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---
title: Neon Genesis Evangelion source anthology
description: Anthology of Gainax/Anno/Evangelion quotes, sources, references, and analyses
tags: NGE, anime, criticism, sociology
...
Date is whenever a source was *created*, not when it was *published* or otherwise disseminated.
1. Primary is material from someone who worked on a object of interest: eg. Hideaki Anno or Hiroyuki Yamaga. (I include Japanese seiyuu because as Asuka's last line shows, they have direct input, or as Ritsuko's last line shows, special insight.)
2. Secondary is a source from someone who knows Primaries first-hand: eg. Carl Horn or Toshio Okada.
3. Tertiary is any source further removed than that - mainstream news coverage, academic analysis, fan speculation & analysis etc.: eg. Mari Kotani, David Samuels, Aaron Clark.
Source is based on the ultimate origins of information, not proximate; an email forwarding an anonymous fan translation of a Anno interview in a Japanese book is considered primary, not tertiary. Some people or materials shift statuses; eg. Carl Horn is sometimes recording Anno (primary), statements by Hiroyuki Yamaga (primary or secondary), or his own interpretations (tertiary). It is usually clear which classification applies best.
# 1990
## 1990 Primary
## 1990 Secondary
## 1990 Tertiary
extreme but interesting 1990 article on otaku: ['"I'm alone, but not lonely": Japanese Otaku-Kids colonize the Realm of Information and Media; A Tale of Sex and Crime from a faraway Place'](http://web.archive.org/web/20071103111333/www.cjas.org/~leng/otaku-e.htm)
# 1991
## 1991 P
> Animage: What would you recommend?
>
> Anno: Shows like Yamato or Gundam (1979, TV) which have soul, emit the staff's "cry of mind" out of the screens as a certain vibration. On the other hand, I feel bad when I watch shows that are made sluggishly without such soul.
>
>
> ... Anno: Of the movies, I recommend Gundam III - Meeting in Space. The picture is quite nice. Moreover, if I have to recommend Mr. Tomino's animation, I would choose Legendary Giant IDEON (1980, TV). It would be best to watch the movie version's Part II (1982, movie) after watching the TV series. Although some of the picture quality might be poor, please tolerate it.
>
> ...Anno: Yes, I did, although it is a little bit light. I was just overwhelmed by its adult mood throughout the animation. I can't express such mood yet. Actually, I felt sad when I watched Nadia, which I directed, soon after watching it. I felt Nadia was too childish. (laughs)
>
> ... Anno's Top 10 Anime
> 1. Yamato (1974, TV)
> 2. Mobile Suit Gundam (1979, TV)
> 3. Gundam--Char's Counterattack (1988, movie)
> 4. Legendary Giant IDEON (1980, TV & movie)
> 5. Animal Treasure Island (1971, movie)
> 6. Fight! Pyuta! (1968, TV)
> 7. Future Boy Conan (1978, TV)
> 8. Aim at Ace (1973, first TV series)
> 9. Tom & Jerry (1944)
> 10. Ann the Red Hair [[_Anne of Green Gables_](!Wikipedia "Anne of Green Gables (anime)")] (1979, TV)
--Kazuhiko Shimamoto (Gyakyoo Nine) and Hideaki Anno (Nadia); from _Animage_ magazine, September 1991; translated by Masashi Suzuki; [_The Rose_ #33, July 1992](http://web.archive.org/web/20050407200800/home.comcast.net/~hasshin/shimamoto.html)
## 1991 S
## 1991 T
# 1993
## 1993 P
> "We had no trouble starting up another project right away. All the outside staff we had hired for _Aoki Uru_ were now gone, but Anno and the rest were still there. They went on a retreat to Matsumoto in Nagano and before you knew it, they had a project plan all drawn up. Still, it would take over a year to go from project start to broadcast.
> Anno had been running on empty ever since _Nadia_ finished, but _Evangelion_ seemed to be just the thing to get him up and running again. And once he puts his mind to something, he goes all out..."
--Yasuhiro Takeda, _[Notenki Memoirs](docs/2002-notenki-memoirs)_ pg 165
### Early Evangelion
#### Project Meeting
>" *Preliminary Meeting*
>
> [Theme]
>
> Before the birth of the human race, there twice existed prehistoric civilizations with advanced technology. The first civilization (the First Ancestral Race) created the EVA, but because of this they were destroyed. The next civilization (the Second Ancestral Race) created the Spears of Longinus, thus successfully containing the EVA; afterwards, as a countermeasure to anyone reviving the EVA, they planted Angels all over the world.
>
> [Analysis]
>
> At this stage EVA are not to be considered "man-made", but beings resurrected by the Ancestral Races. Hence, the Angels exist largely to destroy the EVA and remove traces of their presence in the case of their revival. However, it goes without saying that very similar themes are to be found in some of Director Anno's works such as "Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind" and "Nadia". Ancient civilizations that boasted great technology are a typical theme found in Science Fiction anime. At this stage, it is difficult to imagine works with the same level or originality and complexity coming after EVA."
--translated by [AyrYntake](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=196081#196081) from a [Japanese fansite](http://homepage3.nifty.com/mana/eva-shi1.htm), with unclear sourcing; [I date](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=414778#414778) this to September-December 1993. That there are *two* predecessor civilizations is supported by Ikuto Yamashita in the 1998 [_Sore o Nasumono_](http://wiki.evageeks.org/Sore_o_Nasumono); [Olivier Hagué](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-March/039404.html) in 2001:
> Actually, I was referring to the "two ancient civilizations" bit mentioned in "Sore o Nasu Mono", here... I guess "Aruka" was supposed to be the ruins of one of those?...
[Reichu](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=196071#196071) in 2008 offered a partial translation of _Sore o Nasumono_:
> "Spear of Longinus: By the time humanity evolved, two prehistoric civilizations with extremely advanced technology had led existences on Earth. The first civilization created Eva, which was the cause of their destruction, and the next created the Spear of Longinus and successfully contained Eva. Afterwards, as a safeguard in the event that someone revived Eva, Angels were planted [placed into slumbers] to act as fully-automated safety devices, so to speak."
#### Evangelion Proposal
> Also, in the Eva production timeline in the Collectors Box Set, Anno proposed the first in-house draft of "Evangelion" to Gainax for consideration on September 20, 1993 -- over two years before the start of the series.
>
> The Series Plan (2nd draft) and plot/synopsis of all 26 episodes was submitted on January 5 of the following year (1994), and for the most part "fixed" (in-house) the following month on February 4. The Planning Draft for external distribution was completed in April of that same year -- a year and a half before the start of the series.
>
> Production work for Ep.1 was completed in April 1995, and Ep.2 in May 1995, but the opening and ending sequences were not finished until September.
--<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-March/039407.html>
- [earliest English translation of Proposal](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-October/008116.html); not sourced from Gainax, but from a book published by '"Evangelical Society of Neon Genesis" (Shinseiki Fukuin Kyoukai)'; Yip includes only episode titles and some of the later summaries
- Takeuchi's [translation notes](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-October/008133.html) on the foregoing
- [report](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-April/013136.html)
- [description of artbook](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-April/013059.html)
- [another description; also says 12th angel](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2000-August/036814.html)
- [e admits](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2009-December/005610.html) his translation was wrong - 12 angels, not 12th: [Olivier Hagué's corrections](http://www.animeboards.com/showthread.php?t=23715) (Olivier seems to be reachable [via GameFAQs](http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/user.php?topic=59380081&user=173358))
- [Another translation](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-March/039404.html); but incomplete & badly translated!
- [Highly incomplete translations from French edition](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=75146#75146)
- Independent translation & transcription of Kaworu is a cat: [translation from Proposal](http://the-liliquarium.livejournal.com/807.html); cf <http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=286573#286573>
> "In the notes of the DVD volume 7, it says that the cat was supposed to be the real Angel, actually...but in the previous outline the Kaworu is 'humanoid Angel'"
--<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-March/039397.html> TODO: I never did figure out what notes these were; there is no cat in the Platinum commentary
--[Kaworu & cat sketch](http://i528.photobucket.com/albums/dd325/Synapsidia/EVA/Kaworu_prototype1.png) from _Newtype 100% Collection_
more pics & translations; note that episodes 23-26 were re-translated (& better):
- <http://wiki.evageeks.org/Proposal>
- <http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:Neon_Genesis_Evangelion_Proposal_(Translation)>
> Humanity has reached its evolutionary limit. Their salvation lies in invoking the Human Instrumentality Project. In order to disrupt the plan, a group of unidentified giant battle weapons have invaded.
>
> The Apostolos. They've been given the names of angels, but can they really be Messengers of the Gods?
>
> ... [Notes: They use the word _Kamigami_, "Gods," for the phrase (_Kamigami no tsukai_), or, "Messengers of the Gods" on page 2. In this context it's different than saying the one Christian God. Kind of noteworthy, I thought. -AET]
--<http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:Neon_Genesis_Evangelion_Proposal_%28Translation%29#Page_2_.28Synopsis_and_Staff.29>
> The Feel Of A Game
>
> The main project will include all sorts of game elements to be inlaid into the main story.
>
> In the second half of the story, preparations to invade a discovered enemy stronghold would be done in the vein of a simulation or RPG game
--<http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:Neon_Genesis_Evangelion_Proposal_%28Translation%29#Page_5_.28Highlights.29>
> Possessing various forms and various super-scientific special abilities, the mysterious objects Apostolos advance upon mankind. In actuality, they are ancient relics that were left sleeping all around the world by prehistoric lifeforms called the First Ancestral Race [!!!]. There are 28 in all. Adam was the first one confirmed, excavated by mankind 15 years ago in the Dead Sea region, but it was destroyed by a mysterious explosion. 27 will subsequently awaken.
--<http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:Neon_Genesis_Evangelion_Proposal_%28Translation%29#Page_7_.28Apostolos.29>
> The translator does not appear to be familiar with the series and thus some errors are present.
>
> What is meant by "The Human Complementary Plan," a plan to save mankind from despair?
>
> Mankind has already obtained the power to antagonize God. This is the basis of this story and the great international project known as "The Human Complementary Plan." Half a century ago, we developed nuclear fusion. Next up for mankind, who can store the sun in the palm of his hand, is a complementary plan to create the "perfect human" with their own hands. The goal is to liberate all of mankind by scientifically re-creating "the tree of life" forbidden by God, by taking away "death" from man, and by freeing him from the original sin and the curse that plagues him. The one who is advocating and recommending this plan is Gendo Ikari, the father of the main character. Through "artificial evolutionary research," he is single-mindedly pursuing the form of a human who has achieved the ultimate evolution...
--<http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:Neon_Genesis_Evangelion_Proposal_%28Translation%29#Page_13_.28Human_Instrumentality_Project.29>
> Specially educated and trained from the beginning as an exclusive operator. A determined girl who is apt to stretch herself depending on the situation. Hobby is playing video games. Hates to lose and hates boys. Aspires only to be like Kaji. Quarter Japanese, also has German-American blood. Step mother lives in Germany (her father passed away).
--<http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:Neon_Genesis_Evangelion_Proposal_(Translation)#Page_13_.28Human_Instrumentality_Project.29>; note that in episode 23, Asuka holes up in Hikari's room playing video games ('HIKARI (MONO): She won't go to school and she won't go back home. She just keeps playing games.'). in _Rebuild 2.0_ trailer, Asuka whips out a handheld to play. TODO: how much does she play in the movie?
> [Gendo:] Gradually becoming fixated on the research itself and turning into a digitalized human who justifies any means in order to achieve the goal. Believes his plan will form a utopia bringing true equality to all people.
--<http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:Neon_Genesis_Evangelion_Proposal_(Translation)#Page_13_.28Human_Instrumentality_Project.29>
> [Toji] Father works for the research center.
>
> ...[Kensuke] Father is a civil worker. (Mother passed away.)
>
> ...[Ryoji] Childish but very strict. Greatly influences Shinji's development.
>
> ...[PenPen] Created artificially by genetic manipulation. Intelligence of an infant. Usually resides in a large refrigerator. Loves to bathe in hot springs for some reason.
--<http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:Neon_Genesis_Evangelion_Proposal_(Translation)#Page_13_.28Human_Instrumentality_Project.29> Notes: PenPen has no name though he has the manga backstory (?), Keel Lorenz is described quite differently, nothing about Hikari or Toji's mother - but note that Kensuke's mother is dead
> Episode 13, 14, 16 -- I believe the translation for original planned episode 13 should say that defeat is expected because Shinji is more arrogant, not that Shinji expected defeat. If you think about the descriptions of these three episodes, you can see that most of it was compressed into Episode 16 in the series. -- Shinji gets a higher sync ratio than Asuka, so he becomes arrogant. He gets trapped inside the Eva (well trapped in the Eva in the Angel). There's a plan to rescue Shinji from Unit 1. Shinji has a conversation with an Angel.
>
> Episode 17 - Asuka's first date. The basis of this was used in Lies and Silence. Asuka does go on a date in that episode if we remember. Another translation that I *think* I am reading correctly; it should be Misato recalls *past episodes* not that she recalls her own past. In other words, the clip show would have been here.
>
> Episode 20 - NERV's birth - so the details changed, but it was still about the history of NERV
>
> Episode 21 - the underwater battle was moved to a different episode, and the character changed but there was still a mental attack from an Angel [Asuka instead of Shinji]
>
>
> ...
> Episode 25 - I believe what the translation should read here is that as the 12 most powerful Angels descend from the Moon, the UN dissolves Human Instrumentality to stop it and resolves to destroy the *Laboratory* because that's the reason the Angels/Apostles have been coming (I think "deciding on destruction" is referring to the first sentence where it says Aruka is held by the Laboratory. After all, why would they dissolve the project and then continue attacking the Angels?] And this is pretty close to what happened in Episode 25' Air; they send in the troops to take over.
--translation corrections & comments from [JoeD80](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=326024#326024) with regard to the current [Eva wiki](http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:Neon_Genesis_Evangelion_Proposal_%28Translation%29) translation
## 1992 S
## 1993 T
> GAINAX, the studio that created Gunbuster, was made up of fans who really--I mean really--knew anime. They were out to have as much fun with it as possible, and break a few boundaries while they were at it. They were the best anime has ever seen. Look at their short film that opened Daicon IV, following that up with the incredible four-minute ROYAL SPACE FORCE, the film that got them the funding for their masterpiece (and only feature film) THE WINGS OF HONNEAMISE. With NADIA and GUNBUSTER, they demonstrated they could produce classics in the TV and OAV genres as well. In their coda, OTAKU NO VIDEO, they made anime's great _roman a clef_, closing the circle for anime fans and exiting in style.
--Carl Horn <http://groups.google.com/group/rec.arts.anime/browse_thread/thread/f0401912352a88b1/f82f63a1f3571cb3?hl=en&q=author%3ADHORN%40ricevm1.rice.edu+roman+a+clef&pli=1>
# 1994
## 1994 P
> "So why did Evangelion wind up with that shape?" I figure that from now on I will hear that question countless times. The director instructed me to make, "the image of a demon [_oni_]." A giant just barely under the control of mankind. I get the feeling I've seen that correlation before... The image I had for the design concept was the fairy tale, Gulliver's Travels. Enormous Power Restrained.
--["Ikuto Yamashita Discusses Eva's Design"](http://web.archive.org/web/20041215001258/www.evangelion.ca/story/ikuto.html) (Ikuto was the mecha designer)
> [Yutaka] Izubuchi drew some design proposals on the Evangelions. Anno sent him instructions and rough sketches, and Izubuchi drew some designs. Izubuchi introduced one with four eyes like what unit 02 ended up having. We don't know how much his proposal influenced the final design though, since he's not credited for the final designs.
>
> ... I'd always thought Izubuchi had influenced the mecha (for lack of a better term) designs in Eva; there's a good deal of resemblance between the Eva-01 and Izubuchi's Kaempfer design from Gundam 0080, particularly around the head. Nice to see that there is actually some proof to back me up on this.
--<http://www.animenation.net/forums/archive/index.php/t-197689.html>
> For the salvation of mankind who are approaching evolutionary dead-end as living things
>
> "The Human Supplement Project" is put in motion
>
> Attacking to prevent that project, an unidentified fleet of gigantic battle weapons
> ? "The Apostles"
>
> Are they, bestowed with the name of "Angels",
>
> Really "messengers of the gods" at all?
--<http://webcitation.org/5mYowlbrW>
> What is the appeal of Giant Robot Anime?
>
> "Giant robot anime" is an expression of children's subconscious desires.
>
> That is to say, the thing called "giant robot anime"
>
> Is compensation for the complexes and various suppressions that children hold, a means of resistance, compensatory behavior.
>
> Adults know "the difficulty of living."
>
> And, at the same time they also know "the fun of living."
>
> In order to live, even if they know it is a "lie"
>
> They know that "hope" and the "dream" called "justice and love" are necessary.
>
> We can communicate purely to children with no sense of difference between fiction and reality due to a characteristic of the means of expression called animation, namely, usage of the view of the world where everything are "pictures" drawn by people.
>
> That is the greatest appeal that "giant robot animation" holds.
--<http://webcitation.org/5mYown8VS> (Tentatively assigned to 1994 & Primary)
## 1994 S
## 1994 T
> In the end, Leiqunni's attempt to isolate herself from a world she regards as evil is no more productive than Shiro's initial refusal to even consider good and evil in the world (that's why I prefer to render his opening line as "I don't know if it's good or bad" although one could say "For better or worse"). HONNEAMISE is a film advocating anti-detachment.
>
> ... Yamaga has not merely jerked Shiro's strings to commit this act--indeed, the act derives from choice and serves to illustrate that Shiro *knows* he has a choice--Leiqunni believes *she has none.* Leiqunni believes in original sin, that "all are guilty." But if one is guilty from birth, the entire concept of "sin" as a choice becomes meaningless, for we are evil--indeed, doomed, by nature and can do nothing but ask for grace.
>
> But Shiro doesn't believe this is true. His prayer at the end comes only after a long string of conscious choices, actions, and decisions on his part. He prays not out of a belief that God's mercy is the only thing that can save the helplessly evil human race--on the contrary, his prayer is based on the careful observation of humanity's historical record: full of choices that led to slaughter. And yet, he simultaneously recognizes that the same human race has made it here, to "God's space"--what used to be thought of as Heaven. What he beseeches, then, is a light to mankind--"In our despair, give us one, fixed star." A beacon of *truth*--to remind us that we always have a *choice.*
>
> The more I look at HONNEAMISE, the more convinced I am that Yamaga knew what he was doing. The film holds with [Andre] Gide's warning: "Do not understand me too quickly." Whether the necessity for the viewer to go back again to fully comprehend it, will be a liability in its release here--I don't know--there is so much one can get from the first viewing only. But in that endurance, the viewer discovers that which endures: the art of THE WINGS OF HONNEAMISE. The film is Yamaga's choice--and also, still, a light to anime--a genre that doesn't believe in itself as it should...
--Carl Horn, ["Some more thoughts on the rape scene in HONNEAMISE"](http://groups.google.com/group/rec.arts.anime/browse_thread/thread/92161d0f90638586/b282407a09d2586f); incidentally, [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-March/039239.html) bought _Honneamise_ "character/mecha drawing references and animator storyboards", and mentions "The attempted rape scene unfolds differently in the storyboards."
# 1995
## 1995 P
- [Literal Translation Project](http://plaza.harmonix.ne.jp/~onizuka/literal/evangelion.html) of NGE episodes
> And in that world, a 14-year-old boy shrinks from human contact. And he tries to live in a closed world where his behavior dooms him, and he has abandoned the attempt to understand himself. A cowardly young man who feels that his father has abandoned him, and so he has convinced himself that he is a completely unnecessary person, so much so that he cannot even commit suicide.
>
> And there is a 29-year-old woman who lives life so lightly as to barely allow the possibility of a human touch. She protects herself by having surface level relationships, and running away.
>
> Both are extremely afraid of being hurt. Both are unsuitable-lacking the positive attitude-for what people call heroes of an adventure. But in any case, they are the heroes of this story.
>
> They say, "To live is to change." [This is apparently a quote of the last line of Miyazaki's _Nausicaa_ manga.] I started this production with the wish that once the production complete, the world, and the heroes would change. That was my "true" desire. I tried to include everything of myself in Neon Genesis Evangelion-myself, a broken man who could do nothing for four years. A man who ran away for four years, one who was simply not dead. Then one thought. "You can't run away," came to me, and I restarted this production. It is a production where my only thought was to burn my feelings into film. I know my behavior was thoughtless, troublesome, and arrogant. But I tried. I don't know what the result will be. That is because within me, the story is not yet finished. I don't know what will happen to Shinji, Misato or Rei. I don't know where life will take them. Because I don't know where life is taking the staff of the production. I feel that I am being irresponsible. But... But it's only natural that we should synchronize ourselves with the world within the production. I've taken on a risk: "It's just an imitation."
>
> ...July 17, 1995, In the studio, a cloudy, rainy day.
>
> ..."By the way, Shinji's name came from a friend of mine. Misato's name came from the hero of a manga. The name Ritsuko came from a friend of mine in middle school. I borrowed from everywhere. Even names that have no bearing on anything actually came from the countless rules that govern these things. It might be fun if someone with free time could research them."
--["What were we trying to make here?"](http://www.evamonkey.com/writings_anno01.php) Anno, original manga vol 1 (for character name sources, see Anno's 2000 discussion of [Character Name Origins](#p-8))
> [Anno] '"It isn't completed yet, but in episodes one and two my recent 'feelings' should be faithfully reflected. When I realized this I thought 'Ah, well done.' "
>
> ... [Anno] "I think this will become a greater cult film than 'Nadia', because there will probably not be another work with this 'feeling'."
>
> ... We visited Gainax towards the end of January. By then, they were busy refining the first few episodes of the new TV series "New Century Evangelion." To start off our information gathering, Anno Hideaki said, "How could I think of doing an old-fashioned robot anime?"
>
> ... Thinking this, we wondered why he would participate in and direct a robot anime project.
>
> "One reason is that we thought it would be good to put on TV a robot anime that is not sponsored by a toy company."
>
> He said that since having an attached sponsor can interrupt how the mecha is designed, this work was not going to have one. He also said, "Robot anime has been stuck in a pattern, and we wanted to break out of it." They are trying to make a film with an entirely different stance than "robot anime" being made with tie-ins to ordinary toy companies. [See the Otsuki anecdote in the "Shinseiki Evangelion" chapter of _The Notenki Memoirs_.]
>
> He said that originally this was not a project that started with a psyched-up feeling, but when they began the real project it began turning into a fairly "hard and heavy" robot anime.
>
> Also, as he was involved in this work he had a thought something like the following. "For example, I wonder if a person over the age of twenty who likes robot anime is really happy.[^evarnewtype] He could find greater happiness elsewhere. Regrettably, I have my doubts about his happiness."
>
>
> ... The protagonist, Ikari Shinji, is not portrayed as an "otaku", but from my point of view [the reporter's] he is not making a positive start in his work, and he could be considered a dependent young man.
>
> "As I was making this work I wanted to try to consider what in the world could the 'happiness' of such a person be?"
>
> ... Ayanami Rei
>
> Voice by: Hayashibara Megumi
>
> Pilot of Evangelion device #0. Reticent, rarely showing her emotions, a nihilist. She's 14.
>
> Katsuragi Misato
>
> Voice by: Mitsuishi Kotono
>
> Introduced as being like Shinji's older sister. She appears to be an optimist, but she has a core of firmness. Her private life is quite..... She's 29.
>
> (Ritsuko image) Akagi Ritsuko
>
> Voice by: Yamaguchi Yuriko
>
> The person responsible for the Evangelion development team. Intellectual, firm. She and Misato are close friends. 30.
>
> (Shinji image) Ikari Shinji
>
> Voice by: Ogata Megumi
>
> Protagonist of the stories. He becomes the pilot of the #1 Evangelion device. He's a relatively obedient honor-student type. He's 14.
>
> (Asuka image) Soryu Asuka Langley
>
> Voice by: Miyamura Yuko
>
> Pilot of the #2 Evangelion device. High-spirited personality, Japanese-German ancestry, from the American quarter. 14.
--["Skill Up"](http://web.archive.org/web/20001215150600/www.acsys.com/~tallman/newtype_e.html); ("From Newtype, April 4, p. 4, article entitled "Skill Up"." Internal evidence dates this to April 1995)
[^evarnewtype]: The _Eva R FAQ_ [quotes](http://web.archive.org/web/20041224092649/http://www.eva-r.com/faq/evarfaqeoe.html) 'Whom Angels Destroy", L Jagi Lamplighter, _Animefantastique_ V1 #2 (Summer/99)':
> "How could I think of doing another old-fashioned robot anime? Our reason was that we though it would be good to put on TV a robot anime that was not sponsored by a toy company. Robot anime has been stuck in a pattern, and we wanted to break out of it. For example, I wonder if a person over the age of twenty who likes robots is really happy?"
> LD Liner Notes Vol.4
>
> Voices from the Cast - Miyamura Yuko
>
>
> ...
> Director Anno: "Hey, what kind of stuffed animal do you like?"
>
> Miyamura: "Monkeys (heart mark)"
>
>
> ...
> [Note: Asuka's stuffed monkey doll is a pre-Eva character drawn by Miyamura Yuko, and is her trademark, appearing in many of her other works and sometimes her autograph.]
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-December/040737.html>
> A question from a listener (for Kotono [Mitsuishi]), "Is there any new TV show that you will be doing a voice for this spring? Is there any new show that you will be doing with Megumi?" \
> Megumi [Hayashibara] said, "Well not this spring, but this fall. Evangelion. We will start recording the voices soon." \
> Kotono said, "It has robots, and a boy rides in it. I still don't know much about it." \
> Megumi said, "I'm surprised that I'm doing a girl who doesn't talk much at all." \
> Kotono said, "Yeah, there are three who ride the robots." \
> Megumi said, "The cute girl, the boy (Ogata Megumi), and the quiet girl (me). I have to challenge something new." \
> Kotono said, "For me this is the first time I'm doing a role of someone older than myself." \
> Megumi said, "I also auditioned for that role too. But the director suddenly asked me to audition for the other role too. I thought that it wasn't me, but you never know what happens."
--25 March 1995 episode of Tokyo Boogie Nights radio show, [Hitoshi Doi](http://www.usagi.org/doi/seiyuu/radio/boogie/19950325.html); in the same show, Megumi Hayashibara discusses her surprise at the male homosexual villains in the recently airing _Sailor Moon_ - one of which seiyuu, Ishida Akira, would voice Kaworu Nagisa
> What I read in Evangelion Design Work, is that, Mr. Anno asked every staff on the team to write out what the ending of the TV series should be and in the Design Book Yamashita Ikuto (the main mecha designer) re-printed his story...
>
> BTW, Mr. Anno ask the staff to do that as a way to generate ideas/leads for his own ending.
--<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-August/019406.html> (Tentative guess at 1995 rather than '94)
- [_Evangelion Design Work](http://wiki.evageeks.org/Sore_o_Nasumono) (the aforementioned Yamashita book; partial translation of his movie proposal; next to nothing on his TV ending)
> Yesterday I bought _"Sore wo Nasu mono: Shin Seiki EVANGELION design works"_ by YAMASHITA Ikuto and KIO Seiji. ISBN number is 4-04-852908-0. On page 44, YAMASHITA comments:
> " Well, 'serious' fans may feel anger that I got inspiration of EVA-02 from synchronized-swimmer-gay(*1) with goggles who appears with crying 'SEXY DYNAMITES!' before the last stage of PC-Engine game 'CHOU-ANIKI'(*2)"
> (*1) not a typo of "synchronized-swimmer-guy".
> (*2) "Chou-ANIKI" is, IIRC, a shooting game. What's peculiar of the game is, both background story and all the characters are written/designed under the concept of "stereotypical image of muscular gay" ( again, not "muscular guy" ).
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-March/012161.html>
> "In 1995, Sadamoto told Newtype magazine what led him to volunteer for the manga job:
>
>> 'Four years after Nadia, I began to think it would be fun to write and plan a manga. At the time I had no experience in that area, but it was something I really wanted to try. Everyone wanted to see my previous work or sales figures, but I had nothing that would prove I was a bona fide comic creator'
>
> The approaching release of Gainax's new series gave Sadamoto that chance to prove himself.
>
> Resisting the doubts of his Gainax colleagues, Sadamoto took the scripts and storyboards for the TV episodes, and began producing 24 pages a month for Shonen Ace magazine.
>
>> 'When I started on the manga, we'd only plotted about five or six episodes, so I didn't have too much of an idea where we were going. We hadn't even decided what colour Evangelion was going to be, or how to design the cockpit! Also, although I was very well acquainted with certain characters through my assignments as a designer, I had to immerse myself in the rest of the Evangelion universe, in whose creation I hadn't been so closely involved.'
>
> For this reason, the first few issues of the manga kept extremely close to the TV storyline. But Sadamoto was already using the manga to play up his own interests, accentuating elements that might have passed the viewing audience by.
>
> In the manga version, the first shot of the underwater angel attack shows it drifting past the submerged hulk of the Gainax building. The character of Doctor Ikari is slightly more sympathetic: the Sadamoto version permits him a relieved smile when Shinji agrees to pilot the Evangelion. It also puts the early episodes back into chronological order, ditching the anime's flashback approach which saves Shinji's first battle until the end of episode two.
>
>> 'Of course I wanted to add as much to it as I could,' says Sadamoto, 'and to try and make the manga version slightly different. The TV series is very much dominated by Hideaki Anno and the staff, but the manga is a "Sadamoto Brand" product, because I've been able to devote myself to it.'
>
> Sadamoto recognised early that the anime team would always have more success with the moving, full-colour battle scenes, and so concentrates more on the characters' thoughts and feelings. Consequently, there is more in the manga on the psychological damage suffered by the pilots, and extra scenes of Shinji recuperating in the hospital. Most notably, there is a cycle of dream sequences in which Shinji encounters his mother, only to see her transform into a fearsome Evangelion machine."
--[_Manga Mania_](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-April/012885.html), 1998?
Hayao Miyazaki, from January 1995 _Comic Box_, ["I Understand NAUSICAA a Bit More than I Did a Little While Ago"](http://www.comicbox.co.jp/e-nau/e-nau.html#7) (compare [Anno's 2010](#p-18) memories about making new _Nausicaa_):
> "MIYAZAKI; Nausicaa and Kushana are very similar-they are two sides of the same coin. But Kushana, whose background I showed a little of, has some deep, physical wounds. I think that she had the capacity to become an extremely fair ruler. But I didn't know if a competent front line commander was capable of being a competent ruler, so I didn't make her one. I made her a surrogate ruler, someone who could take the place of the king. I thought that she could be limited to that role. But as I wrote about her, I kept feeling sorry for her. Her character wasn't being communicated through the writing. I was perplexed. I thought that I had to touch on her relationship with her mother and that I had to depict her more clearly, but I had only one page in which to do all that. In the end, though, I had no choice but to get to it.
>
> - I hadn't thought about it that deeply. Mr. Anno (director of 'Fushigi no Umi no Nadia') previously sent a note saying that he would like to write a story with Kushana as the heroine. I feel that it would be a rather interesting story.
>
> MIYAZAKI: No, I don't think so. It would be boring. He just wants to play war games. I don't dislike playing war-I think that the battle scene I did in volume 3 was done perfectly. It was done well enough that I could say "See! Told you so!!"-but that's just overweening pride. When it comes to depicting war, I think that I can do it just as well as anyone else. But Nausicaa is not a manga about war.
>
> - But [obstinately] what's wrong with having an hour and a half long fighting scene with Kushana as a peerless front line commander?
>
> MIYAZAKI: It's useless. Terrible. Well, that goes without saying, doesn't it? If that's the only plan that's been made then it would be much better to just give up the movie entirely. [laughs] Lots of movies about peerless front line commanders have already been done in America. 'Combat' for example."
> --- What was the reason you wanted to do an original work, despite these circumstances?
>
> Anno: Of course, for myself (laughs). There is always a very personal reason for creating [something]. There is probably no need to say any more [than that] here.
>
> --- Even so, insisting on something original-?
>
> Anno: It's probably so my self-existence will remain within the film.
