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Revert "fix history"

This reverts commit dd31960.
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1 parent 4dcc9dd commit ffea97e52a865c633f6c0dd897ccbbcb7f1f93df @davetoxa davetoxa committed Jan 15, 2013
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-diff --git a/guides/source/getting_started.md b/guides/source/getting_started.md
-index 02ec024..7d86b38 100644
---- a/guides/source/getting_started.md
-+++ b/guides/source/getting_started.md
-@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ code while accomplishing more than many other languages and frameworks.
- Experienced Rails developers also report that it makes web application
- development more fun.
-
--Rails is opinionated software. It makes the assumption that there is a "best"
-+Rails is opinionated software. It makes the assumption that there is the "best"
- way to do things, and it's designed to encourage that way - and in some cases to
- discourage alternatives. If you learn "The Rails Way" you'll probably discover a
- tremendous increase in productivity. If you persist in bringing old habits from
-@@ -71,7 +71,9 @@ By following along with this guide, you'll create a Rails project called
- (very) simple weblog. Before you can start building the application, you need to
- make sure that you have Rails itself installed.
-
--TIP: The examples below use # and $ to denote superuser and regular user terminal prompts respectively in a UNIX-like OS. If you are using Windows, your prompt will look something like c:\source_code>
-+TIP: The examples below use `#` and `$` to denote superuser and regular
-+user terminal prompts respectively in a UNIX-like OS. If you are using
-+Windows, your prompt will look something like `c:\source_code>`
-
- ### Installing Rails
-
-@@ -132,17 +134,16 @@ application. Most of the work in this tutorial will happen in the `app/` folder,
- | File/Folder | Purpose |
- | ----------- | ------- |
- |app/|Contains the controllers, models, views, helpers, mailers and assets for your application. You'll focus on this folder for the remainder of this guide.|
-+|bin/|Contains the rails script that starts your app and can contain other scripts you use to deploy or run your application.|
- |config/|Configure your application's runtime rules, routes, database, and more. This is covered in more detail in [Configuring Rails Applications](configuring.html)|
- |config.ru|Rack configuration for Rack based servers used to start the application.|
- |db/|Contains your current database schema, as well as the database migrations.|
--|doc/|In-depth documentation for your application.|
- |Gemfile<br />Gemfile.lock|These files allow you to specify what gem dependencies are needed for your Rails application. These files are used by the Bundler gem. For more information about Bundler, see [the Bundler website](http://gembundler.com) |
- |lib/|Extended modules for your application.|
- |log/|Application log files.|
- |public/|The only folder seen to the world as-is. Contains the static files and compiled assets.|
- |Rakefile|This file locates and loads tasks that can be run from the command line. The task definitions are defined throughout the components of Rails. Rather than changing Rakefile, you should add your own tasks by adding files to the lib/tasks directory of your application.|
- |README.rdoc|This is a brief instruction manual for your application. You should edit this file to tell others what your application does, how to set it up, and so on.|
--|script/|Contains the rails script that starts your app and can contain other scripts you use to deploy or run your application.|
- |test/|Unit tests, fixtures, and other test apparatus. These are covered in [Testing Rails Applications](testing.html)|
- |tmp/|Temporary files (like cache, pid and session files)|
- |vendor/|A place for all third-party code. In a typical Rails application, this includes Ruby Gems and the Rails source code (if you optionally install it into your project).|
-@@ -417,7 +418,7 @@ def create
- end
- ```
-
--The `render` method here is taking a very simple hash with a key of `text` and value of `params[:post].inspect`. The `params` method is the object which represents the parameters (or fields) coming in from the form. The `params` method returns a `HashWithIndifferentAccess` object, which allows you to access the keys of the hash using either strings or symbols. In this situation, the only parameters that matter are the ones from the form.
-+The `render` method here is taking a very simple hash with a key of `text` and value of `params[:post].inspect`. The `params` method is the object which represents the parameters (or fields) coming in from the form. The `params` method returns an `ActiveSupport::HashWithIndifferentAccess` object, which allows you to access the keys of the hash using either strings or symbols. In this situation, the only parameters that matter are the ones from the form.
-
- If you re-submit the form one more time you'll now no longer get the missing template error. Instead, you'll see something that looks like the following:
-
-@@ -830,7 +831,7 @@ it look as follows:
- <h1>Editing post</h1>
-
- <%= form_for :post, url: { action: :update, id: @post.id },
--method: :put do |f| %>
-+method: :patch do |f| %>
- <% if @post.errors.any? %>
- <div id="errorExplanation">
- <h2><%= pluralize(@post.errors.count, "error") %> prohibited
-@@ -863,7 +864,7 @@ method: :put do |f| %>
- This time we point the form to the `update` action, which is not defined yet
- but will be very soon.
-
--The `method: :put` option tells Rails that we want this form to be
-+The `method: :patch` option tells Rails that we want this form to be
- submitted via the `PUT` HTTP method which is the HTTP method you're expected to use to
- **update** resources according to the REST protocol.
-
-@@ -873,7 +874,7 @@ Next, we need to add the `update` action. The file
- `config/routes.rb` will need just one more line:
-
- ```ruby
--put "posts/:id" => "posts#update"
-+patch "posts/:id" => "posts#update"
- ```
-
- And then create the `update` action in `app/controllers/posts_controller.rb`:
-@@ -882,7 +883,7 @@ And then create the `update` action in `app/controllers/posts_controller.rb`:
- def update
- @post = Post.find(params[:id])
-
-- if @post.update_attributes(params[:post])
-+ if @post.update(params[:post])
- redirect_to action: :show, id: @post.id
- else
- render 'edit'
-@@ -890,13 +891,13 @@ def update
- end
- ```
-
--The new method, `update_attributes`, is used when you want to update a record
-+The new method, `update`, is used when you want to update a record
- that already exists, and it accepts a hash containing the attributes
- that you want to update. As before, if there was an error updating the
- post we want to show the form back to the user.
-
--TIP: You don't need to pass all attributes to `update_attributes`. For
--example, if you'd call `@post.update_attributes(title: 'A new title')`
-+TIP: You don't need to pass all attributes to `update`. For
-+example, if you'd call `@post.update(title: 'A new title')`
- Rails would only update the `title` attribute, leaving all other
- attributes untouched.
-
-@@ -1051,7 +1052,7 @@ called `post_url` and `post_path` available to our application. These are
- precisely the methods that the `form_for` needs when editing a post, and so now
- you'll be able to update posts again.
-
--NOTE: The `:as` option is available on the `post`, `put`, `delete` and `match`
-+NOTE: The `:as` option is available on the `post`, `patch`, `put`, `delete` and `match`
- routing methods also.
-
- ### Deleting Posts
-@@ -1145,7 +1146,7 @@ get "posts/new"
- post "posts" => "posts#create"
- get "posts/:id" => "posts#show", as: :post
- get "posts/:id/edit" => "posts#edit"
--put "posts/:id" => "posts#update"
-+patch "posts/:id" => "posts#update"
- delete "posts/:id" => "posts#destroy"
- ```
-

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