_guide
-script/generate scaffold bird name:string
+rails generate scaffold bird name:string
rake db:migrate
-script/server
+rails server
</pre>
Then navigate to http://localhost:3000/birds. Make sure you have a functioning rails app before continuing.
@@ -57,16 +57,16 @@ This creates a plugin in 'vendor/plugins' including an 'init.rb' and 'README' as
Examples:
<pre>
-./script/generate plugin yaffle
-./script/generate plugin yaffle --with-generator
+rails generate plugin yaffle
+rails generate plugin yaffle --with-generator
</pre>
-To get more detailed help on the plugin generator, type +./script/generate plugin+.
+To get more detailed help on the plugin generator, type +rails generate plugin+.
Later on this guide will describe how to work with generators, so go ahead and generate your plugin with the +--with-generator+ option now:
<pre>
-./script/generate plugin yaffle --with-generator
+rails generate plugin yaffle --with-generator
</pre>
You should see the following output:
@@ -334,7 +334,7 @@ end
To test that your method does what it says it does, run the unit tests with +rake+ from your plugin directory. To see this in action, fire up a console and start squawking:
<shell>
-$ ./script/console
+$ rails console
>> "Hello World".to_squawk
=> "squawk! Hello World"
</shell>
@@ -871,7 +871,7 @@ If you plan to distribute your plugin, developers will expect at least a minimum
Rails ships with several built-in generators. You can see all of the generators available to you by typing the following at the command line:
<shell>
-./script/generate
+rails generate
</shell>
You should see something like this:
@@ -882,7 +882,7 @@ Installed Generators
Builtin: controller, integration_test, mailer, migration, model, observer, plugin, resource, scaffold, session_migration
</shell>
-When you run +script/generate yaffle_definition -h+ you should see the contents of your 'vendor/plugins/yaffle/generators/yaffle_definition/USAGE'.
+When you run +rails generate yaffle_definition -h+ you should see the contents of your 'vendor/plugins/yaffle/generators/yaffle_definition/USAGE'.
For this plugin, update the USAGE file could look like this:
@@ -1111,11 +1111,11 @@ end
To see this work, type:
<shell>
-./script/generate yaffle_route
-./script/destroy yaffle_route
+rails generate yaffle_route
+rails destroy yaffle_route
</shell>
-NOTE: If you haven't set up the custom route from above, 'script/destroy' will fail and you'll have to remove it manually.
+NOTE: If you haven't set up the custom route from above, 'rails destroy' will fail and you'll have to remove it manually.
h3. Migrations
@@ -1195,7 +1195,7 @@ h4. Generate Migrations
Generating migrations has several advantages over other methods. Namely, you can allow other developers to more easily customize the migration. The flow looks like this:
- * call your script/generate script and pass in whatever options they need
+ * call your rails generate script and pass in whatever options they need
* examine the generated migration, adding/removing columns or other options as necessary
This example will demonstrate how to use one of the built-in generator methods named 'migration_template' to create a migration file. Extending the rails migration generator requires a somewhat intimate knowledge of the migration generator internals, so it's best to write a test first:
@@ -1289,7 +1289,7 @@ It's courteous to check to see if table names are being pluralized whenever you
To run the generator, type the following at the command line:
<shell>
-./script/generate yaffle_migration bird
+rails generate yaffle_migration bird
</shell>
and you will see a new file:
10 railties/guides/source/rails_on_rack.textile
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@@ -30,11 +30,11 @@ h4. Rails Application's Rack Object
<tt>ActionController::Dispatcher.new</tt> is the primary Rack application object of a Rails application. Any Rack compliant web server should be using +ActionController::Dispatcher.new+ object to serve a Rails application.</p>
-h4. +script/server+
+h4. +rails server+
-<tt>script/server</tt> does the basic job of creating a +Rack::Builder+ object and starting the webserver. This is Rails' equivalent of Rack's +rackup+ script.
+<tt>rails server</tt> does the basic job of creating a +Rack::Builder+ object and starting the webserver. This is Rails' equivalent of Rack's +rackup+ script.
-Here's how +script/server+ creates an instance of +Rack::Builder+
+Here's how +rails server+ creates an instance of +Rack::Builder+
<ruby>
app = Rack::Builder.new {
@@ -54,7 +54,7 @@ Middlewares used in the code above are primarily useful only in the development
h4. +rackup+
-To use +rackup+ instead of Rails' +script/server+, you can put the following inside +config.ru+ of your Rails application's root directory:
+To use +rackup+ instead of Rails' +rails server+, you can put the following inside +config.ru+ of your Rails application's root directory:
<ruby>
# RAILS_ROOT/config.ru
@@ -233,7 +233,7 @@ h4. Generating a Metal Application
Rails provides a generator called +metal+ for creating a new Metal application:
<shell>
-$ script/generate metal poller
+$ rails generate metal poller
</shell>
This generates +poller.rb+ in the +app/metal+ directory:
8 railties/guides/source/testing.textile
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@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ h5. What are Fixtures?