--_Newtype_ January 1995; "Creator's Talk - Anno Hideaki x Yoshiyuki Sadamoto", [untranslated transcript](http://homepage3.nifty.com/mana/siryou1.htm); excerpt by [Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=420652#420652); there is [apparently](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-May/028315.html) another interview in the January issue: "on page 14 it's between Anno and a couple of the Seiyuu"
### Episode 8
<http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=289843#289843>
"Didn't quite understand this, but might be part of a draft for episode#8?": <http://ameblo.jp/tetsuyasan/entry-10351913360.html>
Google Translate doesn't help; tentatively assigned to 1995: if episode 8, might be 1994?
### Episode 24
[NGE episode 24 drafts overview](http://the-liliquarium.livejournal.com/622.html). Draft 1:
- <http://web.archive.org/web/20071011104241/homepage3.nifty.com/kyrie/story24-1-1.htm>
- <http://the-liliquarium.livejournal.com/1237.html>
- <http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:Episode_24_Draft_1_%28Translation%29>
Draft 2:
- <http://web.archive.org/web/20070311143105/homepage3.nifty.com/kyrie/story24-2-1.htm>
- <http://the-liliquarium.livejournal.com/1482.html>
- <http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:Episode_24_Draft_2_%28Translation%29>
[EGF.org Discussion of drafts, extra material](http://forum.evageeks.org/thread/7702/NGE-Ep24-Script-First-and-Second-Drafts/)
Independent coverage of Draft 1's invocation of _[Bruges-la-Morte](!Wikipedia)_:
- <http://www.dma.aoba.sendai.jp/~acchan/EVA/Angels/Bruges.html>
- <http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dma.aoba.sendai.jp%2F~acchan%2FEVA%2FAngels%2FBruges.html&sl=ja&tl=en>
- [Olivier Hagué's mention of the drafts and Bruges](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-March/039397.html)
See also Patrick Yip's comments on the archaic and [feminine naming](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-March/011357.html) of Kaworu
## 1995 S
## 1995 T
- 1995-animerica-newdirectionrobotanime.pdf
- 1995-ebert-chicagosuntimes-honneamisereview.txt
- 1995-mangazine-previewdescription.pdf
# 1996
## 1996 P
> "Because there is no real original in this world but one's life."
--Anno, [Studio Voice October 1996](http://johakyu.net/lib/2007/07/2007-07-27-000536.php); [translated by Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=420652#420652)
> Interviewer: Is it possible that the fates of the characters in the manga (drawn by Sadamoto) will differ from the anime?
>
> Sadamoto: Well, that's possible. I might have everybody die, for example. Maybe something like, "This is getting difficult to keep up... Okay, next month is the final episode!" -Kaboom! (laugh) Third Impact occurs and it's over! (laugh)
>
> Interviewer: (laugh) Well, I hope you won't let that happen...
--translated by [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-March/027330.html): "The Japanese for this interview can be found on P64 of the Photo File "Eve". (Interviewed on February 14, 1996 - before the initial airing of the TV series ended)"
- 1996-animerica-hideakipanel.pdf ([French translation](http://evaexpress.over-blog.com/article-21558589.html))
> On the unique appearance of the Evangelion Units...
>
> ANNO: There is a monster in Japan called the oni, which has two horns sticking out of its head, and the overall image of the EVA is based on that. I wanted also to have an image that beneath the image of that robot monster is a human. It's not really a robot, but a giant human, so it's different from other robot mecha such as those in Gundam.
>
> On Gunbuster's alternate future -- is it dominated by Russia?
>
> ANNO: There's a Japanese Empire. In the year 2000, the U.S. and Japan had a war, and Japan occupied Hawaii. Sorry.
>
> On the decision to have the final episode of Gunbuster in black-and-white...
>
> ANNO: When you have color, you have an extra dimension of information. Color would have gotten in the way of the sense of scale we wanted to portray with the black hole bomb. Also -- no one had ever done it before.
>
> On the date 2015 which figures in both Gunbuster and Evangelion...
>
> ANNO: The date is from an old show I liked as a kid, and it was also the year in which Tetsuwan Atom took place.
>
> ...On anime creators who inspired him...
>
> ANNO: Outside of my staff, Mr. Yoshiyuki Tomino. Tomino's Mobile Suit Gundam and Space Runaway Ideon are my favorite anime besides Yamato. Hayao Miyazaki, with whom I worked on Nausicaa, animating the scene where the God-Soldier fires, was also a mentor to me.
>
> ...On how the protagonist of Evangelion reflects Anno himself...
>
> ANNO: Shinji does reflect my character, both in conscious and unconscious part. In the process of making Evangelion, I found out what kind of person I am. I acknowledged that I'm a fool.
>
> On his religious beliefs...
>
> ANNO: I don't belong to any kind of organized religion, so I guess I could be considered agnostic. Japanese spiritualism holds that there is kami (spirit) in everything, and that's closer to my own beliefs.
>
> On whether he is a vegetarian like Nadia and Rei ...
>
> ANNO: I like tofu. I just don't want to eat meat or fish. It's not for religious reasons.
>
> On expressing himself through animation...
>
> ANNO: Animation makes sense to people in the process of their seeing it. So when people get confused by my themes, or cannot get the overall message, the connection is not really going through, because it didn't satisfy that person. So there would be less meaning for that individual. There has to be a relationship that comes into being between the person watching and what the character's saying in the animation itself.
>
> ...On Evangelion's success...
>
> ANNO: As for all the merchandising, it's just a matter of economics. It's strange that Evangelion has been a hit. Everyone in it is sick!
>
> On his next project...
>
> ANNO: Another TV show, probably some kind of space adventure.
>
> ...On the future of the anime industry...
>
> ANNO: The creators have to change their frame of mind for the field to advance. And it doesn't look too hopeful in today's Japan. It's in a critical condition right now. I don't think there's any bright future. That's because the people who are producing it are not doing well. But there's also problems in the people who are watching it. The people who make it, and the people who want it, they're always wanting the same things. They've been making only similar things for the past ten years, with no sense of urgency. To get it going once more, you need to force people to go outside, to go out again.
>
> ...On his hobbies and interests...
>
> ANNO: My hobby is scuba diving, and besides science fiction, I like to read romance novels written by women. Since I'm a male, I don't really know the emotions of women. And because I want to understand their feelings, and create more realistic female characters, this is something I have to pursue.
>
> To an American fan who boasted of having spent all his schoolbook money on anime goods...
>
> ANNO: You're a fool. Study harder. If I could go back in time and tell my college-age self something, I would tell him to study harder, too.
>
> ...On getting into the anime industry...
>
> ANNO: If you want to get into anime, my best advice to you as a creator is to please have diverse interests in things besides animation. Look outward, first of all. Most anime makers are basically autistic. They have to try and reach out, and truly communicate with others. I would guess that the greatest thing anime has ever achieved is the fact that we're holding a dialogue right here and now.
--"Virtual Panel! Meet Hideaki Anno," Animerica 4:9, p. 27 <http://web.archive.org/web/20020606012703/http://masterwork.animemedia.com/Evangelion/anno.html>
> "This was a one-page transcript of Anno's remarks at Anime Expo '96. This is hard to imagine today, but at that point (July 1996) the series had been over for two months, yet many American fans still hadn't seen it--not because they didn't want to, but because there was as yet no digital distribution of anime, fan or licensed--only by getting a physical copy of the tape could you watch it. This limited the speed at which an audience could grow, of course, and ADV's version was not yet on the market. Anno said a few things at the AX'96 panel that have been remembered, but what I find most interesting is "when asked about Evangelion's last two episodes, which upset many fans, Anno cooly replied, 'I have no problem with them. If there's a problem, it's all with you guys. Too bad.'" I'm not absolutely sure (it may be in my transcription notes) but I think Anno might have said "too bad" in English, presumably for emphasis."
--[Carl Horn on the AX panel](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2009-November/004949.html)
- [_Aerial Magazine_ version](http://web.archive.org/web/20070927035716/www.aoianime.hu/evangelion/index.php?page=interanno) of Anime Expo '96 Anno panel
> "Pen-Pen was a creation of Sadamoto, to soften the atmosphere. But I tended to forget its existence."
>
> "I'd say Asuka. She's cute."
>
> "Last year I brought back some of your miracle drug, [melatonin](!Wikipedia)."
-- Some of [Carl Horn's](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=16582#16582) (TODO: ask him for rest of 3 pages) random notes of things Anno said
> This was excerpted from the Neon Genesis Evangelion Book Two:3's letters page, featuring Q&A with Hiroyuki Yamaga from Fanime Con '98.
>
> And speaking of letters pages, Book One:3 had a question Widya asked Hideaki Anno at Anime Expo '96:
>
>> WS: Would you consider yourself to be more of the John Lennon or Paul McCartney of Gainax?
>
>> HA: I don't listen to the Beatles, so I don't know.
--[Fuuma Monou](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-June/015467.html)
> There are too many painful things for people to go on living in reality.
>
> _Thus, humans run and hide in dreams_.
>
> _They watch films as entertainment_
>
>
> ...
> For the sake of people who forget reality until the bill comes due, who _want to devote themselves to happy fallacies_. I guess that's our job in the entertainment and service sector.
>
>
> ...
> Postscript. Yesterday, when I was in a state of mental collapse after my
>
> latest work had ended, I was moved deep within my heart by an encouraging
>
> phone call I received. The words of concern proceeding from the receiver
>
> became joy on my end as, with a exultant face, my whole body was buoyed. In
>
> secret, I rejoiced in receiving some recognition for myself. Thank you from
>
> the bottom of my heart.
--"A Dream World That Hasn't Forfeited its Goal" --Anno Hideaki, [Ghibli ga Ippai Liner Notes](http://web.archive.org/web/20071014224218/keyframe.cjas.org/~mneideng/trans/misc/annoghib.txt); apparently dates to before [August 1996](http://www.ex.org/1.5/24-ghibli.html)
> "Evangelion is like a puzzle, you know. Any person can see it and give his/her own answer. In other words, we're offering viewers to think by themselves, so that each person can imagine his/her own world. We will never offer the answers, even in the theatrical version. As for many Evangelion viewers, they may expect us to provide the 'all-about Eva' manuals, but there is no such thing. Don't expect to get answers by someone. Don't expect to be catered to all the time. We all have to find our own answers."
>
> ...Evangelion is my life and I have put everything I know into this work. This is my entire life. My life itself."
>
> ...For [my generation, after the political failures of the previous], there was nothing to speak of but what was within the 'magic box' (television). It's pathetic, but we had no other options. I think admitting that is a start.
>
> ...[Anno says something to the effect that he (consciously) identifies with Shinji, Asuka, and Misato, but Kaworu and especially Rei belong to his unconscious (Kaworu is his "shadow").]
- the untranslated [11/96 Newtype](http://homepage3.nifty.com/mana/ecom4.htm) ([mirror](http://home.gamer.com.tw/creationDetail.php?sn=863335)) interview with Anno; translation sourcing:
1. [Protoculture Addicts #43](http://www.cjas.org/~echen/articles/spring97/05_03b.html), translated by Miyako Graham from 11/96 Newtype
2. [Protoculture Addicts #43](http://www.evaotaku.com/omake/anno.html)
3. [Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/post/420652/Books-Shizo-Parano/#420652)
4. [Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/post/405232/Books-Shizo-Parano/#405232)
[Protoculture Addicts #39 excerpts](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-September/003354.html)
> According to what he said, making EVANGELION was a very difficult job, as we can imagine. He really looked tired and his words were sometimes too harsh to be reported here.
>
> ..."EVANGELION is my life", Anno says, "and I have put everything I know into this work. This is my entire life. My life itself!" As many fans want to know about the ending of this series, episodes 25 & 26, he says that he is making a different version and those two girls (Misato and Ritsuko) are dead in the end. He says, "I truly believe that sex and violence are part of our human life. These days in Japan, I think Japanese children need to know about those things more... instead of being protected too much from the society. Those matters are a little like a poison: we need to give them to the children little by little to establish an immunity, so they would have the ability and mental strength to resist. A lot of youth I know just don't have this immunity, and when something terrible happens, they can't deal with it. In a way, the poison can be the medication at the same time, and I believe that the more we know about those things, the more we can protect ourselves against specific matters."
>
> Among Japanese fans, Rei is the most popular character from this series, and I asked him why. He says, "Rei-chan is very popular... I think that she's very quiet and doesn't wish to talk very much, and doesn't complain. In Japan, I suppose that girls like that are very much desired. They're quiet, patient, and don't complain and work hard. As for Rei-chan, she was created as a pilot for Evangelion... in other words, she is a clone of a human being. When we humans are born, in general, we just show up without having a purpose in our human life! Later, we find a purpose and choose our own way and decide how to live our life. Rei-chan's case is not like that. She was created solely for the purpose of being an EVA's pilot and I'm not quite sure if she's happy."
>
> ...Anno-san says, "Gendo is a type of person who can see and think about the welfare of an organization as a whole. In other words, he'd do anything to succeed. He takes drastic and extreme measures by fair means or foul, or by hook or by crook, in order to accomplish his own purpose. In some ways, he's mean. He hardly cares about Shinji."
>
> ...I asked him what kind of foods he likes, and he says, "For my daily diet, I eat and love tofu, and I like fish too. I'm not a strict vegetarian but I just don't like the taste of meat, so I end up eating vegetables."
>
> ...He also says that he has been trying to read romance novels. He says, "I'm kinda shy myself and I don't know much about the feelings of young women. In order to write something like EVANGELION, to create Misato and other young women, I have to understand more about feelings and their behaviors. Reading romance novels seems to help a lot."
>
> Basically, he says he practices no religion, but he believes in the human spirit. He's very much interested in studying Christianity, but personally he feels he hasn't received much influence from it.
>
> Now, this is Anno-san's question: "Why has our animation become so popular in foreign countries?"
>
> ...To conclude, here is an extract from an interview of Hideaki Anno in the November issue of NEWTYPE magazine (1996-11, pg. 20-23):
>
>> "I didn't have any interest in studying human psychology in the past. I only took a course about it at university, but I suppose I always had something in my mind to analyze human psyche. I thought I wasn't interested in humans very much, but then, when I started talking about myself, I needed words to explain. So, I started reading books on psychology. From Episode #16, EVANGELION's story went into the direction to ask just what the human mind is all about inside. I wrote about myself. My friend lent me a book on human psychological illness and this gave me a shock, as if I finally found what I needed to say."
>>
>> "Lately, due to the ending of episodes #25 & 26, some people started watching EVANGELION. They were not anime fans. In fact, many of them are females and they tell me that they really enjoyed episode #25, objectively. Most anime fans are furious. I understand their anger. I can't help laughing when hard-core anime fans say that we did a very lousy job, with intentional negligence. No, we didn't. No staff members did a lousy job. I feel sad that those fans couldn't see our efforts. Personally, I think the original TV version we showed ended beautifully."
>>
>> "EVANGELION is like a puzzle, you know. Any person can see it and give his/her own answer. In other words, we're offering viewers to think by themselves, so that each person can imagine his/her own world. We will never offer the answers, even in the theatrical version. As for many EVANGELION viewers, they may expect us to provide the "all-about EVA" manuals, but there is no such thing. Don't expect to get answers by someone. Don't expect to be catered to all the time. We all have to find our own answers."
--Miyako Graham, [Protoculture Addicts #43 quoting Anno at AX96, and a _Newtype_](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2007-May/004160.html)
> "The design concept in Eva was that the characters themselves should lean towards a relatively subdued appearance. But the plug suits! Gaudy as hell. Embarrassing--I mean, they almost look like, y'know, body paint. Naturally, I thought the cos-players wouldn't even consider attempting it.
>
> But there were, at the December '95 Comic Market, the February '96 Wonder Festival, at the... You know, I hate crowds, so ordinarily the whole cos-play scene is no more than a distant reality. But this... this, I had to see. Specifically, I had to see the girls in sky-blue wigs, wearing white plugsuits. Mmmm. I had to see it.
--Sadamoto, manga [vol 2](http://www.evamonkey.com/writings_sadamoto03.php) commentary
> "[The show had] a 'live feeling.' I [Anno] was creating everything in accordance with the situation at the time....The truth is, the 'complementation project,' up until about half-way through the series, I was doing things without having clearly decided [about] the complementation of human beings, [about] what is being complimented."
>
> ...I [Anno] really hate the fact that animation - or at least "Evangelion," the work I've been doing - has become merely a "place of refuge." Nothing but a place where one escapes from reality - by becoming deeply absorbed in it, [people] simply ran from the pain of reality, and from there was hardly anything that came back to reality. To that extent I feel like [the work] did not arrive [at reality]. Steadily the number of people taking refuge [in the work] increases, and if this keeps up, in the extreme case, it would become a religion. It would become the same [situation as with] the Aum adherents and Shoko Asahara. Perhaps, if I did things correctly, I would have had the potential to become the founder of a new religion, but I hate [that idea]. For clutching at straws [lit. "grasping at a spider's web"], one person is enough."
--Translated by Numbers-kun; [first quote](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=420652#420652), [second quote](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=485240#485240); from an otherwise untranslated July 1996 _Animage_ interview with Anno and Yuko Miyamura: <http://johakyu.net/lib/2007/07/2007-07-27-000535.php>
> "The sudden abandonment of the narrative conclusion and puzzles of the fictional world that had been constructed up until the 24th episode, brought about an intense shock in animation fans....
>
> It's fair to say that Evangelion is a story which depicts "anxiety without a cause" which exhaustively ends with a convincing feeling of tension. It's clear that this kind of feeling is widespread when we look at the AUM incident and its repercussions. On this point, the work has a striking feeling of the present. However, the thing that we should pay closer attention to is the paradoxical whereby feelings of anxiety are always determined materialistically, but for the people who are caught in the center of this kind of anxiety, they can only experience it abstractly....
>
> One of my friends who is from Poland described his completely accurate impression of Rei as being related to the problems of post-war, in other words Rei is linked to the problems of Bosnia,etc. At the same time I thought that the room overlaps with a science laboratory, particularly a medical laboratory. Therefore, ANNO intersected images of refugees/ trauma with the "scientific" -- this is the only word that can accurately express the situation -- motif of stark anti-decorativeness. (After all, this would be linked to questions about AUM, more specifically to the problem of "Satyan," AUM's scientific laboratories) Rei's solitude is grounded in a completely tactile substantiality which gives us extremely realistic images of the discommunication that children of the present face. And these images of discommunication belong neither to Kogyal("child girl")-like autism nor to otaku-like autism which has been defined in opposition to Kogyal-like autism. (And these two types of autism are nothing more than the opposing gender extremities of post-modern decorativeness)
>
> Motifs such as charming beautiful girls and hi-tech machines which has strengthened the barrenness of anime, and in the end became important elements in his [Hideaki Anno's] work. It became crucial to articulate 90's-like problems through stereotypes and abstract motifs. To begin with "Evangelion" is an extremely otaku-like work which was by lots of details referenced from former anime and science fiction films, from the design concept of cockpit to the brand of beer (Here in this aspect I don't have time to treat it, although it's important) In other words, it can be said that ANNO broke through the literary imagination of the 1980's by strongly mixing and re-editting the motifs of the anime-like imagination, which had been completely barren for some ten years....
>
> In the opening scene of "Evangelion" he already inserts a cut of a character which had initially been introduced in the 24th episode. The countless devices of this type means that Anno started the broadcast after conceiving the total structure pretty clearly [indeed?]. Actually, the speed of the narrative development of numerous foreshadowing in the first few episodes indicates that his work was made by reverse calculation of a precise, total construction. The flavor of the episodes of the first half is consistently the same. (Some comical episodes after the 8th episode are considered within this consistency). This story revived the genre of animation and at the same time, clarified the limits of the literary imagination...
>
> In the opening scene of "Evangelion" he already inserts a cut of a character which had initially been introduced in the 24th episode. The countless devices of this type means that Anno started the broadcast after conceiving the total structure pretty clearly. Actually, the speed of the narrative development of numerous foreshadowing in the first few episodes indicates that his work was made by reverse calculation of a precise, total construction. The flavor of the episodes of the first half is consistently the same. (Some comical episodes after the 8th episode are considered within this consistency). This story revived the genre of animation and at the same time, clarified the limits of the literary imagination.
>
> According to Anno himself, this change of attitude came about while creating and producing the work. "Evangelion" was received enthusiastically among anime fans. He said that in noticing that autistic, enthusiast reception, he thought he should changed the entire conceptual structure of the work, and in the end that's what he did. After all of the episodes were broadcast, in what looks like a self-tormenting, auto-destructive critique of anime fans that ANNO would repeat many times in radio interviews, specialty anime magazines, etc., he would clearly reiterate the personal intellectual history of MIYAZAKI and OSHII. All three of them isolated themselves from "anime-like things" owing to their hate of the autism after they achieved overwhelming success among anime fans. But ANNO is completely different from them on two critical points. The first difference occurs in "Evangelion" with its simultaneous deep absorption in the anime-like and it's distance from it. In Anno's case the change was terribly compressed. In Miyazaki's case, the change occurred between the time of the success of "Lupin the Third, The Castle of Cagliostro" (1979) and "Totoro," and in Oshii's case he took about ten years between the time of the television version of "Urusei Yatsura" and "Mobile Police, Patlabor 2."
>
> In the second difference, as perhaps an inevitable result of that temporal compression, in ANNO the successful critique of anime was brought about by the logic of acceleration and multiplication, while in the case of MIYAZAKI and OSHII the critique of anime succeeded because of the logic of removal. The last half of "Evangelion" takes the form of a critique of previous anime works through developing all the narrative possibilities and anime-like expressions and pushing them to their limits; in other words producing a totality of the anime-like. Simply put, in the second half of "Evangelion" ANNO produces a super-complicated and super-high speed anime and thereby achieved a qualitative change. Several compositions were made for the purposes of constructing a 90's savior narrative were rapidly inverted and were instead employed to tear to shreds the interactive communication among the characters. This means that for ANNO, he deliberately cut off communication with anime fans who supposedly can only appreciate works by identifying themselves with and investing their emotions into the characters....
>
> There are no compromises in Anno's second half. By employing difficult lines and the omission of mise-en-scene , quick scene shifts, and busy cuts with few frames (in animation this is extremely luxurious because it requires a new illustration for speeds less than one frame-per-second) he manages to condense the narrative which would usually have required several episodes into one. For example, Rei dies in the time of just two minutes. We are overwhelmed by its speed. On the other hand simultaneously Anno will one after another invert riddles in the second part of the story that had been solved in the first half. Therefore, if we only watch an episode only one time, the plot will be almost impossible to follow. (In other words this means that ANNO completely disregarded the age of the viewers who would have been expected to be watching at that broadcast time following the rules of the televisual medium. ) Nevertheless, in the last half of "Evangelion" in a dimension completely separate from that of the narrative logic, he was fairly successful at communicating the feeling of anxiety and the misery of the characters who are one after another wounded to the point of death. How did he accomplish that?
>
> The last half of "Evangelion" gradually loses the co-ordination with the complicated foreshadowing that was installed in the first half and loses the science-fictional, simulational reasonableness of the composition of the fictional world. (Which is natural given by the change of direction) However, it doesn't mean that the structure became careless. Instead a density and strange necessity arises. For example in episode #22 there is the unfolding of an incomprehensible story as Eva brings down the angel on a satellite orbit only by the throw of a special spear. A rational explanation is not even provided inside the story. But certainly the unfolding of the story possesses a certain inevitability with the flow of the scenes. That "inevitability" which exists especially independent from the narrative strategy is the true worth of the last half of "Evangelion." That inevitability allows for the dissemination of despair and tension....
>
> To put it boldly, from episode 17 until episode 24 (but especially in episode 18, 19, 22, and 23) at the moment when that condensed unfolding reaches its highest point, he several times makes me thing of GODARD. That is not an explanation related to the quality of cinema itself. That doesn't mean that ANNO tried to cite or parody GODARD. Anybody can borrow stereotypical "Godard-like" images. (Of course ANNO himself does it. For instance using lots of subtitles)"
-- ["Anime or something like it: Neon Genesis Evangelion"](http://www.ntticc.or.jp/pub/ic_mag/ic018/intercity/higashi_E.html), Hiroki Azuma; the quotes from Anno are from an untranslated Hiroki Azuma interview with Anno: <http://johakyu.net/lib/2007/07/2007-07-27-000536.php>. [Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=410273#410273) translates part of the interview:
> Azuma: Finally, only one question about the "set up" of the work. The enemy called "Angel" has no concrete image. It might be a pyramid, a ring of light, a virus.... in what way did you intend that?
>
> Anno: They were paradoxically presented as things without form. For me the idea of an "enemy" is ambiguous, because my relationship to "society" is ambiguous..... The adults of the previous generation taught us that, despite fighting against the system, they were not able to accomplish anything.
>
> Azuma: I felt it was awfully close to the image of the enemy [presented] by Aum Shinrikyo.
>
> Anno: Aum is part of my generation. I understand them well.[^aum]
>
> Azuma: Although I'm roughly ten years your junior, from my perspective there seems to be a strong sympathy with Aum from people of your generation. But if you say "an Aum-like thing," you have to distinguish it from the reality of Aum, right?
>
> Anno: We create works that "rationalize" or "sublimate" our "Aum-like" parts. The people who joined Aum did not do this. Hating society, they cut themselves off by their own volition. I wish Aum itself had "sublimated," but I think instead it steadily came apart and finally collapsed, ending with this act of self-destruction. Even though there was, to a certain extent, some talent there, overall I had no sympathy for the organization.
[^aum]: As well Anno might; Japanese commentators seemed to often link Aum Shinrikyo with _otaku_; [Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=485240#485240) offers "a roundtable conversation between Shinichiro Kurimoto (of homopants.com~!) and Shunsuke Serizawa on Aum that was translated in Japan Echo (Autumn 1995)":
> "Serizawa: I'm inclined to see this as a crime planned and carried out by _otaku_, maladjusted young people immersed in solitary pursuits. I wrote as much in a recent newspaper article. That one word clarified an awful lot, I thought.
>
> Kurimoto: _Otaku_ out for revenge against society. That's my theory."
> Omori: However, [Ryu] Mitsuse-san is more governed by something like an Eastern sense of the transience of things, but the world of Evangelion is more along the lines of Western civilization......
>
> Anno: I dislike Western civilization. I don't place much trust in Western civilization.
>
> Omori: That is, [you consider it] as something one must repudiate? Not positive -
>
> Anno: No, it's something like, because I don't care that much about it, I can make use of it. If I were a Christian believer I couldn't have inserted Christian elements [into Eva] in that way. I would have been scared to.
>
> Omori: No question. Because you have no attachment to [Christianity], you can make use of the names of the angels without being concerned. Ah, [you can use] these names because the word makes a strong impression, for example. [You can use them] as you think appropriate.
>
> Anno: I think that if I look at something like the equation of [the terms] "apostle" and "angel" from the point of view of Westerners, even I receive complaints it doesn't make any difference. Well, there is a single American [see the [Michael House](#michael-house) interview for his version] in our company, and he scolded me about various things. "You can't do this." As I had expected. But I did those things [anyway], I think, without taking any notice of that.
--excerpt from discussion between Hideaki Anno and SF critic/translator Nozomi Omori; translation by [Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=491215#491215) ([full original](http://homepage3.nifty.com/mana/siryou4-1.htm))
- Johakyu.net's (untranslated) Anno writings, statements, interviews, etc. 1983-2010: <http://johakyu.net/lib/anno-interviews-year.php>
> 'The first film will be a feature-length edit of the first 24 episodes, the second, an all-new version of the final two which will provide, according to Anno, "the same ending, but from a different perspective."'
--[_The Anime Guide_](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=421779#421779)
> "Check the second last color page of the filmbook Vol.9. There it says "the smile of Shinji -- who is complemented. And then this is one ending, out of many possible ones".
--[Patrick Yip](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-September/020655.html)
> "...here is the literal translation: [TV Filmbook Vol.9 (Ep26), p.95, seq.19 checkpoint]
>
>> "Congratulations" "Congratulations" "Congratulations" Shinji's friends, acquaintances and parents unanimously congratulate him. Amidst the many words of congratulations, a smile appears at the corners of Shinji's mouth. A happy/contented smile -- that is the figure of the complemented/instrumentalized Shinji. This ending is just one shape, one possibility out of many."
--[Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2000-September/037424.html)
> "...that particular checkpoint at the bottom of Newtype TV filmbook #9 p25 has a big "maybe" attached. This is not the usual "appears" or "seems", but instead an explicit "maybe" (ka mo shirenai). The literal translation is:
>
>> 'Misato stretched out her hand to Shinji. At this time she may have intended to offer her body to comfort Shinji. However, this was merely substitutive behavior in order to assuage her own loneliness.'
--[Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-December/040760.html)
> 'Becoming more and more emotionally intense in later episodes, the clever and intricate design work, otaku in-jokes and bouncey "fan service" expected from Gainax are in EVANGELION interleaved with bizarre, brutal, surrealistic and shocking scenes which caused much controversy and even calls for a boycott against the show. Public outrage over the ambiguous, mocking conclusion of the series - combined with the factor of EVANGELION's vast popularity - led to the announcement from Gainax that a double-feature EVA "movie" would be released in the spring of 1997. The first film will be a feature-length edit of the first 24 episodes, the second, an all-new version of the final two which will provide, according to Anno, "the same ending, but from a different perspective."'
--[_The Complete Anime Guide: Japanese Animation Film Directory & Resource Guide_ (second edition)](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=421779#421779) (1 February 1997)
> Okamoto (O) said that he watched _Evangelion_ twice though he watched the ending first. He said the reference material he received along with the video has "controversial" written in it. He did not understand at first but later knew why once he watched the whole series.
>
>
> O - _Gunbuster_ is easier to understand. The final episode in the second video is black-and-white. I think it might be done to make it stand out - I men the "Okarinasai" at the end.
>
> A (Anno) - My generation was the age when black and white moved to color. I would like people living now to see how great to have color. That was 35 monochrome.
>
> O - I love black and white. Perhaps nearly half of my works are black and white?
>
> A - Recently there are more black and white CM on TV. Poster too. Somehow it is getting popular.
>
> O - And then there is partial coloring.
>
> A - "Part Color"... Everyone is now so familiar with beautiful full color, so on the contrary they see that as unusual.
>
> O - But development cost is high. In the past development solution for black-and-white was always available. Now you need to order it first and then they make the development solution.
>
> A - If it's color development can be done in the same day. For black and white, they told me to give them 2 days and it became a problem to me schedule-wise. If there is a rush, they would not get it done unless they have 2 days.
>
> O - But that thing does not fade. Print is easy to fade as time passes by.
>
> A - It becomes reddish...
>
>
> Then some talk about Okamoto's _Nikudan_. Anno watched it twice and Okamoto said it's more than enough...Anno said he still remembered a lot of the scenes and how they are edited and linked.
>
> But the ones he watched most are _The longest day of Japan_ and _Battle of Okinawa_[^okinawa]. He even played it as BGV [background video] when he was doing storyboarding at one time, and then slowly his attention was drawn to the video and ended up spending 3 hours watching it.
>
> Then Okamoto talked about his filming _Battle of Okinawa_ in Okinawa and the problem with lack of manpower and resource, ended up doing one of the characters.
>
> Then Anno said it's easier in anime -- if one more character is needed just draw him. But Anno said anime and real life both have aspects that the other side may envy. For example in anime, the camera does not move, and the shadow and body motion needs to be made realistic. Even with CG it has become easier, it still has that CG feel. Anno then said for anime the main work is still about fixing the motion. Scrolling and wrapping the background is particularly inefficient.
>
> Then more flattery from Anno about how Okamoto's tempo and scene cutting is suitable for anime. And then Anno talked about frame aspect ratio -- love Cinescope and miss its disappearance. Hate standard ratio and also not like Vista. He loves the way when Cinescope aspect is used audience have to follow the scene by moving their heads which is something not possible with TV watching.
>
> Skipped the part that talks about _Blood and Sand_ [血と砂 (No English release - reads "Chi to suna"), 1965] and _Sengoku yarou_ [1963], and use of long shots. Except that Anno mentioned the fun thing with anime is that the photographer doubles as the actor in anime and in real-life you never see cameraman doubles as actor.
>
> Very technical talk about how many frames of films to use for one blink. Anno said 6-7 frames, if he does not want the scene to get noticed, he put 6, if he wants to make sure it gets noticed he put at least 9 frames. And he said that if it is familiar and static scene, even 2 frames can leave an impression. 3 frames may already make it too slow. But if it is fighting it needs 7-8 frames. Took 12 frames in film, cut may be 5-6, depending on how the pictures look. And of course in dialogue how to cut is already predetermined. He said he spent 12 hours to cut 20 min of animation. The longest time took him 24 hours.
