Permalink
Browse files

Replace first person point of view on guides.

[skip ci]
  • Loading branch information...
1 parent fd11946 commit f52a13cdf457a4163de60c04801bc77954124a56 @htanata htanata committed Feb 27, 2014
Showing with 11 additions and 11 deletions.
  1. +3 −3 guides/source/active_support_core_extensions.md
  2. +7 −7 guides/source/security.md
  3. +1 −1 guides/source/testing.md
@@ -572,12 +572,12 @@ NOTE: Defined in `active_support/core_ext/module/aliasing.rb`.
#### `alias_attribute`
-Model attributes have a reader, a writer, and a predicate. You can alias a model attribute having the corresponding three methods defined for you in one shot. As in other aliasing methods, the new name is the first argument, and the old name is the second (my mnemonic is they go in the same order as if you did an assignment):
+Model attributes have a reader, a writer, and a predicate. You can alias a model attribute having the corresponding three methods defined for you in one shot. As in other aliasing methods, the new name is the first argument, and the old name is the second (one mnemonic is that they go in the same order as if you did an assignment):
```ruby
class User < ActiveRecord::Base
- # let me refer to the email column as "login",
- # possibly meaningful for authentication code
+ # You can refer to the email column as "login".
+ # This can be meaningful for authentication code.
alias_attribute :login, :email
end
```
View
@@ -17,15 +17,15 @@ After reading this guide, you will know:
Introduction
------------
-Web application frameworks are made to help developers build web applications. Some of them also help you with securing the web application. In fact one framework is not more secure than another: If you use it correctly, you will be able to build secure apps with many frameworks. Ruby on Rails has some clever helper methods, for example against SQL injection, so that this is hardly a problem. It's nice to see that all of the Rails applications I audited had a good level of security.
+Web application frameworks are made to help developers build web applications. Some of them also help you with securing the web application. In fact one framework is not more secure than another: If you use it correctly, you will be able to build secure apps with many frameworks. Ruby on Rails has some clever helper methods, for example against SQL injection, so that this is hardly a problem.
In general there is no such thing as plug-n-play security. Security depends on the people using the framework, and sometimes on the development method. And it depends on all layers of a web application environment: The back-end storage, the web server and the web application itself (and possibly other layers or applications).
The Gartner Group however estimates that 75% of attacks are at the web application layer, and found out "that out of 300 audited sites, 97% are vulnerable to attack". This is because web applications are relatively easy to attack, as they are simple to understand and manipulate, even by the lay person.
The threats against web applications include user account hijacking, bypass of access control, reading or modifying sensitive data, or presenting fraudulent content. Or an attacker might be able to install a Trojan horse program or unsolicited e-mail sending software, aim at financial enrichment or cause brand name damage by modifying company resources. In order to prevent attacks, minimize their impact and remove points of attack, first of all, you have to fully understand the attack methods in order to find the correct countermeasures. That is what this guide aims at.
-In order to develop secure web applications you have to keep up to date on all layers and know your enemies. To keep up to date subscribe to security mailing lists, read security blogs and make updating and security checks a habit (check the <a href="#additional-resources">Additional Resources</a> chapter). I do it manually because that's how you find the nasty logical security problems.
+In order to develop secure web applications you have to keep up to date on all layers and know your enemies. To keep up to date subscribe to security mailing lists, read security blogs and make updating and security checks a habit (check the <a href="#additional-resources">Additional Resources</a> chapter). It is done manually because that's how you find the nasty logical security problems.
Sessions
--------
@@ -198,7 +198,7 @@ In the <a href="#sessions">session chapter</a> you have learned that most Rails
It is important to notice that the actual crafted image or link doesn't necessarily have to be situated in the web application's domain, it can be anywhere - in a forum, blog post or email.
-CSRF appears very rarely in CVE (Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures) - less than 0.1% in 2006 - but it really is a 'sleeping giant' [Grossman]. This is in stark contrast to the results in my (and others) security contract work - _CSRF is an important security issue_.
+CSRF appears very rarely in CVE (Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures) - less than 0.1% in 2006 - but it really is a 'sleeping giant' [Grossman]. This is in stark contrast to the results in many security contract works - _CSRF is an important security issue_.