_Fixtures_ is a fancy word for sample data. Fixtures allow you to populate your testing database with predefined data before your tests run. Fixtures are database independent and assume one of two formats: *YAML* or *CSV*. In this guide we will use *YAML* which is the preferred format.
-You'll find fixtures under your +test/fixtures+ directory. When you run +script/generate model+ to create a new model, fixture stubs will be automatically created and placed in this directory.
+You'll find fixtures under your +test/fixtures+ directory. When you run +rails generate model+ to create a new model, fixture stubs will be automatically created and placed in this directory.
h5. YAML
@@ -144,10 +144,10 @@ For this guide we will be using Rails _scaffolding_. It will create the model, a
NOTE: For more information on Rails _scaffolding_, refer to "Getting Started with Rails":getting_started.html
-When you use +script/generate scaffold+, for a resource among other things it creates a test stub in the +test/unit+ folder:
+When you use +rails generate scaffold+, for a resource among other things it creates a test stub in the +test/unit+ folder:
<pre>
-$ script/generate scaffold post title:string body:text
+$ rails generate scaffold post title:string body:text
...
create app/models/post.rb
create test/unit/post_test.rb
@@ -604,7 +604,7 @@ Integration tests are used to test the interaction among any number of controlle
Unlike Unit and Functional tests, integration tests have to be explicitly created under the 'test/integration' folder within your application. Rails provides a generator to create an integration test skeleton for you.
<shell>
-$ script/generate integration_test user_flows
+$ rails generate integration_test user_flows
exists test/integration/
create test/integration/user_flows_test.rb
</shell>
16 railties/lib/generators/rails/app/templates/README
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@@ -29,14 +29,14 @@ link:files/vendor/rails/actionpack/README.html.
1. At the command prompt, start a new Rails application using the <tt>rails</tt> command
and your application name. Ex: rails myapp
-2. Change directory into myapp and start the web server: <tt>script/server</tt> (run with --help for options)
+2. Change directory into myapp and start the web server: <tt>rails server</tt> (run with --help for options)
3. Go to http://localhost:3000/ and get "Welcome aboard: You're riding the Rails!"
4. Follow the guidelines to start developing your application
== Web Servers
-By default, Rails will try to use Mongrel if it's are installed when started with script/server, otherwise Rails will use WEBrick, the webserver that ships with Ruby. But you can also use Rails
+By default, Rails will try to use Mongrel if it's are installed when started with <tt>rails server</tt>, otherwise Rails will use WEBrick, the webserver that ships with Ruby. But you can also use Rails
with a variety of other web servers.
Mongrel is a Ruby-based webserver with a C component (which requires compilation) that is
@@ -164,20 +164,20 @@ Finally, when you're ready to resume execution, you enter "cont"
== Console
-You can interact with the domain model by starting the console through <tt>script/console</tt>.
+You can interact with the domain model by starting the console through <tt>rails console</tt>.
Here you'll have all parts of the application configured, just like it is when the
application is running. You can inspect domain models, change values, and save to the
database. Starting the script without arguments will launch it in the development environment.
-Passing an argument will specify a different environment, like <tt>script/console production</tt>.
+Passing an argument will specify a different environment, like <tt>rails console production</tt>.
To reload your controllers and models after launching the console run <tt>reload!</tt>
== dbconsole
-You can go to the command line of your database directly through <tt>script/dbconsole</tt>.
+You can go to the command line of your database directly through <tt>rails dbconsole</tt>.
You would be connected to the database with the credentials defined in database.yml.
Starting the script without arguments will connect you to the development database. Passing an
-argument will connect you to a different database, like <tt>script/dbconsole production</tt>.
+argument will connect you to a different database, like <tt>rails dbconsole production</tt>.
Currently works for mysql, postgresql and sqlite.
