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Emacs 24.2.91 with emacs-24.2.91-mac-3.91

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commit 9e47eed3174a602055ed0c18ea1dd7f9aad6e18e 1 parent f54f6b8
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Showing with 11,166 additions and 5,249 deletions.
  1. +26 −0 ChangeLog
  2. +2 −2 Makefile.in
  3. +1 −0  README
  4. +1 −1  README-emacs
  5. +1 −1  build-emacs.app.sh
  6. +11 −11 configure
  7. +2 −2 configure.ac
  8. +13 −0 doc/emacs/ChangeLog
  9. +1 −1  doc/emacs/abbrevs.texi
  10. +45 −45 doc/emacs/ack.texi
  11. +3 −3 doc/emacs/arevert-xtra.texi
  12. +2 −2 doc/emacs/basic.texi
  13. +3 −3 doc/emacs/buffers.texi
  14. +6 −6 doc/emacs/building.texi
  15. +2 −2 doc/emacs/cal-xtra.texi
  16. +1 −1  doc/emacs/calendar.texi
  17. +4 −4 doc/emacs/cmdargs.texi
  18. +1 −1  doc/emacs/commands.texi
  19. +10 −10 doc/emacs/custom.texi
  20. +1 −1  doc/emacs/dired.texi
  21. +5 −5 doc/emacs/display.texi
  22. +36 −36 doc/emacs/emacs.texi
  23. +1 −1  doc/emacs/emacsver.texi
  24. +3 −3 doc/emacs/emerge-xtra.texi
  25. +3 −3 doc/emacs/files.texi
  26. +1 −1  doc/emacs/fortran-xtra.texi
  27. +7 −7 doc/emacs/frames.texi
  28. +67 −67 doc/emacs/glossary.texi
  29. +4 −4 doc/emacs/gnu.texi
  30. +1 −1  doc/emacs/indent.texi
  31. +9 −9 doc/emacs/killing.texi
  32. +23 −23 doc/emacs/maintaining.texi
  33. +12 −12 doc/emacs/misc.texi
  34. +2 −2 doc/emacs/modes.texi
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  39. +9 −9 doc/emacs/programs.texi
  40. +2 −2 doc/emacs/rmail.texi
  41. +1 −1  doc/emacs/search.texi
  42. +1 −1  doc/emacs/sending.texi
  43. +12 −12 doc/emacs/text.texi
  44. +3 −3 doc/emacs/trouble.texi
  45. +5 −12 doc/emacs/vc1-xtra.texi
  46. +3 −3 doc/emacs/windows.texi
  47. +10 −10 doc/emacs/xresources.texi
  48. +7 −7 doc/lispintro/emacs-lisp-intro.texi
  49. +65 −31 doc/lispref/ChangeLog
  50. +1 −1  doc/lispref/abbrevs.texi
  51. +1 −2  doc/lispref/backups.texi
  52. +6 −6 doc/lispref/commands.texi
  53. +2 −3 doc/lispref/compile.texi
  54. +104 −0 doc/lispref/control.texi
  55. +10 −8 doc/lispref/customize.texi
  56. +18 −18 doc/lispref/display.texi
  57. +1 −1  doc/lispref/edebug.texi
  58. +11 −6 doc/lispref/elisp.texi
  59. +2 −2 doc/lispref/errors.texi
  60. +4 −4 doc/lispref/files.texi
  61. +9 −9 doc/lispref/frames.texi
  62. +11 −11 doc/lispref/functions.texi
  63. +1 −2  doc/lispref/help.texi
  64. +2 −4 doc/lispref/index.texi
  65. +4 −4 doc/lispref/internals.texi
  66. +3 −3 doc/lispref/intro.texi
  67. +11 −11 doc/lispref/keymaps.texi
  68. +132 −0 doc/lispref/lists.texi
  69. +4 −4 doc/lispref/loading.texi
  70. +1 −1  doc/lispref/macros.texi
  71. +3 −3 doc/lispref/maps.texi
  72. +2 −2 doc/lispref/minibuf.texi
  73. +12 −13 doc/lispref/modes.texi
  74. +3 −3 doc/lispref/nonascii.texi
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  77. +9 −9 doc/lispref/os.texi
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  79. +1 −1  doc/lispref/positions.texi
  80. +3 −3 doc/lispref/processes.texi
  81. +6 −6 doc/lispref/searching.texi
  82. +4 −4 doc/lispref/sequences.texi
  83. +1 −1  doc/lispref/streams.texi
  84. +19 −15 doc/lispref/strings.texi
  85. +146 −155 doc/lispref/symbols.texi
  86. +4 −4 doc/lispref/syntax.texi
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  88. +2 −2 doc/lispref/tips.texi
  89. +11 −12 doc/lispref/variables.texi
  90. +10 −10 doc/lispref/windows.texi
  91. +1 −1  doc/man/emacs.1
  92. +79 −2 doc/misc/ChangeLog
  93. +36 −3 doc/misc/Makefile.in
  94. +3 −3 doc/misc/auth.texi
  95. +11 −11 doc/misc/autotype.texi
  96. +475 −0 doc/misc/bovine.texi
  97. +39 −39 doc/misc/calc.texi
  98. +78 −78 doc/misc/cc-mode.texi
  99. +5 −5 doc/misc/cl.texi
  100. +4 −4 doc/misc/ebrowse.texi
  101. +9 −9 doc/misc/ede.texi
  102. +24 −24 doc/misc/ediff.texi
  103. +4 −4 doc/misc/edt.texi
  104. +1 −1  doc/misc/eieio.texi
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  107. +7 −7 doc/misc/erc.texi
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  110. +1 −1  doc/misc/eudc.texi
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  115. +23 −23 doc/misc/gnus-faq.texi
  116. +87 −87 doc/misc/gnus.texi
  117. +52 −52 doc/misc/idlwave.texi
  118. +3 −3 doc/misc/info.texi
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  125. +119 −111 doc/misc/org.texi
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  129. +28 −28 doc/misc/reftex.texi
  130. +1 −1  doc/misc/remember.texi
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  133. +1 −1  doc/misc/ses.texi
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  141. +2,048 −0 doc/misc/wisent.texi
  142. +17 −17 doc/misc/woman.texi
  143. +32 −25 etc/AUTHORS
  144. +13 −3 etc/NEWS
  145. +1 −1  etc/images/README-HiRes
  146. +26 −26 info/autotype.info
  147. +878 −0 info/bovine.info
  148. +209 −208 info/ccmode.info
  149. +66 −66 info/cl.info
  150. +3 −0  info/dir
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  155. +158 −158 info/eintr.info
  156. +1,531 −1,275 info/elisp.info
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  158. +887 −892 info/emacs.info
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  164. +573 −569 info/gnus.info
  165. +110 −109 info/idlwave.info
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  167. +2 −2 info/mairix-el.info
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  171. +12 −12 info/nxml-mode.info
Sorry, we could not display the entire diff because too many files (1,669) changed.
View
26 ChangeLog
@@ -1,3 +1,29 @@
+2012-12-13 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
+
+ * info/dir: Add bovine, wisent.
+
+2012-12-12 Andreas Schwab <schwab@suse.de>
+
+ * Makefile.in (install-info): Use `${MAKE} -s' for echo-info.
+ (uninstall): Likewise.
+
+2012-12-12 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
+
+ * info/dir: Add srecode.
+
+2012-12-11 Nicolas Richard <theonewiththeevillook@yahoo.fr> (tiny change)
+
+ * Makefile.in (install-info, uninstall): Ensure make's messages
+ about changing directories are in English. (Bug#13143)
+
+2012-12-05 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
+
+ * configure.ac: Handle info/ files with or without ".info" extension.
+
+2012-11-24 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
+
+ * make-dist (nt): Adjust to changes in names of the *.manifest files.
+
2012-11-21 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* configure.ac (--enable-profiling): Doc fix.
View
4 Makefile.in
@@ -612,7 +612,7 @@ install-info: info
[ -f dir ] || \
(cd $${thisdir}; \
${INSTALL_DATA} ${srcdir}/info/dir $(DESTDIR)${infodir}/dir) ; \
- info_misc=`cd $${thisdir}/doc/misc; ${MAKE} echo-info | sed '/ing directory/d'`; \
+ info_misc=`cd $${thisdir}/doc/misc; ${MAKE} -s echo-info`; \
cd ${srcdir}/info ; \
for elt in ${INFO_NONMISC} $${info_misc}; do \
test "$(HAVE_MAKEINFO)" = "no" && test ! -f $$elt && continue; \
@@ -694,7 +694,7 @@ uninstall:
done
-rm -rf $(DESTDIR)${libexecdir}/emacs/${version}
thisdir=`/bin/pwd`; \
- (info_misc=`cd doc/misc; ${MAKE} echo-info | sed '/ing directory/d'`; \
+ (info_misc=`cd doc/misc; ${MAKE} -s echo-info`; \
if cd $(DESTDIR)${infodir}; then \
for elt in ${INFO_NONMISC} $${info_misc}; do \
(cd $${thisdir}; \
View
1  README
@@ -1,5 +1,6 @@
0. current
+ + update 12/19/2012: Emacs 24.2.91 with emacs-24.2.91-mac-3.91
+ update 11/25/2012: Emacs 24.2.90 with emacs-24.2.90-mac-3.90
+ high resolution toolbar icons
+ toolbar-on patch
View
2  README-emacs
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@ Copyright (C) 2001-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
See the end of the file for license conditions.
-This directory tree holds version 24.2.90 of GNU Emacs, the extensible,
+This directory tree holds version 24.2.91 of GNU Emacs, the extensible,
customizable, self-documenting real-time display editor.
The file INSTALL in this directory says how to build and install GNU
View
2  build-emacs.app.sh
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ app_dir=$installprefix/Emacs.app/Contents/Resources
# this may not works since emacs 24*
# version=`grep 'defconst[ ]*emacs-version' ./lisp/version.el \
# | sed -e 's/^[^"]*"\([^"]*\)".*$/\1/'`
-version=24.2.90
+version=24.2.91
compver=x86_64-apple-darwin`uname -r`
# make an emacs bundle
View
22 configure
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
#! /bin/sh
# Guess values for system-dependent variables and create Makefiles.
-# Generated by GNU Autoconf 2.69 for emacs 24.2.90.
+# Generated by GNU Autoconf 2.69 for emacs 24.2.91.
#
#
# Copyright (C) 1992-1996, 1998-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@@ -577,8 +577,8 @@ MAKEFLAGS=
# Identity of this package.
PACKAGE_NAME='emacs'
PACKAGE_TARNAME='emacs'
-PACKAGE_VERSION='24.2.90'
-PACKAGE_STRING='emacs 24.2.90'
+PACKAGE_VERSION='24.2.91'
+PACKAGE_STRING='emacs 24.2.91'
PACKAGE_BUGREPORT=''
PACKAGE_URL=''
@@ -1974,7 +1974,7 @@ if test "$ac_init_help" = "long"; then
# Omit some internal or obsolete options to make the list less imposing.
# This message is too long to be a string in the A/UX 3.1 sh.
cat <<_ACEOF
-\`configure' configures emacs 24.2.90 to adapt to many kinds of systems.
+\`configure' configures emacs 24.2.91 to adapt to many kinds of systems.
Usage: $0 [OPTION]... [VAR=VALUE]...
@@ -2048,7 +2048,7 @@ fi
if test -n "$ac_init_help"; then
case $ac_init_help in
- short | recursive ) echo "Configuration of emacs 24.2.90:";;
+ short | recursive ) echo "Configuration of emacs 24.2.91:";;
esac
cat <<\_ACEOF
@@ -2222,7 +2222,7 @@ fi
test -n "$ac_init_help" && exit $ac_status
if $ac_init_version; then
cat <<\_ACEOF
-emacs configure 24.2.90
+emacs configure 24.2.91
generated by GNU Autoconf 2.69
Copyright (C) 2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@@ -2956,7 +2956,7 @@ cat >config.log <<_ACEOF
This file contains any messages produced by compilers while
running configure, to aid debugging if configure makes a mistake.