### CSRF Countermeasures
@@ -374,7 +374,7 @@ For _countermeasures against CSRF in administration interfaces and Intranet appl
The common admin interface works like this: it's located at www.example.com/admin, may be accessed only if the admin flag is set in the User model, re-displays user input and allows the admin to delete/add/edit whatever data desired. Here are some thoughts about this:
-* It is very important to _think about the worst case_: What if someone really got hold of my cookie or user credentials. You could _introduce roles_ for the admin interface to limit the possibilities of the attacker. Or how about _special login credentials_ for the admin interface, other than the ones used for the public part of the application. Or a _special password for very serious actions_?
+* It is very important to _think about the worst case_: What if someone really got hold of your cookies or user credentials. You could _introduce roles_ for the admin interface to limit the possibilities of the attacker. Or how about _special login credentials_ for the admin interface, other than the ones used for the public part of the application. Or a _special password for very serious actions_?
* Does the admin really have to access the interface from everywhere in the world? Think about _limiting the login to a bunch of source IP addresses_. Examine request.remote_ip to find out about the user's IP address. This is not bullet-proof, but a great barrier. Remember that there might be a proxy in use, though.
@@ -406,7 +406,7 @@ If the parameter was nil, the resulting SQL query will be
SELECT * FROM users WHERE (users.activation_code IS NULL) LIMIT 1
```
-And thus it found the first user in the database, returned it and logged them in. You can find out more about it in [my blog post](http://www.rorsecurity.info/2007/10/28/restful_authentication-login-security/). _It is advisable to update your plug-ins from time to time_. Moreover, you can review your application to find more flaws like this.
+And thus it found the first user in the database, returned it and logged them in. You can find out more about it in [this blog post](http://www.rorsecurity.info/2007/10/28/restful_authentication-login-security/). _It is advisable to update your plug-ins from time to time_. Moreover, you can review your application to find more flaws like this.
### Brute-Forcing Accounts
@@ -732,7 +732,7 @@ Imagine a blacklist deletes "script" from the user input. Now the attacker injec
strip_tags("some<<b>script>alert('hello')<</b>/script>")
```
-This returned "some&lt;script&gt;alert('hello')&lt;/script&gt;", which makes an attack work. That's why I vote for a whitelist approach, using the updated Rails 2 method sanitize():
+This returned "some&lt;script&gt;alert('hello')&lt;/script&gt;", which makes an attack work. That's why a whitelist approach is better, using the updated Rails 2 method sanitize():
```ruby
tags = %w(a acronym b strong i em li ul ol h1 h2 h3 h4 h5 h6 blockquote br cite sub sup ins p)
@@ -812,7 +812,7 @@ The [moz-binding](http://www.securiteam.com/securitynews/5LP051FHPE.html) CSS pr
#### Countermeasures
-This example, again, showed that a blacklist filter is never complete. However, as custom CSS in web applications is a quite rare feature, I am not aware of a whitelist CSS filter. _If you want to allow custom colors or images, you can allow the user to choose them and build the CSS in the web application_. Use Rails' `sanitize()` method as a model for a whitelist CSS filter, if you really need one.
+This example, again, showed that a blacklist filter is never complete. However, as custom CSS in web applications is a quite rare feature, it may be hard to find a good whitelist CSS filter. _If you want to allow custom colors or images, you can allow the user to choose them and build the CSS in the web application_. Use Rails' `sanitize()` method as a model for a whitelist CSS filter, if you really need one.
### Textile Injection
View
@@ -134,7 +134,7 @@ Unit Testing your Models
In Rails, models tests are what you write to test your models.
-For this guide we will be using Rails _scaffolding_. It will create the model, a migration, controller and views for the new resource in a single operation. It will also create a full test suite following Rails best practices. I will be using examples from this generated code and will be supplementing it with additional examples where necessary.
+For this guide we will be using Rails _scaffolding_. It will create the model, a migration, controller and views for the new resource in a single operation. It will also create a full test suite following Rails best practices. We will be using examples from this generated code and will be supplementing it with additional examples where necessary.
NOTE: For more information on Rails <i>scaffolding</i>, refer to [Getting Started with Rails](getting_started.html)

0 comments on commit f52a13c

Please sign in to comment.