>
> Skipped the part about talking with the audience.
>
>
> About line of eye sight:
>
> A - In the case of anime, the acting and performance usually does not take that much into account. One reason could be the character design. The eyes of the characters usually stress on the details of the eyes and this make it difficult to put acting by using line of sight. However, in Eva the character design is comparatively easier to do such acting, so I put some effort into that. Like where the character is looking at in that scene, or whether the audience are going to see the eyes or not...
>
> Because it is so fundamental I took great care about it. So unusually I put instructions in the storyboard like "Eyes are looking here". As I am influenced by director Okamoto, I used camera line of sight more than usual
>
> O - if possible, line of sight should be on somewhere close. And on direction, A would look at B and then speak, and B would look back at A in reaction. It has to be like that...
>
> A - for me, camera line of sight is often on the front. The drawing staff usually hates it. Drawing frontal face is more difficult and often it could not be done well. But if the line of sight goes the other way, it becomes hard to use it to act.
>
> O - There is power if the guy's sight is close to you
>
> A - yes, that's it. That has energy in it.
>
> A - I don't like switching between front and side. It is easier to frame the position of eyes of the characters if it is a front to front exchanges between the lines of sights of two persons. Anime is at the end a 2D thing so the amount of information is limited.
>
> When it is cut to a new scene, the audience will try to search for something to focus, and if it is a face, it will be the eyes they look first. So when the eyes have expressed the information, you can cut to another scene already. In TV anime, static scenes are many.
>
> I think this is the proper way to go. Although I think acting by eyes is very important it is also very tedious. I don't mind putting effort into doing it but somehow when I look at it later I have a feeling that it won't get noticed, or nobody cares. And then I get a bit irritated.
>
> O - Perhaps because eyes in anime characters are so big...
>
> A - That has many physical reasons. If we do not make the eyes big and treat it as a symbol for the characters, it will become difficult for many to draw.
>
> O - but one can act just by eyes. Like the position of the iris...
>
> A - true, but as the end we only have the drawings to fall back on. If we overdo that kind of serious acting, it carries a risk of looking ridiculous. Character Design is a difficult thing.
>
>
> About Director: Skipped the part about old time directors and struggles with studio about rights to edit. Except Anno said that for anime sometimes it needs to do editing without having all drawings. But he thinks editing is fun. Gather extra cuts and then try to experiment by switching the cuts or rearranging order and that is interesting. And even the question of whether to cut 2 frames or not can make a difference.
>
> About Storyboarding: More flattery from Anno about watching _Ghost Train_ and Okamoto said because of AD's mistake he once needed to take 140-150 cuts in one day.
>
>
> A - for movies, consensus is impossible
>
> O - Director must be a dictator
>
> A - He is a despot. Nothing can move forward if we have to wait until someone else makes a decision and approves. Also the personal character would not come out. In anime, a overall design called storyboard is made from the very beginning. And the production system is based on that design, so it is easier to unify opinions. On the other hand, there is an image that the director's job is over once the storyboard is decided.
>
> O - since we are on it, in _Gunbuster_ and _Eva_ last episode, there are parts in black and white, that flashback, that kind of stood out. It used quite a bit of sketch like drawings. Did the storyboard also cover that?
>
> A - It was put in there.
>
> O - Oh, those sketches were interesting. It somehow feels it's moving.
>
>
> Anime vs real-life film: Okamoto said real-life is not necessarily better. Anno said many anime directors want to do real-life. Many simply put drawings in place of real-life images and they seem to want to push anime to look closer to real life film. And both think it is not a good idea.
>
> Final comment by Anno - Animation is a kind of static world, but there is a yearn for thrill when it switches from one static world to another static world and that cut to new scene is a most efficient way to get such thrill. And he thinks Okamoto's style of film cutting has similar effect
>
> A - in a TV anime, 30 min of video has a limit of 3500 pictures. So the images cannot move as much as I want. And how to squeeze out the best from the image in such lack of motion, it is all in the cutting.
>
> [[In fact at the end of the article, it was stated the talk took place at the home of Okamoto in Ikuta-ku Kawasaki-shi Kanagawa Prefecture on Wednesday 1996 Oct 16th."](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=435659&sid=57c586e6eb75d2a5c2862d759fe039c7#435659)]
--January 1997 _Animage_ interview/discussion between Anno and film-maker [Kihachi Okamoto](!Wikipedia); [Japanese source](http://johakyu.net/lib/2008/05/2008-05-18-000850.php); [translated](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=434860#434860) by [Patrick Yip/symbv](http://forum.evageeks.org/profile.php?mode=viewprofile&u=5214)
[^okinawa]: [dororo](https://groups.google.com/group/rec.arts.anime.misc/browse_thread/thread/44d6e26454a39d9f/6ce18dfac1b36686) on `rec.arts.anime.misc`, 9 December 1999:
> "But if you really want the full skinny, I'd say Clements's piece in Manga Mania 41 is the place to go. He points out that Hideaki Anno is *such* a fan of a film called the Battle of Okinawa, and references it so much in Gunbuster, that Anno was asked to write the sleeve notes for the LD re-release of this famous warfilm. Apparently, he knows every frame."
> Nobi Nobita: "Evangelion reduced me to tears many times. It was truly the first time I cried out and my shoulders shook from weeping due to an anime. The first time it struck me was episode 14. I found the summary part well made too, but, after the commercial ended, there was the point when Rei's monologue suddenly began. I was like, uwaaaaaa.... crying (laughs). It was like that was the first time it hit me. Up to that point I had thought it was just an entertaining anime, but I felt that this was my own issue."
--[Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=489524#489524), _June_ ([original scan](http://i978.photobucket.com/albums/ae268/TTGL/24.jpg))
> --- Nobi-san was reduced to tears by Episode 14. How [did you compose] Rei's monologue?
>
> Anno: I had intended to recap the series in the first half of the episode. When I did the second half, I had long forgotten to explore what sort of person Rei was, so [I believed] it was necessary to develop her.
>
> The script for episode 16 had been written before that. At first I had planned [a scenario where] Shinji and the angel would make "first contact," but I wasn't able to pull it off.
>
> In the original conception, the languages of various countries and the cries of various animals and miscellaneous noises would appear on the screen; [selecting from] among these, the angel would finally hit upon Japanese. When this happens, there is a sharp noise, an image [suddenly] fills [the screen], and [the angel] asks if this is right for [Shinji's] thought-language or thought-patterns; it would have started from there.
>
> --- That's really cool.
>
> Anno: As far as that goes, I thought it was fine, but then when [the angel] speaks Japanese that was the end [of my conception]. Kaworu-kun had been prepared as a "human type" [angel] from the start, and I wanted to hold on to the idea of [an angel] conversing in human language until then. When I wondered, well, what will [Shinji] do after he gets taken into the angel, I wondered if this might be [his] chance for self-reflection. Episode 16's "inner space"-like environment was the first [of that sort]. That went relatively smoothly.
>
> When it came to Rei, I was completely blocked. I couldn't write anything at all. I had intended to make Rei a schizophrenic (分裂症的) character^[[NemZ](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=422173#422173) comments that [schizophrenia](!Wikipedia) doesn't fit Rei very well, but [schizoid personality disorder](!Wikipedia) *does*; to quote Wikipedia: "a personality disorder characterized by a lack of interest in social relationships, a tendency towards a solitary lifestyle, secretiveness, emotional coldness and sometimes (sexual) apathy, with a simultaneous rich, elaborate and exclusively internal fantasy world."], but when I tried to write, I couldn't think of anything - nothing at all. Finally, I thought, when writing madness, one has no choice but to become mad. At that time I consulted a bit with my friends. When I asked if there was something composed by a madman, I was loaned a "Bessatsu Takarajima"^["<http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%88%A5%E5%86%8A%E5%AE%9D%E5%B3%B6> A collection of half-book/half-magazines on a variety of subjects published by Takarajima-sha."] volume on mental illness. It was an "easy and reasonable" book [イージーでリーズナブルな本] (laughs), but inside it there was a poem written by a madman.[^madmanpoem] That was extremely good. When I read the poem I had a strong impression, as though this was the first time that I had come close. I had a feeling like a light glinting upon the tip of a sharp knife. It was certainly not the feeling of an ordinary man. That was good. If I think about it now, this sort of 'capacity' was [already] within me (laughs). ^["?? '今考えればそういう素養が自分にあったというだけの話なんですけど(笑)。'"] It's mad to believe that the writings of a madman are of the highest quality. I read that [poem] and was filled with images; I was able to write [Rei's monologue] in one sitting.
>
> It's alleged that [the monologue] was based upon another text, but in all honesty, that's not so. There was something that inspired it, but it was completely different. It's alleged that it strongly resembles someone's poem, and it that it was probably copied from it, but, "Ah, well, that man is probably crazy too" (laughs). It seems to be a famous poem. Being able to write something to the extent that it's said to be the same, I can't help thinking, "Don't I have talent, too?" (laughs)^["I haven't been able to find out much about this poem."]
>
> After the television broadcast finished, I became worse and worse, and went to see a doctor. I even seriously contemplated death. It's like [I] was empty, with no meaning to [my] existence. Without the slightest exaggeration, I had put everything I had [into Evangelion]. Really. After that finished I realized that there was nothing [left] inside of me. When I asked [the doctor?] about it afterwards, [he said?] "Ah, that is an 'identity crisis' (self-collapse) [自我崩壊]."^["I can't tell if this is the doctor speaking about Anno's crisis, or something else (something Anno heard people say about himself or about Evangelion?)."] It was a sensation as though I had taken something like extremely bad LSD. I was told, "It's amazing that you were able to do that without medication." Yeah, now, I feel very fortunate (laughs).^["I'm somewhat unclear as to who is speaking, and what refers to what, here. ^__^; Sorry! I hope it's not completely wrong, but... 'Medication' here is 'kusuri.'"] In order to determine whether or not I really wanted to die, I went up to the rooftop of this building (the GAINAX building) and stuck my foot out, waiting to lose my balance and fall forward. I did it to personally determine [whether I wanted to live or die], [thinking,] if I really want to die, I should die here, and if I don't want to die, I'll step back. Well, it didn't lead to my death, and so I'm here. <!-- suicide -->
>
> At first I was manic, but I rapidly developed a severe depression. I wouldn't leave my office at work; I would leave only to use the bathroom, and I would almost never eat meals. A dilemma suddenly arose: I didn't want to encounter other people, and yet I did want to encounter other people.
>
> I don't return home [at the end of the day], because the time and effort spent returning is bothersome. I just stay overnight here all the time; I don't return home more than a few times in a year. At work, when I go to the bathroom, I go across the studio, I have to encounter people. I just wanted to think by myself, so I returned home for the first time in many months. My bed is never made, so there's nothing to do but crawl into it. When I took my clothes off and lay down - I can't put it any other way than extraordinarily terrifying, terrifying thoughts [怖い考え] - I had a sensation like my whole body was enveloped in such [thoughts]. When I was enveloped by this, I suddenly leapt to my feet and, in a panicked state, threw on my clothes, grabbed my bag, and went out onto the street, [crying,] "Taxi!" I went back to my workplace, I went back to my office at my workplace and slept. This is the "identity crisis." I don't have the feeling that I want to die, or anything like that. There's nothing I can say [that can explain things]. On the other hand, that was how seriously I took "Evangelion."
>
> --- I wonder why human beings require a meaning to their existence. [The lack of such] produces anxiety.
>
> Anno: I think it's more natural for human beings to be anxious. I think happiness is nothing but an illusion [錯覚].
--22 August 1996; first interview in _June_; scans ([1](http://img41.imageshack.us/img41/593/41230819.jpg) [2](http://img194.imageshack.us/img194/782/44224485.jpg) [3](http://img442.imageshack.us/img442/4945/83711814.jpg)) hosted by [Lili](http://the-liliquarium.livejournal.com/7236.html) & translated by [1731298478](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=421849#421849)
> [Numbers-kun's paraphrases follow] This interview contains Nobita Nobi as a special guest. Nobi is a manga/dojinshi author and critic who writes dojinshi, shonen-ai, and criticism under the name Nobita Nobi and writes elsewhere under the name Nariko Enomoto (I assume, but I'm not certain, that this is her real name). She began working on Eva dojinshi during the series.
>
>
> ...
> 1. Anno's Love of Shojo Manga
>
> Anno wept a little when he read Nobi's contribution to Karasawa's book. Nobi cried many times during Evangelion, beginning with Rei's monologue in Episode 14. Nobi is asked about her theory that the artists and viewers are locked in battle. She felt that she was in a battle with Anno. Anno thinks his first battle was with his staff^[[Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=425800#425800) clarifies this: "He says in the context that his staff aren't motivated by money, but only whether the work is interesting or not. He doesn't elaborate, but it might refer to something like the various tensions experienced by the staff during the making of Evangelion and the difficulty Anno had in keeping everything together."]. In junior high school, Anno had a friend - nowadays, he says, you would call her a girlfriend - named Ritsuko^[See Anno's statement, "What were we trying to make here?", where he writes: "The name Ritsuko came from a friend of mine in middle school."], who had a major impact on his life and introduced him to sci-fi and shojo manga. Aside from titles like "Devilman" and "Team Astro," Anno was largely uninterested in shonen manga. However, Anno doesn't think he would be able to do justice to a shojo manga in an anime adaptation^[Less than 2 years later, Anno began directing the Gainax anime adaptation of _His and Her Circumstances_.]. Anno would read "Bessatsu Margaret," "Ribon," "Hana to Yume," "Betsucomi," and, at one point, even "Ciao." Among the authors he likes, he mentions Fusako Kuramochi, Jun Ichikawa, Shinji Wada, Yu Azuki, Mariko Iwadate, Hideko Tachikake, Yukari Takahashi, Yumiko Oshima, and Taeko Watanabe.
> 2. Devilman and Evangelion
>
> Nobi sees similarities between Devilman and Evangelion. This is due to the fact that Shinji's mother is ultimately, or ultimately becomes, a kind of angel. As a result Shinji questions his self-identity. In the end, the foundations of human identity are overthrown. Anno says that the similarities to Devilman in this sense were unconscious; he noticed them afterwards. Evangelion follows the pattern of Ultraman and Devilman, in the sense that an enemy is defeated, but the power of that enemy is absorbed. Human beings make a copy of the angels, and then combine it with the human heart or mind.
> 3. Anno and Miyazaki
>
> Anno was asked to write a [commentary](http://keyframe.cjas.org/~mneideng/trans/misc/annoghib.txt) for the Studio Ghibli box set; however, in it, he criticized Miyazaki. Anno and Miyazaki are basically at one in their approaches; however, Miyazaki aims for a broad appeal, and Anno does not. Miyazaki risks ending up at "[Sazae-san](!Wikipedia)". In Anno's view, Miyazaki's greatest work is volume seven of the Nausicaa manga. If I understood the next part correctly (Anno laughs a lot telling this), when Nausicaa was being serialized in Animage Anno used to visit Miyazaki's office and ask to see the part of Nausicaa currently in progress; Miyazaki wouldn't let him, so he would go in and look at them when Miyazaki wasn't there. Anno wished that Miyazaki would stop making anime and focus on the Nausicaa manga. Miyazaki struggled greatly with how to end the manga; now, Anno completely understands how Miyazaki felt. According to Anno, Evangelion ended up being a cross between Devilman and volume seven of the Nausicaa manga. At an "ideological" level, Anno had to arrive at the same answers. Nobi was deeply moved by the Nausicaa movie when she first saw it, but less impressed after reading volume 7 of the manga. The darkness of the manga is eliminated in the film. However, for Nobi, Anno goes in the opposite direction, and is a kind of "black Miyazaki."
> 4. The "Onanii Show"
>
> Anno only makes works for himself, and not for an audience. However, making works is still the only way he can relate to other people. This relationship is like a "masturbation show," because other people are watching him act to please himself. They decide by themselves how they react to it. He does not directly "pleasure" others. It requires some narcissism to be an author; someone entirely lacking self-confidence wouldn't "expose" themselves.
> 5. Anno's Vegetarianism
>
> Anno's vegetarianism is the result of the fact that he has no interest in ordinary life, including eating. When he was young his ideal sort of food was what astronauts would take into space. Today he regularly uses ["Energy In"](http://www.weider-jp.com/weider-in-jelly/lineup/energy.html). He stopped eating meat at a young age. He wouldn't eat school meals. When he was in his second year of elementary school, a teacher made him stay behind until he ate his meal. At 8PM the teacher gave up. Anno won't do things others force him to do. He would rather have died than eat that meal. His parents couldn't affect him, either. His body is no longer accustomed to eating meat, and now the taste makes him physically sick. He has few "worldly" desires. He has very little desire for food or money. His sexual desire is average.
> 6. Cel Anime and Expression
>
> The interviewer feels that, behind the desire of women for "June"-like manga and stories, lies the problem of the family, and this is something Eva portrays. However, Anno feels he could not portray human relationships well because of the limitations of the medium, which he discusses. Precisely because of those limitations one must try to remain fixated on "human drama."
> 7. The Production of Eva
>
> When Anno thought of Eva, he wanted to create an anime that would surpass "Gundam" and "Yamato." However, he became dissatisfied with his early ideas. The script for the first episode took half a year to complete^[Compare Toshio Okada's [claim](#return-of-the-otaking) that "He [Anno] told an anime magazine in Japan that he couldn't make what he wanted because of schedule or budget. But that's not correct. I talked with Mr. Yamaga and Mr. Anno. They said, "It's not only a problem of schedule or budget. It's a problem of what the ending is going to be." Mr. Anno couldn't decide." and then "Because many anime and *seiyuu* magazines are asking Mr. Anno [about the last two episodes], and every time his answer changes. It's "confused, confuse-er, confuse-est." He's not happy right now."]. He was stuck after that, so he wrote episodes 5 and 6, and then came back to episode 3. He felt he had to go beyond regular TV anime in developing realistic characters in episodes 3 and 4. However, the first six episodes left the staff drained and feeling weighed down by the heavy mood, so he felt it necessary to lighten the feeling of the series for episodes 7, 8, and 9. This early stage of production took 4 or 5 months in total; the storyboards were done in two months. However, the schedule became more and more constrained. The series was only finished thanks to the supreme efforts and talents of the staff. Episode 26 was completed in only three days^[See also Tsurumaki's comment in the _Red Cross Book_: "My opinion was, "Why don't we show them the entire process including our breakdown." You know -- make it a work that shows everything including our inability to create a satisfactory product."]. Episode 24 was put together almost entirely by Masayuki alone in the space of three weeks.
>
> 8. Rei's Monologue / Anno's Depression
>
> I made attempt at a translation [here](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=421849#421849) [Numbers-kun's translation is quoted previously in this section]. When Anno was working on Rei's monologue in Episode 14, he wanted to develop her in a "schizophrenic" direction, and wondered how to portray a kind of madness. He was loaned a magazine-like book on mental illness that contained a poem by someone who suffered from a mental disorder, and that triggered his imagination. Anno experienced a kind of nervous breakdown following Eva's conclusion. He no longer wanted to see people, and climbed up onto the roof of the Gainax building to see if he really wanted to live or to die. In the end he wanted to live, but after making Eva he felt he had nothing left inside of him.
> 9. Asuka's Period
>
> Nobi is not sure that female manga writers will be able to match the imagination of the male authors. Anno wanted to do a longer story involving Asuka's menstruation, but because he felt it was impossible for a man to write, he abandoned it. Only a single scene remained. He feels he can't match the way Nobi portrayed Asuka in the doujinshi "Absolute Safety Razor" (or "Absolutely Safe Razor" - "Zettai Anzen Kamisori")^[Later [Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=425800#425800) expansion: "I don't know if Anno meant he thought Nobi's Asuka was altogether better or that he simply couldn't do justice to female characters the way Nobi could (with the story giving an example). It seems very hard to find information on Nobi's Eva dojinshi in Japanese, so I can't imagine they would have been translated. The name "Zettai Anzen Kamisori" has been used for a few things, so that might make things harder as well."].
> 10. Group Mentality
>
> Nobi was irritated by male Rei otaku at Comiket. Anno emphasizes with her irritation. Anno says that Aum demonstrated that some people are driven to be a part of a group. Anno realized how easy it is to become a cult leader. However, the problem is that human beings also cannot live alone and must somehow depend on others. In addition, people nowadays, including Anno and Gainax, make and use film and anime as a kind of drug.
>
> \X\. The AT-Field
> At the bottom of one section of the interview there are a few quotes besides images of AT-Fields. I assume these quotes are from Anno, and also came from the interview. There Anno says that the image of opening an AT field is one of violation. It is based on the tearing of clothes. Clothes are the most basic form of protection for human beings. Originally the AT-Field was used to explain why only Evas could damage Angels. Later on Anno wondered what the meaning of it was. He later felt it was the barrier of the heart or mind. It protects what is most valuable to human beings.
-- 22 August 1996; second interview in _June_; paraphrased by [Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=425333#425333)
[^madmanpoem]: The only lead I found for this poem was a vague possibility that it was a poem from the memoirs of [Daniel Paul Schreber](!Wikipedia), but that never panned out. [Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=484463#484463) looked for it and found one possible book published in the 1980s but no confirmation;
> "I looked for this poem but was never able to find it. In [this 2ch thread](http://www.logsoku.com/thread/anime.2ch.net/eva/1126970562/) someone suggested that the volume in question was [this one](http://www.amazon.co.jp/%E9%9A%A3%E3%81%AE%E3%82%B5%E3%82%A4%E3%82%B3%E3%81%95%E3%82%93%E2%80%95%E9%9B%BB%E6%B3%A2%E7%B3%BB%E3%81%8B%E3%82%89%E3%82%A2%E3%83%B3%E3%82%B0%E3%83%A9%E7%B2%BE%E7%A5%9E%E7%97%85%E9%99%A2%E3%81%BE%E3%81%A7-%E5%88%A5%E5%86%8A%E5%AE%9D%E5%B3%B6-281/dp/4796692819), but according to the Takarajima web page it was published in October 1996 (November 1996 on the linked page), which is way too late. I think the most likely culprit is [this one](http://www.furuhon-hiroba.com/products/1879.html), which according to the Takarajima page was published in August 1989 (though the linked page says July 1986). There's a list of the sections of the book [here](http://como4976.blog62.fc2.com/blog-entry-1872.html). The book seems to try to understand mental illness in an "anti-psychiatric" way. The book's second section deals with something like "mental illness from the inside" and the fourth section with something like the expression of mental illness, so either of those could easily contain a poem like the one Anno described. However, that was only the best match I could find; there's no certainty that that's the book, and I couldn't confirm anything about the poem."
> "The difficult thing [when creating filmbooks] is to establish rules as to how much to write -- How much information which is not explicitly stated in the work (secret settings, etc.) can be released? How far is allowed? This is because these criterion are rather subtle and vague. For example, there are cases where it is okay to publish facts (settings) [_settai_?] that are public knowledge among staff, and other cases where these facts absolutely must not be made public. This information control was particularly difficult with Eva, because the copyright holder's (GAINAX's) checks were much stricter than for anime works produced by other companies...."
--translated by [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2000-July/036221.html), who gives the source as: "Osamu Kishikawa -- Editor (structure/text), Newtype Eva TV/movie filmbooks and Eva Remix filmbooks Excerpted from comments at the end of Filmbook Remix, Vol.II"
_Neon Genesis Evangelion OST II_ booklet has [a statement by Otsuki](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-March/027229.html)? Asked on [EGF](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=493260#493260)
Bochan_bird, resident in Japan during NGE's airing, included [a partial timeline of the aftermath](http://www.evaotaku.com/html/kaibunsho-bginfo.html) as background material for his translation of the Kaibunsho; the timeline is not sourced from the Kaibunsho, and all translations seem to be his own:
> - 1996/04/14: Director Anno appears live as a guest on Megumi Hayashibara's radio program "Tokyo Boogie Night" and says that fans should "return to reality."
> - 1996/04/26: Shonen Ace-A June issue article states that: "The video/LD vol.13 (Ep25-26) release will be a complete remake of the TV ending and will focus on the story elements. In addition, a complete and new cinema edition that differs from the video version is scheduled for release in summer 1997."
> - 1996/04/27: MEGU June issue becomes the first anime magazine to review the TV ending, and brands it a "betrayal" and "nightmare".
> - 1996/05/10: Newtype Magazine June issue contains the first in-depth interview with Director Anno following the conclusion of the TV airing, in which Anno criticizes anime fans and otaku in particular.
> - 1996/05~06: Eva remains a subject of interest, and various incidents of Eva fan obsession and "otaku-ness" occur such as the Mitaka City "Rei in kimono" posters and pencil boards mentioned in the kaibunsho.
> - 1996/06/10: Animage (Anime Magazine) July issue includes a dialog between Director Anno and Yuko Miyamura (Asuka voice actress) in which Anno again criticizes anime fans (albeit tempered by self-deprecation and some jests by Miyamura) and makes a number of other frank remarks and criticisms.
> - 1996/06~1997/02: Numerous review articles and interviews appear in anime magazines, some positive and some not so positive. Among these, the Quick Japan (music and sub-culture magazine) #9 issue features a lengthy Anno interview in which he once again criticizes the fans, but also makes some frank criticisms and observations about himself. He also mentions the harried production schedule and other behind-the-scenes talk. Various announcements are also made regarding the movie release schedule during this period.
> "This understandably can't be used as a reference, because there is nothing to support it but my word, but I have mentioned before that I received a phone call from a Gainax staffer while episode #25 and #26 were in production, asking me to confirm where in the Book of Revelation the part about "I am the Alpha and the Omega" appears. I mentioned that it actually appears three times in different forms, and gave the citations. The implication was that they were considering quoting it in the final episodes. In any case, they did not use those verses, but if you're skeptical that they would have considered such a thing, note that the booklets that accompanied the Japanese Evangelion I, II, and III soundtracks actually do have Biblical quotes as epigrams. These were some of the very first things ever released on the show; I believe "Eva I" hit the market even before the TV series had finished its initial airing. "Eva III," as you might know (that's the one with all the remixes of "Fly Me To The Moon") would become the first anime soundtrack to go #1 in Japan since GALAXY EXPRESS 999."
--[Carl Horn](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2009-December/005553.html)
> `Hideaki Anno:` Originally, and even today, Japanese animation are products of ordinary [habitual/common] consumption, created for the Japanese public. It is indeed amusing to see the success of animation abroad, but I think that fans everywhere have the same tastes. Animation is a universal language.
>
> ...`HA:` Of course, it's the same formula which made "Idols" just as popular. They are not really humans, they are only a sketch on a piece of paper, incapable of doing anything really, and [they are] out of the reach of their fans. For example, when a boy makes love with a woman in an anime, it is only part of a scenario, it is nothing more, and the fan knows, he steps back from what he sees.
>
> `AnimeLand:` Yet, there are some fans that no longer go out with real girls...
>
> `HA:` It is true that some fans of animation display unfortunate behavior.
>
> `AL:` And yet you continue to create this kind of characters for them.
>
> `HA:` You need to understand that Japanese animation is an industry that is, for the most part, male, and as is quite evident, everything is made for their gratification. Further, it is more gratifying for us to draw this sort of character, rather than old grandmothers.
>
> `AL:` So actually, animators draw their ideal woman on celluloid?
>
> `HA:` It's much easier. Characters in animation do not cheat. They do not let you go for another. Animation is on certain points, very close to the pornography industry. All your physical needs are met. You can watch different animations and find anything you desire.
>
> ...`AL:` Have you received any complaints for using Christian concepts in your work? The angels are supposed to represent something good, benign, which doesn't seem to be the case in Evangelion.
>
> `HA:` I am not familiar with many things in Christianity, and I have no intention of approaching it or criticizing it either. Isn't it said that Lucifer was an angel himself before having fallen?
>
> `AL:` Imagine that a European company decided to buy the rights to _Evangelion_, and to change certain scenes because of religious concerns. Would you agree with censoring these scenes?
>
> `HA:` I don't know, it would depend on the circumstances. After all, this series was made for a Japanese audience.
>
> ...`AL:` American and European animation seem more and more smothered by their laws and codes of discipline, whereas Japanese animation offers more adult subjects and characters. Don't you believe that the controversy and the problems that meet Japanese animation come from here?
>
> `HA:` Actually, I think that some censorship is necessary, but it is not normal that we should be ordered by a conventional [_bien-pensant_; see <http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bien_pensant>] minority. I do not think you can get away with anything for the so-called well-being and protection of children.
>
> `AL:` Violence seems to be more admissible for these people than the notion of sex. Doesn't it seem backwards to you?
>
> `HA:` The legal context obviously differs between nations and eras. The only universal constant is the thirst of humans for sex and violence. We need to try to manage this without falling into the opposite extreme, and brainwashing. Films are extremely influential and powerful, especially as propaganda tools.
>
> ...`HA:` No, Gainax examined my project for _Evangelion_ and told me, "OK, you have carte blanche." I have never been limited on anything, except perhaps time and money.
>
> ...`HA:` I don't know. I used components that I liked and that appeared to me necessary to advance the story. I also worked in concepts that were popular at the time. When I hear the criticism from fans about the end of _Evangelion_, I really wonder if we can say that I have as good a knowledge of the environment as you seem to say.
>
> `AL:` Where did you get the idea of the EVAs?
>
> `HA:` I was inspired by Japanese demons [_oni_]. I gave them a modern appearance, but such characters have been around a long time.
>
> `AL:` It seems that there exists a sort of recurring message in your series, that one cannot live alone, or even separated from a group or ethnic identity. Why this message, addressed to otaku, who live at the same time in a relatively separate world?
>
> `HA:` You can find whatever message you want to find in any film or series. I have not wanted to pass on this or that message in particular, but the fact that you reflect on this is a good one. I made Evangelion to make me happy and to make anime lovers happy, in trying to bring together the broadest audience possible.
-- 4 October 1996? interview with Pierre Giner; published _AnimeLand_ #32 (May 1997); original [excerpt/translation](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-September/003351.html) September 1997; full sources: [scan](/docs/eva/1997-animeland-may-hideakianno-interview.pdf "May 1997 Animeland excerpt (scan)")/[French transcription](/docs/eva/1997-animeland-may-hideakianno-interview-french)/[English translation](/docs/eva/1997-animeland-may-hideakianno-interview-english). (The final Q/A pair has also been [excerpted & translated](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-July/018749.html) from an interview published 18 July 1997 ("the day before the release of EoE") in the Italian magazine _Man-ga!_ #3. The connection is unclear - did _Man-ga!_ translate into Italian & reprint _AnimeLand_'s interview?)
### ORIGINAL
1. _Evangelion Original_ I ISBN 4-8291-7321-1 C0076 P980E (episodes #1 - #9)
2. _Evangelion Original_ II ISBN 4-8291-7322-x C0076 P980E (#10- #18)
3. _Evangelion Original_ III ISBN 4-8291-7323-8 C0076 P980E (#19- #26)
These 3 books were published 1996-1997; they seem to be nearly-final drafts - they include a number of dialogue changes and occasional deleted scenes. They were used by the [Literal Translation Project](http://plaza.harmonix.ne.jp/~onizuka/literal/evangelion.html), but unfortunately LTP seems to have edited their transcription to conform to the final aired anime episodes & omitted all the interesting differences such as the deleted scenes. (This is a pity because some changes are quite interesting, like Rei I surviving.) Parts of ORIGINAL have been translated:
- [Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-April/027465.html), episode 1 (? guess from first mention of N^2 being first episode), "In EVANGELION ORIGINAL, the N^2 mine was originally called P-type mine. I wonder why."
- [Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-June/028939.html), episode 1, Misato's line: "Didn't even Rei take seven months to sync with the EVA? He's just arrived. He can't possibly control it!"
- [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-March/026489.html), episode 2, scene variant: SEELE scene discussing the first Angel attack; different from ADV or LTP translation (ORIGINAL version discusses how it was expected and SEELE's contempt for the rest of humanity; aired version discusses how their preparations may not pay off and the need for NERV to be very careful)
- [Shin-seiki](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=116702#116702) says episode 03, "Hedgehog's Dilemma: Rain, after running away", was originally titled "Hedgehog's Dilemma: The Wandering Third Children" (TODO: was this confirmed in the Platinum commentary?)