-It was created by emacs $as_me 24.2.90, which was
+It was created by emacs $as_me 24.2.91, which was
generated by GNU Autoconf 2.69. Invocation command line was
$ $0 $@
@@ -3833,7 +3833,7 @@ fi
# Define the identity of the package.
PACKAGE='emacs'
- VERSION='24.2.90'
+ VERSION='24.2.91'
cat >>confdefs.h <<_ACEOF
@@ -8188,7 +8188,7 @@ if test "$MAKEINFO" = "no"; then
MAKEINFO=makeinfo
if test "x${with_makeinfo}" = "xno"; then
HAVE_MAKEINFO=no
- elif test ! -e $srcdir/info/emacs; then
+ elif test ! -e $srcdir/info/emacs && test ! -e $srcdir/info/emacs.info; then
as_fn_error $? "You do not seem to have makeinfo >= 4.7, and your
source tree does not seem to have pre-built manuals in the \`info' directory.
Either install a suitable version of makeinfo, or re-run configure
@@ -25684,7 +25684,7 @@ cat >>$CONFIG_STATUS <<\_ACEOF || ac_write_fail=1
# report actual input values of CONFIG_FILES etc. instead of their
# values after options handling.
ac_log="
-This file was extended by emacs $as_me 24.2.90, which was
+This file was extended by emacs $as_me 24.2.91, which was
generated by GNU Autoconf 2.69. Invocation command line was
CONFIG_FILES = $CONFIG_FILES
@@ -25750,7 +25750,7 @@ _ACEOF
cat >>$CONFIG_STATUS <<_ACEOF || ac_write_fail=1
ac_cs_config="`$as_echo "$ac_configure_args" | sed 's/^ //; s/[\\""\`\$]/\\\\&/g'`"
ac_cs_version="\\
-emacs config.status 24.2.90
+emacs config.status 24.2.91
configured by $0, generated by GNU Autoconf 2.69,
with options \\"\$ac_cs_config\\"
View
4 configure.ac
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ dnl You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
dnl along with GNU Emacs. If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
AC_PREREQ(2.65)
-AC_INIT(emacs, 24.2.90)
+AC_INIT(emacs, 24.2.91)
AC_CONFIG_HEADER(src/config.h:src/config.in)
AC_CONFIG_SRCDIR(src/lisp.h)
AC_CONFIG_AUX_DIR(build-aux)
@@ -821,7 +821,7 @@ if test "$MAKEINFO" = "no"; then
MAKEINFO=makeinfo
if test "x${with_makeinfo}" = "xno"; then
HAVE_MAKEINFO=no
- elif test ! -e $srcdir/info/emacs; then
+ elif test ! -e $srcdir/info/emacs && test ! -e $srcdir/info/emacs.info; then
AC_MSG_ERROR( [You do not seem to have makeinfo >= 4.7, and your
source tree does not seem to have pre-built manuals in the `info' directory.
Either install a suitable version of makeinfo, or re-run configure
View
13 doc/emacs/ChangeLog
@@ -1,3 +1,16 @@
+2012-12-08 Dani Moncayo <dmoncayo@gmail.com>
+
+ * killing.texi (Deletion): Doc fix (Bug#12748).
+
+2012-12-03 Juanma Barranquero <lekktu@gmail.com>
+
+ * vc1-xtra.texi (General VC Options): Remove obsolete reference
+ to `vc-path'.
+
+2012-12-02 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
+
+ * custom.texi (Init Rebinding): kbd is now a function (Bug#13052).
+
2012-11-18 Dani Moncayo <dmoncayo@gmail.com>
* display.texi (Auto Scrolling): Fix some inaccuracies, plus
View
2  doc/emacs/abbrevs.texi
@@ -141,7 +141,7 @@ abbrev definitions, both global and local.
When Abbrev mode is enabled, an abbrev expands whenever it is
present in the buffer just before point and you type a self-inserting
-whitespace or punctuation character (@key{SPC}, comma, etc.@:). More
+whitespace or punctuation character (@key{SPC}, comma, etc.). More
precisely, any character that is not a word constituent expands an
abbrev, and any word-constituent character can be part of an abbrev.
The most common way to use an abbrev is to insert it and then insert a
View
90 doc/emacs/ack.texi
@@ -44,7 +44,7 @@ Tomas Abrahamsson wrote @file{artist.el}, a package for producing
@acronym{ASCII} art with a mouse or with keyboard keys.
@item
-Jay K.@: Adams wrote @file{jka-compr.el} and @file{jka-cmpr-hook.el},
+Jay K. Adams wrote @file{jka-compr.el} and @file{jka-cmpr-hook.el},
providing automatic decompression and recompression for compressed
files.
@@ -96,13 +96,13 @@ Eli Barzilay wrote @file{calculator.el}, a desktop calculator for
Emacs.
@item
-Steven L.@: Baur wrote @file{footnote.el} which lets you include
+Steven L. Baur wrote @file{footnote.el} which lets you include
footnotes in email messages; and @file{gnus-audio.el} and
@file{earcon.el}, which provide sound effects for Gnus. He also wrote
@file{gnus-setup.el}.
@item
-Alexander L.@: Belikoff, Sergey Berezin, Sacha Chua, David Edmondson,
+Alexander L. Belikoff, Sergey Berezin, Sacha Chua, David Edmondson,
Noah Friedman, Andreas Fuchs, Mario Lang, Ben Mesander, Lawrence
Mitchell, Gergely Nagy, Michael Olson, Per Persson, Jorgen Schaefer,
Alex Schroeder, and Tom Tromey wrote ERC, an advanced Internet Relay
@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ Christian Limpach and Adrian Robert developed and maintained the
NeXTstep port of Emacs.
@item
-Anna M.@: Bigatti wrote @file{cal-html.el}, which produces HTML calendars.
+Anna M. Bigatti wrote @file{cal-html.el}, which produces HTML calendars.
@item
Ray Blaak and Simon South wrote @file{delphi.el}, a mode for editing
@@ -130,14 +130,14 @@ Jim Blandy wrote Emacs 19's input system, brought its configuration and
build process up to the GNU coding standards, and contributed to the
frame support and multi-face support. Jim also wrote @file{tvi970.el},
terminal support for the TeleVideo 970 terminals; and co-wrote
-@file{wyse50.el} (q.v.@:).
+@file{wyse50.el} (q.v.).
@item
Per Bothner wrote @file{term.el}, a terminal emulator in an Emacs
buffer.
@item
-Terrence M.@: Brannon wrote @file{landmark.el}, a neural-network robot
+Terrence M. Brannon wrote @file{landmark.el}, a neural-network robot
that learns landmarks.
@item
@@ -162,7 +162,7 @@ Kevin Broadey wrote @file{foldout.el}, providing folding extensions to
Emacs's outline modes.
@item
-David M.@: Brown wrote @file{array.el}, for editing arrays and other
+David M. Brown wrote @file{array.el}, for editing arrays and other
tabular data.
@item
@@ -184,7 +184,7 @@ Emacs Lisp functions; and @file{trace.el}, a tracing facility for Emacs
Lisp.
@item
-Chris Chase, Carsten Dominik, and J.@: D.@: Smith wrote IDLWAVE mode,
+Chris Chase, Carsten Dominik, and J. D. Smith wrote IDLWAVE mode,
for editing IDL and WAVE CL.
@item
@@ -266,10 +266,10 @@ He also wrote @file{dynamic-setting.el}.
@item
Carsten Dominik wrote Ref@TeX{}, a package for setting up labels and
cross-references in @LaTeX{} documents; and co-wrote IDLWAVE mode
-(q.v.@:). He was the original author of Org mode, for maintaining notes,
+(q.v.). He was the original author of Org mode, for maintaining notes,
todo lists, and project planning. Bastien Guerry subsequently took
over maintainership. Benjamin Andresen, Thomas Baumann, Joel Boehland, Jan B�cker, Lennart
-Borgman, Baoqiu Cui, Dan Davison, Christian Egli, Eric S.@: Fraga, Daniel German, Chris Gray, Konrad Hinsen, Tassilo Horn, Philip
+Borgman, Baoqiu Cui, Dan Davison, Christian Egli, Eric S. Fraga, Daniel German, Chris Gray, Konrad Hinsen, Tassilo Horn, Philip
Jackson, Martyn Jago, Thorsten Jolitz, Jambunathan K, Tokuya Kameshima, Sergey Litvinov, David Maus, Ross Patterson, Juan Pechiar, Sebastian Rose, Eric Schulte,
Paul Sexton, Ulf Stegemann, Andy Stewart, Christopher Suckling, David O'Toole, John Wiegley, Zhang Weize,
Piotr Zielinski, and others also wrote various Org mode components.
@@ -429,7 +429,7 @@ characters used by @TeX{} and net tradition.
@item
Bastien Guerry wrote @file{gnus-bookmark.el}, bookmark support for Gnus;
-as well as helping to maintain Org mode (q.v.@:).
+as well as helping to maintain Org mode (q.v.).
@item
Henry Guillaume wrote @file{find-file.el}, a package to visit files
@@ -456,7 +456,7 @@ Jesper Harder wrote @file{yenc.el}, for decoding yenc encoded messages.
Alexandru Harsanyi wrote a library for accessing SOAP web services.
@item
-K.@: Shane Hartman wrote @file{chistory.el} and @file{echistory.el},
+K. Shane Hartman wrote @file{chistory.el} and @file{echistory.el},
packages for browsing command history lists; @file{electric.el} and
@file{helper.el}, which provide an alternative command loop and
appropriate help facilities; @file{emacsbug.el}, a package for
@@ -617,7 +617,7 @@ Pavel Kobyakov wrote @file{flymake.el}, a minor mode for performing
on-the-fly syntax checking.
@item
-David M.@: Koppelman wrote @file{hi-lock.el}, a minor mode for
+David M. Koppelman wrote @file{hi-lock.el}, a minor mode for
interactive automatic highlighting of parts of the buffer text.
@item
@@ -630,7 +630,7 @@ menu support.
@item
Sebastian Kremer wrote @code{dired-mode}, with contributions by Lawrence
-R.@: Dodd. He also wrote @file{ls-lisp.el}, a Lisp emulation of the
+R. Dodd. He also wrote @file{ls-lisp.el}, a Lisp emulation of the
@code{ls} command for platforms that don't have @code{ls} as a standard
program.
@@ -647,7 +647,7 @@ Daniel LaLiberte wrote @file{edebug.el}, a source-level debugger for
Emacs Lisp; @file{cl-specs.el}, specifications to help @code{edebug}
debug code written using David Gillespie's Common Lisp support; and
@file{isearch.el}, Emacs's incremental search minor mode. He also
-co-wrote @file{hideif.el} (q.v.@:).
+co-wrote @file{hideif.el} (q.v.).
@item
Karl Landstrom and Daniel Colascione wrote @file{js.el}, a mode for
@@ -673,7 +673,7 @@ Emacs Lisp programs.
@item
Lars Lindberg wrote @file{msb.el}, which provides more flexible menus
-for buffer selection; co-wrote @file{imenu.el} (q.v.@:); and rewrote
+for buffer selection; co-wrote @file{imenu.el} (q.v.); and rewrote
@file{dabbrev.el}, originally written by Don Morrison.
@item
@@ -752,11 +752,11 @@ maintained CC Mode from Emacs 22 onwards.
Michael McNamara and Wilson Snyder wrote Verilog mode.
@item
-Christopher J.@: Madsen wrote @file{decipher.el}, a package for cracking
+Christopher J. Madsen wrote @file{decipher.el}, a package for cracking
simple substitution ciphers.
@item
-Neil M.@: Mager wrote @file{appt.el}, functions to notify users of their
+Neil M. Mager wrote @file{appt.el}, functions to notify users of their
appointments. It finds appointments recorded in the diary files
used by the @code{calendar} package.
@@ -859,7 +859,7 @@ Erik Naggum wrote the time-conversion functions. He also wrote
@file{parse-time.el}, for parsing time strings.
@item
-Takahashi Naoto co-wrote @file{quail.el} (q.v.@:), and wrote
+Takahashi Naoto co-wrote @file{quail.el} (q.v.), and wrote
@file{robin.el}, another input method.
@item
@@ -908,7 +908,7 @@ Takaaki Ota wrote @file{table.el}, a package for creating and editing
embedded text-based tables.