== Description of Contents
@@ -207,7 +207,7 @@ app/views/layouts
app/helpers
Holds view helpers that should be named like weblogs_helper.rb. These are generated
- for you automatically when using script/generate for controllers. Helpers can be used to
+ for you automatically when using <tt>rails generate</tt> for controllers. Helpers can be used to
wrap functionality for your views into methods.
config
@@ -234,7 +234,7 @@ script
Helper scripts for automation and generation.
test
- Unit and functional tests along with fixtures. When using the script/generate scripts, template
+ Unit and functional tests along with fixtures. When using the <tt>rails generate</tt> scripts, template
test files will be generated for you and placed in this directory.
vendor
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/controller/USAGE
View
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Description:
template engine and test framework generators.
Example:
- `./script/generate controller CreditCard open debit credit close`
+ `rails generate controller CreditCard open debit credit close`
Credit card controller with URLs like /credit_card/debit.
Controller: app/controllers/credit_card_controller.rb
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/generator/USAGE
View
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ Description:
CamelCased or under_scored, as an argument.
Example:
- `./script/generate generator Awesome`
+ `rails generate generator Awesome`
creates a standard awesome generator:
lib/generators/awesome/
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/generator/templates/USAGE.tt
View
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@ Description:
Explain the generator
Example:
- ./script/generate <%= file_name %> Thing
+ rails generate <%= file_name %> Thing
This will create:
what/will/it/create
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/helper/USAGE
View
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Description:
test framework.
Example:
- `./script/generate helper CreditCard`
+ `rails generate helper CreditCard`
Credit card helper.
Helper: app/helpers/credit_card_helper.rb
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/integration_test/USAGE
View
@@ -6,5 +6,5 @@ Description:
TestUnit.
Example:
- `./script/generate integration_test GeneralStories` creates a GeneralStories
+ `rails generate integration_test GeneralStories` creates a GeneralStories
integration test in test/integration/general_stories_test.rb
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/mailer/USAGE
View
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@ Description:
engine and test framework generators.
Example:
- `./script/generate mailer Notifications signup forgot_password invoice`
+ `rails generate mailer Notifications signup forgot_password invoice`
creates a Notifications mailer class, views, test, and fixtures:
Mailer: app/mailers/notifications.rb
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/metal/USAGE
View
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@ Description:
Cast some metal!
Examples:
- `./script/generate metal poller`
+ `rails generate metal poller`
This will create:
Metal: app/metal/poller.rb
4 railties/lib/generators/rails/migration/USAGE
View
@@ -8,12 +8,12 @@ Description:
column lines from supplied attributes: AddColumnsToTable or RemoveColumnsFromTable
Example:
- `./script/generate migration AddSslFlag`
+ `rails generate migration AddSslFlag`
If the current date is May 14, 2008 and the current time 09:09:12, this creates the AddSslFlag migration
db/migrate/20080514090912_add_ssl_flag.rb
- `./script/generate migration AddTitleBodyToPost title:string body:text published:boolean`
+ `rails generate migration AddTitleBodyToPost title:string body:text published:boolean`
This will create the AddTitleBodyToPost in db/migrate/20080514090912_add_title_body_to_post.rb with
this in the Up migration:
4 railties/lib/generators/rails/model/USAGE
View
@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ Description:
created model. This allows you create Single Table Inheritance models.
Examples:
- `./script/generate model account`
+ `rails generate model account`
For ActiveRecord and TestUnit it creates:
@@ -25,6 +25,6 @@ Examples:
Fixtures: test/fixtures/accounts.yml
Migration: db/migrate/XXX_add_accounts.rb
- `./script/generate model post title:string body:text published:boolean`
+ `rails generate model post title:string body:text published:boolean`
Creates a Post model with a string title, text body, and published flag.
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/observer/USAGE
View
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ Description:
This generator only invokes your ORM and test framework generators.
Example:
- `./script/generate observer Account`
+ `rails generate observer Account`
For ActiveRecord and TestUnit it creates:
Observer: app/models/account_observer.rb
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/performance_test/USAGE
View
@@ -6,5 +6,5 @@ Description:
TestUnit.
Example:
- `./script/generate performance_test GeneralStories` creates a GeneralStories
+ `rails generate performance_test GeneralStories` creates a GeneralStories
performance test in test/performance/general_stories_test.rb
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/plugin/USAGE
View
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ Description:
CamelCased or under_scored, as an argument.
Example:
- `./script/generate plugin BrowserFilters`
+ `rails generate plugin BrowserFilters`
creates a standard browser_filters plugin:
vendor/plugins/browser_filters/README
6 railties/lib/generators/rails/resource/USAGE
View
@@ -18,6 +18,6 @@ Description:
views or add any methods to the generated controller.