- [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-June/029204.html), episode 3 & episode 7, changed lines:
> In EVANGELION ORIGINAL I, p. 3-11, Touji said his father and mother worked at the research institute (NERV?), but this was changed in the actual series to his father and uncle [Bochan seems mistaken here - Literal & ADV both say father and *grandfather*; Proposal only mentions father], thus eliminating his mother. The girl's line about her mother [episode 7, "My mother is decorating a lot for the discussion of post-graduate life. She's so silly!"] does not appear in EVANGELION ORIGINAL, so it was added at a later date (during the recording?) and may have slipped through the editing process.
[Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-June/029298.html) notes this latter line is not mentioned in any footnote either, indicating it was added very late in production.
- [Nanashi](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-December/033295.html), as part of a NGE TV chronology, copies out the dates Episode 4 specified before they were cut from broadcast (possibly contradicting other chronologies like the _Rei Ayanami Raising Project_ calendar):
- "Day b+2 - Saturday, 7-15-2015
- Day b+3 - Sunday, 7-16-2015
- Day b+4 - Monday, 7-17-2015
- Night in the movie theater.
- Day b+5 - Tuesday, 7-18-2015
- Night in Kensuke's camp.
- Episode 4 ends."
- [Savant](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-June/015718.html) discusses the Chinese version of ORIGINAL I, confirming Reichu's description of the marginalia and quotes one such comment: "This script portrays Shinji as being more 'soft' than in the finished series."
- [Seven Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-February/025759.html), episode 12, Misato-Shinji discussion of her father (seems same as TV)
- [CuSO4](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-May/014267.html) confirms that episodes 13 and 14 were mistakenly swapped
- [Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-June/029298.html), episode 14, variant synch-ratio line by Ritsuko Akagi. (Seventh Messenger transcribes this as episode *13* with episode 14's titles but as noted above by CuSO4, ORIGINAL swaps them)
- [Reichu](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=196289#196289) mentions that episode 17 originally mentions an 'Essene' organization rather than 'Seele', fitting in with [the storyboard](http://www.evacommentary.org/op/op_2.html#cut044); [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-May/028353.html) says "...SEELE is the remnant of the Essene branch that wrote the DSS (based on information in EVANGELION ORIGINAL)..." and [NAveryW](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=196222#196222) spots of the word [Essene](!Wikipedia) in a ['Project Meeting'](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=196081#196081) document (a brainstorming session apparently predating the Evangelion Proposal; see [Project Meeting](#project-meeting).)
- [Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-September/020217.html) translates a deleted scene in episode 18 where Touji visits his sister in the hospital, a modified scene between Ritsuko & Misato, and a modified scene in episode 3.
- [Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-February/025983.html), episode 19, some tech jargon
- [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-August/030966.html) paraphrases a section in episode 19 where Eva-01 eats the S2 Engine of an angel; in ORIGINAL, Eva-01 attaches the Angel's arm to itself and then pushes the S2 engine into its own stomach
- [Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-February/025401.html) provides the Touji-Hikari hospital scene in episode 19, and Yui's flashback plugtest scene in episode 21
- [Nanashi](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2000-February/034183.html) translates the episode 20 scene notes for Shinji reforming out of LCL
- [Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-June/029072.html), episode 21, variant techno-babble line by Naoko Akagi
- [NAveryW](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=368599#368599) (translation by Eric Blair in #evageeks), episode 21, deleted Misato line: "I know the Angels aren't just battle weapons left by the First Root Race." [Reichu](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=410193#410193) transcribes the kanji and translates them as "I know the Angels aren't just weapons left behind by the First Indigenous Race." This is important - it is one of the few solid leads (aside from the Project Meeting and the Proposal) that the First Ancestral Race was not invented for the video games but were part of the backstory early on.
- [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-June/028905.html), episode 21, changed scene description; Rei I survives! This is worth quoting in full:
> "Dr. Akagi glimpses Yui in Rei's leering face. She impulsively clutches at Rei's throat and begins to strangle her. Muffled cries escape from Rei's throat and Dr. Akagi regains her senses. Rei's arms dangle limply...The loud 'thud' of a falling object is heard. Rei's breath rasps in her throat as she tries to breathe again. She looks around but Dr. Akagi is nowhere to be seen. Expressionless, she gets up and staggers out of the control center...Exterior view of completed NERV Headquarters (pyramid) with the blood-red NERV logo on its front."
- [Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-June/028887.html), episode 21, scene description: "Analysis platform. Nothing remained where the corpse of Dr. [Naoko] Akagi had fallen except a white outline. There was blood on the cover of Gaspar."
- [Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-June/028964.html), episode 21, cut scene: "At the bottom of the page that Bochan quoted, there's a little footnote that says GAINAX excluded the scene of Rei waking up."
- [Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-February/025514.html) excerpts 3 Ritsuko scenes from episode 23: the disposal of Rei's remains, Ritsuko before the SEELE monoliths, and Ritsuko entering Central Dogma with Misato & Shinji
- [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-June/029653.html), episode 24, translation discussion - did Kaworu say "It means I *like* you" or "It means I *love* you"?
> The ambiguous word is "suki" which can be interpreted as 'like' or 'love'. I interpret it here is 'like' because of the preceding word "koui", which has probably been mistranslated, thus deepening the misunderstanding. "Koi" (short 'o') means 'love'. "Koui" (long 'o') means 'friendship/affinity/goodwill'. While the long and short 'o' are difficult to hear, the kanji in the written script are those for "koui".
- [Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-June/028928.html), episode 24, Kaworu's order to Unit-02: "Ok, better get going. Come, [clone?] of Adam, slave of Lilith."
- [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-March/026419.html) ([second translation](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-November/032387.html)) translates a cut episode 24 scene fits perfectly in EoE but not EoTV, in which SEELE discusses Kaworu's death; [Reichu](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=472732#472732) translates her copy, Keele's line in this one runs
> Keel: The Angels who were the Children of Adam have all perished. Only the final Angel — humanity, us — remains. The promised day has come. When Lilith is enwombed with a soul*, this impure world shall be cleansed.
- [Seventh Messenger](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-October/021550.html) translates the opening from episode 26; primary difference is "Everyone has lost something. Because of this, the complementation of the heart and soul continues.", as opposed to "The thing that people lost, in other words, the complementation of the mind has begun." or "The thing that people had lost / In other words, the instrumentality of souls was still ongoing".
### Director's Cut (EoTV)
Preview for D&R/EoE, included on the LD releases for the TV, which otherwise was NGE+DC; [transcript](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=367257&sid=77b04094109e0fbbf4139115d74f2d1c#367257) of voice-over (preview for 25', on episode 24): <!-- Note to self: images are on Evageeks, but saved them locally as doc/archive/eva/images/tv/genesis-*.jpg -->
> TEXT: Preview
>
>
> MISATO (OFF): Shinji defeated the final angel,
>
> but unable to deal with reality, he shuts the world out.
>
> And the promised time comes.
>
> The impending annihilation of Nerv.
>
> Asuka is driven to the brink of death.
>
> The Human Instrumentality Project
>
> is about to be activated along with Rei.
>
> Over the heads of the people rebelling against their own reality
>
> and feeding their dreams, the Eva series descends
>
> as if mocking the deception that is about to be uncovered.
>
> Next time: "Air."
>
>
> TEXT: Next time
Preview for episode 26'
> Text: Preview
>
>
> Misato (Off): Finally, Shinji Ikari faces the Pandemonium that is reality.
>
> Unable to cope with the trauma, he resigns himself to a fantasy world.
>
> Where there is no pain called 'reality'.
>
> Where there is no fiction called 'myself'.
>
> Where there is no fear called 'other people'.
>
> Where there is no hope called 'others'.
>
> Where there is no existence called 'the self'.
>
>
> Next time, the finale: "My Pure Heart for You"
### _End of Evangelion_
> "From the Renewal box-set extras, a pre-production image of the scrapped original TV episode 25, showing that the EoE scenario was not an afterthought:
>
> [Misato executing JSSDF soldiers](http://www.windsong.demon.co.uk/nge/Ep25Air-Splat.jpg)
--["The Many Worlds of Neon Genesis Evangelion"](http://www.windsong.demon.co.uk/nge/manyworlds.html)
> "Our aim was to be the antithesis of all the giant robot animated shows around us. It's not a world where the wind blows through your hair while you declare your purpose in a booming voice. Especially in the past one or two years, this type of refractive, feminine character has not been seen."
--[Yoshiyuki Sadamoto](http://web.archive.org/web/20071113011303/http://www.aoianime.hu/evangelion/index.php?page=intersadamoto2) Taken from Viz Comics' Collected Evangelion Manga, Vol. 2
> The Newtype Filmbook description for the scene states (literally):
>
> > "Amidst the many words of congratulations, a faint smile starts at the corners of Shinji's mouth (and spreads across his face). A happy face -- that is the figure of the Complemented Shinji. This conclusion is also one form, one possibility among many."
--[Eva FAQ](http://www.evaotaku.com/html/evafaq.html); translated by Bochan Bird
> "Newtype Filmbook 8 rather straightforwardly says, "She [Naoko] throws her body down from the Command Center" (_Kanojo wa mizukara no karada o, hatsureijo kara nage-otosu_)."
--<http://www.animenation.net/forums/archive/index.php/t-117875.html>
[_Addition_ audio-drama](http://www.evamonkey.com/audio_drama_translation.htm); humorous audio drama, apparently with [input from Anno](http://www.evamonkey.com/addition_audio_drama.php); good for sarcastic commentary, such as Asuka calling Kaworu 'homoboy' - good for bad explanations of the angels?
> Anno commented in various interviews after the conclusion of the series that "anime fans need to have more self-respect" and to "come back to reality"; in a Newtype interview on 10 May, after the announcement on 26 April of a new movie and re-edited versions of the TV series, he also stated that "computer networking is graffiti on toilet walls."
--Fujie 2004 TODO: Fujie is unreliable; I'd rather use the Protoculture Addicts issues
[Protoculture Addicts #43](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2004-December/002032.html); Anno, newtype interview: psychology (may be source of claim ["Although ANNO Hideaki has admitted to being influenced by Jungian psychology, this statement desperately begs a Lacanian reading of the formation of identity."](http://members.fortunecity.com/wndrkn/mecha.html)), ending, interpretation; but maybe it was [actually PA63](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2009-December/005643.html)? TODO: when my back-issues finally come in, figure this out
[Protoculture Addicts #39](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-August/003138.html); Anno in Newtype interview: satisfactory ending, censorship
> "However - in Protoculture Addicts issue 42, the editorial speaks of a discussion with a Gainax employee at Anime Expo 1996 (when Anno attended). It says, "[...] did confirm that the last episodes (from 19 on, but mainly 25-26) were censored following pressure from the PTA (Parent-Teacher Association; but no mention of any legal action) and that they had been botched."
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-August/040229.html>; see also <http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-November/040705.html>
> When I heard that EVANGELION was censored (see our article "Evangelion Controversy" on page 45), I was totally outraged. How this could be possible in our modern world? And all this (we speculated) in the name of religious belief? What about free speech? How could a legal system go along with this? Well, maybe it did not and the TV station censored the show itself to avoid offending certain sensibilities. We cannot really know where the truth lies. I was particularly confused when my friend Miyako read me Hideaki Anno's interview in NEWTYPE of June. He avoided the subject of censorship and skillfully defended his work. His point of view made sense and he made some interesting comments about the Internet fans who excessively criticized the show.
>
> "I think the people who are very much involved with the Net," Mr. Anno said, "have very narrow views toward life and the world. They're always in their rooms and don't go out very often to communicate in person. Because of their information on the Net, they feel they know everything without searching the real truths." They easily and anonymously say things that they would never say in person. "Their messages are like graffiti in a public toilet." They attack other while they are staying in a safe place. "They don't have anything certain to hold on... that's probably why they watch anime shows. (...) I would like to add and say to those fans, hey, go out and visit towns. I am 35 now and I am realizing the importance of human contact little by little..."
>
> (This interview, published in the June issue of NEWTYPE, was made by Mr. Shinichiro Inoue. He encourages people to send comments and questions to Anno-san by writing to: Mr. Hideaki Anno, Monthly NEWTYPE Magazine, Kadokawa Shoten, Tokyo, 162-77, Japan.)
--<http://www.protoculture.ca/PA/edito41.htm>
> "To update on the EVANGELION controversy, nothing really came out from Anno-san at Anime Expo. He seemed embittered, and quickly lost patience with the fans. "If you don't understand, it is your problem", he said! He made many comments in such terms that our reporter on location couldn't put them on paper. For more details, check our report on Anime Expo in the next issue. Anyway, someone who worked on EVANGELION did confirm that the last episodes (from 19 and on, but mainly 25-26) were censored following pressure from the PTA (Parent-Teacher Association; but no mention of any legal action) and that they had been botched. To be continued."
--<http://www.protoculture.ca/PA/edito42.htm> ([Mirror](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-November/040705.html); PA #43 doesn't mention the PTA...)
["Entretien avec Anno Hideaki tiré de New Type de juin 1996"](http://www.evalegend.com/interview_anno96.php) ([mirror](http://evamedias.free.fr/fin.htm#entretien_96)); TODO: possibly the same as "from Hideaki Anno's Anime Expo '96 interview, pp20–3 in the November 1996 Newtype, as translated by Miyako Graham in issue 43, pages 40–41 of Protoculture Addicts from Hideaki Anno's Anime Expo '96 interview, pp20–3 in the November 1996 Newtype, as translated by Miyako Graham in issue 43, pages 40–41 of Protoculture Addicts"?
Anno interview in _June_, mentioning draft material of Kaworu episode 24 (see [previous section](#Episode 24)):
- translation: <http://the-liliquarium.livejournal.com/7611.html>
- scans: <http://the-liliquarium.livejournal.com/7236.html>
- Horn: <http://www.evamonkey.com/writings_horn13.php>
> "The EoE screenplays that we have archived on the site were written after the TV show, in its original form, was completed, and apparently in tandem with the development of the DC additions. (You can see a note making reference to potential TV revisions at the beginning of the 26' screenplay.)"
--[Reichu](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=326156#326156)
>> It was more abbreviated than Patrick's. Also wished they used that last line in the hospital scene that was translated from the Evangelion: THE MOVIE page - "I'm fucked up"
>
> It's actually - "Ore wa saitei da" (I'm the lowest, with all the irony Shinji's shift from "boku" to "ore" implies) but yes, that's probably the best translation.
--[Zhou Tai An](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-December/023637.html); 'boku' is a boy 'I' pronoun, while 'ore' is stereotypically manly
## 1996 S
> The television broadcasts were finished two months ago. But "Eva fever" has not yet cooled down. As a matter of course, there was also a big reaction to the interview with Anno Hideaki in the June issue of NT (Newtype). It seems like bunches of letters are delivered to the editorial office daily for Director Anno, which he is reading little by little as his busy schedule permits
['From Newtype, July 7, 1996 issue'](http://web.archive.org/web/20001212215800/www.acsys.com/~tallman/ecom_e.html) ("Note: this is still a rough translation.")
> However, despite being made as a group operation, there are TV series that are colored almost entirely by the personality of one individual. Hayao Miyazaki's "Conan, Boy of the Future" is that way, and many of the series where Yoshiyuki Tomino served as chief director are also the same.
>
> "Neon Genesis Evangelion" is also a series that was shaped by the personality of its one creator, Hideaki Anno. The worldview, character creation, creation of Mecha, the gadgets, the division of cuts, and even to the point of each line of dialogue, everything is inscribed with the name of "Hideaki Anno." For example, the mental landscape of Anno is, of course, reflected in the story, behavior patterns of the characters and the like. Anno's mood is reflected and his intent is clear even in trivial places like the name of a department store or the brand of can coffee that appears.
--<http://webcitation.org/5mYowiZN8>; from the TV filmbooks by Gainax?
> Those "thoughts" about a piece of work are, for the viewer, a bit of a sophisticated way of enjoying it. After viewing a piece of work, that work is assimilated in the viewer's head through thinking, "Did that mean this?" and "Is that right?" and will go on to become the building block of thought. Being able to come across works that can be contemplated is an irreplaceable encounter.
>
> However, recently I feel that these encounters are scarce. I wonder if I'm just imagining this?
>
> ... Thinking requires effort. When anime is thought of as "entertainment", I'm not denying that there is also a policy that the audience not be made to use unnecessary effort. Works that are just to been seen and enjoyed. Those are also probably necessary. However, weren't there too many of those types of works? Among those, "Neon Genesis Evangelion" was clearly a work that could be thought about. While keeping its entertainment value as a piece of work, it also offers enjoyment that the audience thinks about. The Eva Boom that you all know about proves that. Everyone is starving for thinking.
>
> And the story pregnant with riddles concluded, for many of the audience members, still pregnant with those riddles. There were also fans who screamed, "I was betrayed" by that ending. However, this is also certain proof that Eva draws people in.
>
> ... In reaching the film's completion, it might also be interesting to try reading about things like how the drama was put together and corrected and how the implications continued to change.
--<http://webcitation.org/5mYowkBjV>
> "Here's part of a Neon Genesis Evangelion Wizard Manga Scene article by Carl Gustav Horn(the same guy in charge of the Viz EVA manga translation BTW .) It may give a glimpse into Anno's personality .
> Having gambled and won on 'Evangelion,'Anno can afford to dismiss his critics .But this ultimate 'fanboy,' who breaks into 'Ultraman' poses when in front of the camera ,is as hard on himself as he is on his industry and its fans .'Evangelion' was a struggle against four of his own cowardice-a hiatus from work where 'all I was doing was simply not dying,' said Anno to the American audience .'If I talk about the 'limitations of the industry,after all ,what does that mean? Aren't I really talking about the limitations inside myself? It is the creators who have to change their frame of mind .'Most people who make anime ,Anno said,have the kind of 'autism' he himself has suffered from .'They have to try and reach out with their work,and communicate to others .What's the greatest thing anime has ever achieved ?The fact that we're holding a dialogue right now .'When a fan of the master asked for advice to those who'd like to break into anime,he shot back,'Be interested in other things *besides* animation .'
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1996-November/000809.html>
> It's the words of Anno's translator at 1996's Anime Expo ."
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1996-November/000812.html>
Possible NERV acronym:
> The Newtype 100% collection has a sketch of the NERV logo with the words "NEO EARTH RETURN V......?" team. Can't quite make out the V word.
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-October/006688.html>
> From the Newtype 100% collection book, i can barely make out in one drawing..."Neo Eath of Retarn Vererasion ...." (those of you who have it its on page 168)
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-October/006691.html>
> "I just looked at the book for the spelling, and the full title says "Neo Eath of Retarn Vercerasion team" which probably doesn't mean a thing. I think the designer was just roughing out the NERV logo and perhaps at the time they were thinking of making an acronym, for an additional double meaning. In its place, they used the quote "God's in his heaven, all's right in the world" which (to me, anyway) works better than an acronym."
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-November/001208.html>
--[Scan](http://www.evamonkey.com/randomimages/nerv.jpg) of the relevant _NewType 100%_ page
> "Neo Eath Of Retariv Vercerasion Team-Term" --<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-October/022081.html>
> [first email] I have a couple of friends who work in the Anime industry. They told me about the influence of "Evangelion."
>
> The most significant issue is that because "Evangelion" series had excessively atrocious and erotic scenes, and GAINAX presented/deliver incomplete products to the TV station, as the result, TV stations began to review the scripts before animated and also they began to order anime producers to present/deliver the products one week before on air. Not only TV-Tokyo*1 but also most of TV stations in Tokyo began these acts.
>
> \# TV-Tokyo broadcasted "Neon Genesis Evangelion."
>
> In some sense, the relationships of mutual trust between Anime producers and TV stations were destroyed by "Evangelion," and consequently, TV stations set up more strict rules for anime production to make it safer.
>
> Due to the before-animated-review by TV-Stations, now that Anime producers have to revise scripts a lot. As the result, some anime productions suffer from the too tight schedule which had been carried out without problems before.
>
> The friends of mine in the Anime industry say, "if GAINAX wished to make an atrocious and erotic Anime or an experimental Anime, it could have make OVA. More over, they must recognize the significant influence to the entire Anime industry by the fact that the coarse manner in the production resulted those two episodes (They mean the last two episodes).
>
> ...[second email] Anyhow, the friend of mine who often tell me the story about the Anime industry are directors of drawings, and scenario writers who do the series construction and main-writing. They are at Toei Doga, Tokyo Movie, or at Sunrise, and are engaged in the TV Anime presently on air.
>
> In order to prove my story, I think I have to show at least one fact. OK. You know the TV Anime series "Famous Detective Conan." [_Case Closed_] By the influence from Evangelion, Nippon TV checked the scripts before aired which has never been done before. And the station ordered to retake the script because "The way of the murder is not appropriate." As the result, the honorable schedule was much disturbed. ( I sympathy with those staffs.)
>
>> Which part, do you say, has the questionable scenes? I watched each episode, 2,3 times, but I can't figure out which.
>
> Is that so? Don't you think it is questionable if a woman's voice at sex is aired in the TV anime around early evening. If you don't think so, you have a very different point of view from mine, thus, I don't want to discuss further.
> What does not make sense even more is the part concerning "The
> incomplete film". How can TV Stations evaluate the "incompleteness"?
>
> It is hard to evaluate the "incompleteness" quantitatively. However, from the point of view of common sense, don't you think it is natural to think that the picture-show like( or less than that in some scenes) last two episodes would be regarded as "incomplete." It is their excuse that the schedule was too tight. GAINAX is responsible of the tight schedule. For the TV station, the delivered film is the only object to evaluated the show's quality. That is the contract between companies.
>
> I ask you a question. If GAINAX had had enough time for the making (in general it takes about one month to make a 30-minute TV anime show) and had enough manpower, had GAINAX made that kind a film?
--Junichi Toyouchi, posting to the `fj.rec.animation` Usenet newsgroup; [original Usenet posting](https://groups.google.com/group/fj.rec.animation/browse_thread/thread/beb937976ce9c42c/452b730d2e572f94). Both emails [translated by Kentaro Onizuka](https://groups.google.com/group/rec.arts.anime.misc/browse_thread/thread/a42e5d4e330bad4b/8fcd5ed1132de77) (also of Literal Translation Project) in `rec.arts.anime.misc`; the emails are consistent with the Kaibunsho
### Toshio Okada
#### "Conscience of the Otaking"
> "This was part one of a four-part interview with the founding president of Gainax, Toshio Okada, conducted at Otakon '95, and should certainly be read as an alternate viewpoint to many of the events described in ["The Notenki Memoirs"](/docs/2002-notenki-memoirs). It ran in Animerica 4:2 through 4:5, although Okada only touches on Eva in 4:2. At the time the interview was conducted, Evangelion was in production but had not yet aired, and Okada mentions episode 5 in the context of how Gainax (since he left) has gained more control over its scheduling. He also makes the interesting assertion that he was talking about "the base story of Neon Genesis Evangelion" with Anno back when he was still at the company (he dates his departure to 1992). Hiroyuki Yamaga would later respond to some of Okada's remarks in Animerica 6:5, but not those related to Eva (I don't believe Yamaga's 1997 and 1998 Fanime remarks on Eva ever appeared in Animerica, although I think Miyako Matsuda-Graham may have covered it for _Protoculture Addicts_)."
--[Carl Horn](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2009-December/005173.html)
See the [full text](/docs/1996-animerica-conscience-otaking) with PDF & Markdown links; the following are excerpts:
##### "Conscience" part 1
- ["The Conscience of the Otaking: The Studio Gainax Saga in Four Parts: Part One"](/docs/1996-animerica-conscience-otaking#part-1), _Animerica_ 4:2, pg 6-7, 24-26
> `Okada`: Well, then, when the Gainax staff asked me what we should make next, I said we shouldn't make any more anime for two years. Hiroyuki Yamaga thought that maybe we should do something else. But Hideaki Anno disagreed. As he put it, we already had the staff, so he felt we should keep going with anime projects. So I then decided we *should* continue. Bu I didn't really have any feelings from deep inside, and I didn't really think we should continue in this kind of work if we didn't have anything *inside* of us to support it.
>
> ...`O`: And so, I guess I've otakuized the computer game genre as well as anime, with such games as **_Denno Gakuen_** ("_Cybernetic High School_") and **_Battle Skin Panic_**, and software versions of **_SILENT MOEBIUS_** and **_NADIA_**. But that was enough for me, and then I had nothing more to do with computer games either. [LAUGHS] By that time, it had been two years since I had been able to decide on anything to do with anime. At that point, Takami Akai told me I should change my job. Because we're friends - not 'presidents', not 'producers' - Yamaga is not a 'director'. In the beginning of Gainax, we were all just friends. So, just like a role-playing game, the idea was that we'd switch jobs. Akai told me, "I'll be the producer, you can be the creator, and Anno can be the director." About then, Anno and I started talking about the base story of **_NEON GENESIS EVANGELION_**. But Yamaga had another plan. He wanted to make **_AOKI URU_** (**_BLUE URU_**), part two of **_HONNEAMISE_**. I couldn't understand why it should be made at all. So I said to Yamaga, Okay, this is *your* plan...I can have nothing to do with it. So he was going to produce it on his own, and Anno was going to direct. But then the plan crashed, due to problems with money and staff. Finally, after all this, I was talking with my wife, and I asked her what she thought of the whole thing and how she felt. And she said, "I think you're a stupid man, because you're still president of Gainax, yet you've made nothing for two years. It's not your way." I was very surprised to hear that. [LAUGHS] And so I decided to leave Gainax.
>
> `ANIMERICA`: Was this in 1993?
>
> `O`: 1993...1992, I think. And then later, back in Osaka, I gave my friend Takeshi Sawamura a call, because I'd heard that he was now president of Gainax. And then I heard my friend *Yamaga* is president of Gainax, Huh? Yamaga? He's a *director*! [LAUGHS] I start thinking to myself, he's not that good at ordering around a staff, or a company. So I asked my friend Yasuhiro Takeda to call me up and explain, and he says, "Uh, I'm not on the main staff of Gainax now." *Huh*? What's happened in my - what *used* to be my company? And then the main staff explained it to me: "Okay, it's just that now there are *two* presidents of Gainax, Mr. Sawamura and Mr. Yamaga. To the press, Yamaga will say, 'I am president of Gainax', and to the bankers and financiers, Sawamura will say, 'I am president of Gainax'."
>
> `A`: Why, for the purposes of the media's view of Gainax, would Yamaga be president?
>
> `O`: I don't know, because it's very hard for me to ask Yamaga. If I asked him, he couldn't really explain anything to me. [LAUGHS] So I can only wonder about it, but many people have said that Gainax has changed these last three or four years. Three months after I left, many other people left as well: Mahiro Maeda, Mr. Kanda, Mr. Murahama, and Shinji Higuchi - right now Shinji's the SFX director of the new **_GAMERA_** film; he's a very talented man. In those days, many talented and powerful people left Gainax. It used to be that we worked together, we talked together, we never got enough sleep - it was very hard, but we were like a family. That was Gainax. It was no ordinary company, and no bankers would finance such a company. But things have changed. **_Princess Maker 1_** and **_2_** made a lot of money for Gainax, and it's almost an ordinary company now.
>
> `A`: They've got their finances under control?
>
> `O`: Yes, and they've got control of their work. They'll say, "This month we've got to do the DOS/V version of that game, next month, that screen saver, this month's for **_Princess Maker 3_**, and that month of **_EVANGELION_** episode 5." [LAUGHS] They're very controlled, and I think it's a good thing for the Gainax staff, because now their creative plans can be under control too. In my day, one year we would make so *much* money, and - ha, ha, ha - next year, *very* poor. One month we'd be making films [BERSERKER SCREAM] every, every, every day! But next month we wouldn't have any work [CRY OF DESPAIR]. That's the way it was. But now, things are under control. And I really think it's very good for the staff. But... it's not *my* way.
##### "Conscience" part 2
- ["The Conscience of the Otaking: The Studio Gainax Saga in Four Parts: Part Two"](/docs/1996-animerica-conscience-otaking#part-2). _Animerica_ 4:3, pg 8-9, 22-25
> `Okada`: He was on the staff of the Daicon III Opening Anime. At first, Hideaki Anno and Takami Akai were the only two people on its main staff--Anno drew the mecha and the special effects, and Akai drew the characters and most of the motion. But then Yamaga appeared, and said he'd do the backgrounds. Then they all went off to Artland to study professional filmmaking, and worked on the original **_MACROSS_** TV series. Anno studied mecha design, and Akai had wanted to do characters, but he couldn't because Haruhiko Mikimoto already had such an advanced technique. So when Akai realized he wouldn't get the opportunity to do anything on **_MACROSS_**, he went back to Osaka. And it was there that Yamaga learned how to direct--his teacher was Noboru Ishiguro [see _ANIMERICA, Vol. 3, No. 8, for details on Ishiguro's legendary career in anime--Ed._], Yamaga designed the storyboards for the opening credits of **_MACROSS_**...They went back to Osaka, in 1983, to make the Daicon IV Opening Animation. Of course, those people on the **_MACROSS_** staff, who would later become very important people in the industry, were quite angry with them. But, as Anno and Yamaga explained to Ishiguro and Shoji Kawamori, they had to go back to Osaka so they could make amateur films again. [LAUGHS] At first, the plan for Daicon IV Opening Anime was to make a fifteen-minute short in 16mm. I liked the screenplay--no dialogue--but the idea of portraying an original world, well, that was the beginning of what would eventually become **_THE WINGS OF HONNEAMISE_**. We *thought* we were strong enough to take on such a project, but Yamaga couldn't deal with the storyboards, and Anno couldn't deal with the animation--in the end, it was just impossible. So we quit, and decided to make the five-minute, 8mm film that became the Daicon IV Opening Animation. But when that was done, it was quite natural that Yamaga and I began to talk about the original plan, with the idea of making that film in a professional way. At that time, we were thinking of **_WINGS_** as a 30-minute movie.
>
>
> ...`ANIMERICA`: Did you write the screenplay for the next Gainax production, **_AIM FOR THE TOP! GUNBUSTER_**?
>
> `O`: I wrote the base story, then I gave it to Yamaga and told him to write the screenplay. And Yamaga said, "Okay, this is my kind of work! But don't hope for a good screenplay. I'm going to make a stupid robot-girl anime." [LAUGHS] I said, like...okay, okay, okay! Then he asked me what I would like. And I told him that I like space best as the setting for everything. We talked for more than three months...I talked, he asked, he talked, and I'd say no...no...no. Then he went back to Niigata, and about a week later he sent me his screenplay--and when I read it, I was laughing all over the place. And I called up Yamaga, and told him "You're a good screenwriter!" And he said, "No! That screenplay is stupid!" [LAUGHS]
>
> `A`: So did Yamaga end up writing the screenplay?
>
> `O`: Yes, but Anno changed *everything*! [LAUGHS]...To *me*, **_GUNBUSTER_** was a science-fiction film. But to Yamaga, it was a stupid robot-action girl film. [LAUGHS] So he sent the script to Anno. And *Anno* thought, "Ah! This is a real mecha anime!" And he cut up Yamaga's screenplay, then asked me, "How do you want to make it?" But everyone else on the staff was telling him, "Make it this way! That way! This way! That way!" Anno was so confused, he gave it to Higuchi and told him, "You can draw the storyboards any way you *like*!" So, Higuchi drew the storyboards...with *no screenplay*. Nothing but a theme: science-fiction-stupid-girl-action-robot-mecha! [LAUGHS]
>
> `A`: Is that why it's a comedy at the start, and a drama at the end? It's so different, Part One from Part Six.
>
> `O`: Part Six was the very first idea I had for the film--and it would be at the very end, I told Yamaga. That last scene, "Welcome Back"--it's so far from the idea of a stupid-comedy-action-parody-girl-robot-film. At that point, every fan is sobbing--Yamaga was so ashamed of himself! [LAUGHS]
>
> `A`: Maybe **_GUNBUSTER_** was so successful because it had a little something of everything.
>
> `O`: Yes. Somehow, I thought the 'chaos strategy' ended up giving the screenplay a stronger structure. That's why I think maybe we could have changed **_WINGS_**. But that was all ten years ago. [LAUGHS]
>
> ...`A`: **_OTAKU NO VIDEO_** seems to have a pretty strong structure. It's chronological, and you more or less wrote it by yourself. Is it true that in **_OTAKU NO VIDEO_**, the characters of both Tanaka *and* Kubo symbolize you?