@item
-Pieter E.@: J.@: Pareit wrote @file{mixal-mode.el}, an editing mode for
+Pieter E. J. Pareit wrote @file{mixal-mode.el}, an editing mode for
the MIX assembly language.
@item
@@ -924,7 +924,7 @@ Damon Anton Permezel wrote @file{hanoi.el}, an animated demonstration of
the ``Towers of Hanoi'' puzzle.
@item
-William M.@: Perry wrote @file{mailcap.el} (with Lars Magne
+William M. Perry wrote @file{mailcap.el} (with Lars Magne
Ingebrigtsen), a MIME media types configuration facility;
@file{mwheel.el}, a package for supporting mouse wheels; co-wrote (with
Dave Love) @file{socks.el}, a Socks v5 client; and developed the URL
@@ -953,7 +953,7 @@ support for Wyse 50 terminals. He also co-wrote @file{compile.el}
(q.v.@:) and @file{ada-stmt.el}.
@item
-Richard L.@: Pieri wrote @file{pop3.el}, a Post Office Protocol (RFC
+Richard L. Pieri wrote @file{pop3.el}, a Post Office Protocol (RFC
1460) interface for Emacs.
@item
@@ -976,12 +976,12 @@ minor mode for displaying a ruler in the header line; and
structures.
@item
-Francesco A.@: Potorti wrote @file{cmacexp.el}, providing a command which
+Francesco A. Potorti wrote @file{cmacexp.el}, providing a command which
runs the C preprocessor on a region of a file and displays the results.
He also expanded and redesigned the @code{etags} program.
@item
-Michael D.@: Prange and Steven A.@: Wood wrote @file{fortran.el}, a mode
+Michael D. Prange and Steven A. Wood wrote @file{fortran.el}, a mode
for editing Fortran code.
@item
@@ -989,7 +989,7 @@ Ashwin Ram wrote @file{refer.el}, commands to look up references in
bibliography files by keyword.
@item
-Eric S.@: Raymond wrote @file{vc.el}, an interface to the RCS and SCCS
+Eric S. Raymond wrote @file{vc.el}, an interface to the RCS and SCCS
source code version control systems, with Paul Eggert; @file{gud.el},
a package for running source-level debuggers like GDB and SDB in
Emacs; @file{asm-mode.el}, a mode for editing assembly language code;
@@ -1005,14 +1005,14 @@ used in Emacs Lisp library files; and code to set and make use of the
which each lisp function loaded into Emacs came.
@item
-Edward M.@: Reingold wrote the calendar and diary support,
+Edward M. Reingold wrote the calendar and diary support,
with contributions from Stewart Clamen (@file{cal-mayan.el}), Nachum
Dershowitz (@file{cal-hebrew.el}), Paul Eggert (@file{cal-dst.el}),
Steve Fisk (@file{cal-tex.el}), Michael Kifer (@file{cal-x.el}), Lara
-Rios (@file{cal-menu.el}), and Denis B.@: Roegel (@file{solar.el}).
+Rios (@file{cal-menu.el}), and Denis B. Roegel (@file{solar.el}).
Andy Oram contributed to its documentation. Reingold also contributed
to @file{tex-mode.el}, a mode for editing @TeX{} files, as did William
-F.@: Schelter, Dick King, Stephen Gildea, Michael Prange, and Jacob
+F. Schelter, Dick King, Stephen Gildea, Michael Prange, and Jacob
Gore.
@item
@@ -1031,7 +1031,7 @@ VT line of terminals.
@item
Nick Roberts wrote @file{t-mouse.el}, for mouse support in text
-terminals; and @file{gdb-ui.el}, a graphical user interface to GDB.
+terminals; and @file{gdb-ui.el}, a graphical user interface to GDB@.
Together with Dmitry Dzhus, he wrote @file{gdb-mi.el}, the successor to
@file{gdb-ui.el}.
@@ -1043,7 +1043,7 @@ into ``handwriting''.
Markus Rost wrote @file{cus-test.el}, a testing framework for customize.
@item
-Guillermo J.@: Rozas wrote @file{scheme.el}, a mode for editing Scheme and
+Guillermo J. Rozas wrote @file{scheme.el}, a mode for editing Scheme and
DSSSL code.
@item
@@ -1067,7 +1067,7 @@ Kevin Ryde wrote @file{info-xref.el}, a library for checking
references in Info files.
@item
-James B.@: Salem and Brewster Kahle wrote @file{completion.el}, providing
+James B. Salem and Brewster Kahle wrote @file{completion.el}, providing
dynamic word completion.
@item
@@ -1091,7 +1091,7 @@ Michael Schmidt and Tom Perrine wrote @file{modula2.el}, a mode for
editing Modula-2 code, based on work by Mick Jordan and Peter Robinson.
@item
-Ronald S.@: Schnell wrote @file{dunnet.el}, a text adventure game.
+Ronald S. Schnell wrote @file{dunnet.el}, a text adventure game.
@item
Philippe Schnoebelen wrote @file{gomoku.el}, a Go Moku game played
@@ -1111,7 +1111,7 @@ for interactively running an SQL interpreter in an Emacs buffer;
@file{cus-theme.el}, an interface for custom themes; @file{master.el}, a
package for making a buffer @samp{master} over another; and
@file{spam-stat.el}, for statistical detection of junk email. He also
-wrote parts of the IRC client ERC (q.v.@:).
+wrote parts of the IRC client ERC (q.v.).
@item
Randal Schwartz wrote @file{pp.el}, a pretty-printer for lisp objects.
@@ -1162,7 +1162,7 @@ David Smith wrote @file{ielm.el}, a mode for interacting with the Emacs
Lisp interpreter as a subprocess.
@item
-Paul D.@: Smith wrote @file{snmp-mode.el}.
+Paul D. Smith wrote @file{snmp-mode.el}.
@item
William Sommerfeld wrote @file{scribe.el}, a mode for editing Scribe
@@ -1204,7 +1204,7 @@ cursor'' that you can move with the keyboard and use for copying text.
Ken Stevens wrote @file{ispell.el}, a spell-checker interface.
@item
-Kim F.@: Storm made many improvements to the Emacs display engine,
+Kim F. Storm made many improvements to the Emacs display engine,
process support, and networking support. He also wrote
@file{bindat.el}, a package for encoding and decoding binary data;
CUA mode, which allows Emacs to emulate the standard CUA key
@@ -1278,12 +1278,12 @@ for Gnus; and @file{timezone.el}, providing functions for dealing with
time zones.
@item
-Neil W.@: Van Dyke wrote @file{webjump.el}, a ``hot links'' package.
+Neil W. Van Dyke wrote @file{webjump.el}, a ``hot links'' package.
@item
Didier Verna wrote @file{rect.el}, a package of functions for
operations on rectangle regions of text. He also contributed to Gnus
-(q.v.@:).
+(q.v.).
@item
Joakim Verona implemented ImageMagick support.
@@ -1332,7 +1332,7 @@ the shift key and motion commands; and @file{dos-fns.el}, functions
for use under MS-DOS.
@item
-Joe Wells wrote the original version of @file{apropos.el} (q.v.@:);
+Joe Wells wrote the original version of @file{apropos.el} (q.v.);
@file{resume.el}, support for processing command-line arguments after
resuming a suspended Emacs job; and @file{mail-extr.el}, a package for
extracting names and addresses from mail headers, with contributions
@@ -1351,7 +1351,7 @@ time spent on projects; the Bah
@file{remember.el}, a mode for jotting down things to remember;
@file{eudcb-mab.el}, an address book backend for the Emacs Unified
Directory Client; and @code{eshell}, a command shell implemented
-entirely in Emacs Lisp. He also contributed to Org mode (q.v.@:).
+entirely in Emacs Lisp. He also contributed to Org mode (q.v.).
@item
Mike Williams wrote @file{thingatpt.el}, a library of functions for
@@ -1362,16 +1362,16 @@ Roland Winkler wrote @file{proced.el}, a system process editor.
@item
Bill Wohler wrote MH-E, the Emacs interface to the MH mail system;
-making use of earlier work by James R.@: Larus. Satyaki Das, Peter S.@:
-Galbraith, Stephen Gildea, and Jeffrey C.@: Honig also wrote various
+making use of earlier work by James R. Larus. Satyaki Das, Peter S.
+Galbraith, Stephen Gildea, and Jeffrey C. Honig also wrote various
MH-E components.
@item
-Dale R.@: Worley wrote @file{emerge.el}, a package for interactively
+Dale R. Worley wrote @file{emerge.el}, a package for interactively
merging two versions of a file.
@item
-Francis J.@: Wright wrote @file{woman.el}, a package for browsing
+Francis J. Wright wrote @file{woman.el}, a package for browsing
manual pages without the @code{man} command.
@item
@@ -1429,13 +1429,13 @@ messages; @file{rfc1843.el}, an HZ decoding package;
other Gnus components.
@item
-Ian T.@: Zimmerman wrote @file{gametree.el}.
+Ian T. Zimmerman wrote @file{gametree.el}.
@item
Reto Zimmermann wrote @file{vera-mode.el}.
@item
-Neal Ziring and Felix S.@: T.@: Wu wrote @file{vi.el}, an emulation of the
+Neal Ziring and Felix S. T. Wu wrote @file{vi.el}, an emulation of the
VI text editor.
@item
View
6 doc/emacs/arevert-xtra.texi
@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@ explained in the corresponding sections.
@menu
* Auto Reverting the Buffer Menu:: Auto Revert of the Buffer Menu.
* Auto Reverting Dired:: Auto Revert of Dired buffers.
-* Supporting additional buffers:: How to add more Auto Revert support.
+* Supporting additional buffers:: How to add more Auto Revert support.
@end menu
@node Auto Reverting the Buffer Menu
@@ -66,9 +66,9 @@ operating systems. It may not work satisfactorily on some other
systems.
Dired buffers only auto-revert when the file list of the buffer's main
-directory changes (e.g. when a new file is added). They do not
+directory changes (e.g., when a new file is added). They do not
auto-revert when information about a particular file changes
-(e.g. when the size changes) or when inserted subdirectories change.
+(e.g., when the size changes) or when inserted subdirectories change.
To be sure that @emph{all} listed information is up to date, you have
to manually revert using @kbd{g}, @emph{even} if auto-reverting is
enabled in the Dired buffer. Sometimes, you might get the impression
View
4 doc/emacs/basic.texi
@@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ just like digits. Case is ignored.
of a character, using the minibuffer. If you enter a name, the
command provides completion (@pxref{Completion}). If you enter a
code-point, it should be as a hexadecimal number (the convention for
-Unicode), or a number with a specified radix, e.g.@: @code{#o23072}
+Unicode), or a number with a specified radix, e.g., @code{#o23072}
(octal); @xref{Integer Basics,,, elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference
Manual}. The command then inserts the corresponding character into
the buffer. For example, both of the following insert the infinity
@@ -385,7 +385,7 @@ On some text terminals, Emacs may not recognize the @key{DEL} key
properly. @xref{DEL Does Not Delete}, if you encounter this problem.
The @key{delete} (@code{delete-forward-char}) command deletes in the
-``opposite direction'': it deletes the character after point, i.e. the
+``opposite direction'': it deletes the character after point, i.e., the
character under the cursor. If point was at the end of a line, this
joins the following line onto this one. Like @kbd{@key{DEL}}, it
deletes the text in the region if the region is active (@pxref{Mark}).
View
6 doc/emacs/buffers.texi
@@ -44,8 +44,8 @@ variables}---variables that can have a different value in each buffer.
by the largest buffer position representable by @dfn{Emacs integers}.
This is because Emacs tracks buffer positions using that data type.
For typical 64-bit machines, this maximum buffer size is @math{2^61 -
-2} bytes, or about 2 EiB. For typical 32-bit machines, the maximum is
-usually @math{2^29 - 2} bytes, or about 512 MiB. Buffer sizes are
+2} bytes, or about 2 EiB@. For typical 32-bit machines, the maximum is
+usually @math{2^29 - 2} bytes, or about 512 MiB@. Buffer sizes are
also limited by the amount of memory in the system.
@menu
@@ -614,7 +614,7 @@ names (all but one of them).