Examples:
- `./script/generate resource post` # no attributes
- `./script/generate resource post title:string body:text published:boolean`
- `./script/generate resource purchase order_id:integer amount:decimal`
+ `rails generate resource post` # no attributes
+ `rails generate resource post title:string body:text published:boolean`
+ `rails generate resource purchase order_id:integer amount:decimal`
8 railties/lib/generators/rails/scaffold/USAGE
View
@@ -21,9 +21,9 @@ Description:
declaration in config/routes.rb.
If you want to remove all the generated files, run
- 'script/destroy scaffold ModelName'.
+ 'rails destroy scaffold ModelName'.
Examples:
- `./script/generate scaffold post`
- `./script/generate scaffold post title:string body:text published:boolean`
- `./script/generate scaffold purchase order_id:integer amount:decimal`
+ `rails generate scaffold post`
+ `rails generate scaffold post title:string body:text published:boolean`
+ `rails generate scaffold purchase order_id:integer amount:decimal`
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/scaffold_controller/USAGE
View
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ Description:
template engine and test framework generators.
Example:
- `./script/generate scaffold_controller CreditCard`
+ `rails generate scaffold_controller CreditCard`
Credit card controller with URLs like /credit_card/debit.
Controller: app/controllers/credit_cards_controller.rb
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/session_migration/USAGE
View
@@ -5,4 +5,4 @@ Description:
Before invoking this generator, be sure that your ORM supports session stores.
Example:
- `./script/generate session_migration CreateSessionTable`
+ `rails generate session_migration CreateSessionTable`
2  railties/lib/generators/rails/stylesheets/USAGE
View
@@ -2,4 +2,4 @@ Description:
Copies scaffold stylesheets to public/stylesheets/.
Examples:
- `./script/generate stylesheets`
+ `rails generate stylesheets`
2  railties/lib/rails/commands/console.rb
View
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ def start
opt.banner = "Usage: console [environment] [options]"
opt.on('-s', '--sandbox', 'Rollback database modifications on exit.') { |v| options[:sandbox] = v }
opt.on("--debugger", 'Enable ruby-debugging for the console.') { |v| options[:debugger] = v }
- opt.on('--irb') { |v| abort '--irb option is no longer supported. Invoke `/your/choice/of/ruby script/console` instead' }
+ opt.on('--irb') { |v| abort '--irb option is no longer supported. Invoke `/your/choice/of/ruby script/rails console` instead' }
opt.parse!(ARGV)
end
12 railties/lib/rails/commands/plugin.rb
View
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
#
# Installing plugins:
#
-# $ ./script/plugin install continuous_builder asset_timestamping
+# $ rails plugin install continuous_builder asset_timestamping
#
# Specifying revisions:
#
@@ -319,13 +319,13 @@ def options
o.separator ""
o.separator "EXAMPLES"
o.separator " Install a plugin:"
- o.separator " #{@script_name} install continuous_builder\n"
+ o.separator " #{@script_name} plugin install continuous_builder\n"
o.separator " Install a plugin from a subversion URL:"
- o.separator " #{@script_name} install http://dev.rubyonrails.com/svn/rails/plugins/continuous_builder\n"
+ o.separator " #{@script_name} plugin install http://dev.rubyonrails.com/svn/rails/plugins/continuous_builder\n"
o.separator " Install a plugin from a git URL:"
- o.separator " #{@script_name} install git://github.com/SomeGuy/my_awesome_plugin.git\n"
+ o.separator " #{@script_name} plugin install git://github.com/SomeGuy/my_awesome_plugin.git\n"
o.separator " Install a plugin and add a svn:externals entry to vendor/plugins"
- o.separator " #{@script_name} install -x continuous_builder\n"
+ o.separator " #{@script_name} plugin install -x continuous_builder\n"
end
end
@@ -381,7 +381,7 @@ def options
"Exports the plugin, allowing you to check it into your local repository. Does not enable updates, or add an svn:externals entry.") { |v| @method = :export }
o.on( "-q", "--quiet",
"Suppresses the output from installation.",
- "Ignored if -v is passed (./script/plugin -v install ...)") { |v| @options[:quiet] = true }
+ "Ignored if -v is passed (rails plugin -v install ...)") { |v| @options[:quiet] = true }
o.on( "-r REVISION", "--revision REVISION",
"Checks out the given revision from subversion or git.",
"Ignored if subversion/git is not used.") { |v| @options[:revision] = v }
4 railties/lib/rails/generators/actions.rb
View
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ def plugin(name, options)
options[:git] = "-b #{options[:branch]} #{options[:git]}" if options[:branch]
options[:svn] = "-r #{options[:revision]} #{options[:svn]}" if options[:revision]
in_root do
- run_ruby_script "script/plugin install #{options[:svn] || options[:git]}", :verbose => false
+ run_ruby_script "script/rails plugin install #{options[:svn] || options[:git]}", :verbose => false
end
else
log "! no git or svn provided for #{name}. Skipping..."