>
> `O`: Yeah. They're two sides of my mind. Sometimes I think just like a Tanaka, and sometimes just like a Kubo. Sometimes I've taken people aside and told them, "You must become otaku...otaku...otaku..." But other times it's been people telling *me*, "You must see this...see this...see this!"
>
> ...`A`: But in comparing, say, **_OTAKU NO VIDEO_**'s structure to **_NADIA_**, you might say...
>
> `O`: **_NADIA_** was *true* chaos, good chaos and bad chaos! [LAUGHS] On **_NADIA_**, Anno didn't direct the middle episodes, Shinji Higuchi did. And some episodes were directed in Korea--why, no one knows exactly. [LAUGHS] That's *real* chaos, not good! What I mean to say is, *controlled* chaos--that's good. Controlled chaos is where you've got all the staff in the same room, looking at each other. But on **_NADIA_** you had Higuchi saying, "Oh, I'll surprise Anno", hide, and change the screenplay! Screenplays and storyboards got changed when people went home, and the next morning, if no one could find the original, I authorized them to go ahead with the changes. No one can be a real director or a real scriptwriter in such a chaos situation. But on **_GUNBUSTER_**, that chaos was controlled, because we were all friends, and all working in the same place. But on **_NADIA_**, half our staff was Korean, living overseas. We never met them. No control.
>
> `A`: Was **_NADIA_** the first Gainax film to have Korean animators?
>
> `O`: No, we used Korean animators even on **_GUNBUSTER_**. But we had never before used a Korean director or animation director. It was real chaos, just like hell.
##### "Conscience" part 3
- ["The Conscience of the Otaking: The Studio Gainax Saga in Four Parts: Part Three"](/docs/1996-animerica-conscience-otaking#part-3). _Animerica_ 4:4, pg 9-10, 24-27
> `Okada`: Japanese movie critics only review live-action movies. The Japanese art scene doesn't address anime, and its critics have nothing to say about it. And when it comes to the anime magazines, all they ever say is "It's good, it's good, it's good!" That's all. ANIMAGE, NEWTYPE - they're all the *same*. They're just merchandising magazines. They do have a "Reader's Voice Corner", where people write in their opinions. Some readers liked **_WINGS_**, but in those days **_PROJECT A-KO_** was what most anime fans thought of as good, and such money-making anime was the type that was promoted in the industry, which put **_WINGS_** in a very difficult place. Some people said "It's *very good*!" But almost all said, "I can't understand it." And I can't...I can't understand *why* they can't understand. It is a very simple film. Maybe it's difficult for them.
>
> ...`ANIMERICA`: Probably the one thing people discuss most about the movie in America is the attempted rape scene - what does it mean, why did he do it...there are all kinds of theories. I think it's because it's so very shocking, so sudden.
>
> `O`: That scene wasn't good technique. When I said the screenplay was weak, I was referring to such things. If **_WINGS_** had a stronger structure, the audience could always follow Shiro's mind, his heart, his feelings. But sometimes the film is undercut by a weak screenplay, and the audience ends up saying, "Oh, why, why, why? I can't understand Shiro - and of course, Leiqunni [LAUGHS] - what am I missing?" I think the audience gets confused at three points in the film: the first scene, which is Shiro's opening monologue, the rape scene, and the prayer from space. Why? The film needed a stronger structure. A little more. A few changes, and the audience would be able to follow Shiro's thoughts. But right now, they miss it, and that's a weakness. It's true that there will be ten or twenty percent of the audience who *can* follow it as it is, and say, "Oh, it's a *great* film! I can understand *everything*!" But eighty percent of the audience is thinking, "I lost Shiro's thoughts two or three times, or maybe four or five." Those are the kind of people who will say, "The art is great, and the animation is very good, but the story - *mmmm*..."
>
> `A`: Well, as an 'art' film, if you compare **_WINGS_** to, say, the animated version of Miyazaki's **_NAUSICAA OF THE VALLEY OF WIND_** - which compresses a very long manga into a movie, and an ending where the protagonist becomes a messiah...I understand Yamaga has said specifically that he did *not* want an ending like that - that he did not want Shiro to become some kind of higher being. He would still be a human being. Even though he'd gone into space, he'd be the same person.
>
> `O`: I know that we wanted to make it a very realistic film, so Shiro's speech from orbit never hurt anyone, and he came back from space to the planet, lived a long time, and died as an ordinary person. That was his only story. The film was Gainax's call to the world, of how we would be. The story of the anime is explaining why we are making anime in the first place. The lift-off of the rocket was only a preview of our future, when we were saying to ourselves, "Oh, we will *do* something!" But those feelings are mostly gone, just like memories, just like the person you were when you were young. It has *almost* gone away. But there is still the real thing, the film we made, that tells our story.
>
> ...`A`: Yamaga has said (in **_AILE DE HONNEAMISE_**) that he was in a coffee shop in August of 1984 and heard someone ordering "Royal Milk Tea", and the title "Royal Space Force" just clicked for him.
>
> `O`: Even Gainax's staff can get confused about this story. There's also a woman at Gainax who says it was she who got the idea for the title, and I think I found the concept. And Yamaga says it was he. No one knows what's the real story. In the end, we all just thought about the title "Oh, that's it! That's it." So, no problem. But interviewers always think, the director's the director. They never realize that at Daicon Film, or Gainax, there is *no* director, and *no* producer, and *no* animators, and *no* accountants^[The last was perhaps not the best idea.]. Everyone did those jobs, in the good old days of Gainax. So, what Yamaga says, the media likes to think these things are the facts, and so 'history' is made. But, in truth - no one knows, because **_WINGS_** was made in that kind of chaos.
>
> `A`: But - even though you are, as you say, 'amateurs', you still made **_WINGS_**. There are many anime films which you can see once or twice, and you'll never get anything more out of it. But **_WINGS_** you can see again and again, and notice more details - not just in the artwork, but in the political, the social, the economic - you find more and more layers.
>
> `O`: Yeah. Well, actually, there's another reason for the design complexity. Take, for example, Hayao Miyazaki's films. They're very simple to understand, yet very interesting and very good. That's because Miyazaki is a strong controller. One man does all the storyboard, the screenplay, directs the animation - he maintains control over everything. But in **_WINGS_**, or even **_GUNBUSTER_**, we didn't have that kind of control, because neither Yamaga nor Anno are that kind of strong director, as Miyazaki is. On a Gainax anime project, everyone has to be a director. Therefore, everyone's feelings and everyone's knowledge are going into it, creating all that detail. That's the *good* side of how Gainax's films are different from others. But we have no strong director, and that's the *weak* side.
##### "Conscience" part 4
- "The Conscience of the Otaking: The Studio Gainax Saga in Four Parts: Part Four". _Animerica_ 4:5, pg 8-9, 24-27
> `ANIMERICA`: Where did "Honneamise" come from? I've always wondered why they chose something that sounds French.
>
> `O`: Yes, it's French, but it doesn't mean anything. [LAUGHS] When they ordered us to come up with another title, all we could think was that we were going to make an utterly *meaningless* title, "Honneamise"--meaning *nothing*.
>
> `A`: Well, wasn't the name of Shiro's kingdom, "Honneamano"?
>
> `O`: Yes, but we came up with that *after* the new anime. --"Oh, **_THE WINGS OF HONNEAMISE_**...? What is Honneamise? Ah! Oh yes, it's the country's name!" [LAUGHS]
>
> `A`: You just liked the sound of "Honneamise"?
>
> `O`: It wasn't that it sounded right to us, but that it was a meaningless sound--so, we liked it. [LAUGHS]
>
> ...`A`: I like the little legend that was made up about "Honneamise", to explain it--about a bird who one day tried to fly to heaven and was turned by God into a fish for his temerity.
>
> `O`: Yeah. Mr. Yamaga was drinking some whiskey, and thinking, "Oh, yes,--the *meaning*!" The publicity people had told him that his new title had to have some kind of story behind it. He said to them, "Oh, yes--but--but--I'll have to have some drinks before I can come up with one!" [LAUGHS] And they said "Ohhhhhkay!" That's all.
>
> `A`: So you chose that meaningless title because you didn't want to call it anything else in the first place?
>
> `O`: Yes. On the LD box set, it's finally called **_THE ROYAL SPACE FORCE_**.
>
> ...`O`: Back during the 1987 premiere, Yamaga and I were talking about the next story of **_WINGS_**. It would be that world, a hundred years later. A spaceship from the world of **_WINGS_** then journeys to our present-day Earth, from their homeworld, four light-years from us.
>
> `A`: Wow! Interesting! So they'd be ahead of us technologically. Four light-years...so the world of **_WINGS_** is around Alpha Centauri?
>
> `O`: Yeah. Four light-years away.
>
> `A`: But you never pursued that idea seriously?
>
> `O`: Well, no one asked me. [LAUGHS] But when we'd finished **_WINGS_**, and were at the "premiere" in L.A., Yamaga and I were always talking about what the next stage of the story would be, one-hundred years after the original. On Earth, it would be either the present day, or the near-future.
>
> `A`: You could set it in the **_GUNBUSTER_** universe and *really* screw up the timeline. [LAUGHS] Is it true, by the way, that **_GUNBUSTER_** is the future of **_NADIA_**?
>
> `O`: No, not really. The similarities are because Anno was trying to get an idea... "Ohhhhh...I'm not getting anything..." [LAUGHS] "I need a name for a spaceship...how about...something from...**_GUNBUSTER_**!" [LAUGHS] "How about _Eltreum_ or _Exelion_?"
>
> ...`A`: Occasionally, I've asked Gainax's translator [Michael House?] to ask Yamaga questions for me about **_WINGS_**, and Yamaga has responded, "You know, I don't remember--it was ten years ago."
>
> `O`: That's probably the truth. I almost forget myself, because we saw the film two or three hundred times, and had so many different ideas about it. So you forget.
#### "Return of the Otaking"
> OKADA: I had a lot of fun making GUNBUSTER, but I didn't have that burning sensation when I made OTAKU NO VIDEO. It was something that I lightly made. I made it that way because I thought the people who watched it were like the people in the live-action portion--not the people who made it. 1983 was the turning point for myself and my friends. Basically what I wanted to do was set the stage for 1983 because that was when everything was changing; I wanted to show people what it was like during that period back in 1983, how we lived, basically, what our life was as otaku.
>
> PANEL: I'd like one more question, and then I'm going to open it up to everybody: There are many themes...I go back to OTAKU NO VIDEO--you talk a lot about, and it seems like you predicted in that film, a lot of the commercialization and product management that is now very, very common in the animation industry. Do you feel more strongly now about the way things have to be processed, and managed, and shoved out the door--you see all around you the selling of creativity?
>
> OKADA: That world we made in OTAKU NO VIDEO, it was not a prediction: it was an otaku's dream. Maybe we can be more major, or a bigger group, or maybe we can make our own theme parks! But in these days, I can't believe all of the things that are happening--our otaku's dreams are beginning to become a reality in the United States. I am very surprised, and very glad.
--["Return of the Otaking"](http://web.archive.org/web/20001217080300/www.j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/04_gal_999/otaking2.html), part 2; Anime America 1996 panel
> [OKADA:] Mr. Miyazaki's new movie, MONONOKE-HIME, is going to be using 80 cuts of computer graphics in it. If there were more opportunity, time, or availability, he would have wanted to use 120 cuts in it. So Mr. Miyazaki is also one of the people starting to use computer graphics, too. And, also, Mr. Miyazaki says, "If we'd had a computer system when we made LAPUTA, there's half of it I'd like to remake." So there's great possibilities with computer graphics. And Mr. Anno has said, in remaking the last two episodes of EVANGELION, he's going to Studio Ghibli to study Mr. Miyazaki's system. And that studio has a big system for computer-graphics images. I've heard they've got five, or seven, Silicon Graphics workstations. What Anno wants to make is a "snow world"-- the Eva units fighting the enemy amidst a world of snow, on a snow- covered mountain. But it's very difficult to portray snow falling and piling, and the robots walking through the snow--it's very difficult to draw by the human hand. Mr. Anno wants to make a masterful scene of a battle amongst the snow.[^haguesnow]
>
> ...AUDIENCE: Many Americans believe the line Kubo [OTAKU NO VIDEO] has concerning wanting to become the tyrannical king to be a reference to Nostradamus. We were wondering if it really is, and if Gainax was into other forms of Western occultism, like Masonry, or the Knights of Malta.
>
> OKADA: No, no! (waves dismissively at audience).
>
> PANEL: [TO AUDIENCE MEMBER] You're a bad boy!
>
> OKADA: The setting of 1983 is still the primary focus of OTAKU NO VIDEO, and the characters in that video during the time had seen the movie, NOSTRADAMUS: THE MAN WHO SAW THE FUTURE [narrated by Orson Welles-*ed.*]. Anyway, what it was, is that, their idea--that vision was so strong in their minds that they presented that story. And what I wanted to do was for people to see it, and make that, and say, "Oh, there are still people like this!" or, "Yes, that was the way it was back then."
--["Return of the Otaking"](http://web.archive.org/web/20001014204422/www.j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/04_gal_999/otaking4.html), part 4
[^haguesnow]: In April 2001, [Olivier Hagué](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-April/039702.html) comments (based on apparently Gainax sources, not Okada):
> "But did they ever state that there would be no more Eva? After all, they intended to make the Summer 97 movie an original story, independently from the alternate ending (first supposed to be released on video only)... And there are still some Gainax members who would like to make (or at least, to see ^^) that one.
>
> It was supposed to take place in snowy landscapes (instead of the "endless summer" setting), to have new characters, and overall a more realistic touch (some of the Gainax members called it "a sort of Hard-gelion" ^^). Who knows?... In a few years, maybe?..."
> AUDIENCE: Many Japanese intellectuals are Christians. Similarly, the characters in OTAKU NO VIDEO were clearly outcasts. Do you believe that liminality is necessary for creativity? [sotto voce] Try and translate that one, pal...O.K....Do you feel it is easier for social outcasts to be creative, to invent original ideas?
>
> OKADA: That's right. Basically, creativity will not come out of happy lives, but from people who become outcasts. There is no reason for you to become *purposely* unhappy. 'Cause everybody who watches anime is happy--the people who watch it who are *not* happy, are the people who make it [LAUGHS]. It's not too good of a thing to make anime. I think a peaceful life is to take anime merchandise cheap from Japan, and then sell it expensively over here and/or work at Viz and make some weird American anime magazine. Very happy! [LAUGHS]
--["Return of the Otaking"](http://web.archive.org/web/20001014231243/www.j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/04_gal_999/otaking5.html), part 5
> OKADA: In THE WINGS OF HONNEAMISE's story, that planet is six light years from our Earth. So, I told Mr. Yamaga, we should make a continuation story where their spaceship, not interplanetary, but interstellar, arrives here 100 years after the time of HONNEAMISE. So, they come to our Earth, and make contact with Earth. So, it is a continuity of that story. But it is very difficult to make. The plot I want to have, if I am to make a continuation of THE WINGS OF HONNEAMISE, is to have the story of them making their own interstellar ship, And that ship will arrive in our solar system right about the time Earth is able to colonize Mars. Not a warp drive, but an acceleration ship.
>
> ...OKADA: Yes. It would take 30 or 40 years. And then I'd try to show the conflict between the two cultures, the two planets. I would be really enthusiastic were I able to make a war between the two planets.
--["Return of the Otaking"](http://web.archive.org/web/20001217140000/www.j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/04_gal_999/otaking6.html), part 6; this may be connected to the weird cut EoE scenes (see my [argument](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2010-March/005990.html))
> ...[OKADA:] The difference I see is that it's becoming merchandise-based. And if they see something wrong with it, they don't have this burning sensation inside of them to basically say, "Well, if I made it like this--" For example, if you watch RANMA 1/2, and say, "Well, there's something wrong here, but if I made it like *this*, it's going to be like this..." But I don't see that burning sensation as much in the United States or Japan as I did back in 1983 or 1985. What I first started learning in my high school years, when I saw STAR BLAZERS, UCHU SENKAN YAMATO, it was like, "If I had made it like this, it would have been like this." So there's not too much of that anymore, so I guess it's like, "Oh, well, then, I guess everybody's happy--that's fine, then."
>
> ...OKADA: Right now, he's an executive at Bandai Visual. And he still has a religion: he believes in Mamoru Oshii, just like Jesus Christ [PRAYS TO HEAVEN]. In those days, in 1983 or 1984, he asked of everything to Mr. Oshii: "Is it good, or is it bad?" And if Mr. Oshii said, "Oh, it's good!," so Mr. Watanabe would think, "Oh, it's good, it's good, I must make it, I must make it!" And then I told Mr. Watanabe, "I want to make this film, THE WINGS OF HONNEAMISE," and he thinks, "I think it's a good idea, but I can't decide if it's *really* good. So--just a moment, I must go to Mr. Oshii's house" [RUNS IN PLACE; LAUGHS]. And Mr. Oshii says, "Oh-- it's interesting!" So, he thought, "It's good, it's good, it's good!" [LAUGHS] And it's a very powerful motivation for him, inside. So, he works very hard, and gets a very large budget for our film from the president of Bandai. So Mr. Oshii, he is a very good person for me, or for Studio Gainax, but...but...it is very strange to say, "Maybe it is good, but maybe it is not so good." It was a religion. But just now, Mr. Watanabe, he's come out of his brainwashing. So, he sometimes says: "Maybe...maybe, *maybe*, Mr. Oshii is sometimes wrong." [LAUGHS]
--["Return of the Otaking"](http://web.archive.org/web/20001217151500/www.j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/04_gal_999/otaking7.html), part 7
> OKADA: Not so. It's almost the same, from what I said to you at Otakon. You must remember that EVANGELION is produced at Tatsunoko, so the schedule is out of the control of Gainax--it's the responsibility of Tatsunoko. Tatsunoko almost rules, when it comes to control. So, I think, the responsibility was not with Gainax. People say, "It's the responsibility of Mr. Anno," but they're wrong. Control over schedule is the responsibility of the producer. But Tatsunoko and T.V. Tokyo couldn't handle it. It was out of Gainax's control.
>
> AUDIENCE: I talked to a person from Tatsunoko. He said he does not blame Mr. Anno, but he blames other people at Gainax, who might be telling Anno about his schedule, and--
>
> OKADA: Oh! I think producers always say that. But I talked with Mr. Anno about this a month ago, and then he said, "I'm *almost* the producer of EVANGELION, but I must be so, because Tatsunoko did not do anything for EVANGELION." See, he is very disappointed with Tatsunoko, and some rumors have said that Tatsunoko lost the film, or cels before they were shot.[^delays]
>
> AUDIENCE: Wow!
>
> OKADA: And I asked Mr. Anno, "Is it the truth?" And he says, in a dark voice, "Yes."
>
> AUDIENCE: Oh, wow.
>
> OKADA: But that was in the middle of the episodes. That wasn't the trouble with the last two episodes, the confusion. It was just Mr. Anno's teleplay. He said to me, "I can make a schedule on my own." At that time, I heard from Mr. Anno about his new plans, so maybe you want to--?
>
> AUDIENCE: Of course.
>
> OKADA: After EVANGELION, his next plan is to make a STAR TREK. Not *that* STAR TREK--a sort of anime like STAR TREK, a crew in a spaceship, who go to every planet, and each planet has its own culture. For example, one planet will have a very democratic culture, and everyone will approve, so they'll board, or they say, "no," and they talk with the crew about everything. And the spaceship crew will sometimes fall in love in some way on the planet, or something will happen--*maybe* some robots fight [LAUGHS]. He wants to make that film, because Mr. Anno thinks it will be a very good experience for the Japanese animation world. But the sponsor says, "It's not so good." because, in Japan these days...of course, you know, several years ago, it was the toy makers, like Bandai, who had a very strong control over the production of anime, and what they would want would be something like, "We need three new robots in this film," and so the anime was made with the three new robots. But right now, it's the record companies, like King, Polydor, or Sony Music Entertainment, who have very strong control over the production of anime. And what *they* want, is, "O.K., we've got two new idol singers, and we want to promote them." And so the anime is made with two new characters. [A dig at the _Macross_ franchise?]
--["Return of the Otaking"](http://web.archive.org/web/20001217163000/www.j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/04_gal_999/otaking8.html); the lost cel anecdote is interesting as cel-collector Mike Toole [claims](http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/the-mike-toole-show/2011-03-13) that "A lot of _Evangelion_ cels were stolen." (was there [corporate conflict](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2005-July/002766.html)? [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2005-July/002775.html) says Bandai/Sega (major Eva sponsor per _Notenki Memoirs_) made the [limited machine/hand-painted](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-June/029295.html) reproductions which the real cels would have competed with. [Carl Horn](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2005-July/002776.html) points to Okada's mention of Tatsunoko as a cel source, and discusses prices/descriptions of legitimate cels auctioned on Mandarake^[In 2011, a Misato OP cel sold [on Mandarake](http://webcitation.org/5xxsyzFOS) for 326k yen.]. [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2005-July/002777.html) then claimed it was an 'inside job' - Tatsunoko deliberately sold off the cels and most of them are still in dealer stockpiles. Bochan_bird also mentions sitting in on high-stakes back-room cel deals, which certainly would fit selling batches of stolen Eva cels... There was [one contest](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-June/029293.html) for legitimate real cels), The STAR TREK plan is a little odd; may be a version of the scrapped _Olympia_ project (see the "_Olympia_ - the phantom project" chapter in _The Notenki Memoirs_).
[^delays]: See the later discussion of the cels that Tatsunoko 'lost'. As well, [Ebj](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2006-December/003864.html) in 2006 claims
> "They did in-between animations. Since some later-to-be Gainax staffers used to cause delays during the production of Macross in that same role, I remember some Tatsunoko representative joking that they returned the favor with Eva."
[In 2011](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2011-March/006856.html), Ebj said:
> "The last survivor of the three founding brothers for Tatsunoko once mentioned that, since Gainax staffers were always late when working as in-between animators to deliver material, when Tatsunoko did some of the in-betweens on Eva for Gainax in turn they, too, delivered them late on purpose."
(As far as I can verify, one of the founding brothers is dead, but the other two are alive.)
> OKADA: Right now, I think there's more than fifty people who work at Gainax. Most of these people work on making computer games, and half of them work on making CD-ROMs, such as the CD-ROM featuring Yoshiyuki Sadamoto's artwork. And there's maybe only two or three people who work on anime. The anime part of Gainax, I think, is Mr. Anno and Mr. Suzuki, and one other person. So, the animation department is very, very small. Most of the people in Gainax just now work on artwork CD-ROMs. When they make anime, they must join forces with another studio. It's a bad case of a company that's grown larger and larger--they have to make a lot of money every year, every month, so they have to make and sell a lot of CD-ROMs, because animation *loses* money. The case of EVANGELION, where they're actually *making* money, is something of a miracle, in the opinion of Gainax executives such as Hiroyuki Yamaga and Mr. Sadamoto, and not something they can expect as normal. They want to keep on making anime, but since it's unprofitable, they must make more CD-ROMs and computer games to balance things out. And so the computer game department gets larger and larger, and the animation department gets smaller and smaller. It's not good.
--["Return of the Otaking"](http://web.archive.org/web/20001217173900/www.j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/04_gal_999/otaking9.html), part 9
> OKADA: I think the style, or mood, of EVANGELION, is not so far, not so different, from the serious side of GUNBUSTER or NADIA. The biggest difference would have been in the style of planning the last episode. My style is to always plan the ending *first,* as I did with GUNBUSTER--everything then follows from that. In NADIA, Mr. Anno couldn't decide on the ending--it wasn't fixed until only three months before the final episode was shown. [Compare Okada's comments about Anno & deciding NGE's ending!] So subsequently, I was confused about NADIA, and there was a lack of control over the various episodes. EVANGELION is a very great series--I think it's one of the top anime ever made. But--the last scenes were never fixed. When I talked to Mr. Anno a month ago, he said he couldn't decide the ending until the time came. That's his style. So, if I had made EVANGELION with him, I couldn't do such a thing. I'd think I'd have to fix the ending, what would happen with every character. Then, everything would follow: the first episode, the second episode...If I wanted to show a boy's coming-of-age story, a *bildungsroman,* the last scene would show the grown-up man; the first scene, a boy who hates everything about the adult world. That would be the structure; I'm very careful about a regular construction. But Mr. Anno's style on EVANGELION was not so. He wants to put it together episode-by-episode. It's just like the style of a manga. In your typical manga, the artist doesn't have any picture of the last scene, or the last episode. They just think of building up on past episodes. And finally, the manga artist, and his assistants, and editor...[BURIES HEAD IN HANDS], they work out an idea about the last sequence. If it's a good idea, the whole episode is very good. If they can't make a good idea, the whole episode is not so good. It's an unhappy story. And I think that's what happened with the last two episodes of EVANGELION. Mr. Anno and his staff couldn't make a good idea for it. He told an anime magazine in Japan that he couldn't make what he wanted because of schedule or budget. But that's not correct. I talked with Mr. Yamaga and Mr. Anno. They said, "It's not only a problem of schedule or budget. It's a problem of what the ending is going to be." Mr. Anno couldn't decide. Mr. Anno's and my own style of production are very different.
>
> ... Because many anime and *seiyuu* magazines are asking Mr. Anno that question, and every time his answer changes. It's "confused, confuse-er, confuse-est." He's not happy right now. Maybe you know that back in January, or February, he shaved his head[^awl]. It's a Japanese gesture of contrition. People said, "Oh, he's feeling a lot of responsibility towards the producer, or T.V. Tokyo, or the sponsor." Not so. He felt a very strong responsibility about *his* stuff. "Sorry, I can't do it!" So he shaved his head. This summer, he hates anime fans. I think he'll feel happier by autumn.
--["Return of the Otaking"](http://web.archive.org/web/20001217044400/www.j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/04_gal_999/otaking10.html), part 10; [NAveryW](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=392434&sid=c442d95034b169641c0e45a47ec4455f#392434) highlights how Okada's account of Yamaga & Anno still not knowing what the ending was directly contradicts Yamaga's later 2010 statements, and Anno knowingly lying to the public with different answers.
> "This reminds me of [Takeshi Honda](!Wikipedia "Takeshi Honda (animator)") at Katsucon many years back. He said that Anno constantly changed things. He changed many of the later episodes at the last minute, and that was so frustrating for him that he did not speak to Anno until after The End of Evangelion was completed....Indeed, Takeshi Honda gave me the impression that towards the end, Anno was rewriting the episodes the day before they were scheduled to sit down and start doing the key animation."
--[Aaron Clark](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=392551#392551) after reading above thread; [part 2](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2010-September/006500.html)
[^awl]: In an amusing example of how English sources can be unreliable, Rei Ayanami's English voice-actor, Amanda Winn-Lee, is [quoted](http://web.archive.org/web/20041224092649/http://www.eva-r.com/faq/evarfaqeoe.html) (_Animefantastique_, Lamplighter) as saying:
> "_Evangelion_ is a therapist's dream. Anno obviously didn't get along well with his mother or any female. My guess is that Anno hates women. He must have been one very lonely little boy. Rumour is that when he finally finished _Evangelion_, he shaved all the hair off his entire body... all of it. That's just weird."
> OKADA: Yeah, maybe that's right. Right now, many anime fans in Japan are fighting each other over whether that ending was good or bad. Some say, "Anno must feel no obligation towards the fans--he must make something true to himself." Many fans are fighting over this. Your question has come up in these debates. In my personal opinion, if he wanted to make such a statement, to say, "this is just fiction, and you should go back to the real world," he could do it a better way. If that's what he wanted to say, it's not necessary to make an anime to do it. But he's still an animator, and he wants to make another anime series. So his true mind does not say, "it's only animation, and I should go back to the real world." So I think Mr. Anno's confused just now.
>
> ...My style is to look for a good idea, or a good scene, in the midst of a not-so-good manga. If I make it into an anime, maybe it can be better than it was. I heard that Mr. Miyazaki thinks the same way. In FUTURE BOY CONAN, he took the basic novel THE INCREDIBLE TIDE, by Alexander Key--not a very good story, in Mr. Miyazaki's view. But he said, "I can take that story, and make a good anime out of it." He has the power to turn a not-so-good story into a good anime. I think he's a not-so-good person--just like me.
--["Return of the Otaking"](http://web.archive.org/web/20001217055200/www.j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/04_gal_999/otaking11.html)
> In 1970, in Japan, the world Expo was held in Osaka. The theme was human progress. I was only an eleven year-old boy back then, and I thought, science can do everything, and make everything better. Man has gone to the Moon, and he'll go to Mars, and Pluto, and to other solar systems. Everything can happen, and everyone will be happy. And I thought the United States could do anything; everyone there is happy. We Japanese will follow them. So we believed then. Of course I can't say that now, in these confused times, but the 1970 Osaka Expo had a tremendous influence on me then, as a young man--that humanity shall progress towards everything, and progress is good. I don't think so, right now...but deep in my mind, there's still a little voice saying, "Human progress is very good! Trust the United States!" [LAUGHS]
--["Return of the Otaking"](http://web.archive.org/web/200012170658/http://www.j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/04_gal_999/otaking12.html)
## 1996 T
- 1996-animerica-avengingangeladvann.pdf
- 1996-animerica-ngedescchardesign.pdf
- 1996-pa41-editorial.txt
- 1996-pa41-feature-controversy.txt
- 1996-pa41-feature-manga.txt
- 1996-pa41-feature-mechafiles.txt
- 1996-pa41-feature-products.txt
- 1996-pa41-feature-review.txt
- 1996-pa41-feature.txt
> "If you're a diehard EVA fan you might want to buy this month's issue of Animerica,Anime and Manga Monthly(Volume 5 Number 11).
>
> ... There's also a page long AV Interface article on the four-disc Girlfriend of Steel CD-Rom game set ,an AnimExpress column for Genesis 0:8:Lies and Silence,and an End of Evangelion CD Compact View review.This issue also has that hilarious Planet Anime ad with the faces of Asuka,Shinji,and Rei superimposed on real life models.You've gotta see it to believe it.^_^Oh,and there's an ad from Rising Sun Creations for a Tsukuda Hobby life size(approximately 3 foot tall) pre-painted Pen-Pen model with stand!"
<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1996-December/005205.html>
> Let us study in detail one by one and try to piece together the personal relationships these frightened adults and children are fated to fence each other into. Let us also study how these small, ordinary relationships grow to be the power that changes the world.
>
> ... It would seem that all is clear between Shinji and Asuka. The situation with them has changed so they can express their feelings and, so to speak, become as close as childhood friends.
>
> Asuka yells "Hot!", splashing the morning bath water, rages over forgetting her lunch box, and openly states her feeling, like an incantation, of being frustrated with wanting Shinji as her partner; from these facts we may infer that her feelings for him as a man are less than they appear to be.
>
> Shinji appears to be henpecked by Asuka. However, since he got very flustered when she slipped into his futon one night, and since he couldn't look straight at her figure in a sexy bathing suit, we may read between the lines that Shinji has feelings for her as a woman. Before the split between Asuka and Shinji, when their friendship was turning into passion, possibilities for Shinji seemed good.
>
> ... TOUJI & KENSUKE & HIKARI
>
> Where do broken dreams and wishes go?
>
> ... However, Touji was selected as the fourth candidate, and when EVA device #1 attacked Touji's EVA device #3, this relationship was broken. Kensuke's dream of being an EVA pilot was also broken, and Hikari's feelings for Touji too...
>
> The 'promise' of a personal relationship was seldom made in "Evangelion" and it made a touching picture that Hikari, an honor student and class president, was charmed by Touji, who had a bit of an image as a delinquent. Hikari was portrayed as a girl who was wishing, "I'm not yet able to confess my feelings, but I want to transmit them somehow," and Touji, either knowing or not knowing about her feelings, promised to eat the leftovers of her box lunch. Touji, Hikari, and Kensuke; from here on we will not be able to take our eyes off of them.
>
> GENDOU & REI, MISATO & SHINJI
>
> ... Concerning actual blood relatives introduced in this story, the only pair is the protagonist, Ikari Shinji, who meets with his father, NERV Commander Gendo. However, one very rarely sees "family feelings" between these two. Rather, we can observe more cases where unrelated companions form family-like ties.