@vindex uniquify-buffer-name-style
Other methods work by adding parts of each file's directory to the
-buffer name. To select one, load the library @file{uniquify} (e.g.
+buffer name. To select one, load the library @file{uniquify} (e.g.,
using @code{(require 'uniquify)}), and customize the variable
@code{uniquify-buffer-name-style} (@pxref{Easy Customization}).
View
12 doc/emacs/building.texi
@@ -261,7 +261,7 @@ or previous error message for a different source file.
@findex next-error-follow-minor-mode
You can type @kbd{C-c C-f} to toggle Next Error Follow mode. In
this minor mode, ordinary cursor motion in the compilation buffer
-automatically updates the source buffer, i.e.@: moving the cursor over
+automatically updates the source buffer, i.e., moving the cursor over
an error message causes the locus of that error to be displayed.
The features of Compilation mode are also available in a minor mode
@@ -324,7 +324,7 @@ nohup @var{command}; sleep 1
@ifnottex
On the MS-DOS ``operating system'', asynchronous subprocesses are
not supported, so @kbd{M-x compile} runs the compilation command
-synchronously (i.e.@: you must wait until the command finishes before
+synchronously (i.e., you must wait until the command finishes before
you can do anything else in Emacs). @xref{MS-DOS}.
@end ifnottex
@@ -589,7 +589,7 @@ to recompile and restart the program.
@findex gud-tooltip-mode
@vindex gud-tooltip-echo-area
GUD Tooltip mode is a global minor mode that adds tooltip support to
-GUD. To toggle this mode, type @kbd{M-x gud-tooltip-mode}. It is
+GUD@. To toggle this mode, type @kbd{M-x gud-tooltip-mode}. It is
disabled by default. If enabled, you can move the mouse cursor over a
variable, a function, or a macro (collectively called
@dfn{identifiers}) to show their values in tooltips
@@ -625,7 +625,7 @@ Set a breakpoint on the source line that point is on.
@kbd{C-x @key{SPC}} (@code{gud-break}), when called in a source
buffer, sets a debugger breakpoint on the current source line. This
-command is available only after starting GUD. If you call it in a
+command is available only after starting GUD@. If you call it in a
buffer that is not associated with any debugger subprocess, it signals
a error.
@@ -756,7 +756,7 @@ This key is available only in the GUD interaction buffer.
that makes sense.
Because @key{TAB} serves as a completion command, you can't use it to
-enter a tab as input to the program you are debugging with GDB.
+enter a tab as input to the program you are debugging with GDB@.
Instead, type @kbd{C-q @key{TAB}} to enter a tab.
@node GUD Customization
@@ -774,7 +774,7 @@ Instead, type @kbd{C-q @key{TAB}} to enter a tab.
you are using DBX; @code{sdb-mode-hook}, if you are using SDB;
@code{xdb-mode-hook}, if you are using XDB; @code{perldb-mode-hook},
for Perl debugging mode; @code{pdb-mode-hook}, for PDB;
-@code{jdb-mode-hook}, for JDB. @xref{Hooks}.
+@code{jdb-mode-hook}, for JDB@. @xref{Hooks}.
The @code{gud-def} Lisp macro (@pxref{Defining Macros,,, elisp, the
Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}) provides a convenient way to define an
View
4 doc/emacs/cal-xtra.texi
@@ -103,7 +103,7 @@ knows about. These are: @code{holiday-general-holidays},
@code{holiday-bahai-holidays}, @code{holiday-christian-holidays},
@code{holiday-hebrew-holidays}, @code{holiday-islamic-holidays},
@code{holiday-oriental-holidays}, and @code{holiday-other-holidays}.
-The names should be self-explanatory; e.g.@: @code{holiday-solar-holidays}
+The names should be self-explanatory; e.g., @code{holiday-solar-holidays}
lists sun- and moon-related holidays.
You can customize these lists of holidays to your own needs, deleting or
@@ -628,7 +628,7 @@ of the diary entries, or add items.
variables @code{diary-comment-start} and @code{diary-comment-end} to
strings that delimit comments. The fancy display does not print
comments. You might want to put meta-data for the use of other packages
-(e.g.@: the appointment package,
+(e.g., the appointment package,
@iftex
@pxref{Appointments,,,emacs, the Emacs Manual})
@end iftex
View
2  doc/emacs/calendar.texi
@@ -1551,7 +1551,7 @@ diary file and iCalendar files, which are defined in ``RFC
2445---Internet Calendaring and Scheduling Core Object Specification
(iCalendar)'' (as well as the earlier vCalendar format).
-@c Importing works for ``ordinary'' (i.e. non-recurring) events, but
+@c Importing works for ``ordinary'' (i.e., non-recurring) events, but
@c (at present) may not work correctly (if at all) for recurring events.
@c Exporting of diary files into iCalendar files should work correctly
@c for most diary entries. This feature is a work in progress, so the
View
8 doc/emacs/cmdargs.texi
@@ -576,7 +576,7 @@ Emacs tries @env{TEMP}, then @env{TMPDIR}, then @env{TMP}, and finally
This specifies the current time zone and possibly also daylight
saving time information. On MS-DOS, if @env{TZ} is not set in the
environment when Emacs starts, Emacs defines a default value as
-appropriate for the country code returned by DOS. On MS-Windows, Emacs
+appropriate for the country code returned by DOS@. On MS-Windows, Emacs
does not use @env{TZ} at all.
@item USER
The user's login name. See also @env{LOGNAME}. On MS-DOS, this
@@ -747,7 +747,7 @@ Use @var{font} as the default font.
When passing a font name to Emacs on the command line, you may need to
``quote'' it, by enclosing it in quotation marks, if it contains
-characters that the shell treats specially (e.g.@: spaces). For
+characters that the shell treats specially (e.g., spaces). For
example:
@smallexample
@@ -839,7 +839,7 @@ otherwise use an appropriate standard mode for @var{num} colors.
Depending on your terminal's capabilities, Emacs might be able to turn
on a color mode for 8, 16, 88, or 256 as the value of @var{num}. If
there is no mode that supports @var{num} colors, Emacs acts as if
-@var{num} were 0, i.e.@: it uses the terminal's default color support
+@var{num} were 0, i.e., it uses the terminal's default color support
mode.
@end table
If @var{mode} is omitted, it defaults to @var{ansi8}.
@@ -1070,7 +1070,7 @@ it.
By default, Emacs uses an icon containing the Emacs logo. On
desktop environments such as Gnome, this icon is also displayed in
-other contexts, e.g.@: when switching into an Emacs frame. The
+other contexts, e.g., when switching into an Emacs frame. The
@samp{-nbi} or @samp{--no-bitmap-icon} option tells Emacs to let the
window manager choose what sort of icon to use---usually just a small
rectangle containing the frame's title.
View
2  doc/emacs/commands.texi
@@ -53,7 +53,7 @@ holding down the @key{Ctrl} key while pressing @kbd{a}; we will refer
to this as @kbd{C-a} for short. Similarly @kbd{Meta-a}, or @kbd{M-a}
for short, is entered by holding down the @key{Alt} key and pressing
@kbd{a}. Modifier keys can also be applied to non-alphanumerical
-characters, e.g. @kbd{C-@key{F1}} or @kbd{M-@key{left}}.
+characters, e.g., @kbd{C-@key{F1}} or @kbd{M-@key{left}}.
@cindex @key{ESC} replacing @key{Meta} key
You can also type Meta characters using two-character sequences
View
20 doc/emacs/custom.texi
@@ -610,10 +610,10 @@ always considered safe.
@vindex custom-enabled-themes
Setting or saving Custom themes actually works by customizing the
variable @code{custom-enabled-themes}. The value of this variable is
-a list of Custom theme names (as Lisp symbols, e.g.@: @code{tango}).
+a list of Custom theme names (as Lisp symbols, e.g., @code{tango}).
Instead of using the @file{*Custom Themes*} buffer to set
@code{custom-enabled-themes}, you can customize the variable using the
-usual customization interface, e.g.@: with @kbd{M-x customize-option}.
+usual customization interface, e.g., with @kbd{M-x customize-option}.
Note that Custom themes are not allowed to set
@code{custom-enabled-themes} themselves.
@@ -1648,7 +1648,7 @@ you can specify them in your initialization file by writing Lisp code.
@findex kbd
There are several ways to write a key binding using Lisp. The
-simplest is to use the @code{kbd} macro, which converts a textual
+simplest is to use the @code{kbd} function, which converts a textual
representation of a key sequence---similar to how we have written key
sequences in this manual---into a form that can be passed as an
argument to @code{global-set-key}. For example, here's how to bind
@@ -1676,11 +1676,11 @@ and mouse events:
(global-set-key (kbd "<mouse-2>") 'mouse-save-then-kill)
@end example
- Instead of using the @code{kbd} macro, you can use a Lisp string or
-vector to specify the key sequence. Using a string is simpler, but
-only works for @acronym{ASCII} characters and Meta-modified
-@acronym{ASCII} characters. For example, here's how to bind @kbd{C-x
-M-l} to @code{make-symbolic-link} (@pxref{Misc File Ops}):
+ Instead of using @code{kbd}, you can use a Lisp string or vector to
+specify the key sequence. Using a string is simpler, but only works
+for @acronym{ASCII} characters and Meta-modified @acronym{ASCII}
+characters. For example, here's how to bind @kbd{C-x M-l} to
+@code{make-symbolic-link} (@pxref{Misc File Ops}):
@example
(global-set-key "\C-x\M-l" 'make-symbolic-link)
@@ -2329,7 +2329,7 @@ Here a full file name is used, so no searching is done.
@cindex loading Lisp libraries automatically
@cindex autoload Lisp libraries
Tell Emacs to find the definition for the function @code{myfunction}
-by loading a Lisp library named @file{mypackage} (i.e.@: a file
+by loading a Lisp library named @file{mypackage} (i.e., a file
@file{mypackage.elc} or @file{mypackage.el}):
@example
@@ -2496,7 +2496,7 @@ editor customizations even if you are running as the super user.
More precisely, Emacs first determines which user's init file to use.
It gets your user name from the environment variables @env{LOGNAME} and
-@env{USER}; if neither of those exists, it uses effective user-ID.
+@env{USER}; if neither of those exists, it uses effective user-ID@.
If that user name matches the real user-ID, then Emacs uses @env{HOME};
otherwise, it looks up the home directory corresponding to that user
name in the system's data base of users.
View
2  doc/emacs/dired.texi
@@ -968,7 +968,7 @@ is the second argument. The output of the @command{diff} program is
shown in a buffer using Diff mode (@pxref{Comparing Files}).
If the region is active, the default for the file read using the
-minibuffer is the file at the mark (i.e.@: the ordinary Emacs mark,
+minibuffer is the file at the mark (i.e., the ordinary Emacs mark,
not a Dired mark; @pxref{Setting Mark}). Otherwise, if the file at
point has a backup file (@pxref{Backup}), that is the default.
View
10 doc/emacs/display.texi
@@ -249,14 +249,14 @@ variables @code{scroll-up-aggressively} and
position of point after scrolling. The value of
@code{scroll-up-aggressively} should be either @code{nil} (the
default), or a floating point number @var{f} between 0 and 1. The
-latter means that when point goes below the bottom window edge (i.e.@:
+latter means that when point goes below the bottom window edge (i.e.,
scrolling forward), Emacs scrolls the window so that point is @var{f}
parts of the window height from the bottom window edge. Thus, larger
@var{f} means more aggressive scrolling: more new text is brought into
view. The default value, @code{nil}, is equivalent to 0.5.
Likewise, @code{scroll-down-aggressively} is used when point goes
-above the bottom window edge (i.e.@: scrolling backward). The value
+above the bottom window edge (i.e., scrolling backward). The value
specifies how far point should be from the top margin of the window
after scrolling. Thus, as with @code{scroll-up-aggressively}, a
larger value is more aggressive.
@@ -1089,7 +1089,7 @@ buffer text, so blank lines at the end of the buffer stand out because
they lack this image. To enable this feature, set the buffer-local
variable @code{indicate-empty-lines} to a non-@code{nil} value. You
can enable or disable this feature for all new buffers by setting the
-default value of this variable, e.g.@: @code{(setq-default
+default value of this variable, e.g., @code{(setq-default
indicate-empty-lines t)}.