@@ -226,7 +226,7 @@ def generate(what, *args)
log :generate, what
argument = args.map {|arg| arg.to_s }.flatten.join(" ")
- in_root { run_ruby_script("script/generate #{what} #{argument}", :verbose => false) }
+ in_root { run_ruby_script("script/rails generate #{what} #{argument}", :verbose => false) }
end
# Runs the supplied rake task
8 railties/lib/rails/generators/base.rb
View
@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@ def self.namespace(name=nil)
#
# For example, if the user invoke the controller generator as:
#
- # ruby script/generate controller Account --test-framework=test_unit
+ # rails generate controller Account --test-framework=test_unit
#
# The controller generator will then try to invoke the following generators:
#
@@ -117,11 +117,11 @@ def self.namespace(name=nil)
# All hooks come with switches for user interface. If the user don't want
# to use any test framework, he can do:
#
- # ruby script/generate controller Account --skip-test-framework
+ # rails generate controller Account --skip-test-framework
#
# Or similarly:
#
- # ruby script/generate controller Account --no-test-framework
+ # rails generate controller Account --no-test-framework
#
# ==== Boolean hooks
#
@@ -133,7 +133,7 @@ def self.namespace(name=nil)
#
# Then, if you want, webrat to be invoked, just supply:
#
- # ruby script/generate controller Account --webrat
+ # rails generate controller Account --webrat
#
# The hooks lookup is similar as above:
#
2  railties/lib/rails/rack/debugger.rb
View
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@ class Debugger
def initialize(app)
@app = app
- ARGV.clear # clear ARGV so that script/server options aren't passed to IRB
+ ARGV.clear # clear ARGV so that rails server options aren't passed to IRB
require_library_or_gem 'ruby-debug'
::Debugger.start
10 railties/test/generators/actions_test.rb
View
@@ -36,22 +36,22 @@ def test_create_file_should_write_block_contents_to_file_path
end
def test_plugin_with_git_option_should_run_plugin_install
- generator.expects(:run_ruby_script).once.with("script/plugin install #{@git_plugin_uri}", :verbose => false)
+ generator.expects(:run_ruby_script).once.with("script/rails plugin install #{@git_plugin_uri}", :verbose => false)
action :plugin, 'restful-authentication', :git => @git_plugin_uri
end
def test_plugin_with_svn_option_should_run_plugin_install
- generator.expects(:run_ruby_script).once.with("script/plugin install #{@svn_plugin_uri}", :verbose => false)
+ generator.expects(:run_ruby_script).once.with("script/rails plugin install #{@svn_plugin_uri}", :verbose => false)
action :plugin, 'restful-authentication', :svn => @svn_plugin_uri
end
def test_plugin_with_git_option_and_branch_should_run_plugin_install
- generator.expects(:run_ruby_script).once.with("script/plugin install -b stable #{@git_plugin_uri}", :verbose => false)
+ generator.expects(:run_ruby_script).once.with("script/rails plugin install -b stable #{@git_plugin_uri}", :verbose => false)
action :plugin, 'restful-authentication', :git => @git_plugin_uri, :branch => 'stable'
end
def test_plugin_with_svn_option_and_revision_should_run_plugin_install
- generator.expects(:run_ruby_script).once.with("script/plugin install -r 1234 #{@svn_plugin_uri}", :verbose => false)
+ generator.expects(:run_ruby_script).once.with("script/rails plugin install -r 1234 #{@svn_plugin_uri}", :verbose => false)
action :plugin, 'restful-authentication', :svn => @svn_plugin_uri, :revision => 1234
end
@@ -155,7 +155,7 @@ def test_initializer_should_write_date_to_file_in_config_initializers
end
def test_generate_should_run_script_generate_with_argument_and_options
- generator.expects(:run_ruby_script).once.with('script/generate model MyModel', :verbose => false)
+ generator.expects(:run_ruby_script).once.with('script/rails generate model MyModel', :verbose => false)
action :generate, 'model', 'MyModel'
end
2  railties/test/isolation/abstract_unit.rb
View
@@ -154,7 +154,7 @@ def engine(name)
def script(script)
Dir.chdir(app_path) do
- `#{Gem.ruby} #{app_path}/script/#{script}`
+ `#{Gem.ruby} #{app_path}/script/rails #{script}`
end
end

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