>
> ... That Katsuragi Misato lets Shinji live in her apartment is also not merely from sympathy. If Rei and Gendo have exchanged smiles with the same mutual warmth, as peacefully as in a "husband and wife" relationship, Misato and Shinji have something spiritually like an "older sister/younger brother" relationship.
>
> Shinji appears to be afraid of contact with others, and Misato can identify with this, since she continues to be troubled by the loss of her father in the Second Impact. Misato surely has experienced Shinji's feelings of hesitation and pain. Therefore, she blames herself for not giving his feelings enough support at this important stage.
>
> Having just come through such a path herself, Misato is capable of throwing Shinji off without hesitation when his heart is in torment. Misato is shown in this story to be the one with the greatest understanding of Shinji, the one who wants to be his guiding hand. Also, Shinji is the one who truly understands her pain.
--['From Newtype, March 3 1996 p.4, cover story: Stray Children.'](http://web.archive.org/web/20010211123346/www.acsys.com/~tallman/stray_e.html)
> There's a peculiar thing Shinji does with his Super - DAT Walkman as early as the second episode of EVANGELION: he keeps switching back and forth between tracks 25 and 26 - the numbers of the final two episodes - and when those two episodes arrived, they were undoubtedly the most controversial hour of anime television in recent memory. The uproar over #25, " Do You Love Me? " and #26, " Take Care of Yourself, " was somewhat reminiscent of that over the final two episodes of the British 1960s TV classic THE PRISONER - a series which EVA had already made reference to in episode 4, when Shinji resigns temporarily from NERV. Like the conclusion of THE PRISONER, EVA's ending had a jerking, interrogative style, and seemed to suggest the show was about something else than what it appeared to be at the beginning - and even that the show's legions of fans should re - examine their motives for liking EVA in the first place. Complaints were so numerous over the conclusion that even many Japanese who didn't follow anime heard about the situation, and that this Gainax was a bunch of " bad boys. "
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20010304203436/j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/03_evangelion/end1.html>
> "No sooner did EVA have its controversial TV ending that Gainax announced it would produce two *more* endings by the spring and summer of 1997: for the video and LD release, it would entirely remake the last two episodes, releasing them as a fourteenth two - episode volume after the first thirteen (as well as remake for the ongoing video release selected scenes in the latter part of the series it was dissatisfied with). There will be a two - part theatrical release to accompany it; one movie will be a compressed " digest " of the series' plot - the other will be the two new episodes. In addition to this, there will be an EVA theatrical movie with an entirely original plot and a *third* ending. Anno indicated at the Expo that these " additional " two endings would in fact really be the same ending as the final TV episode, but from different viewpoints."
>
> ... "Indeed, there seems to be evidence that Anno's dissatisfaction with the original conclusion was more with its often minimalist (if interestingly - handled) visuals, a result of running out of time and budget, than its writing per se: Toshio Okada, in last issue's "Return of the Otaking", [LINK HERE - SUNDAY MORNING SECTION] spoke of Anno's ambitious plans for a CG - enhanced battle sequence in the remake. Okada also pointed out that Anno has tended to give different rationales concerning the remake, and of late Gainax's own publicity has rather coyly spoken of fan interest being the cause. "
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20010305211004/j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/03_evangelion/end2.html>
# 1997
## 1997 P
- 1997-annotalkstokidspart1of2.wmv
- 1997-annotalkstokidspart2of2.wmv
- 1997-yamaguchi-2015thelastyearofryojikaji.txt
> As a matter of fact, Anno is a student of Leni Riefenstahl, and parodied her Triumph of the Will in the Nadia omake. In the spring 1997 issue of Tokion he said regarding the dangerous potential of art: "Nazi Germany was a perfect example. Those guys were making great movies! Even the anti-Nazi propaganda films Disney produced, portrayed Nazis as being fashionable" (He also said of Evangelion in that same interview, "I'm obviously not from a Christian upbringing, so they will have to excuse me for borrowing certain Christian words and images." He didn't say, "They will have to ignore my borrowing them, because they have no meaning whatsoever within the story").
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2009-December/005598.html>
> "There's also both Genesis 0:0 features (0:0 - IN THE BEGINNING and 0:0' - THE LIGHT FROM THE DARKNESS) which are recap and making of pieces, neither very interesting although the first has very brief interviews with Sadamoto Yoshiyuki and Anno Hideaki. There's also a series of brief questions asked of the voices of the three main female characters, Mitsuishi Kotono (Misato), Miyamura Yuko (Asuka), and Hayashibara Megumi (Rei). Also included is a separate collection of short TV spots for the End of Evangelion movie I'd never seen before which were QUITE interesting, I'll put it that way."
--<http://www.mania.com/neon-genesis-evangelion-renewal-evangelion-dvdbox_article_75523.html>; TODO find out what this was about; tentative assignment of Genesis 0:0 to '96 or '97
<http://www.gainax.fr/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=121&Itemid=416>
"La Fin d'Evangelion par Hideaki Anno. Newtype : La fin cinématographique d'Eva est enfin achevée. Dites-nous franchement quels sont vos sentiments."
"Entretien de Anno Hideaki dans New Type de septembre 1997"
TODO: get a translation from the French
<http://www.gainax.fr/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=122&Itemid=416>
"Hideaki Anno parle de Love And Pop"
"Extrait de l'interview d'Hideaki Anno dans le Newtype/Kadokawa Shôten de septembre 1997."
TODO: translation from the French
> Interview with Anno in French magazine:
>
>> "According to Studio Gainax's press release, when humans fall in love or feel close to their family, the part of the brain labeled A-10 comes into play. Strangely, the pilots of EVAs have to use this part of their brains to "merge" with their EVA. That makes them warriors of LOVE, with the power of LOVE to protect their loved ones."
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-September/005110.html>
> "...in an interview, director Anno indicated that Misato's character design is modeled after Tsukino Usagi. The hair style (sans odango), especially the front, is almost an exact duplication of Usagi. He has even used the words "Misato is Usagi in her 29th years" (I am not quoting the words here, as I forgot the exact wording).
>
>Ref : Shinseiki Evangelion Kanzen Kouryaku Tokuhon, by Shinseiki Fukuin Kyoukai, ISBN4-380-97219-4
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-November/002387.html>
> "The part about Misato being inspired by Usagi was mentioned by Sadamoto in the bonus disc of the _Renewal_ as well but only in the regards of her hairs; in that interview he also said that he was inspired by Fujiko Mine from Lupin, he liked the fact that at the same time she seems to be in her 20s and in her 30s."
--[HyperShinchan](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=471771#471771)
> "In the notes accompanying LD 0:2, it was stated that during the storyboard stage of episode 4, a staff asked Anno what Misato is like, and Anno replied that Misato is just like Tsukino Misato. [error; should be 'Tsukino Usagi']
>
> Anno is a Sailor Moon fans, and he had participated in drawing some cells in episode 46. [see also: "I recall reading one time that Anno himself worked some on Sailor Moon, animated the Outer Senshi's transformation scenes, but I don't know if that is really true or not." <http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-January/024692.html>]
>
> In the special EVA video dated before the TV series, Sadamoto stated that Misato's front bangs was modeled after Sailor Moon."
--<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-January/024719.html>
> Some other interesting tidbit that Yamashita Ikuto put together:
>
> Evangelion was first proposed as a project by Mr. Anno on Sept. 20 1993.
>
> Almost 5 years ago.
>
> The unique look and feel of Tokyo-03 was strongly influenced by the fact that in 1994 GAiNAX relocated their office to the city of Mitaka (3 Eagles) which gave them a new environment to visualized the the world of Evangelion. "Eva LD Movie Box Set"
--<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-December/023860.html>
>> I've gotten curious enough to ask. Precisely what is Rei doing in that tank in central dogma? (I think it's episode 15 or in that neighborhood).
>
> Making backups of Rei's memory. A member of GAINAX said that in an interview.
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-December/003255.html>; from [some anime magazine](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-December/003576.html) (TODO: but which & when?)
> This was from Shonen A's Sadamoto Yoshiyuki interview:
>
>> "...there were a lot of holes in the plot. For example, I asked (Hideaki Anno) why only children pilot EVAs. His immediate response was 'Right, I must get this sorted out.', then he got all worked up."
--[Leonard Tai](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-May/014883.html); TODO was this really from 1997? Maybe there was an interview in 1998 *before* Tai wrote in May 1998 and I am unduly pessimistic about how old his information is?
- [TV yearly chronology](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-October/007749.html), from _Neon Genesis Evangelion Artbook Photofile 02: Adam_
> Miyazaki: Anyway, I think it's good that you had success with Evangelion. It gives you an opportunity to work and an influential voice. Besides that, escape from the ghost of Evangelion as fast as possible. You can't be "that Mr. Anno who made Evangelion" 10 or 20 years from now.
>
> Anno: I know!
>
> Miyazaki: So, I think you should keep your hands off Evangelion entirely from here on out.
>
> Don't worry about that. The evil spirit has already gone. So, I'm going to do shoujo manga (_His and Her Circumstances_) for now. (laughs)
>
> ...Miyazaki: Isn't that film (_Love and Pop_) something like an exorcism of Evangelion? (laughs)
>
> Anno: To put it bluntly, yes, it is. (laughs)
--["もののけ姫 vs エヴァンゲリオン (宮崎監督と庵野監督:97年夏の師弟対決を中心に)"](http://homepage3.nifty.com/mana/miyazaki-annno.html); excerpts from an interview apparently during their Sahara trip
- [Carl Horn's](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=382637#382637) description: "Miyazaki and Anno took a special plane journey through the Sahara together in the late 1990s in a [vintage [red] plane](http://web.archive.org/web/19980710052633/http://nausicaa.net/miyazaki/file-archive/UNSORTED/antonov.JPG), retracing the route of Antoine de Saint-Exupery (a book was written about their trip)"; [CuSO4](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-August/019934.html) discusses it a little & [Patrick Yip describes](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-August/019965.html) it extensively and also provides [a photo](http://imgur.com/ySDP2) & [video](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aa36Wq3BL7k). [Luna1883](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-September/031351.html):
> ...the north African itinerary and attendant snapshots was documented in "quick japan" (or a sister publication). the feature basically says that Anno and Miyazaki wanted to follow the final flight of the author of the "little prince", Antoine de saint-Exupery, who died in 1943; and also pay their respects to a certain Oscar-winning epic (and Booker prize-winning novel) about the high-flying life of adulterous mapmakers in the Sahara during WW2--a quietly beautiful film that asked very pointed questions about the concept of identity (national and otherwise)...what is extraordinary is that Miyazaki and Anno flew a vintage plane (a 2-seat Sopwith-camel biplane like the English patient's, i hope) across the desert. (lets hope Anno wasn't the pilot). anyway, there is a picture on top of a dune with Miyazaki wearing a sensible hat and grey suit, pointing straight ahead, and Anno in a black pullover, no hat, doing an Ultraman pose!
[Ebj](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-September/031354.html):
> I have a shot I found in an Italian anime mag which is quite similar: there are Anno and Miyazaki again, the setup is an airport runway with desert landscape all around, there actually is a biplane, but it's big, with some windows for passengers (say 15 mt overall length), it's red, with a sign on the side which says "O.K - K.O", and Miyazaki is wearing a mechanic suit, leaning on the plane, while Anno stands on top of it (around 4 mt above) in a red 'tunic' and sunglasses doing the Ultraman pose. BTW, Studio Ghibli did the drawings for episode 12 of Eva...you can see that they did draw episode 12 looking at the hairstyle of the speaker of the propaganda-van for candidate Nozoku Takahashi (the name is derived by Nozomu Takahashi, producer of Studio Ghibli).^[<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-September/031363.html> for second quote]
From Bochan_bird's [background Kaibunsho material](http://www.evaotaku.com/html/kaibunsho-bginfo.html) (see previous 1996 quotation for discussion):
> - 1997/03/10~: Quick Japan #9 and #10 issues contain interviews and a roundtable discussion by Gainax figures Toshimichi Otsuki (Producer), Yoshiyuki Sadamoto (Eva character designer and manga artist), Hiroki Sato (PR Manager), Kazuyshi Tsurumaki (Assistant Director) and Masayuki (Assistant Director). The roundtable discussion covers topics ranging from Eva story contents to behind-the-scenes happenings, past activities, a personal critique/characterization of Director Anno, and so on.
#### Theatrical pamphlets
Background: <http://wiki.evageeks.org/Movie_Pamphlets>
##### D&R
###### Intro
> "The series [NGE] featured attractive SF settings, dynamic battle scenes, a pedantic flavor from incorporating Christian motifs and psychoanalytical jargon into a dramatic work, and a super-intensive amount of information. Evangelion exceeded the bounds of conventional anime on all these counts, making it truly worthy of the title "Neon Genesis". The series enjoyed the enthusiastic support of numerous fans, and also spawned discussions on various topics.
>
> The TV series ended in a manner that could be considered incomplete. This became an intense issue, and by that meaning could be said to have spurred on Evangelion's popularity. The voice of the fans grew stronger and stronger as they demanded a proper ending to the drama, explanations of the mysteries, or even a new story. In order to meet these expectations, a cinema edition was planned -- this is "EVANGELION DEATH AND REBIRTH".
>
>
> ...
> "REBIRTH" is Part 1 of the "Conclusion" which retells TV episodes 25 and 26 as a new story. Evangelion will conclude by showing this Part 1 together with Part 2 of the Cinema Edition which is scheduled for release this summer."
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr1-intro.html>
###### Timeline
> "[2001]: Yui and Gendo Ikari have their first child, Shinji. Had the child been a girl, Gendo intended to name her "Rei".
>
>...
>
>[2003]: Fuyutsuki, through his independent research, draws closer to a massive deception surrounding Second Impact, at the fore of which is Gendo Ikari, Chief of Research at the U.N. Artificial Evolution Laboratories (AEL). When Fuyutsuki visits the AEL and threatens Gendo with a public exposé of the truth, Gendou guides Fuyutsuki to Central Dogma -- a gigantic cavity sprawling deep underground the Laboratories. There Fuyutsuki meets Dr. Naoko Akagi, a foremost authority on bio-computers, who calls their organization "Gehirn". Standing before the incomplete EVA-00, Gendou tempts Fuyutsuki, saying, "Won't you create a new future for humankind together with me?" After careful consideration, Fuyutsuki accepts Gendo's offer...
>
>
> ...
> [2010]: Rei Ayanami (the 1st) visits Gehirn. Gendo, who is accompanying her, explains that she is the child of an acquaintance.
>
> MAGI is completed through the efforts of Dr. Naoko Akagi. That same night, Naoko learns from Rei that she is merely a tool for achieving Gendo's plans. In a rage of passion, she strangles Rei and then throws herself from the Command Center and dies."
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr1-timeline.html>; the interest of 2001 lies in the sibling (and unromantic!) relationship between Shinji & Rei, the interest of 2003 in the 'Laboratories' connection to the Black Moon/Central Dogma and the Proposal's final episode; the interest of 2010 in confirming that Naoko committed suicide
###### Characters
> "She [Asuka Soryu Langley] is one quarter Japanese and German, but her nationality is American. In contrast to Shinji and Rei, she is a bright and active young girl. She hates to lose, and is full of pride. As the battles against the Angels continue, she gradually loses her self-confidence as a pilot, becoming both mentally and physically exhausted.
>
>
> ...
> His [Kaworu Nagisa] birthdate is given as September 13, 2000 -- the same date as Second Impact.
>
>
> ...
> Normally casual and indirect, he [Kaji] rarely shows his true colors. He understands Shinji and Misato, and occasionally offers them advice.
>
>
> ...
> She [Misato] lives with Shinji, and acts as his guardian. During strategic operations she is a bold and daring commander, but normally she is a cheerful optimist who looks after Shinji and the other pilots in the capacity of an older sister. However, she also carries about a past of losing her father due to an Angel, and thus joined NERV to take her revenge on the Angels.
>
>
> ...
> Shinji is an introverted young boy who is awkward at communicating with other people, and harbors doubts as to the value of his own existence. Ordered by his father from whom he had lived apart for over ten years, he piloted EVA-01 and fought against the Angels. He continues to search for his place in life amidst the fierce battles with the Angels.
>
>
> ...
> He [Gendo Ikari] appears cold-blooded and ruthless -- capable of doing anything to achieve his aims -- but there are many mysteries surrounding his conduct.
>
>
> ...
> He [Fuyutsuki Kozo] is currently a member of NERV as a willing collaborator with Gendo, but his true intentions are unknown.
>
>
> ...
> He [Hyuga Makoto] has an easy-going personality, and appears to harbor some affection toward Misato.
>
>
> ...
> She [Horaki Hikari] has a very down-to-earth character, and takes her responsibilities as Class President seriously. For this reason she is somewhat shunned by the boys in the class. While outwardly appalled at Touji's unmannerly character, she secretly harbors affection toward him, but never says so openly. She is one of Asuka's few friends in Japan.
>
>
> ...
> There appear to be some secrets concerning her [Ikari Yui] death. She met Gendo while in university, and married him soon after graduating. She is also the one who brought together Fuyutsuki and Gendo."
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr1-characters.html>
###### Glossary
> "The relation between the actual "Dead Sea Scrolls" and SEELE's "Secret Dead Sea Scrolls" is unclear.
>
>
> ...
> [Instrumentality Project/Human Complementation Project (HCP) (JINRUI HOKAN KEIKAKU)] Like the name implies, this is a project to complement humankind's wanting parts and achieve a "perfect existence". This project was being advanced by the Instrumentality Committee as well as Gendo Ikari and NERV.
>
> In "REBIRTH", Misato says that it is a project to "artificially evolve Humankind, which has reached its limit as a colony of flawed and separate entities, into a perfect single being." However, it appears that the complementation of humankind envisioned by the elders of SEELE does not equal the complementation aimed for by Gendo and Fuyutsuki.
>
>
> ...
> [Children] Evangelion pilots who are limited to 14-year old boys and girls. These pilots are called "Children" (qualified persons), and are identified as First, Second and so on according to the order of their selection. Of these, the First (Rei) and Third (Shinji) Children have extremely similar personal patterns, and Eva crossover tests are even performed between the two. All the candidates for Children are gathered in the New-Tokyo-3 First Municipal Junior High School which Shinji attends, and all members of Class 2-A are in fact candidates. It is not clear why the plural form (CHILDREN) is used instead of the singular form (CHILD). Incidentally, the word CHILD includes various additional meanings such as: embryo, fetus, descendant, product, and even a person who has emerged from a special environment."
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr1-glossary.html>
###### Seiyuu
> [Megumi Ogata, Shinji's seiyuu]: "Every time a new script arrived... every time I turned a new page...
>
>I was torn apart by a new pain.
>
> Even though they were fresh wounds, with fresh blood spilling out, it felt like I was peeling off old scabs which remained on my skin.
>
> Sometimes slowly, sometimes with a quick jerk,
>
> The claws of a merciless 'Creator' peeled away the layers of my heart...
>
> I would be happy if I were able to touch the "Shinji" inside everyone.
>
> The "Shinji" inside me is waiting for the time of complementation.
>
>
> ...
> [Yuko Miyamura, Asuka's seiyuu]: Please, people -- Let's try to be a little happier!!
>
>
> ...
> [Kotono Mitsuishi, Misato's seiyuu]: I am truly glad to have met the woman named Misato. Although she doesn't easily speak her true feelings, which often gave me some trouble, I truly like her bright manner by which she hides the loneliness and darkness deep within her heart. After the TV series had ended, I listened to "Cruel Angel's Thesis" again and was struck by the phrase "Although I cannot become a goddess, I will live on." Surely this must be the voice of Misato's heart. I look forward to watching Misato in this cinema edition, as well as seeing who and how Shinji fights.
>
>
> ...
> [Fumihiko Tatsuki, Gendo's seiyuu]: Although the answer to most of the rumors is "YES", I vacillate between ! and ? with each episode on whether I like or hate Evangelion and Gendo Ikari. However, I can't help but feel an endless fascination at the way Eva's story unfolds, tinted by an infinite amount of information amidst drama with needlessly excessive 'fan-service'..."
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr1-seiyuu.html>
###### "Refrain"
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr1-refrain.html>
###### Notes
> "People found a God, and in their folly tried to acquire it. Thus retribution was visited upon mankind."
>
> Ritsuko Akagi thus ridiculed Second Impact -- the greatest calamity since the dawn of history which was visited upon humankind in the final year of the 20th century.
>
>
> ...
> Another "Children", Rei Ayanami, was a manufactured girl -- manufactured to carry out a certain task. She shed the first tears of her life upon realizing that she was "lonely", but then died in battle immediately thereafter. A third Rei was prepared at once -- a new Rei who knew not the reason for her tears.
>
> "Piloting Eva is all I have."
>
> The dedicated pilot of EVA-02, Sohryu Asuka Langley's pride was sustained by piloting Eva. Losing her mother at a young age had made her choose "strength" as her raison d'être. The strength of being needed by those around her, and yet not needing anyone around her.
>
> But Asuka had been beaten -- by Shinji, by the Angels, and by herself.
>
> Having lost the ability to pilot Eva, she lost her sense of worth -- a broken person.
>
>
> ...
> "Yes, worthy of friendship."
>
> The Fifth Children, Kaworu Nagisa, achieved a chance meeting with Shinji, and conveyed his friendship. Kaworu's words gently opened up Shinji's heart, which had shut itself away in its shell. But Kaworu's true identity was that of the final Angel -- the enemy of humankind.
>
>
> ...
> The Angel's name was Kaworu Nagisa -- The first person to ever tell Shinji that he liked him. And the first person to whom Shinji ever opened up his heart. Having killed Kaworu by his own hand, Shinji shut away his heart once again and implored Asuka to help him. Asuka - the spirited young girl who had always made fun of him. But Asuka's pride had been shattered, and she did not respond. On the other hand, the death of the last Angel meant the completion of SEELE's scenario. To artificially evolve Humankind which has reached its limit as a colony of flawed and separate entities into a perfect single being -- that was the true meaning of the Instrumentality Project (HCP), and was also synonymous with Third Impact.
>
>
> ...
> What does Gendo plan in the midst of this hopeless situation. What will SEELE's scenario bring to pass? Is there a future for Asuka, lying curled up like an unborn child inside the unmoving EVA-02? What runs through Ritsuko's head as she smiles coldly inside MAGI? And Misato dashing through the battlefield that was once NERV HQ -- will she make it in time? The clashing of various people's wills amidst a complex battle resembles a council that will decide humanity's future. Evolution and death, stagnation and birth, truth and lies -- and the future chosen by humankind? "
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr1-notes.html>
##### D&R Special Edition (2)
###### Commentary
> "From the initial planning stages, this series has evolved around its director Hideaki Anno, and it could be said that all aspects from the basic concept to the conclusion bear the mark of Anno's creative individuality.
>
>
> ...
> Evangelion became centered on the theme of "people's hearts" from around the middle of the TV series. As the culmination of this trend, the climax of the series, episodes 25 "Owaru sekai (Ending World)" and 26 "Sekai no chuushin de ai wo sakenda kemono (The Beast who Shouted "I/Love" at the Center of the World)", took an experimental and shocking approach in that the story developed within the inner worlds of the main characters. While this climax may have fulfilled the basic thematic requirements, it left the mysteries presented thus far mostly unsolved, and gave a strong impression of having ended with the story incomplete.
>
> This ending became an intense issue, and by that meaning could be said to have spurred on Evangelion's popularity. The voice of the fans grew stronger and stronger as they demanded a proper ending to the drama, explanations of the mysteries, or even a new story. In order to meet these expectations, a cinema edition was planned -- this is "EVANGELION DEATH AND REBIRTH".
>
>
> ...
> "REBIRTH" is Part 1 of the "Conclusion" which retells TV episodes 25 and 26 as a new story. It was originally intended that Evangelion would conclude only with "REBIRTH", but the story content increased as production progressed, so "REBIRTH" is being released as only Part 1 of the conclusion. Evangelion will conclude by showing "REBIRTH" together with Part 2 of the Cinema Edition which is scheduled for release this summer."
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr2-commentary.html>
###### Children
> A cowardly soul. A wanting heart. The desire to be loved.
>
> Shinji Ikari.
>
>
> ...
> Rei Ayanami -- Bandages. Mysteries. Indifference. An object of interest. Mother.
>
> Sohryu Asuka Langley -- Girl. Perplexing. Formidable. Indecipherable. Sex.
>
> Misato Katsuragi -- Adult. Superior. Meddlesome. Soldier. Family.
>
>
> ...
> But the word "like" swept away his [Shinji's] darkness.
>
>
> Kaworu Nagisa.
>
> The Fifth Children.
>
> A gentle boy.
>
> The first person to whom Shinji ever opened his heart.
>
>
> ...
> Piloting Eva-01, Shinji strains under these complex emotions, and kills Kaworu.
>
> The first person to ever tell him he "liked" him.
>
> The first person to whom he ever opened his heart.
>
>
> By his own hand....
>
>
> ...
> SOHRYU ASUKA LANGLEY --
>
> A Sullied Heart
>
>
> A high but fragile wall. A tightly stretched thread. The fear of not being needed.
>
>
> Sohryu Asuka Langley.
>
>
> She lost her mother at a tender age.
>
> Her mother killed her within her heart by giving her love to a doll instead.
>
> So, she sought after strength.
>
> The strength to beat anyone.
>
> The strength to be able to live alone.
>
> The strength that could become her raison d'être.
>
>
> ...
> But there were already others before her.
>
> Shinji Ikari. And Rei Ayanami.
>
>
> These two must be beneath her.
>
> Sortie. Soaring. Victory. Action. Military prowess. Achievement. Defeat of the enemy. Mistakes. Defeat. Rear guard. Dismissal.
>
> "I lost to stupid Shinji..."
>
> Her pride collapsed, and she ran away.
> But the organization found her and brought her back, confining her in a white solitary cell called a sickroom. Asuka slumbers amidst the sheets, but her heart is shut away.
>
> "Nein [No]... Stop... Tod [Death]... Pain... Schmach [Shame]... Mother... erhängen [hang]..."
>
> Her dreams within that white darkness are bitter...
>
>
> ...
> As the scenario progresses, he [Shinji] changes her [Rei Ayanami].
>
>
> Smiles. Worrying. Words of thanks.
>
>
> These were all for him.
>
> Smiles directed toward him. Worrying about him.
>
>
> "Thank you" said to him.
>
> And with her first tears, she finally realized.
>
> "This is my heart. I want to be with Ikari."
>
> But death engulfed her before she could convey her heart.
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr2-children.html>
###### Terminology
> Their English name is not APOSTLE (= SHITO), but ANGEL (= TENSHI). To be sure, Sachiel, Shamshel, Ramiel and the other names given to the Angels except for the 1st Angel Adam are all angel names. Further, just as the name of the 6th Angel which appeared from the ocean is that of "fish" angel, Gaghiel, and the name of the 10th Angel which plummeted down from satellite orbit is that of "sky" angel, Sahaquiel, the names of the Angels bear a mysterious symbolism with the attributes, place of initial confirmation, and conditions of appearance of each Angel. Unlike the style of the angels recorded in the Bible. which are generally believed to "have wings, wear white robes, and have an angelic halo about their heads," these Angels come in varying shapes and sizes including humanoid and animal-like forms, giving rise to the speculation that the Angels do not have a specific form, or are amorphous.
>
>
> ...
> Incidentally, the widely circulated idea that L.C.L is the abbreviation of "Link Connected Liquid" is incorrect.
>
>
> ...
> S^2^ engine mounting tests were repeated in various locations, but this brought about the tragic result of the disappearance of the 2nd US NERV Branch.
>
>
> ...
> The helix of light Angel. When discovered it was a double helix loop reminiscent of DNA floating in the sky.
>
>
> ...
> This same red sphere was confirmed in the chest of Eva-01, but it is unclear whether one also exists in the other Eva. However, when selecting the Fourth Children, Dr. Ritsuko Akagi referred to Touji Suzuhara as "a child for whom a core can be prepared." This suggests the fact that NERV can "prepare" cores, and further that an individual core is prepared for each pilot.
>
>
> ...
> The Fourth Children = Touji Suzuhara, who was piloting the Eva at the time, suffered the loss of a part of his leg, but was otherwise rescued unharmed.
>
>
> ...
> It is unclear whether SEELE drew up its "scenario" as a set of plans based on these "Dead Sea Scrolls", or whether the two are one and the same. These same documents described the invading Angels and other information.
>
>
> ...
> Many cross-like images are used in Evangelion: the explosions caused by the Angels, Misato's pendant, the stop signal plug inserted into the berserked EVA-00, the cross used to transport Eva-03, the pillar on which Lilith is crucified underground, etc. The cross is widely known as the symbol of Christianity, but before Christ it was nothing more than an implement of punishment used to bring about a painful death, and it was the death of Jesus Christ that transformed it into the embodiment of love and forgiveness and the symbol of self-sacrifice. However, in prehistoric times the cross was widely used to symbolize the sun, the heavens and the wind. So, is the meaning of the cross in Evangelion derived from Christ or from before Christ?
>
>
> ...
> This figure [Tree of Life] is comprised of ten spheres linked by 22 paths, and can be interpreted in various ways: as a step-by-step diagram for meditation, a map leading to wisdom, or a prediction of humankind's future, etc.
>
>
> ...
> This area [Terminal Dogma] was probably the objective of the Angel invasions. Although Angel intrusion was prevented for a long time, the area was finally penetrated by a humanoid Angel = Kaworu Nagisa.
>
>
> ...
> There are theories which place Lilith, confined in the depths of Terminal Dogma, as the 2nd Angel, but the truth is unknown.
>
>
> ...
> These three are all enrolled in Class 2-A, but this is because all the members of Class 2-A were candidates for Children. Touji Suzuhara, also a member of this class, was selected as the Fourth Children with the transfer of command of Eva-03 to Japan. This junior high school is referred to as "code 707" within NERV. It is nestled in the foothills near Gate No. 20 in order to facilitate Evangelion sorties.
>
>
> ...
> Incidentally, the Eva series units from Eva-05 onward use dummy plugs into which the personality of Kaworu Nagisa has been transplanted. [But whose souls are in the Mass Production Evas themselves? Shinji's classmates? There's suggestive evidence...]
>
>
> ...
> Special Agency NERV has a mark which consists of three parts. The first of these is the organization name, "NERV". Written below that are the words, "God is in his heaven. All's right with the world," a phrase taken from "Pippa Passes", written by 19th century poet Robert Browning. The third part is the figure of a fig leaf. It hardly needs be said that the fig leaf symbolizes the original sin entangling Adam and Eve. [RCB glossary extends this with "and brings to mind the humans who ate of the Fruit of Wisdom."] It is unclear why NERV's mark uses only half of a fig leaf.
>
>
> ...
> Incidentally, this [Yashima] strategy comes from a legend in which Nasuno Yoichi shot an arrow from horseback which pierced a fan on a ship during the Battle of Yashima in 1185. Because this strategy also gathered electric power from throughout Japan, it also includes the meaning of Yashuu Strategy (in ancient times Japan was referred to as "Yashuu" [8 states/countries]).
>
>
> ...
> The Eva units which were built outside NERV HQ. [RCB glossary clarifies that they were built at 'the various NERV branches'. Not that there are that many...]
>
>
> ...
> According to SEELE, it seems that human complementation originally planned to use Lilith, and Eva-01 is also said to be the clone of Lilith.
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr2-terminology.html>
###### Timeline
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr2-timeline.html>
###### Production notes
> In addition to selecting the used episodes and scenes, the series of image scenes where Shinji and the others play instruments in the school gymnasium, and linking the various scenes in a shuffled manner rather than simply arranging them in order were also the ideas of Akio Satsukawa.
>
>
> ...
> Approximately 30 minutes of "DEATH" were newly produced. These contents can be divided into the following three patterns. First is the series of image scenes where Shinji and the others play instruments in the school gymnasium. This is original film shown only in "DEATH". Second is retakes of the TV series film. Third are the scenes scheduled to be added as new cuts to the video release versions of episodes 22 to 24.
>
>
> ...
> The third type was the scenes scheduled to be added as new cuts to the video release versions of episodes 22 to 24. Work proceeded on these cuts separately from this cinema edition. These include the scene where Yui talks with Fuyutsuki while appeasing the infant Shinji, Asuka's monologue in the bathroom, Kaji and Asuka's dialog before meeting Shinji and the others, etc.
>
>
> ...