@cindex Whitespace mode
@@ -1258,7 +1258,7 @@ line looks like this:
Here @var{hh} and @var{mm} are the hour and minute, followed always by
@samp{am} or @samp{pm}. @var{l.ll} is the average number, collected
for the last few minutes, of processes in the whole system that were
-either running or ready to run (i.e.@: were waiting for an available
+either running or ready to run (i.e., were waiting for an available
processor). (Some fields may be missing if your operating system
cannot support them.) If you prefer time display in 24-hour format,
set the variable @code{display-time-24hr-format} to @code{t}.
@@ -1369,7 +1369,7 @@ as octal escape sequences instead of caret escape sequences.
Some non-@acronym{ASCII} characters have the same appearance as an
@acronym{ASCII} space or hyphen (minus) character. Such characters
can cause problems if they are entered into a buffer without your
-realization, e.g.@: by yanking; for instance, source code compilers
+realization, e.g., by yanking; for instance, source code compilers
typically do not treat non-@acronym{ASCII} spaces as whitespace
characters. To deal with this problem, Emacs displays such characters
specially: it displays @code{U+00A0} (no-break space) with the
View
72 doc/emacs/emacs.texi
@@ -1324,13 +1324,13 @@ when you get it, not just free for the manufacturer.
If you find GNU Emacs useful, please @strong{send a donation} to the
Free Software Foundation to support our work. Donations to the Free
-Software Foundation are tax deductible in the US. If you use GNU Emacs
+Software Foundation are tax deductible in the US@. If you use GNU Emacs
at your workplace, please suggest that the company make a donation.
For more information on how you can help, see
@url{http://www.gnu.org/help/help.html}.
We also sell hardcopy versions of this manual and @cite{An
-Introduction to Programming in Emacs Lisp}, by Robert J.@: Chassell.
+Introduction to Programming in Emacs Lisp}, by Robert J. Chassell.
You can visit our online store at @url{http://shop.fsf.org/}.
The income from sales goes to support the foundation's purpose: the
development of new free software, and improvements to our existing
@@ -1351,15 +1351,15 @@ USA
@unnumberedsec Acknowledgments
Contributors to GNU Emacs include Jari Aalto, Per Abrahamsen, Tomas
-Abrahamsson, Jay K.@: Adams, Alon Albert, Michael Albinus, Nagy
+Abrahamsson, Jay K. Adams, Alon Albert, Michael Albinus, Nagy
Andras, Benjamin Andresen, Ralf Angeli, Dmitry Antipov, Joe Arceneaux, Emil �str�m,
Miles Bader, David Bakhash, Juanma Barranquero, Eli Barzilay, Thomas
-Baumann, Steven L.@: Baur, Jay Belanger, Alexander L.@: Belikoff,
+Baumann, Steven L. Baur, Jay Belanger, Alexander L. Belikoff,
Thomas Bellman, Scott Bender, Boaz Ben-Zvi, Sergey Berezin, Karl
-Berry, Anna M.@: Bigatti, Ray Blaak, Martin Blais, Jim Blandy, Johan
+Berry, Anna M. Bigatti, Ray Blaak, Martin Blais, Jim Blandy, Johan
Bockg�rd, Jan B�cker, Joel Boehland, Lennart Borgman, Per Bothner,
Terrence Brannon, Frank Bresz, Peter Breton, Emmanuel Briot, Kevin
-Broadey, Vincent Broman, Michael Brouwer, David M.@: Brown, Stefan Bruda,
+Broadey, Vincent Broman, Michael Brouwer, David M. Brown, Stefan Bruda,
Georges Brun-Cottan, Joe Buehler, Scott Byer, W@l{}odek Bzyl,
Bill Carpenter, Per Cederqvist, Hans Chalupsky, Chris Chase, Bob
Chassell, Andrew Choi, Chong Yidong, Sacha Chua, Stewart Clamen, James
@@ -1368,44 +1368,44 @@ Edward O'Connor, Christoph Conrad, Ludovic Court
Toby Cubitt, Baoqiu Cui, Doug Cutting, Mathias Dahl, Julien Danjou, Satyaki
Das, Vivek Dasmohapatra, Dan Davison, Michael DeCorte, Gary Delp, Nachum
Dershowitz, Dave Detlefs, Matthieu Devin, Christophe de Dinechin, Eri
-Ding, Jan Dj�rv, Lawrence R.@: Dodd, Carsten Dominik, Scott Draves,
+Ding, Jan Dj�rv, Lawrence R. Dodd, Carsten Dominik, Scott Draves,
Benjamin Drieu, Viktor Dukhovni, Jacques Duthen, Dmitry Dzhus, John
Eaton, Rolf Ebert, Carl Edman, David Edmondson, Paul Eggert, Stephen
Eglen, Christian Egli, Torbj�rn Einarsson, Tsugutomo Enami, David
Engster, Hans Henrik Eriksen, Michael Ernst, Ata Etemadi, Frederick
Farnbach, Oscar Figueiredo, Fred Fish, Steve Fisk, Karl Fogel, Gary
-Foster, Eric S.@: Fraga, Romain Francoise, Noah Friedman, Andreas
-Fuchs, Shigeru Fukaya, Hallvard Furuseth, Keith Gabryelski, Peter S.@:
+Foster, Eric S. Fraga, Romain Francoise, Noah Friedman, Andreas
+Fuchs, Shigeru Fukaya, Hallvard Furuseth, Keith Gabryelski, Peter S.
Galbraith, Kevin Gallagher, Kevin Gallo, Juan Le�n Lahoz Garc�a,
Howard Gayle, Daniel German, Stephen Gildea, Julien Gilles, David
Gillespie, Bob Glickstein, Deepak Goel, David De La Harpe Golden, Boris
Goldowsky, David Goodger, Chris Gray, Kevin Greiner, Michelangelo Grigni, Odd
Gripenstam, Kai Gro�johann, Michael Gschwind, Bastien Guerry, Henry
Guillaume, Doug Gwyn, Bruno Haible, Ken'ichi Handa, Lars Hansen, Chris
-Hanson, Jesper Harder, Alexandru Harsanyi, K.@: Shane Hartman, John
-Heidemann, Jon K.@: Hellan, Magnus Henoch, Markus Heritsch, Dirk
+Hanson, Jesper Harder, Alexandru Harsanyi, K. Shane Hartman, John
+Heidemann, Jon K. Hellan, Magnus Henoch, Markus Heritsch, Dirk
Herrmann, Karl Heuer, Manabu Higashida, Konrad Hinsen, Anders Holst,
-Jeffrey C.@: Honig, Tassilo Horn, Kurt Hornik, Tom Houlder, Joakim
+Jeffrey C. Honig, Tassilo Horn, Kurt Hornik, Tom Houlder, Joakim
Hove, Denis Howe, Lars Ingebrigtsen, Andrew Innes, Seiichiro Inoue,
Philip Jackson, Martyn Jago, Pavel Janik, Paul Jarc, Ulf Jasper,
-Thorsten Jolitz, Michael K.@: Johnson, Kyle Jones, Terry Jones, Simon
+Thorsten Jolitz, Michael K. Johnson, Kyle Jones, Terry Jones, Simon
Josefsson, Alexandre Julliard, Arne J�rgensen, Tomoji Kagatani,
Brewster Kahle, Tokuya Kameshima, Lute Kamstra, Ivan Kanis, David
Kastrup, David Kaufman, Henry Kautz, Taichi Kawabata, Taro Kawagishi,
Howard Kaye, Michael Kifer, Richard King, Peter Kleiweg, Karel
-Kl�@v{c}, Shuhei Kobayashi, Pavel Kobyakov, Larry K.@: Kolodney, David
-M.@: Koppelman, Koseki Yoshinori, Robert Krawitz, Sebastian Kremer,
+Kl�@v{c}, Shuhei Kobayashi, Pavel Kobyakov, Larry K. Kolodney, David
+M. Koppelman, Koseki Yoshinori, Robert Krawitz, Sebastian Kremer,
Ryszard Kubiak, Igor Kuzmin, David K�gedal, Daniel LaLiberte, Karl
-Landstrom, Mario Lang, Aaron Larson, James R.@: Larus, Vinicius Jose
+Landstrom, Mario Lang, Aaron Larson, James R. Larus, Vinicius Jose
Latorre, Werner Lemberg, Frederic Lepied, Peter Liljenberg, Christian
Limpach, Lars Lindberg, Chris Lindblad, Anders Lindgren, Thomas Link,
-Juri Linkov, Francis Litterio, Sergey Litvinov, Emilio C.@: Lopes,
+Juri Linkov, Francis Litterio, Sergey Litvinov, Emilio C. Lopes,
Martin Lorentzon, Dave Love, Eric Ludlam, K�roly L@H{o}rentey, Sascha
L�decke, Greg McGary, Roland McGrath, Michael McNamara, Alan Mackenzie,
-Christopher J.@: Madsen, Neil M.@: Mager, Ken Manheimer, Bill Mann,
+Christopher J. Madsen, Neil M. Mager, Ken Manheimer, Bill Mann,
Brian Marick, Simon Marshall, Bengt Martensson, Charlie Martin,
Yukihiro Matsumoto, Tomohiro Matsuyama, David Maus, Thomas May, Will Mengarini, David
-Megginson, Stefan Merten, Ben A.@: Mesander, Wayne Mesard, Brad
+Megginson, Stefan Merten, Ben A. Mesander, Wayne Mesard, Brad
Miller, Lawrence Mitchell, Richard Mlynarik, Gerd Moellmann, Stefan
Monnier, Keith Moore, Jan Moringen, Morioka Tomohiko, Glenn Morris,
Don Morrison, Diane Murray, Riccardo Murri, Sen Nagata, Erik Naggum,
@@ -1413,44 +1413,44 @@ Gergely Nagy, Nobuyoshi Nakada, Thomas Neumann, Mike Newton, Thien-Thi Nguyen,
Jurgen Nickelsen, Dan Nicolaescu, Hrvoje Niksic, Jeff Norden,
Andrew Norman, Kentaro Ohkouchi, Christian Ohler,
Kenichi Okada, Alexandre Oliva, Bob Olson, Michael Olson, Takaaki Ota,
-Pieter E.@: J.@: Pareit, Ross Patterson, David Pearson, Juan Pechiar,
-Jeff Peck, Damon Anton Permezel, Tom Perrine, William M.@: Perry, Per
-Persson, Jens Petersen, Daniel Pfeiffer, Justus Piater, Richard L.@:
+Pieter E. J. Pareit, Ross Patterson, David Pearson, Juan Pechiar,
+Jeff Peck, Damon Anton Permezel, Tom Perrine, William M. Perry, Per
+Persson, Jens Petersen, Daniel Pfeiffer, Justus Piater, Richard L.
