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A minimal ruby gem to allow fuzzing native ruby code with afl.
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README.md

afl-ruby

AFL for Ruby! You can learn more about AFL itself here.

Getting Started

0. Clone the repo

afl-ruby is not yet available on Rubygems, so for now you'll have to clone and build it yourself.

git clone git@github.com:richo/afl-ruby.git

1. Build the extension

You will need to manually build the native extension to the Ruby interpreter in order to allow AFL to instrument your Ruby code. To do this:

cd lib/afl
ruby ../../ext/afl/extconf.rb
make

2. Instrument your code

To instrument your code for AFL, call AFL.init when you're ready to initialize the AFL forkserver, then wrap the block of code that you want to fuzz in AFL.with_exceptions_as_crashes { ... }. For example:

def byte
  $stdin.read(1)
end

def c
  r if byte == 'r'
end

def r
  s if byte == 's'
end

def s
  h if byte == 'h'
end

def h
  raise "Crashed"
end

require 'afl'

unless ENV['NO_AFL']
  AFL.init
end

AFL.with_exceptions_as_crashes do
  c if byte == 'c'
  exit!(0)
end

3. Patch AFL

AFL checks if you're an instrumented binary by seeing if you have the AFL environment variable anywhere in your binary. We're using a bog stock ruby interpreter, so we can't do that. Apply afl-fuzz.c.patch before building AFL to remove this check. Assuming you have cloned afl and afl-ruby in the same directory (i.e. in ~/MYCODE/afl and ~/MYCODE/afl-ruby) you can do this by:

cd ../afl
git checkout -b apply-ruby-patch
git apply ../afl-fuzz.c.patch
git add .
git commit -m "Apply Ruby patch"
make install
# Check that this did indeed update your AFL
ls -la $(which afl-fuzz)

4. Run the example

You should then be able to run the sample harness in the example/ directory:

/path/to/afl/afl-fuzz -i example/work/input -o example/work/output -- /usr/bin/ruby example/harness.rb

It should only take a few seconds to find a crash. Once a crash is found it should be written to example/work/output/crashes/ for you to inspect.

Troubleshooting

If AFL complains that Program '/usr/bin/ruby' is not a 64-bit Mach-O binary then this may be because your system Ruby has the old Mach-O magic header bytes, which AFL does not accept. You should try running afl-fuzz using a different Ruby interpreter. For example, you can use an rbenv Ruby like so:

# Find out which versions rbenv has available
ls ~/.rbenv/versions
# Pick an available version, then run something like this:
/path/to/afl/afl-fuzz -i work/input -o work/output -- ~/.rbenv/versions/2.4.1/bin/ruby harness.rb

Developing

Extensions

Be sure to build the C extension (see "Build the extension" above).

Tests

To run the basic test suite, simply run:

rake test

Make sure you have built the extension and patched AFL first, as above.

Credits

Substantial portions of afl-ruby are either inspired by, or transposed directly from afl-python by Jakub Wilk jwilk@jwilk.net licensed under MIT.

Stripe allowed both myself and rob to spend substantial amounts of company time developing afl-ruby.

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