> Production of "REBIRTH" initially started as a remake of episodes 25 and 26 of the TV series Evangelion, that is to say as the conclusion to Evangelion. However, the content grew much larger than planned during the course of production, with the two episodes together totaling almost 70 minutes in length. Therefore, it was decided to start with a theater release of the first half corresponding to episode 25.
>
>
> ...
> After the storyboard work for "REBIRTH" had been finished, Chief Director Anno started work on Part 2 of the movie edition corresponding to TV episode 26. A separate team was also assembled for the artwork of episode 26, and work proceeded in parallel with episode 25.
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr2-prodnotes.html>
###### Notes
> Episode 25' "Air" is based on the original episode 25 script which was completed during production of the TV series. Due to production time limits and other problems, this script was not used and the TV episode 25 "Owaru sekai (The Ending World)" instead became a drama which unfolded within an inner universe like episode 26. In this sense, episode 25' could be considered a return to the originally intended contents. In contrast, episode 26' adds much more story and dramatic content to TV episode 26, thus deepening the theme.
>
> This movie was created as the remake of the last two TV episodes, so the TV episode format is followed, with each episode having its own subtitle and eyecatch scenes.
>
>
> ...
> Some real-life shots were used to depict the inner universe of Shinji in episode 26', and a team called the "Special Production Team" was formed to film these shots. Hideaki Anno also wrote the script and served as chief director for these parts, with Shinji Higuchi participating in the role of special effects director. "Special effects director" in this context means directing the filming of special effects. The actual filming proceeded with Hideaki Anno and Shinji Higuchi mutually discussing their ideas and opinions of each shot.
>
>
> ...
> The other song is the insert song "Komm, süsser Tod" used in episode 26'. The lyrics are the English translation of words composed by Chief Director Anno. The title is German, meaning "Come, Sweet Death". The vocalist is Arianne [[Schreiber](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=460172#460172)], and composition and arrangement are by Shiro Sagisu.
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dr2-notes.html>
##### Red Cross Book
###### Commentary
> For the TV series, episodes 25 "Owaru sekai (The Ending World)" and 26 "Sekai no chuushin de ai wo sakenda kemono (The Beast who Shouted "I/Love" at the Center of the World)" were shown following episode 24 to conclude the series. Thus, the story of Evangelion branches into two after the last scene of episode 24. There is one ending as shown in TV episodes 25 and 26, while episodes 25' and 26' as shown in "THE END OF EVANGELION" are another ending. (Here, plain numbers are used to indicate the TV episodes, and numbers with apostrophes for the movie episodes)
>
>
> ...
> From the initial planning stages through this cinema edition, Neon Genesis Evangelion has evolved around its director Hideaki Anno. All aspects from the overall theme and framework of the story down to each individual drawing and line of dialogue bear the mark of Anno's creative individuality.
>
>
> ...
> The show's soaring popularity rivaled the biggest hits of the past such as "Star Blazers (Space Battleship Yamato)" and "Mobile Suit Gundam (Kidou Senshi Gundamu)", giving rise to the phrase "the Eva phenomenon".
>
>
> ...
> Episodes 25' (Air) and 26' (Magokoro wo, kimi ni) are packed with breathtaking cinematic scenes: the drama of the characters, action scenes, solutions to mysteries, etc. On the other hand the movie also takes an experimental approach which deals squarely with the issue of "people's hearts" in the same manner as the climax to the TV series. Thus, in both name and fact, this is the complete conclusion to Neon Genesis Evangelion.
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/rcb-commentary.html>
###### Glossary
> Although the personalities of these three Rei differ from one another, this is due to environmental factors. Their soul is one and the same, and it appears to have been that of Lilith. At the final stage of the Instrumentality Project, Rei betrayed Gendo, returned to Lilith of her own judgment and entrusted the future to Gendo's son -- Shinji Ikari.
>
>
> ...
> Introverted in character, he is concerned about how he is viewed by others. Further, he is awkward at expressing himself and communicating with others, so he repeatedly evades confrontation and disobeys orders. At the time of the JSSDF attack on NERV, he had fallen into a state of self-loss, which is also the reason why his counter-attack was delayed.
>
>
> ...
> She died in an accident during a test in 2004, but her soul remained inside Eva-01. Further, it seems that this accident was actually intended by her.
>
>
> ...
> The name Eva is thought to derive from "Eva", wife of Adam in the Old Testament, and "Evangel", the English word for "gospel".
>
>
> ...
> His [Kaji] curiosity proved his ruin, and although he was consequently shot to death, he left the results of his investigations to Misato.^[[Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2000-June/035714.html) quotes the _Newtype 100%_ description of the final scene: "Presaging his own death, Kaji waited for his assassin.", then page 83 of _100%_, which says "...Kaji frees Fuyutsuki, but that act costs him his own life. Misato is released and returns home, where she infers Kaji's death from his message on her answering machine. When confronted with the sobbing Misato, Shinji could do nothing but flee from the scene." The eight Newtype filmbook (ISBN4-04-852615-4) [says](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-April/012739.html) "While a lot of fans think that it was done by Misato, Director Anno raised the possibility that it could have been done by Japan government or Seele agent"]
>
>
> ...
> Misato said that, viewed from the Instrumentality Project, humankind is "a colony of flawed and separate entities". Colony means a group of individual organisms linked to each other, with new individual organisms produced by splitting or budding. Each individual organism within the colony has the capability to live independently.
>
>
> ...
> Beings originated from the source of life called Lilith. They take various sizes and shapes: from a giant octahedron to a minute Angel the size of bacteria, or even a "shadow" Angel without tangible form. Borrowing Fuyutsuki's words in episode 26', it seems that Angels are beings which got the "Fruit of Life" whereas humanity got the "Fruit of Wisdom". In other words, "Angels" are another form of humankind with the same potential as humans. Thus, humans are the 18th Angel.
>
>
> ...
> Also, the physical body of Eva-01 was apparently created from Lilith. This is why when the Lance of Longinus was lost, Eva-01 became the sole substitute for Lilith as the medium for Instrumentality (Human Complementation).
>
>
> ...
> A plan to artificially evolve humanity, which had reached its limit as a colony of flawed and separate entities, into a perfect single being. It was promoted under the direction of SEELE, with Special Agency NERV as the implementing organization. However, it seems that SEELE's objective differed from that of NERV -- that is to say of Gendo and Fuyutsuki. Eva was not actually built as a weapon, but instead with the aim of realizing this project. Specifically, this appears to have been a project to artificially initiate Third Impact, thus eliminating all of humanity who, after shedding their human forms, would then evolve to a new stage.
>
>
> ...
> SEELE's Instrumentality Project proceeded according to the account written in the "Secret Dead Sea Scrolls", and aimed to move humankind to the next level of evolution. However, the loss of the Lance of Longinus and then the further rebellion of NERV Commander Gendo Ikari forced SEELE to modify the plan at the final stage.
>
>
> ...
> An insignia consisting of seven eyes on an inverted triangle. The same pattern was painted on the mask that covered Lilith's face, but its relation to Yahweh, the absolute God of the Old Testament who is said to have seven eyes, is unclear.
>
>
> ...
> Called so because the catastrophe was the largest since an asteroid collided with Earth 4 billion years ago (= Giant Impact).
>
>
> ...
> The Second Children, and dedicated pilot of Eva-02. She is one quarter German and Japanese, but her nationality is American. Highly intelligent, she graduated from university at the age of 14 and boasted a higher synchronization rate than the Third Children in the early stages of actual combat. The suicide of her mother led her to develop an overly-aggressive character, and she maintained her mental balance by outwardly publicizing her superiority. Birthdate: December 4, Blood type: O, Age: 14
>
>
> ...
> The real mother of Sohryu Asuka Langley. She suffered mental breakdown due to an accident during an experiment, and thereafter lived in a dream world until committing suicide. Her soul appears to have been used in the core of Eva-02.
>
>
> ...
> The objective of the Instrumentality Project was the artificial evolution of humankind into a "perfect single being". This single being means a life form which ends as a single individual, and is used to differentiate from "colony" -- a life form comprised of multiple individuals.
>
>
> ...
> What is common to these Children is that they are all young boys and girls who have lost their mothers. Incidentally, the candidates for Children were grouped into Class 2-A of the First Municipal Junior High School of New-Tokyo-3.
>
>
> ...
> It is likely that he [Kaworu] was an Angel which had been captured by SEELE in the embryo stage.
>
>
> ...
> He [Makoto Hyuga] harbors affection toward Misato Katsuragi, his superior, and assisted with her objectives, including the occasional gathering of information.
>
>
> ...
> He [Fuyutsuki] appears to have harbored more than a little affection towards Yui Ikari.
>
>
> ...
> Although its lower body was missing while pierced by the Lance of Longinus, its lower body grew back as soon as the Lance was pulled out. The Instrumentality Project originally planned to use Lilith, but the loss of the Lance caused SEELE to change the plan and attempt complementation using Eva-01 instead. At that time, Keel Lorentz says that Eva-01 is "Lilith's clone", which apparently indicates that Eva-01 was made by copying Lilith.
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/rcb-glossary.html>
###### Tsurumaki interview
> I honestly think it would have been best simply to end it with the TV series. Frankly speaking, I feel that everything after that was a bit of unnecessary work, although I guess normally one should feel happy about having their work made into a movie.
>
>
> ...
> It felt really good toward the end -- after finishing the work for episode 16, and especially from episode 20 onward. Of course, physically I was dead tired, but my mind was still sharp as a knife. I felt that I was utilizing my natural abilities to their maximum potential.
>
>
> ...
> -- Episode 16 made quite an impression, and seemed to mark a turning point for Evangelion.
>
> KT - That's because it was the first episode where the direction of drawing from the inside like that appeared.
>
>
> -- I see.
>
> KT - The first draft of the scenario was actually a dialog between Shinji and the Angel. However, we felt it would be too anti-climactic to have an Angel start talking like some pulp fiction alien (speaks while tapping his Adam's apple with his hand) "Your analog mode of thought is incorrect." So we came up with the idea actually used in this episode, which was to have Shinji converse with himself.
>
>
> -- There was a line in that dialogue -- something like, "We can't weave our lives only out of things we like...." That line was pretty intense. I would have thought it would strike right to the heart of anime fans, but there was almost no reaction from anyone. (laugh)
>
> KT - Well, most people don't pay close attention to the dialog when watching a TV anime. That is to say, we hear the words, but they don't enter our minds. I'm that way too. Hideaki Anno understands this, and started to incorporate expressions that convey the message to the viewers in a more direct manner. Thus, elements which attempted to somehow convey the message within the bounds of the story gradually became fewer, and expressions which were more introspective or emotionally expressive became more frequent.
>
>
> ...
> It was probably about then that we began to see the direction of "Eva" -- that we were moving toward that kind of introspective story. That's why we made Part A of episode 16 like a normal story. By this meaning, the boundary between Parts A and B of episode 16 could be considered the dividing line between the front and back of "Evangelion".
>
>
> ...
> KT - I didn't mind it. The schedule was an utter disaster and the number of cels plummeted, so there were some places where unfortunately the quality suffered. However, the tension of the staff as we all became more desperate and frenzied certainly showed up in the film.
>
>
> ...
> KT - About the time that the production system was completely falling apart, there were some opinions to the effect that, "If we can't do satisfactory work, then what's the point of continuing?" However, I didn't feel that way. My opinion was, "Why don't we show them the entire process including our breakdown." You know -- make it a work that shows everything including our inability to create a satisfactory product. I figured that, "In 10 years or so, if we look back on something that we made while we were drunk out of our minds, we wouldn't feel bad even if the quality wasn't so good."
>
>
> ...
> -- I see. Then, it's true that Shinji's feelings are Director Anno's feelings?
>
> KT - To tell the truth I'm not sure, but at the very least I tried to work on the project from that viewpoint. That's why in the scenario planning sessions I was always saying something like, "Isn't that a little too hero-like for Shinji to say? Hideaki Anno isn't that much of a hero."
>
>
> -- In episode 25' Shinji becomes completely despondent. Does this mean that Director Anno had also experienced that?
>
> KT - I think Hideaki Anno's tension after the TV series had ended had probably fallen to about that level.
>
>
> ...
> -- Was this cinema edition made to match Director Anno's state of mind?
>
> KT - I believe so. There was a time when Hideaki Anno clearly wanted to attempt a more cathartic development. It didn't end up that way, but I don't think we lied.
>
>
> -- When you say "lie", do you mean to suddenly conclude with something like "love saved the world"?
>
> KT - Exactly. And we didn't do that with this movie. I feel no dissatisfaction at the ending. I really like it.
>
>
> -- At the end of this movie, Shinji seems to have reached a sort of settlement regarding troubles of the heart.
>
> KT - Well, my personal view is, "Do we really need to complement these troubles of the heart?" Regardless of whether or not we are complemented, have troubles, or find our answers, interpersonal relations exist, and the world goes on. I thought the last scene meant to say that life goes on, but I could be wrong.
>
>
> -- In the end, Evangelion was a story about communication -- at least judging from that last scene.
>
> KT - That was the intent from the start of the TV series. That was what I tried to produce from episode 2 onward.
>
>
> -- Yes, that was the scene where Misato and Shinji talk while measuring distances from each other in Misato's apartment, right? Although they appeared to be getting along fine with each other, Shinji was thinking, "She seems okay, but....", while Misato was thinking "I wonder if he sees through me?"
>
> KT - there were other scenes in episode 2 as well. For instance, when Misato talks to Shinji but doesn't enter his room. Even in episode 3, they are having a casual morning conversation, but are not looking at each other. Like they looking through a slightly opened door, but not connecting. This is the same between Shinji and Rei, and between Shinji and his father. It's no wonder there was a lot of distant, awkward communication.
>
>
> -- I see. So, the theme remained the same throughout the series?
>
> KT - That's right.
>
>
> ...
> -- Now even businessmen are debating the mysteries of "Eva" in bars. (laugh)
>
> KT - (laugh) For example, Hideaki Anno says that, "Anime fans are too introverted, and need to get out more." Further, he should be happy that non-anime fans are watching his work, right? But when all is said and done, Hideaki Anno's comments on "Evangelion" + "Evangelion" are that it is a message aimed at anime fans including himself, and of course, me too. In other words, it's useless for non-anime fans to watch it. If a person who can already live and communicate normally watches it, they won't learn anything.
>
>
> -- But, don't all the people watching "Evangelion" now actually have this type of anime-fan complex? Doesn't everyone share some feelings of uneasiness at not being able to get along with the world.
>
> KT - Yes, maybe that's so. Hideaki Anno's statements certainly are true when looking at the small circle of anime fans, but stepping back and looking at the much wider circle of Japanese people in general, we may find many of the same types of problems. They're not problems specific to just anime fans.
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/rcb-tsurumaki.html>
###### Seiyuu comments
> [Megumi Ogata (Shinji Ikari)] I sometimes felt a loathing when I held the script.
>
> And was shocked to realize that this loathing was towards a part of me.
>
> Pain as I peeled away the scabs from my heart one after another.
>
> The fear of breaking down.
>
> Rejection, despair, pleasure, rapture, aversion....
>
> It was all so real -- it was live.
>
> A strip show that was more embarrassing than actually taking off my clothes.
>
> 3 years during which I unmistakably faced "Me".
>
>
> I thought that when the story was over, I would be able to view it somewhat objectively -- but I couldn't. Because it was still continuing -- because I am alive -- because the people I like are alive. So I think that I will surely repeat over and over as I gasp for breath amidst a certain peace of sorts. Foolish pursuits -- and the pursuit of an irresistible love.
>
>
> ...
> [Kotono Mitsuishi (Misato Katsuragi)] I am truly glad to have met her. It was difficult playing Misato Katsuragi even during the TV series -- because she is a person who doesn't easily speak her true feelings. During scenes where her feelings exploded or she poured out her heart, I also became a bit over-emotional and afterwards couldn't remember exactly what kind of performance I had given (- not a good thing). My hands shook and it took all my might to keep the script I was holding from rustling and making noise. (Times like these make me feel that voice acting is a bit restricting.) I have focused exclusively on Misato for so long -- wanting to know her, to get close to her -- concentrating all of my five senses on her. That's the way I am, so I am unable to objectively look at "Eva" right now after finishing the voice-over work. My perspective is still on the same level as Misato, but I feel that's fine. In episode 25' "Air" she was strong, brave and a woman. The sole survivor of Second Impact 15 years earlier, her cross necklace is the keepsake of her father. I wonder if it's just me who feels that she alone survived in order to give that cross to Shinji?
>
>
> ...
> [Yuko Miyamura (Sohryu Asuka Langley)] Evangelion has finally reached its conclusion.... Congratulations, everyone, on a job well done. No, really -- Thank you very much. 24 years ago as I gave my birthing cries in Kobe, surely not even Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto of the combined fleet or Nostradamus could have predicted that I would participate in the project called Evangelion. Evangelion's popularity is unstoppable -- like the raid on Pearl Harbor. I'm sure that every Eva fan with a Japanese Spirit will feel like singing none other than "Off to Sea" from "Sally Forth" as they watch this conclusion. If so, then I'd like to send everyone to the theater with a big cheer of "Banzai!" In case you couldn't tell, I think I had a "Kamikaze" feeling during the voice-over. (heart) Haha... (heart) Well done everyone.
>
>
> ...
> [Yuriko Yamaguchi (Ritsuko Akagi)] Ritsuko fades away with her final word, "Liar." But what was this "Liar" in reference to? The script for this last scene only has Gendo saying: "Ritsuko Akagi, I truly...." followed by Ritsuko saying: "Liar (gets shot)". I can imagine many words that might follow "I truly....", but I can't decide on any in particular. That is the complexity of Gendo and Ritsuko's relationship.
>
> From Ritsuko Akagi's inner feelings as a scientist, she could be considered a woman who blindly gave her love to Gendo Ikari, and also a foolish woman that walked the same path as her mother Naoko who committed suicide after being betrayed by Ikari. I personally wanted her to end as a convenient, submissive woman who simply wanted to die righteously. But in the previous movie (D&R) she ended as a deeply jealous woman filled with nothing but hatred toward Ikari.
>
> Feeling unsatisfied with this, I looked for a way to accept her death at the hands of Ikari. This made the interpretation of "Liar" very important. But the voice-over grew nearer and nearer....
>
> Director Anno must have noticed how I felt. When it came time to do the voice-over, he showed me a single, hidden hint at the last moment. With that one incredible hint, I, and Ritsuko Akagi, were utterly defeated. It hardly needs saying, but Director Anno is incredible. Truly awesome -- a genius.
>
>
> ...
> [Fumihiko Tatsuki (Gendo Ikari)] I feel that the more I say about Evangelion, the more I am "living the wrong way." However, as long as I can liberate the feelings in my heart, I feel that my performances as a "voice actor involved with Eva" might not be merely a bunch of fine plays and bloopers, but rather a series of mysterious and concealed performances. Although I took the approach of not exaggerating emotional expression in playing the role of Gendo Ikari, I did my best to squeeze out every ounce of power I could given my present abilities so as not to be overshadowed by the incredible detail and overall high level of this anime.
>
> I cannot find words enough to thank Director Anno for stolidly watching over this forlorn role...
>
>
> ...
> [Motomu Kiyokawa (Kozo Fuyutsuki)] I was riding the subway about the time of the spring theater release (D&R), and overheard three junior high school aged kids discussing Evangelion. The discussion basically took the course of: "That part means such and such," "No, I disagree," and so on. There haven't been very many anime works that people have really discussed, and I think this is one of the great things about Eva.
>
> I feel that even when acting on stage, the type of drama that makes the audience feel and think various things is interesting drama, and also good drama. Of course, the audience won't imagine anything if the drama is devoid of content. Director Anno created many such places in Evangelion where the audience can imagine things. That's why I think it is great. Being able to interpret something in various ways means that much effort has been put into the pictures and story.
>
>
> ...
> [Akira Ishida (Kaworu Nagisa)] Starting from nothing more than this perception, the character of Kaworu Nagisa began to express itself with each passing day. The circumstances surrounding Kaworu Nagisa established him as a navigator for delving into the labyrinth of Evangelion, and give new insight into its unspoken meaning.
>
>
> ...
> Luckily, however, this time I was able to associate myself with Evangelion as Kaworu to the very end. Was Kaworu's choice correct? Did Kaworu really "keep on living"? While this answer appears to have been entrusted to Shinji, I am honestly happy to have been lucky enough to see it through to the end with my own eyes.
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/rcb-seiyuu.html>
###### Notes
####### Episode 25' - Air
> SEELE immediately instructs Gendo and Fuyutsuki to complete the Project using Eva-01, but the two are reluctant to carry out a plan that will bring about the death of all people, and they rebut SEELE's wishes.
>
>
> ...
> Sohryu Asuka Langley had lost everything. Her mother, her confidence, her pride, and even the will to live
>
>
> ...
> Inside Eva's womb, Asuka realizes that she is with her mother -- that her mother is by her side. The swarming enemy are no longer a match for Asuka, and even the nine Eva series units cannot stop her. Eva-02 careens valiantly across the battlefield, soaring, crushing, toppling, stabbing, strangling, kicking, sweeping, shooting, striking, running, stopping, and stopped... its operational limit reached. The nine Eva series units alight on top of the motionless Eva-02 -- and the violation of Eva by Eva begins.
>
>
> ...
> Misato and Shinji rush through gunfire and smoke; two people with a delicate relationship: mother and son, older sister and younger brother, lovers, adult and child, superior and subordinate.... Shots ring out! As Misato covers Shinji, her legs buckle and the two tumble toward the back of the passageway. Tears and anger mix, and naked emotions clash. Choked words, exasperation, the baring of one's heart, affection, and the meeting of two people's lips -- passing from a mere brushing of lips to an adult kiss. In many ways, Misato was Shinji's first woman.
>
> "We'll do the rest when you get back..." were her words, but Shinji knew there would be no "rest", for Misato's still warm hands and lips were covered with blood...
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/rcb-notes.html>
####### Episode 26' - Magokoro wo, kimi ni
> Shinji screamed at seeing the brutally violated form of Eva-02. The howls of Eva-01 create maelstroms inside the Geofront, and Shinji's rage calls back the Lance of Longinus from the Moon. This was also the trigger for starting the two Projects -- the Instrumentality Projects of SEELE and of Gendo. Having regained the Lance, SEELE aims to achieve the Instrumentality (Complementation) of humankind through the indiscriminate death of all life and prayer
>
>
> ...
> On the other hand, deep underground NERV Headquarters which is being laid bare by the JSSDF's attack, Gendo Ikari stands together with Rei before Lilith in Terminal Dogma. Gendo has brought Rei to Lilith to attempt the forbidden joining of Adam and Lilith. Two Instrumentality Projects being executed simultaneously in the heavens and in the bowels of the earth. Will people achieve complementation in either case...? The answer lies within Eva-01....
>
>
> ...
> On the other hand, there were also humans who took the Fruit of Life at that time. These are the Angels -- a different possibility who will fight for the future; another form of human.
>
>
> ...
> People are surrounded by emptiness... And loneliness fills their hearts. And when humans' history reaches its conclusion, Gendo Ikari will be reunited with his wife. Yui Ikari -- the woman who loved a man unworthy of love. Did the Instrumentality Project exist to bring her back? Instrumentality (Complementation) for Gendo could only mean the resurrection of Yui. Having achieved this eagerly awaited reunion, Gendou confesses that he was "afraid" -- afraid that contact with his son would only hurt his son. The hedgehog's dilemma whereby the nearer we draw to one another, the more we hurt each other. This may be the nature of people who estrange themselves from each other using barriers of the heart. Gendou was also this type of weak person. Like his son, Shinji, he was nothing more than a cowardly, weak man. With his last words "Forgive me... Shinji," Gendou is crushed by the jaws of Eva-01. Was this the retribution toward a man who kept running from the world, or was it also his salvation...?
>
>
> ...
> "Do you really think you understand me!? It makes me uneasy! That's the easiest way not to get hurt. Let me hear your voice! You're all you have! Care about me! You don't understand anything, you IDIOT! I'm afraid this way. Don't come near me anymore... But ambiguity only makes me insecure. No. Help me! I think you can save me. Maybe I won't be needed again someday. How pathetic... It unsettles me. That is so ARROGANT! I tried to understand... I get so pissed off whenever I look at you! Then be nice to me. If you want to do it with me, get down on your knees and beg! You're all just hiding behind a smile! You're only using me as an escape... Don't leave me alone! You've never really liked anyone! Don't kill me! ........ No..." [Mostly quoted from the "Komm Susser Tod" scene; a mix of Asuka & Shinji lines.]
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/rcb-notes2.html>
### EoE
> [_The Door Into Summer_] It's the tentative title for episode 25' in the storyboards as well (board No. 7C).
--[Olivier Hagué](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-March/039346.html)
Gainax [initially proposed](http://replay.waybackmachine.org/19981202185145/http://www.ex.org/2.4/11-news.html) EVANGELION: REBIRTH 2 as the title:
> The End of Evangelion Movie Poster The poster reads: "Wouldn't it be nice if everyone would just die?" (Image © 1997 Gainax/Eva Production Committee)
>
> THE END OF EVANGELION is nigh on 19 July
>
> Toei announced 19 July as scheduled premiere date for the eclectic SF drama NEON GENESIS EVANGELION's theatrical finale, THE END OF EVANGELION (Japanese title: "SHIN SEIKI EVANGELION GEKIJOUBAN: Air/MAGOKORO O, KIMI NI." Gainax initially proposed EVANGELION: REBIRTH 2 as the title). This planned 70-minute feature will begin with the incomplete 27-minute Rebirth portion from March's NEON GENESIS EVANGELION: DEATH AND REBIRTH (SHIN SEIKI EVANGELION GEKIJOUBAN: SHI TO SHINSEI) film and finish with new animation.
The full poster reads:
Wouldn't it be nice if everyone would just die?
ocean of hopelessness
fragile souls
devious smiles
morbid objects
self-destruction
cruel strangers
replacement of the opposite sex
immediate cure
spreading enfeeblement
wish for nothingness
imprisoned ego
fear for separation
one-sided mistakes
fright of strangers
dangerous thoughts
denial with strangers
aversion to harmony
arrogant understanding
pity for the weak
uneasy photographs
scars from the past
blurred borders
divergence of common sense
lonely people
question of value
fusion with desire
return into the womb
empty time
decline of yearning
needless me
beginning of fabrications
continuation of reality
that's the end of the dream
Then,
why are you here?
...do you really want to stay here?
The End of Evangelion Neon Genesis Evangelion The Movie Air/My Purest Heart for You
--[George Chen](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-January/024571.html) (TODO: link the poster scans, original & translated)
(Screen text: So, everybody just go and die...)
Staff (in Japanese alphabetical order)
Random women's voices:
You don't really know if it's love until after the infatuation stops.
Men just want a mother figure who'll spoil them.
Men...You do it with them once and they think they own you.
Ritsuko?
Yeah, that's okay,too.
You'll be sorry for that.
That's not romantic in the least.
Men are all scum...
Don't think I'm going to forgive you!
-----------------------------------------
TITLE SCREEN: THE END OF EVANGELION
Neon Genesis Evangelion Cinema Edition - Air/Sincerely Yours (My Pure Heart For You)
-----------------------------------------
(Screen text: Then, why are you here?)
(Screen text: ...Is it okay for me to be here?)
-----------------------------------------
Premiering July 19 (Sat.) Advance tickets including original poster on sale.
General admission: 1500 yen Students: 1200 yen
Created by the EVA Production Committee (Project EVA)
Distributed by Toei Studios, Inc.
This film is animated.
-----------------------------------------
TITLE SCREEN: THE END OF EVANGELION
Neon Genesis Evangelion Cinema Edition - Air/Sincerely Yours (My Pure Heart For You)
Premiering July 19 (Sat.)
Created by the EVA Production Committee (Project EVA)
Distributed by Toei Studios, Inc.
-----------------------------------------
Toei Studios, Inc. logo in triangle
Eirin (Eiga Rinri Kitei Kanri Iinkai = Motion Picture Code of Ethics Committee) registration in circle
(Vertical screen text: Neon Genesis Evangelion Cinema Edition)
--EoE promotional trailer; translated [Bochan_bird](http://web.archive.org/web/19991009185922/http://members.tripod.com/~EvaOtaku/episode25.html)
> The tentative title for episode 26, in the first drafts of the overall story, was "Tatta Hitotsu no, Saeta Yarikata". "Tatta Hitotsu no Saeta Yarikata" is the Japanese title of "the Only Neat Thing to Do" by James Tiptree Jr.
--<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-March/039361.html>
> 'Alice Sheldon, writing as James Tiptree Jr., wrote a clear lineal descendant of "The Cold Equations," called "The Only Neat Thing to Do", (not available online) in 1985. The 1950s had made way for the 1980s and in this story the young female protagonist makes the decision for herself. The situation is somewhat different; she is alone in a spaceship with a parasitical alien that could be a danger to her world if she returns, so she does the "only neat thing" by heading outward forever, in effect committing suicide by eventual diminution of resources. As Godwin did, Tiptree stacked the deck to make only one neat thing available to her protagonist.'
--<http://www.strangehorizons.com/2005/20050919/notkin-c.shtml>
>> In short, while I can understand why the Japanese translated Flowers for Algernon to something like "Honestly for You" or "Yours Truly," I can't understand why someone would translate it back to English as "My Purest Heart for You."
>
> But Gainax states on their webpage that it translates as "For you, my heart and soul" so, just deal with it. Pure heart for you, IS a translation of the Kanji. Spoken Japanese, and Written Japanese are different!
--<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-October/021412.html>
> "Magokoro o kimine" is the Japanese title for "Flowers for Algernon" when it was translated and published in Japan^[Confirmed [by Jonathan Clements](http://schoolgirlmilkycrisis.com/blog/?p=2712#comment-236173) in 2011.]. Project Eva/Mr. Anno decided to use the "Magokoro o kimine" as the movie title stated in the liner note.
--<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-October/021406.html>
> Title "Do you love me" (episode 25) came from British Psychologist R.D. Ren's (?) essay title. [Also based on liner notes]
--<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-October/021356.html>
> This week is an "The End of Evangelion" special on Geruge. (About 45 to 50 minutes of the first 90 minutes of the radio show were devoted to Evangelion and the guests.)...The "Evangelion Story" was by Horaki Hikari (Iwao Junko). Hikari talked about herself and the students in her class (Rei, Asuka, Shinji, Kensuke, Touji). This monologue was about 4 minutes long.The second guest was Mr. Otsuki, producer of Evangelion. He answered a lot of questions from listeners and the Geruge personalities.
>
> Q: Who is going to sing the song for the new movie? \
> Otsuki: A gaijin. \
> Q: Who? \
> Otsuki: I can't say yet. \
> Q: Male or female? \
> Otsuki: Female, a black female. \
> Q: What type of song? \
> Otsuki: Gospel. It's great. We will release a single of it too. We are dubbing it in London right now.^[Likely Loren's 'Thanatos'.]
>
> ...Q: Have you done the after recording? \
> Otsuki: We are doing it now. Yesterday, today, and the day after tomorrow. It will take about four days.
>
> ...Q: What is that picture with Misato, Asuka, Maya, and Hikari going into a pool of blood? Are they going to die?^[This us almost surely the [big red promotional poster](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?t=1797) (see previous for translation); even in the high-resolution scans it is hard to figure out which one is Hikari, though.]
> Otsuki: There will be some people who die. \
> Q: Will there be people who don't die. \
> Otsuki: Yes. \
> Q: Are there any characters who didn't do voices? \
> Otsuki: Touji, Kensuke, Hikari. \
>
> ...Q: Who is your favorite character in Evangelion? \
> Otsuki: All of them. \
> Q: But what if you had to choose just one? \
> Otsuki: Fuyutsuki.^[Very appropriate, if Anno is Gendo...] \
>
> ...Q: What will you do after Evangelion? \
> Otsuki: We have already started working on the next one. I was thinking about saying something, but it's still too early. \
> Q: Can you tell use when it will come out? \
> Otsuki: Next year. \
> Q: TV? \
> Otsuki: Movie.^[Otsuki was a producer on the 1998 Hideaki Anno film _[Love & Pop](!Wikipedia)_.] \
> Q: Is it anime? \
> Otsuki: Can't say right now. \
>
> Q: Will there be any live action scenes in the Evangelion movie? \
> Otsuki: Can't say right now.^[Ultimately there were, but *also* the [extensive live-action mini-film](http://www.evaotaku.com/html/alteva.html) was cut; Otsuki's comment here may point to internal indecision or troubles - what harm to confirm that there would be live action in the movie given the promotional TV spots already had included live-action? The seiyuu for Gendo makes another ambiguous comment in a different radio show, see below.] \
>
> ...There will a showing of movie previews. There will be a 2000 yen pamphlet, which only had 10000 copies printed^[This is not the Red Cross Book, which was 800 yen; it may be one of the 2 [Death & Rebirth pamphlets](http://evaotaku.com/html/programbooks.html).].