Pieri, Fred Pierresteguy, Fran�ois Pinard, Daniel Pittman, Christian
-Plaunt, Alexander Pohoyda, David Ponce, Francesco A.@: Potorti,
-Michael D.@: Prange, Mukesh Prasad, Ken Raeburn, Marko Rahamaa, Ashwin
-Ram, Eric S.@: Raymond, Paul Reilly, Edward M.@: Reingold, David
+Plaunt, Alexander Pohoyda, David Ponce, Francesco A. Potorti,
+Michael D. Prange, Mukesh Prasad, Ken Raeburn, Marko Rahamaa, Ashwin
+Ram, Eric S. Raymond, Paul Reilly, Edward M. Reingold, David
Reitter, Alex Rezinsky, Rob Riepel, Lara Rios, Adrian Robert, Nick
-Roberts, Roland B.@: Roberts, John Robinson, Denis B.@: Roegel, Danny
+Roberts, Roland B. Roberts, John Robinson, Denis B. Roegel, Danny
Roozendaal, Sebastian Rose, William Rosenblatt, Markus Rost, Guillermo
-J.@: Rozas, Martin Rudalics, Ivar Rummelhoff, Jason Rumney, Wolfgang
-Rupprecht, Benjamin Rutt, Kevin Ryde, James B.@: Salem, Masahiko Sato,
+J. Rozas, Martin Rudalics, Ivar Rummelhoff, Jason Rumney, Wolfgang
+Rupprecht, Benjamin Rutt, Kevin Ryde, James B. Salem, Masahiko Sato,
Timo Savola, Jorgen Schaefer, Holger Schauer, William Schelter, Ralph
-Schleicher, Gregor Schmid, Michael Schmidt, Ronald S.@: Schnell,
+Schleicher, Gregor Schmid, Michael Schmidt, Ronald S. Schnell,
Philippe Schnoebelen, Jan Schormann, Alex Schroeder, Stefan Schoef,
Rainer Schoepf, Raymond Scholz, Eric Schulte, Andreas Schwab, Randal
Schwartz, Oliver Seidel, Manuel Serrano, Paul Sexton, Hovav Shacham,
Stanislav Shalunov, Marc Shapiro, Richard Sharman, Olin Shivers, Tibor
@v{S}imko, Espen Skoglund, Rick Sladkey, Lynn Slater, Chris Smith,
-David Smith, Paul D.@: Smith, Wilson Snyder, William Sommerfeld, Simon
+David Smith, Paul D. Smith, Wilson Snyder, William Sommerfeld, Simon
South, Andre Spiegel, Michael Staats, Thomas Steffen, Ulf Stegemann,
Reiner Steib, Sam Steingold, Ake Stenhoff, Peter Stephenson, Ken
-Stevens, Andy Stewart, Jonathan Stigelman, Martin Stjernholm, Kim F.@:
+Stevens, Andy Stewart, Jonathan Stigelman, Martin Stjernholm, Kim F.
Storm, Steve Strassmann, Christopher Suckling, Olaf Sylvester, Naoto
Takahashi, Steven Tamm, Luc Teirlinck, Jean-Philippe Theberge, Jens
-T.@: Berger Thielemann, Spencer Thomas, Jim Thompson, Toru Tomabechi,
+T. Berger Thielemann, Spencer Thomas, Jim Thompson, Toru Tomabechi,
David O'Toole, Markus Triska, Tom Tromey, Enami Tsugutomo, Eli
Tziperman, Daiki Ueno, Masanobu Umeda, Rajesh Vaidheeswarran, Neil
-W.@: Van Dyke, Didier Verna, Joakim Verona, Ulrik Vieth, Geoffrey
+W. Van Dyke, Didier Verna, Joakim Verona, Ulrik Vieth, Geoffrey
Voelker, Johan Vromans, Inge Wallin, John Paul Wallington, Colin
Walters, Barry Warsaw, Christoph Wedler, Ilja Weis, Zhang Weize,
Morten Welinder, Joseph Brian Wells, Rodney Whitby, John Wiegley,
Sascha Wilde, Ed Wilkinson, Mike Williams, Roland Winkler, Bill
-Wohler, Steven A.@: Wood, Dale R.@: Worley, Francis J.@: Wright, Felix
-S.@: T.@: Wu, Tom Wurgler, Yamamoto Mitsuharu, Katsumi Yamaoka,
+Wohler, Steven A. Wood, Dale R. Worley, Francis J. Wright, Felix
+S. T. Wu, Tom Wurgler, Yamamoto Mitsuharu, Katsumi Yamaoka,
Masatake Yamato, Jonathan Yavner, Ryan Yeske, Ilya Zakharevich, Milan
Zamazal, Victor Zandy, Eli Zaretskii, Jamie Zawinski, Andrew Zhilin,
-Shenghuo Zhu, Piotr Zielinski, Ian T.@: Zimmermann, Reto Zimmermann,
+Shenghuo Zhu, Piotr Zielinski, Ian T. Zimmermann, Reto Zimmermann,
Neal Ziring, Teodor Zlatanov, and Detlev Zundel.
@end iftex
View
2  doc/emacs/emacsver.texi
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
@c It would be nicer to generate this using configure and @version@.
@c However, that would mean emacsver.texi would always be newer
@c then the info files in release tarfiles.
-@set EMACSVER 24.2.90
+@set EMACSVER 24.2.91
View
6 doc/emacs/emerge-xtra.texi
@@ -186,12 +186,12 @@ haven't made a choice. All differences start in the default-A state
which one alternative is ``preferred'' (see below).
When you select a difference, its state changes from default-A or
-default-B to plain A or B. Thus, the selected difference never has
+default-B to plain A or B@. Thus, the selected difference never has
state default-A or default-B, and these states are never displayed in
the mode line.
The command @kbd{d a} chooses default-A as the default state, and @kbd{d
-b} chooses default-B. This chosen default applies to all differences
+b} chooses default-B@. This chosen default applies to all differences
that you have never selected and for which no alternative is preferred.
If you are moving through the merge sequentially, the differences you
haven't selected are those following the selected one. Thus, while
@@ -375,7 +375,7 @@ While this example shows C preprocessor conditionals delimiting the two
alternative versions, you can specify the strings to use by setting
the variable @code{emerge-combine-versions-template} to a string of your
choice. In the string, @samp{%a} says where to put version A, and
-@samp{%b} says where to put version B. The default setting, which
+@samp{%b} says where to put version B@. The default setting, which
produces the results shown above, looks like this:
@example
View
6 doc/emacs/files.texi
@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ directory into the minibuffer as the initial contents. You can
inhibit this insertion by changing the variable
@code{insert-default-directory} to @code{nil} (@pxref{Minibuffer
File}). Regardless, Emacs always assumes that any relative file name
-is relative to the default directory, e.g. entering a file name
+is relative to the default directory, e.g., entering a file name
without a directory specifies a file in the default directory.
@findex cd
@@ -773,7 +773,7 @@ spurious, just use @kbd{p} to tell Emacs to go ahead anyway.
multiple names, Emacs does not prevent two users from editing it
simultaneously under different names.
- A lock file cannot be written in some circumstances, e.g. if Emacs
+ A lock file cannot be written in some circumstances, e.g., if Emacs
lacks the system permissions or the system does not support symbolic
links. In these cases, Emacs can still detect the collision when you
try to save a file, by checking the file's last-modification date. If
@@ -1948,7 +1948,7 @@ can use ImageMagick to render a wide variety of images. The variable
@code{imagemagick-enabled-types} lists the image types that Emacs may
render using ImageMagick; each element in the list should be an
internal ImageMagick name for an image type, as a symbol or an
-equivalent string (e.g.@: @code{BMP} for @file{.bmp} images). To
+equivalent string (e.g., @code{BMP} for @file{.bmp} images). To
enable ImageMagick for all possible image types, change
@code{imagemagick-enabled-types} to @code{t}. The variable
@code{imagemagick-types-inhibit} lists the image types which should
View
2  doc/emacs/fortran-xtra.texi
@@ -89,7 +89,7 @@ Move to the beginning of the next statement
@item C-c C-p
Move to the beginning of the previous statement
(@code{fortran-previous-statement}/@code{f90-previous-statement}).
-If there is no previous statement (i.e. if called from the first
+If there is no previous statement (i.e., if called from the first
statement in the buffer), move to the start of the buffer.
@kindex C-c C-e @r{(F90 mode)}
View
14 doc/emacs/frames.texi
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
@chapter Frames and Graphical Displays
@cindex frames
- When Emacs is started on a graphical display, e.g.@: on the X Window
+ When Emacs is started on a graphical display, e.g., on the X Window
System, it occupies a graphical system-level ``window''. In this
manual, we call this a @dfn{frame}, reserving the word ``window'' for
the part of the frame used for displaying a buffer. A frame initially
@@ -246,8 +246,8 @@ Select the text you drag across, in the form of whole lines.
@vindex mouse-highlight
Some Emacs buffers include @dfn{buttons}, or @dfn{hyperlinks}:
-pieces of text that perform some action (e.g.@: following a reference)
-when activated (e.g.@: by clicking on them). Usually, a button's text
+pieces of text that perform some action (e.g., following a reference)
+when activated (e.g., by clicking on them). Usually, a button's text
is visually highlighted: it is underlined, or a box is drawn around
it. If you move the mouse over a button, the shape of the mouse
cursor changes and the button lights up. If you change the variable
@@ -631,7 +631,7 @@ Monospace Bold Italic 12
@cindex X Logical Font Description
The third way to specify a font is to use an @dfn{XLFD} (@dfn{X
Logical Font Description}). This is the traditional method for
-specifying fonts under X. Each XLFD consists of fourteen words or
+specifying fonts under X@. Each XLFD consists of fourteen words or
numbers, separated by dashes, like this:
@example
@@ -644,7 +644,7 @@ characters (including none), and @samp{?} matches any single
character. However, matching is implementation-dependent, and can be
inaccurate when wildcards match dashes in a long name. For reliable
results, supply all 14 dashes and use wildcards only within a field.
-Case is insignificant in an XLFD. The syntax for an XLFD is as
+Case is insignificant in an XLFD@. The syntax for an XLFD is as
follows:
@example
@@ -659,7 +659,7 @@ The entries have the following meanings:
@item maker
The name of the font manufacturer.
@item family
-The name of the font family (e.g.@: @samp{courier}).
+The name of the font family (e.g., @samp{courier}).
@item weight
The font weight---normally either @samp{bold}, @samp{medium} or
@samp{light}. Some font names support other values.
@@ -1067,7 +1067,7 @@ attributes of the tooltip text are specified by the @code{tooltip}
face, and by X resources (@pxref{X Resources}).
@dfn{GUD tooltips} are special tooltips that show the values of
-variables when debugging a program with GUD. @xref{Debugger
+variables when debugging a program with GUD@. @xref{Debugger
Operation}.
@node Mouse Avoidance
View
134 doc/emacs/glossary.texi
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ as an abbrev for a long phrase that you want to insert frequently.
@xref{Abbrevs}.
@item Aborting
-Aborting means getting out of a recursive edit (q.v.@:). The
+Aborting means getting out of a recursive edit (q.v.). The
commands @kbd{C-]} and @kbd{M-x top-level} are used for this.
@xref{Quitting}.
@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@ function from those libraries. This is called `autoloading'.
@item Backtrace
A backtrace is a trace of a series of function calls showing how a
program arrived at a certain point. It is used mainly for finding and
-correcting bugs (q.v.@:). Emacs can display a backtrace when it signals
+correcting bugs (q.v.). Emacs can display a backtrace when it signals
an error or when you type @kbd{C-g} (@pxref{Glossary - Quitting}).
@xref{Checklist}.
@@ -83,14 +83,14 @@ delimiter for you (@pxref{Matching,,Matching Parens}).
@item Balanced Expressions
A balanced expression is a syntactically recognizable expression, such
as a symbol, number, string constant, block, or parenthesized expression
-in C. @xref{Expressions,Balanced Expressions}.
+in C@. @xref{Expressions,Balanced Expressions}.
@item Balloon Help
@xref{Glossary - Tooltips}.
@item Base Buffer
A base buffer is a buffer whose text is shared by an indirect buffer
-(q.v.@:).
+(q.v.).
@item Bidirectional Text
Some human languages, such as English, are written from left to right.
@@ -99,16 +99,16 @@ supports both of these forms, as well as any mixture of them---this
is `bidirectional text'. @xref{Bidirectional Editing}.
@item Bind
-To bind a key sequence means to give it a binding (q.v.@:).
+To bind a key sequence means to give it a binding (q.v.).
@xref{Rebinding}.
@anchor{Glossary - Binding}
@item Binding
A key sequence gets its meaning in Emacs by having a binding, which is a
-command (q.v.@:), a Lisp function that is run when you type that
+command (q.v.), a Lisp function that is run when you type that
sequence. @xref{Commands,Binding}. Customization often involves
rebinding a character to a different command function. The bindings of
-all key sequences are recorded in the keymaps (q.v.@:). @xref{Keymaps}.
+all key sequences are recorded in the keymaps (q.v.). @xref{Keymaps}.
@item Blank Lines
Blank lines are lines that contain only whitespace. Emacs has several
@@ -126,13 +126,13 @@ external border, outside of everything including the menu bar, plus an
internal border that surrounds the text windows, their scroll bars
and fringes, and separates them from the menu bar and tool bar. You
can customize both borders with options and resources (@pxref{Borders
-X}). Borders are not the same as fringes (q.v.@:).
+X}). Borders are not the same as fringes (q.v.).
@item Buffer
The buffer is the basic editing unit; one buffer corresponds to one text
being edited. You normally have several buffers, but at any time you are
editing only one, the `current buffer', though several can be visible
-when you are using multiple windows or frames (q.v.@:). Most buffers
+when you are using multiple windows or frames (q.v.). Most buffers
are visiting (q.v.@:) some file. @xref{Buffers}.
@item Buffer Selection History
@@ -194,7 +194,7 @@ press a mouse button and release it without moving the mouse.
@item Clipboard
A clipboard is a buffer provided by the window system for transferring
text between applications. On the X Window System, the clipboard is
-provided in addition to the primary selection (q.v.@:); on MS-Windows and Mac,
+provided in addition to the primary selection (q.v.); on MS-Windows and Mac,
the clipboard is used @emph{instead} of the primary selection.
@xref{Clipboard}.
@@ -206,7 +206,7 @@ text to or from a variety of coding systems when reading or writing it.
@item Command
A command is a Lisp function specially defined to be able to serve as a
-key binding in Emacs. When you type a key sequence (q.v.@:), its
+key binding in Emacs. When you type a key sequence (q.v.), its
binding (q.v.@:) is looked up in the relevant keymaps (q.v.@:) to find
the command to run. @xref{Commands}.
@@ -241,7 +241,7 @@ Reference Manual}) and programs in C and other languages
A complete key is a key sequence that fully specifies one action to be
performed by Emacs. For example, @kbd{X} and @kbd{C-f} and @kbd{C-x m}
are complete keys. Complete keys derive their meanings from being bound
-(q.v.@:) to commands (q.v.@:). Thus, @kbd{X} is conventionally bound to
+(q.v.@:) to commands (q.v.). Thus, @kbd{X} is conventionally bound to
a command to insert @samp{X} in the buffer; @kbd{C-x m} is
conventionally bound to a command to begin composing a mail message.
@xref{Keys}.
@@ -261,7 +261,7 @@ normally (but see @ref{Glossary - Truncation}) takes up more than one
screen line when displayed. We say that the text line is continued, and all
screen lines used for it after the first are called continuation
lines. @xref{Continuation Lines}. A related Emacs feature is
-`filling' (q.v.@:).
+`filling' (q.v.).
@item Control Character
A control character is a character that you type by holding down the
@@ -358,7 +358,7 @@ key or the @key{BACKSPACE} key, whichever one is easy to type.
@item Deletion
Deletion means erasing text without copying it into the kill ring
-(q.v.@:). The alternative is killing (q.v.@:). @xref{Killing,Deletion}.
+(q.v.). The alternative is killing (q.v.). @xref{Killing,Deletion}.
@anchor{Glossary - Deletion of Files}
@item Deletion of Files
@@ -401,7 +401,7 @@ confirmation. The usual reason for disabling a command is that it is
confusing for beginning users. @xref{Disabling}.
@item Down Event
-Short for `button down event' (q.v.@:).
+Short for `button down event' (q.v.).
@item Drag Event
A drag event is the kind of input event (q.v.@:) generated when you
@@ -431,7 +431,7 @@ them.
@item Electric
We say that a character is electric if it is normally self-inserting
-(q.v.@:), but the current major mode (q.v.@:) redefines it to do something
+(q.v.), but the current major mode (q.v.@:) redefines it to do something
else as well. For example, some programming language major modes define
particular delimiter characters to reindent the line, or insert one or
more newlines in addition to self-insertion.
@@ -440,7 +440,7 @@ more newlines in addition to self-insertion.
@item End Of Line
End of line is a character or a sequence of characters that indicate
the end of a text line. On GNU and Unix systems, this is a newline
-(q.v.@:), but other systems have other conventions. @xref{Coding
+(q.v.), but other systems have other conventions. @xref{Coding
Systems,end-of-line}. Emacs can recognize several end-of-line
conventions in files and convert between them.
@@ -458,7 +458,7 @@ variables in the environment it passes to programs it invokes.
An error occurs when an Emacs command cannot execute in the current
circumstances. When an error occurs, execution of the command stops
(unless the command has been programmed to do otherwise) and Emacs
-reports the error by displaying an error message (q.v.@:).
+reports the error by displaying an error message (q.v.).
@c Not helpful?
@c Type-ahead is discarded. Then Emacs is ready to read another
@c editing command.
@@ -510,11 +510,11 @@ directory, but an absolute file name refers to the same file regardless
of which directory is current. On GNU and Unix systems, an absolute
file name starts with a slash (the root directory) or with @samp{~/} or
@samp{~@var{user}/} (a home directory). On MS-Windows/MS-DOS, an
-absolute file name can also start with a drive letter and a colon, e.g.
+absolute file name can also start with a drive letter and a colon, e.g.,
@samp{@var{d}:}.
Some people use the term ``pathname'' for file names, but we do not;
-we use the word ``path'' only in the term ``search path'' (q.v.@:).
+we use the word ``path'' only in the term ``search path'' (q.v.).
@item File-Name Component
A file-name component names a file directly within a particular
@@ -556,25 +556,25 @@ fontset, rather than changing each font separately. @xref{Fontsets}.
@item Frame
A frame is a rectangular cluster of Emacs windows. Emacs starts out
with one frame, but you can create more. You can subdivide each frame
-into Emacs windows (q.v.@:). When you are using a window system
-(q.v.@:), more than one frame can be visible at the same time.
+into Emacs windows (q.v.). When you are using a window system
+(q.v.), more than one frame can be visible at the same time.
@xref{Frames}. Some other editors use the term ``window'' for this,
but in Emacs a window means something else.
@item Free Software
Free software is software that gives you the freedom to share, study
and modify it. Emacs is free software, part of the GNU project
-(q.v.@:), and distributed under a copyleft (q.v.@:) license called the
+(q.v.), and distributed under a copyleft (q.v.@:) license called the
GNU General Public License. @xref{Copying}.
@anchor{Glossary - Free Software Foundation}
@item Free Software Foundation
The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a charitable foundation
-dedicated to promoting the development of free software (q.v.@:).
+dedicated to promoting the development of free software (q.v.).
For more information, see @uref{http://fsf.org/, the FSF website}.
@item Fringe
-On a graphical display (q.v.@:), there's a narrow portion of the frame
+On a graphical display (q.v.), there's a narrow portion of the frame
(q.v.@:) between the text area and the window's border. These
``fringes'' are used to display symbols that provide information about
the buffer text (@pxref{Fringes}). Emacs displays the fringe using a
@@ -585,7 +585,7 @@ special face (q.v.@:) called @code{fringe}. @xref{Faces,fringe}.
@item FTP
FTP is an acronym for File Transfer Protocol. This is one standard
-method for retrieving remote files (q.v.@:).
+method for retrieving remote files (q.v.).
@item Function Key
A function key is a key on the keyboard that sends input but does not
@@ -593,7 +593,7 @@ correspond to any character. @xref{Function Keys}.
@item Global
Global means ``independent of the current environment; in effect
-throughout Emacs''. It is the opposite of local (q.v.@:). Particular
+throughout Emacs''. It is the opposite of local (q.v.). Particular
examples of the use of `global' appear below.
@item Global Abbrev
@@ -604,7 +604,7 @@ modes that do not have local (q.v.@:) definitions for the same abbrev.
@item Global Keymap
The global keymap (q.v.@:) contains key bindings that are in effect
everywhere, except when overridden by local key bindings in a major
-mode's local keymap (q.v.@:). @xref{Keymaps}.
+mode's local keymap (q.v.). @xref{Keymaps}.
@item Global Mark Ring
The global mark ring records the series of buffers you have recently
@@ -624,7 +624,7 @@ that do not have their own local (q.v.@:) values for the variable.
@item GNU
GNU is a recursive acronym for GNU's Not Unix, and it refers to a
-Unix-compatible operating system which is free software (q.v.@:).
+Unix-compatible operating system which is free software (q.v.).
@xref{Manifesto}. GNU is normally used with Linux as the kernel since
Linux works better than the GNU kernel. For more information, see
@uref{http://www.gnu.org/, the GNU website}.
@@ -639,7 +639,7 @@ that character (in ordinary editing modes). @xref{Inserting Text}.
@item Graphical Display
A graphical display is one that can display images and multiple fonts.
-Usually it also has a window system (q.v.@:).
+Usually it also has a window system (q.v.).
@item Highlighting
Highlighting text means displaying it with a different foreground and/or
@@ -664,7 +664,7 @@ Help echo is a short message displayed in the echo area (q.v.@:) when
the mouse pointer is located on portions of display that require some
explanations. Emacs displays help echo for menu items, parts of the
mode line, tool-bar buttons, etc. On graphical displays, the messages
-can be displayed as tooltips (q.v.@:). @xref{Tooltips}.
+can be displayed as tooltips (q.v.). @xref{Tooltips}.
@item Home Directory
Your home directory contains your personal files. On a multi-user GNU
@@ -712,7 +712,7 @@ commands to adjust indentation.
@item Indirect Buffer
An indirect buffer is a buffer that shares the text of another buffer,
-called its base buffer (q.v.@:). @xref{Indirect Buffers}.
+called its base buffer (q.v.). @xref{Indirect Buffers}.
@item Info
Info is the hypertext format used by the GNU project for writing
@@ -726,7 +726,7 @@ frames. @xref{User Input}.
@item Input Method
An input method is a system for entering non-@acronym{ASCII} text characters by
-typing sequences of @acronym{ASCII} characters (q.v.@:). @xref{Input Methods}.
+typing sequences of @acronym{ASCII} characters (q.v.). @xref{Input Methods}.
@item Insertion
Insertion means adding text into the buffer, either from the keyboard
@@ -761,8 +761,8 @@ Emacs calls ``binding a key sequence''. @xref{Glossary - Binding}.
@item Key Sequence
A key sequence (key, for short) is a sequence of input events (q.v.@:)
that are meaningful as a single unit. If the key sequence is enough to
-specify one action, it is a complete key (q.v.@:); if it is not enough,
-it is a prefix key (q.v.@:). @xref{Keys}.
+specify one action, it is a complete key (q.v.); if it is not enough,
+it is a prefix key (q.v.). @xref{Keys}.
@item Keymap
The keymap is the data structure that records the bindings (q.v.@:) of
@@ -778,14 +778,14 @@ key sequences.
@item Kill Ring
The kill ring is where all text you have killed (@pxref{Glossary - Killing})
recently is saved. You can reinsert any of the killed text still in
-the ring; this is called yanking (q.v.@:). @xref{Yanking}.
+the ring; this is called yanking (q.v.). @xref{Yanking}.
@anchor{Glossary - Killing}
@item Killing
Killing means erasing text and saving it on the kill ring so it can be
yanked (q.v.@:) later. Some other systems call this ``cutting''.
Most Emacs commands that erase text perform killing, as opposed to
-deletion (q.v.@:). @xref{Killing}.
+deletion (q.v.). @xref{Killing}.
@item Killing a Job
Killing a job (such as, an invocation of Emacs) means making it cease
@@ -794,7 +794,7 @@ to exist. Any data within it, if not saved in a file, is lost.
@item Language Environment
Your choice of language environment specifies defaults for the input
-method (q.v.@:) and coding system (q.v.@:). @xref{Language
+method (q.v.@:) and coding system (q.v.). @xref{Language
Environments}. These defaults are relevant if you edit
non-@acronym{ASCII} text (@pxref{International}).
@@ -821,7 +821,7 @@ lists. @xref{Moving by Parens}.
Local means ``in effect only in a particular context''; the relevant
kind of context is a particular function execution, a particular
buffer, or a particular major mode. It is the opposite of `global'
-(q.v.@:). Specific uses of `local' in Emacs terminology appear below.
+(q.v.). Specific uses of `local' in Emacs terminology appear below.
@item Local Abbrev
A local abbrev definition is effective only if a particular major mode
@@ -844,7 +844,7 @@ one of the modifier keys that can accompany any character.
@item @kbd{M-C-}
@kbd{M-C-} in the name of a character is an abbreviation for
-Control-Meta; it means the same thing as `@kbd{C-M-}' (q.v.@:).
+Control-Meta; it means the same thing as `@kbd{C-M-}' (q.v.).
@item @kbd{M-x}
@kbd{M-x} is the key sequence that is used to call an Emacs command by
@@ -875,14 +875,14 @@ fringe) and the window edge.
@item Mark
The mark points to a position in the text. It specifies one end of the
-region (q.v.@:), point being the other end. Many commands operate on
+region (q.v.), point being the other end. Many commands operate on
all the text from point to the mark. Each buffer has its own mark.
@xref{Mark}.
@item Mark Ring
The mark ring is used to hold several recent previous locations of the
mark, in case you want to move back to them. Each buffer has its
-own mark ring; in addition, there is a single global mark ring (q.v.@:).
+own mark ring; in addition, there is a single global mark ring (q.v.).
@xref{Mark Ring}.
@item Menu Bar
@@ -911,7 +911,7 @@ A Meta character is one whose character code includes the Meta bit.
@item Minibuffer
The minibuffer is the window that appears when necessary inside the
-echo area (q.v.@:), used for reading arguments to commands.
+echo area (q.v.), used for reading arguments to commands.
@xref{Minibuffer}.
@anchor{Glossary - Minibuffer History}
@@ -923,8 +923,8 @@ again. @xref{Minibuffer History}.
@item Minor Mode
A minor mode is an optional feature of Emacs, which can be switched on
or off independently of all other features. Each minor mode has a
-command to turn it on or off. Some minor modes are global (q.v.@:),
-and some are local (q.v.@:). @xref{Minor Modes}.
+command to turn it on or off. Some minor modes are global (q.v.),
+and some are local (q.v.). @xref{Minor Modes}.
@item Minor Mode Keymap
A minor mode keymap is a keymap that belongs to a minor mode and is
@@ -933,7 +933,7 @@ over the buffer's local keymap, just as the local keymap takes
precedence over the global keymap. @xref{Keymaps}.
@item Mode Line
-The mode line is the line at the bottom of each window (q.v.@:), giving
+The mode line is the line at the bottom of each window (q.v.), giving
status information on the buffer displayed in that window. @xref{Mode
Line}.
@@ -949,7 +949,7 @@ yanking (q.v.@:) it. @xref{Killing}.
@item MULE
MULE refers to the Emacs features for editing multilingual
-non-@acronym{ASCII} text using multibyte characters (q.v.@:).
+non-@acronym{ASCII} text using multibyte characters (q.v.).
@xref{International}.
@item Multibyte Character
@@ -959,7 +959,7 @@ since the number of non-@acronym{ASCII} characters is much more than 256.
@xref{International Chars, International Characters}.
@item Named Mark
-A named mark is a register (q.v.@:), in its role of recording a
+A named mark is a register (q.v.), in its role of recording a
location in text so that you can move point to that location.
@xref{Registers}.
@@ -1037,7 +1037,7 @@ specify a different file name. @xref{Rmail}.
@end ignore
@item Primary Selection
-The primary selection is one particular X selection (q.v.@:); it is the
+The primary selection is one particular X selection (q.v.); it is the
selection that most X applications use for transferring text to and from
other applications.
@@ -1047,7 +1047,7 @@ uses the primary selection when appropriate. @xref{Killing}.
@item Prompt
A prompt is text used to ask you for input. Displaying a prompt
is called prompting. Emacs prompts always appear in the echo area
-(q.v.@:). One kind of prompting happens when the minibuffer is used to
+(q.v.). One kind of prompting happens when the minibuffer is used to
read an argument (@pxref{Minibuffer}); the echoing that happens when
you pause in the middle of typing a multi-character key sequence is also
a kind of prompting (@pxref{Echo Area}).
@@ -1104,13 +1104,13 @@ correspond to changes that have been made in the text being edited.
@xref{Glossary - Regular Expression}.
@item Region
-The region is the text between point (q.v.@:) and the mark (q.v.@:).
+The region is the text between point (q.v.@:) and the mark (q.v.).
Many commands operate on the text of the region. @xref{Mark,Region}.
@item Register
Registers are named slots in which text, buffer positions, or
rectangles can be saved for later use. @xref{Registers}. A related
-Emacs feature is `bookmarks' (q.v.@:).
+Emacs feature is `bookmarks' (q.v.).
@anchor{Glossary - Regular Expression}
@item Regular Expression
@@ -1134,13 +1134,13 @@ you have a supported method to gain access to those files.
@item Restriction
A buffer's restriction is the amount of text, at the beginning or the
end of the buffer, that is temporarily inaccessible. Giving a buffer a
-nonzero amount of restriction is called narrowing (q.v.@:); removing
-a restriction is called widening (q.v.@:). @xref{Narrowing}.
+nonzero amount of restriction is called narrowing (q.v.); removing
+a restriction is called widening (q.v.). @xref{Narrowing}.
@item @key{RET}
@key{RET} is a character that in Emacs runs the command to insert a
newline into the text. It is also used to terminate most arguments
-read in the minibuffer (q.v.@:). @xref{User Input,Return}.
+read in the minibuffer (q.v.). @xref{User Input,Return}.
@item Reverting
Reverting means returning to the original state. Emacs lets you
@@ -1180,7 +1180,7 @@ files for certain purposes. For example, the variable @code{load-path}
holds a search path for finding Lisp library files. @xref{Lisp Libraries}.
@item Secondary Selection
-The secondary selection is one particular X selection (q.v.@:); some X
+The secondary selection is one particular X selection (q.v.); some X
applications can use it for transferring text to and from other
applications. Emacs has special mouse commands for transferring text
using the secondary selection. @xref{Secondary Selection}.
@@ -1203,7 +1203,7 @@ selections whose values are text. A program can also read the
selections that other programs have set up. This is the principal way
of transferring text between window applications. Emacs has commands to
work with the primary (q.v.@:) selection and the secondary (q.v.@:)
-selection, and also with the clipboard (q.v.@:).
+selection, and also with the clipboard (q.v.).
@item Self-Documentation
Self-documentation is the feature of Emacs that can tell you what any
@@ -1297,7 +1297,7 @@ have. To make a character Super, type it while holding down the
@item Suspending
Suspending Emacs means stopping it temporarily and returning control
to its parent process, which is usually a shell. Unlike killing a job
-(q.v.@:), you can later resume the suspended Emacs job without losing
+(q.v.), you can later resume the suspended Emacs job without losing
your buffers, unsaved edits, undo history, etc. @xref{Exiting}.
@item @key{TAB}
@@ -1344,12 +1344,12 @@ they also specify formatting information. @xref{Editing Format Info}.
@item Theme
A theme is a set of customizations (q.v.@:) that give Emacs a
particular appearance or behavior. For example, you might use a theme
-for your favorite set of faces (q.v.@:).
+for your favorite set of faces (q.v.).
@item Tool Bar
The tool bar is a line (sometimes multiple lines) of icons at the top
of an Emacs frame. Clicking on one of these icons executes a command.
-You can think of this as a graphical relative of the menu bar (q.v.@:).
+You can think of this as a graphical relative of the menu bar (q.v.).
@xref{Tool Bars}.
@anchor{Glossary - Tooltips}
@@ -1362,8 +1362,8 @@ clicks, etc. @xref{Tooltips}.
Top level is the normal state of Emacs, in which you are editing the
text of the file you have visited. You are at top level whenever you
are not in a recursive editing level (q.v.@:) or the minibuffer
-(q.v.@:), and not in the middle of a command. You can get back to top
-level by aborting (q.v.@:) and quitting (q.v.@:). @xref{Quitting}.
+(q.v.), and not in the middle of a command. You can get back to top
+level by aborting (q.v.@:) and quitting (q.v.). @xref{Quitting}.
@c FIXME? Transient Mark Mode
@@ -1395,7 +1395,7 @@ back the text that existed earlier in the editing session.
Unix is a class of multi-user computer operating systems with a long
history. There are several implementations today. The GNU project
(q.v.@:) aims to develop a complete Unix-like operating system that
-is free software (q.v.@:).
+is free software (q.v.).
@item User Option
A user option is a face (q.v.@:) or a variable (q.v.@:) that exists so
@@ -1413,7 +1413,7 @@ information on variables.
@item Version Control
Version control systems keep track of multiple versions of a source file.
-They provide a more powerful alternative to keeping backup files (q.v.@:).
+They provide a more powerful alternative to keeping backup files (q.v.).
@xref{Version Control}.
@item Visiting
@@ -1426,7 +1426,7 @@ tab, newline, and backspace).
@item Widening
Widening is removing any restriction (q.v.@:) on the current buffer;
-it is the opposite of narrowing (q.v.@:). @xref{Narrowing}.
+it is the opposite of narrowing (q.v.). @xref{Narrowing}.
@item Window
Emacs divides a frame (q.v.@:) into one or more windows, each of which
@@ -1438,7 +1438,7 @@ other editors use the term ``window'' for what we call a `frame'
@item Window System
A window system is software that operates on a graphical display
-(q.v.@:), to subdivide the screen so that multiple applications can
+(q.v.), to subdivide the screen so that multiple applications can
have their] own windows at the same time. All modern operating systems
include a window system.
@@ -1451,7 +1451,7 @@ punctuation between them as insignificant. @xref{Word Search}.
@anchor{Glossary - Yanking}
@item Yanking
-Yanking means reinserting text previously killed (q.v.@:). It can be
+Yanking means reinserting text previously killed (q.v.). It can be
used to undo a mistaken kill, or for copying or moving text. Some
other systems call this ``pasting''. @xref{Yanking}.
@end table
View
8 doc/emacs/gnu.texi
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ our web site, @uref{http://www.gnu.org}. For software tasks and other
ways to contribute, see @uref{http://www.gnu.org/help}.
@end quotation
-@unnumberedsec What's GNU? Gnu's Not Unix!
+@unnumberedsec What's GNU@? Gnu's Not Unix!
GNU, which stands for Gnu's Not Unix, is the name for the complete
Unix-compatible software system which I am writing so that I can give it
@@ -151,7 +151,7 @@ systems, approved for use in a residential area, and not in need of
sophisticated cooling or power.
I have found very many programmers eager to contribute part-time work for
-GNU. For most projects, such part-time distributed work would be very hard
+GNU@. For most projects, such part-time distributed work would be very hard
to coordinate; the independently-written parts would not work together.
But for the particular task of replacing Unix, this problem is absent. A
complete Unix system contains hundreds of utility programs, each of which
@@ -262,7 +262,7 @@ and you must charge for the program to support that.''
@end quotation
There are various forms of free or very cheap publicity that can be used to
-inform numbers of computer users about something like GNU. But it may be
+inform numbers of computer users about something like GNU@. But it may be
true that one can reach more microcomputer users with advertising. If this
is really so, a business which advertises the service of copying and
mailing GNU for a fee ought to be successful enough to pay for its
@@ -271,7 +271,7 @@ advertising pay for it.
On the other hand, if many people get GNU from their friends, and such
companies don't succeed, this will show that advertising was not really
-necessary to spread GNU. Why is it that free market advocates don't
+necessary to spread GNU@. Why is it that free market advocates don't
want to let the free market decide this?@footnote{The Free Software
Foundation raises most of its funds from a distribution service,
although it is a charity rather than a company. If @emph{no one}
View
2  doc/emacs/indent.texi
@@ -134,7 +134,7 @@ leftward).
This command can be used to remove all indentation from the lines in
the region, by invoking it with a large negative argument,
-e.g. @kbd{C-u -1000 C-x @key{TAB}}.
+e.g., @kbd{C-u -1000 C-x @key{TAB}}.
@end table
@node Tab Stops
View
18 doc/emacs/killing.texi
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ killing many different types of syntactic units.
@cindex deletion
Most commands which erase text from the buffer save it in the kill
ring. These are known as @dfn{kill} commands, and their names
-normally contain the word @samp{kill} (e.g. @code{kill-line}). The
+normally contain the word @samp{kill} (e.g., @code{kill-line}). The
kill ring stores several recent kills, not just the last one, so
killing is a very safe operation: you don't have to worry much about
losing text that you previously killed. The kill ring is shared by
@@ -123,7 +123,7 @@ point, regardless of the number of spaces that existed previously