--[ゲルゲトショッキングセンター - 1997.06.09](http://www.usagi.org/doi/seiyuu/radio/geruge/19970609.html), partial translation by Hitoshi Doi of the 9 June 1997 Geruge radio show
> Q: How was the recording. \
> [Nagasawa] Miki [seiyuu, Maya Ibuki]: It was difficult. \
> Q: The picture was there. \
> Miki: Yes. \
> Q: How was Mr. Anno? \
> Miki: He was very picky. \
>
> ... Q: Who do you think Maya likes? \
> Miki: Aoba, maybe? \
> Q: Was there something with Ritsuko in the movie? \
> Miki: No... I don't think. [Is that so?] \
>
> ...The "Evangelion Story" was by Nagisa Kaoru (Ishida Akira). Kaoru talked about meeting Shinji and Rei, his true identity as the 17th shito, and the battle against Shinji. This monologue was about 3 minutes 30 seconds long.
>
> ...Ishida Akira [seiyuu, Kaworu Nagisa] answered some questions.
>
> Q: Was the recording difficult? \
> Akira: Very difficult. It was yesterday and the day before. Yesterday, we started at 10 AM, and I was there until 9:45 PM. I was the last one, with Ogata Megumi, Hayashibara Megumi, and Kiyokawa Motomu. \
> Q: Which scene was that? \
> Akira: The very last scene was done before that, so this was the scene before the last scene. \
>
> Q: Kaoru is a key person? \
> Akira: Sort of.. \
>
> Q: Was Kaoru in the emotional scenes? \
> Akira: Kaworu's scenes weren't that emotional. \
>
> Akira: It released a lot of pressure off of my back when I finished. If Evangelion had ended with the TV, I only appeared once and it was all over. But with the movie, there was a lot of pressure on me. When I found out that the movie would be split, it added more pressure. \
>
> Q: What do you think was the best scene with Kaoru? \
> Akira: I would say the scene in episode 24 of the TV series.. \
> Q: What about in the movie? \
> Akira: He doesn't appear as a person (with a physical body) in the movie. The only person that Kaoru interacts with is Shinji. \
-- 10 June 1997, Geruge radio show, translation [Hitoshi Doi](http://www.usagi.org/doi/seiyuu/radio/geruge/19970610.html)
> Tachiki Fumihiko [seiyuu, Gendo Ikari] answered questions by listeners (and the Geruge personalities).
>
> Q: Are there any live action scenes for you? \
> Fumihiko: No. Girls only. The male fans will be happy.^[Fumihiko's live-action comment is interesting - the live-action scenes like the panning-across-theatre scenes *did* have males in them. What didn't have many men (at all?) was the extended live-action mini-film which was cut; see my comments on Otsuki's appearance on the same show.] \
>
> Q: Can you say any of the new lines from the movie? \
> Fumihiko [in a voice like he is dying]: Rei! \
> Q: Is Gendo going to die? \
> Fumihiko: Maybe. \
>
> ...Q: How was the recording for Gendo's voice? \
> Fumihiko: It took two days, and there are more lines than usual. \
>
> Q: If you didn't do Gendo, which character would you like to do? \
> Fumihiko: Rei. I like the character Rei, and I also like the way she talks, from a seiyuu point of view. \
>
> ...The "Evangelion Story" was by Ikari Shinji (Ogata Megumi). Shinji talked about himself, and some of the characters around him. The BGM were a lot of songs and music from Evangelion. This monologue was about 2 minutes 40 seconds long.
>
> The second guest was Ogata Megumi, who said that her throat was sore from the Evangelion recording on Sunday and Monday. She played the quiz game with a listener, and they got 8 questions correct.
>
> Ogata Megumi answered some questions.
>
> Q: Was there a lot of screaming? \
> Megumi: Yes.
>
> Q: Who does Shinji like? Rei or Asuka? \
> Megumi: Both.. but I don't think he really likes either. \
> Q: Is there anything in the movie regarding the relationships? \
> Megumi: It's just like the usual Shinji. But with Rei.. there was that shocking scene in the Rebirth movie (in the spring). This time that same scene was made longer. \
> Q: Did you retake the voices of the Rebirth part? \
> Megumi: Yes, all scenes were redone. \
>
> Q: What is the black moon? \
> Megumi: I don't know about it too well. Shinji doesn't have to know.. Kaoru and Rei are the ones who explain things. The last scene, which is about 5 pages in the script, took one and a half hours to record. The scene is only about 2 or 3 minutes.^[This is broadly consistent with the later accounts of the last scene, eg. Miyamura's description of _kimochi warui_.] \
> Q: Were there a lot of lines for Shinji in that scene? \
> Megumi: None. It was only ad lib. \
--11 June 1997, Geruge radio show, translation [Hitoshi Doi](http://www.usagi.org/doi/seiyuu/radio/geruge/19970611.html)
> The song Komm Susser Todd (German for "Come Sweet Death") used for the film, The End of Evangelion: Episode 26' - Sincerely Yours, is an English translation of Director Hideaki Anno's original Japanese lyrics.
--<http://www.evaotaku.com/omake/Komm.html>
> From the beginning, everyone has been saying that the "Death" part of "Death and Rebirth" is a "perfect collection" of the TV series, but it wasn't an easy-to-understand digest edition, as in "Space Battleship Yamato" and "Mobile Soldier Gundam."
>
> Ignoring the timeline of the TV series, the psychological condition of the main characters is shown.... Shocking and exciting scenes are put together as if just randomly shuffled, and nowhere do we see the introduction, development, turn, and conclusion [as in a well-composed Chinese poem]. This is a somewhat unkind thing to do to people who have never seen the TV series. "Death and Rebirth" could be labeled "No first-time customers" because of this.
>
> [Note: "No first-time customers" is a sign on some very conservative restaurants in Japan that only take regular customers and people introduced by regulars.]
>
> The completely new section "Rebirth", is a 24 part continuation -- a story that replaces the final two episodes which gave rise to all sorts of public criticism.
>
> ... An animated TV series (with 26 episodes) broadcast on TV Tokyo Channel from October '95 to March '96. The ratings were only 7.1%, but bit by bit from the second half on it moved up to a central place by word of mouth, and after the broadcasts ended it extended into even more of a boom. The movie is a continuation of the TV series.
>
> ... This story is told primarily from the point of view of Shinji Ikari, who was suddenly called to become an Eva pilot against his will by his father, Gendo Ikari, who is the commander of Nerve. Shinji is convinced that he was abandoned by his father when he was very young, and he is extremely frightened by contact with strangers. Also, everyone around him at Nerve likewise carries a wound in their heart and a sickness in their soul.
>
> ... The final two episodes of the TV series were 25 and 26. The story suddenly totally abandons what had been foreshadowed up to that point, its SF-style development, etc., and ends by depicting only the inner world of the protagonist, Shinji Ikari. Shinji gets a psychological breakthrough, and the curtain closes with the other characters saying "Congratulations" to him. It also includes things like rough, graffiti-like art, and forms of expression so far from normal you can't even call it "experimental"; this kind of ending, with fans instantly spouting out arguments pro and con, became one reason for the increasingly widespread popularity of Eva.
>
> A 30-billion yen anime?
>
> At any rate, related software was selling and selling. The video LD has totaled over 2.5 million in sets of 10 disks, the sound-track edition (album) has sold over one million in sets of three, the three-volume collected comics and the nine-volume filmbooks have totaled 7.7 million copies, and 1.23 million people have gone to see the movie "Neon Genesis Evangelion Movie: Death and Rebirth" from when it was released in March.
>
> Besides this, if we add in the plastic models and related goods, it easily breaks through the 30 billion yen mark. Furthermore, the TV series video LDs are not yet all sold and the movie edition packages are not yet on sale. Who can say how long the sales will continue?
>
> ... Someone connected to the consumer electronics industry said they are hoping "it will become a trigger for the spread of DVD," and so on July 19th volume 1 of the Eva videos will be offered for sale. In the first period of five volumes, episodes 1-20 of the TV series will be recorded four to a volume, and they will be released one per month.
>
> ... If it really becomes a "trigger," this will be one more thing to increase the legend of Eva.
>
> ... As with Megumi Hayashibara of "Ranma 1/2," and Kotono Mitsuishi and Aya Hisakawa of "Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon" before, a group of new, nearly "untouched" voice actors have grown along with their production and have been enjoying immense popularity.
>
> Among the ranks of the "Eva" players, one could say that Yuko Miyamura matches this pattern. As almost the only "new person", she has made her break in the role of Asuka Langley Souryuu in a difficult lone battle. It could well be said that her energy had no small part in bringing about Eva's popularity.
>
> ... Miyamura: I'm still really new to television series and there were always more experienced actors around me. Especially in Eva with its adult drama, I have learned a lot from the acting and many talents of the experienced actors.
>
> Also, because Asuka was completely finished by losing her mind in the TV series, I also got into a similar mental state; the stress built up and I suffered from bulimia for a while.
--["The following is a set of articles from Nikkei Entertainment, the August 1997 issue. I am in the process of translating the whole set."](http://web.archive.org/web/20010210204056/www.acsys.com/~tallman/rebirth_e.html)
Director's Cut additions to episodes 21-24; originally were part of _Death_:
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dircut/eps21.html>
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dircut/eps22.html>
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dircut/eps23.html>
- <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/dircut/eps24.html>
EoE script/translation:
- episode 25' <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/air.html>
- episode 26' <http://www.evaotaku.com/html/sincerely.html>
> 'Production IG's translation was the most interesting item...they translated the last line as "You disgust me!"'
--[Gregg Turek](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-July/029790.html), Otakon 1999
- [_End of Evangelion_](http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:End_of_Evangelion_Screenplays) preliminary drafts; these appear to be 'black', stolen or leaked from Gainax, but they seem to be genuine ([Olivier Hagué](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-March/039253.html), [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-March/039309.html), and myself all agree):
- [cut scenes](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-July/040066.html): real SEELE plan? Gendo/Yui wanted to colonize other planets?
> Gendo: "Humans should evolve into a new world. That is the purpose of the Eva series."
>
> Keel and Seele: "We don't have to give up our human forms to enter an Ark called Eva. We don't have to aim for new lands either. Humans can be called humans because of their actual shape. That shape [Eva's shape, I'd assume?] is not that of humanity. We'll bring equality to all life forms. And we'll proceed by the means of a "death" conferred to all humans [no, I'm not sure I understand that one... this sentence could be translated in various ways, I think, but none of them seems to make a lot of sense to me ^^;]. It is a rite of passage. To bring about the rebirth of a blocked [clogged? ^_^;] life. If everything doesn't come to an end, nothing can truly begin. The fate of destruction is also the joy of rebirth. So God, humans, all life forms can be united under Lilith."
The final script's dialogue doesn't help:
> SEELE: God, man and all life will use death to become one.
>
> Gendo: Death gives birth to nothing.
>
> Lorenz: We will gift you with death.
--Final script translation by [Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=397202#397202) (compare other translations); he also comments of the opaque lines, "There they seem to be debating whether or not the new life form will have a "human shape," or whether or not Eva-01 will be the new life itself or merely the means for a "sea of LCL" scenario. I don't know why one would cause "death" and not the other, especially after Ritsuko's "horobiru" comment."
- describes the live-action scenes
- [EoE live-action sequence](<http://www.angelfire.com/anime4/mdwigs/livesequence.html>); Olivier Hague translation by way of Wignall; Hague [notes](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-July/040053.html) that the "I need you" telop was originally part of the live-action sequence
- [EoE live-action sequence](http://www.evaotaku.com/html/alteva.html); Bochan's translation
- includes Last A and Last B
[cut storyboards, assault on Geofront by JSSDF (in trailers)](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-April/039565.html) (["There are also extended cuts of the assault on NERV."](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-April/039541.html))
japan.anime.evangelion newsgroup; original posting of 2 endings and live action
<http://groups.google.com/group/japan.anime.evangelion/browse_thread/thread/3fc12c1f9f33edd/e9888baf7dd332b3>
<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-October/040587.html>
<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2003-November/000714.html>
cut anime scene in EoE; explains why Hikari & Touji & Kensuke never showed up; can be read to show that Kensuke was to be the pilot of Eva-04. good also for showing Shinji's bad mental state
> Cut 39 Sound:
>
> Touji: And I really mean it, Shinji. Thanks.
>
> Shinji: ......
>
> Kensuke: See you later, Ikari. You take care.
>
> Shinji: ......
>
> Description/Notes:
>
> - Distant shot -- long, drawn-out pause.
> - (as if to cheer Shinji up) Touji passes the basketball to Shinji without saying anything, but Shinji drops the ball.
>
> ...PAGE 509...Cut 40
>
> Sound: (Ball bouncing sound growing fainter)
>
> Description/Notes:
>
> - Shinji's hands remain where he failed to catch the basketball.
> - Shinji's hands quiver/convulse slightly.
[Brendan Jamieson](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-April/039541.html) confirms basketball court scene:
> I would say that scene was scrapped because it overlooked that Touji, Hikari and Kensuke were out of Tokyo-3 in EoE (IIRC, aren't they watching fighter jets flying overhead to NERV?). There are also extended cuts of the assault on NERV.
Independent source about Touji/Kensuke scene, and also the SEELE conversation about arks and other worlds:
- 25' script : <http://web.archive.org/web/20071011032649/homepage3.nifty.com/kyrie/story25.html>
<http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=ja&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fweb.archive.org%2Fweb%2F20071011032649%2Fhomepage3.nifty.com%2Fkyrie%2Fstory25.html>
- 26': <http://web.archive.org/web/20070301005837/homepage3.nifty.com/kyrie/story26.html>
<http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=ja&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fweb.archive.org%2Fweb%2F20070301005837%2Fhomepage3.nifty.com%2Fkyrie%2Fstory26.html>
Wiki translation of apparent same script: <http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:End_of_Evangelion_Screenplays>; Many differences from EoE:
- sandbox/pyramid [full draft scene](http://wiki.evageeks.org/Resources:End_of_Evangelion_Screenplays#Playground.2Fsandbox_scene); [differences](http://wiki.evageeks.org/Theory_and_Analysis:Sandbox_Sequence#Draft_playground_scene):
1. placed in the film *before* Shinji strangles Asuka
2. Shinji plays with only one girl
3. notes suggests that the little girl is Asuka
4. mother is identified as Misato *or* Yui (final: Misato)
5. 2 'elementary school' scenes for Shinji & Asuka
1. Shinji is crying at the end of school; a female teacher and a female classmate discuss how pathetic he is
2. Asuka is alone while the others play; classmates criticize her for being 'stuck-up' and Asuka rejects them in turn
- describes Maya, while hugging Rei-Ritsuko, as with a 'false smile'
- includes live-action mini-film
- includes Last A and Last B endings - and not actual
Cut live-action Asuka scene; covers 2 unused EoE endings:
> Last A
>
>
>
> You already know the beginning of this one (a beach, petrified headless Evas, etc).
>
> Thew, we see the graves[markers]^[[Olivier](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-July/040044.html) elsewhere says they are described as being like gravemarkers in both the storyboards and after-recording script.] Shinji made (it's stated by Anno it was _he_ who made them). The names of all main Eva characters are written on them, except for "Ayanami Rei".
>
> We then see Asuka's grave.
>
> And Asuka's foot kicking it to the ground. ^^;
>
> (you can still see these graves in the actual ending... no names, but there is Misato's pendant nailed on one of them, and an other has been kicked down^[Olivier [expands](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-July/040035.html): the storyboard is specific that Asuka kicked one and only one, and the verb was definitely [kicked](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-July/040021.html).] ^^ )
>
> We then see Shinji and Asuka on the beach... and you know that scene, too (but this draft demonstrates that Shinji and Asuka didn't just wake up there after Third Impact... they've been living here for some times... meaning they _could_ be the two only humans willing to return, after all... ^^; )
>
> When Shinji starts crying, Asuka was supposed to say something like "Idiot. No way I'll let you kill me" ("idiot" was removed in the storyboards... and the whole line was modified, eventually).
>
>
>
> Then, the ending music (so, there was one... ^^ ) was supposed to begin, and the staff credits were to appear (Anno suggests a horizontal scrolling, like in Gunbuster, I guess).
>
> We were to see Eva-01 lying on the Moon, and woman's hair showing from its broken mask (but her face remains unseen).
>
> Behind Eva-01, you could see Earth, entirely red.
>
> And the Black Moon, destroyed.
>
> The camera goes to the sun, then to the stars.
>
> Credits end.
>
> "Shûgeki" ("the end").
>
>
>
> Now the true ending is based upon Last A. Last B is slightly different.
>
>
>
> Last B
>
>
>
> It begins like the previous one, but Asuka doesn't show up in the "graves scene".
>
> We then see Shinji lying on the beach.
>
> His right hand is holding a white one.
>
> "I'll never see them again."
>
> "It's better to think of it this way."
>
> "I'm still alive, so I'll keep on living."
>
> He squeezes the hand harder.
>
> Then, he sees Rei (like in the actual episode and Last A).
>
> We eventually see that there is nobody lying near Shinji. Just a white arm without the rest of the body.
>
> The camera then shows the full moon.
>
> The ending credits are the same as in Last A.
--<http://www.evamonkey.com/writings_wignall02.php> <http://homepage.powerup.com.au/~wignall/Endings.txt>;
> 'The last line in the EoE Storyboard book is:
>
>> "... Anta nanka ni korosareru no wa mappira yo."
>
> Which I translate as:
>
>> "... (I'll be) damned if I'll be killed by the likes of you."
>
> The direction to the VA is:
>
>> "Kore ijou naku tsumetai koe de"
>
> Which is literally:
>
>> "In the coldest voice possible"'
--[Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-December/033186.html)
> So no Genesis 0:0 In the Beginning. Shame, as it has Anno talking about the show, & another Gainax guy in a rowboat. Is there any chance of a translation please?
--<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2005-February/002407.html>
> 'PS. By the way the TV CM (commercial) for the EoE movie is quite strange..... a mish-mash of real-life video showing the humdrum of a few young women's day-to-day life. The video is done in the documentary way, with thick particles and slightly blurred focus. The names of all the production staff appears continuously throughout the CM, with one name lasting only for 0.1s (my guess) and you can't even read the names at all. At the beginning it asks "So, it'd be good if everybody die..." and at the end it asks "Then, why are you here?"'
--[Patrick Yip](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-August/002764.html)
> Sea of LCL is also the "Source of Life" (filmbook pg. 88), and "the wish of Shinji" (film book pg. 91.)
--[George Chen](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-October/021511.html)
> '..."blank screen": In the original Japanese release of the film, after the screen text, 'Fin.' is shown, the screen goes _completely black_ and no ending credits are shown. Audiences waited in the cinema for around 5 minutes to make sure the film was really over.'
--[Bochan_bird](http://web.archive.org/web/19991009203638/http://members.tripod.com/~EvaOtaku/episode26.htm) on audiences watching EoE
### _Schizo_/_Prano_
_Schizo_ & _Prano_, were 2 related books of interviews published 1997; ISBN 4872333152 & 4872333160 ([book covers](http://userdisk.webry.biglobe.ne.jp/012/101/82/N000/000/001/127151912269416112700_20100418004522.jpg))
#### _Schizo_
> '[Rei's] body inherits half each of Yui and Adam's genetics.'
Sadamoto, pg 180; Sadamoto; <http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=403905#403905>
> Anno: "Ai to Gensou no Fascism." [Murakami's _The Fascism of Love and Fantasy_ or _The Fascism of Love and Illusion_] I like "Zero" [from that novel]. He is a highly dependent personality. I think Ryuu Murakami and I are the same [as Zero]: empty people. Really pathetic people.
>
> Takekuma: His writing style is very stylish. [His books are] the type you keep reading because of the style.
>
> Anno: In the end, there's nothing else. It's pathetic people trying to maintain themselves, living dependently on women.
>
> Takekuma: So, the character Zero is Murakami's own self-projection.
>
> Anno: He remains unable to reject Zero. That also reveals a pathetic quality; the man himself aims at the opposite, but in the end part of his true feelings come out through Zero. It's an amazingly good novel. I think Murakami is also an "oral stage" dependent type. He is overly fixated on the mother, and overly fixated on women. He is also fixated on the idea of crying into a woman's chest. Finally, he is always thinking of doing away with his father. I think it's a story of the Oedipus Complex.
>
> Takekuma: In the desire to destroy the system, the original desire is there, right?
>
> Anno: Yes. It's a story of the Oedipus Complex, where one kills one's father and violates one's mother. However, when I started [Eva], I thought I was the same. Because it [was?] a story where Shinji kills his father and steals his mother from him.
>
> Takekuma: A mother who has become a giant (laughs).
>
> Anno: There was this replacement by a robot, so the original mother is the robot, but then there is a mother of the same age, Rei Ayanami, by [Shinji's] side. [She is] also by the side of the real father. There is also another father there, Adam, who governs the overall course of events. An Oedipus Complex within these multiple structures; that's what I wanted to do. "Ai to Gensou no Fascism." I think there are ideological elements that are the same as those in the novel. [...] The thing that most moved me was [the fact that] when the protagonist, Touji Suzuhara, attempted to kill the current Prime Minister, he felt [the Prime Minister] was a lot like his father. I think he kills his father and violates the mother "Japan." That's why he goes on to destroy Japan. I really like that passage. I like that Ryuu Murakami's real feelings are coming out. In a big way. The novel itself is extremely boring, however (laughs).
<http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=414209#414209>
> "It's a work that mirrors the self of each and every person that watches it. That's because [the show contains] an excessive amount of information, and the projections of the viewers simply return to them. For each person, the appeal [of the show] is also different."
> "[For human beings?], there is no 'original.' ... When those like me, who don't watch anything but anime and manga, suddenly hit upon something, what we discovered will only be something within us we forgot about, there will necessarily be some original [elsewhere]. ... I feel a bit bad [about it]."
> "Fundamentally, Eva is just my life copied out onto film. I'm [still] alive, so the story hasn't finished."
> "The characters of 'Eva' are all composite personalities based around my own personality."
> "Shinji-kun is the current me."
> "I think that [one?] has to be more cognizant of that. The fact that we have nothing."
> "I think [Murakami] is the same as me, an empty person."
> "If we assume that an 'original' exists, it's nothing but my life. ... I can't deny that everything else may be counterfeit."
<http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=420652#420652>
> "The finale of Eva will end up being [like] _Devilman_. That's what the story has to be. I guess I'm doing it unconsciously. [Eva] already completely contains the "taste" of Go Nagai. I can't wipe it away. I can no longer deny the impact of _Devilman_. If I were to deny it, I feel that I would end up completely overturning my own life."
--translated by [Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/post/501860/Implications-of-EoEs-Final-Scene-Again/#501860); Japanese a combination of a [2chan](http://logsoku.com/thread/changi.2ch.net/eva/1234692428/6) and [Wikipedia](https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ja/wiki/%E6%96%B0%E4%B8%96%E7%B4%80%E3%82%A8%E3%83%B4%E3%82%A1%E3%83%B3%E3%82%B2%E3%83%AA%E3%82%AA%E3%83%B3) excerpt. Numbers-kun points out the uncanny resemblance of the [_Devilman_ finale](http://img94.imageshack.us/img94/6318/devilman.jpg) with the Last B scenario (half a torso versus half an arm)
##### _Schizo_ table of contents
[Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=497179#497179) translation of [Japanese webpage](http://m.webry.info/at/kojimars/201004/article_16.htm):
- Part One: Long Interview with Hideaki Anno (by Mitsunari Oizumi)
- Chapter One: We are empty
- Aum Shinrikyo and Eva^[Another Aum reference! We've seen what all the others have had to say about Aum and _Eva_, but what does Anno say?]
- I had gotten tired of Anime fans
- Television dependency
- Eva is a private film
- An unprecedented service^[This is probably related to Anno's other comments about 'service' ("A Dream World That Hasn't Forfeited its Goal", _Top Runner_, the 2010 _CRC_); see following footnote about 'poison'.]
- Chapter Two: How to finish [a?] story
- How to finish [a?] story
- A tentative "happy end"
- Not merely a copy
- One should mix in poison^[Anno has previously discussed how Japanese children need to be given 'poison', at AX96 (_PA_ excerpts). See also Tsurumaki: "A lot of people think anime should always have happy endings, but that's not always the case. We wanted to educate the fans that anime can have bitter endings."]
- A new track
- The influence of Yamato
- Chapter Three: Creation is a masturbation show
- An attachment to deformity
- The first episode of Gundam is the ultimate
- The work and other people
- Picturesque masturbation
- Gainax, the amateur collective
- A taste of Go Nagai
- Chapter Four: Devilman and the Oedipus Complex
- Happiness is an illusion
- Towards Cerebrism^[A reference to _Eva_'s style of 'mysteries' and 'information overload', which Anno later disavowed as 'pedantic'?]
- The Dead Sea Scrolls
- We have no time
- Devilman
- The AT Field
- Anxiety after the end of the broadcast
- Columns: Story Digest
- 1. Episode 1 - Episode 7
- 2. Episode 8 - Episode 15
- 3. Episode 16 - Episode 19
- 4. Episode 20 - Episode 22
- 5. Episode 23 - Episode 26
- Part Two: Hideaki Anno "tried in absentia" by the staff of Evangelion (First Part)
- Yoshiyuki Sadamoto's first meeting with Director Anno
- Masayuki's first meeting with Director Anno
- Hiroki Sato's first meeting with Director Anno
- Toshimichi Otsuki's first meeting with Director Anno
- Kazuya Tsurumaki's first meeting with Director Anno
- The "terror" of Hideaki Anno
- Picking up girls [?] using the "God Warrior"
- Hideaki Anno as an animator
- Hideaki Anno as a director
- The beginning of Eva (1)
- On Rei Ayanami (1)
- On Rei Ayanami (2)
- The beginning of Eva (2)
- On Rei Ayanami (3)
- On Kaworu
- On Rei Ayanami (4)
- On Rei Ayanami (5)
- Part Three: What is Rei Ayanami? (Mitsunari Oizumi)
#### _Prano_
> Anno: The truth is, I have no emotional attachment to Rei at all.
>
> In the midst of making Eva, I suddenly realized that I had forgotten her. Her very existence. For example, in episode seven, I remembered and added one shot with Rei. I had no attachment to her at all, right? I think that was okay, because in episode eight, she doesn't appear, right? Not even in a single shot.
>
> Episode 6 was too early.
>
> At the end Rei says "I don't know what to do," and Shinji says, "I think you should smile," and Rei smiles. ... Afterwards, when I thought about it, I cursed. In short, if she and Shinji completely "communicated" there, then isn't she over with? At that moment, Rei, for me, was finished.
>
> When she smiled, she was already finished, this character.
from page ~95-96; <http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=414209#414209>
##### _Prano_ table of contents
[Numbers-kun](http://forum.evageeks.org/viewtopic.php?p=497179#497179) translation of [Japanese webpage](http://m.webry.info/at/kojimars/201004/article_16.htm):
- Part One: Long Interview with Hideaki Anno (by Kentaro Takekuma)
- Chapter One: I won't study anymore
- An honor student in my hometown
- My family
- The first work I saw
- The monster and the hero
- Yamato on a black-and-white TV
- I won't study anymore
- The legendary Yamato feature
- Farewell Yamato
- Absorbed in 8-mm film
- Chapter Two: The birth of Daicon Film
- Meeting Hiroyuki Yamaga
- Gundam starts broadcasting!
- Beginning on Ultraman
- The birth of Daicon Film
- The reason I became Ultraman
- Setback and separation
- Chapter Three: The long road to Eva
- Selected for _Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind_
- An insolent newcomer
- A second master
- Grave of the Fireflies
- The director Isao Takahata
- Hayao Miyazaki's view of _Royal Space Force_
- The formation of Gainax
- Gainax didn't break up
- _Aim for the Top!_
- Anime loses money
- The suspension of _Blue Uru_
Chapter Four: Feeling despair, but that point was the beginning
- Conflict
- What's so great about Gendo?
- To "depict a human being"
- Nothing changes in the world
- On romantic love
- Crying in the arms of a woman
- The true meaning of words
- Looking for one's mother in a woman
- What would be madness?
- Epilogue
- Columns: Hideaki Anno's amateur period (1) (2)
- From Nausicaa to Nadia
- Introduction to the main characters of Eva
- Part Two: Hideaki Anno "tried in absentia" by the staff of Evangelion (Second Part)
- Why is the main character a boy?
- On "I musn't run away"
- Father and Mother (1) - (5)
- Can Hideaki Anno "change"? (1) (2)
- Why did Shinji pilot? (1) (2)
- Rei Ayanami's smile
- On the last two episodes
- Critique of Otaku
- Suicidal desires (1)
- Psychological attack
- Suicidal desires (2)
- At the end
- Part Three: Me and Evangelion (Kentaro Takekuma)
## 1997 S
> The re-run for Evangelion were aired on Saturday nights from 1997.02.01 to 1997.03.15, at 26:55 (2:55 AM Sunday). They aired four episodes in a row, and after that they had some live clips. They were as follows.
>
> Date Ep Extras
> ---------- ----- --------------------------------------
> 1997.02.01 1-4 press conference of the Evangelion movie
> 1997.02.08 5-8 otaku in lines waiting to buy tickets for the Eva movie
> 1997.02.15 9-12 main seiyuu commenting on the Eva movie: Ogata Megumi, Hayashibara Megumi, Mitsuishi Kotono, Miyamura Yuko
> 1997.02.22 13-16 video clips from some Evangelion events: Miyamura Yuko, Mitsuishi Kotono, Hayashibara Megumi
> 1997.03.01 17-20 inside Gainax studios: staff, cels, CG room
> 1997.03.08 21-23 30 minute special (narration by Tachiki Fumihiko)
> 1997.03.15 24-26
>
> **1997.03.08**
>
> The 30 minute special that was aired on 1997.03.08 gave information about how big a hit Evangelion was: 200,000 advance tickets for the movie were sold, 2,420,000 LDs and videos were sold, 880,000 CD singles were sold, 1,240,000 CDs were sold, (the 3rd soundtrack reached number 1 in the Oricon charts), 3,500,000 comics were sold.
>
> There were highlights from the TV series, live video of Anno Hideaki (creator and director of Evangelion), some clips of the main seiyuu (same clips that were used in the previous weeks), some interviews with fans.
--["Evangelion re-runs"](http://www.usagi.org/doi/seiyuu/tv/1997eva.html) (last updated 3 March 1997 by [Hitoshi Doi](!Wikipedia "Hitoshi_Doi#Personal_website_and_Seiy.C5.AB_Database")); they ran on [TV Tokyo](http://www.usagi.org/doi/seiyuu/radio/boogie/19970118.html)
> The cult anime named Evangelion. A forbidden anime about how a group led by morally/spiritually bankrupt individuals uses an autistic boy to wage pitched battles against incomprehensible creatures, and how through contact with the hearts of a mentally fragile, bandaged girl and an overly self-conscious, traumatized girl, that boy ultimately attains deliverance/salvation himself in the final episode. Some viewers became enraged, some despondent, some lost friends as a result of hysterical disputes, and some attained deliverance/salvation themselves.
>
> ... If memory serves correctly, when the plan arose they made up to Ep6 (despite Anno apparently saying in Quick Japan magazine that they had "made up to Ep7 in advance") and sent out feelers in all directions, but were given the cold shoulder by every company. (laugh) Even Bandai snubbed them based on the past results of the huge failure of "Wings of Honneamise (Royal Space Force)". (laugh) They had connections with a TV Tokyo producer, but if you can't get sponsors it doesn't matter. So after wandering lost by the wayside for a bit, Kadokawa Shoten finally picked them up. But the truth is that even Kadokawa just barely picked them up, and flatly rejected their budget requests, saying that they only intended to budget the same level and not a yen more than other anime Kadokawa had sponsored in the past (Tenchi Muyo, etc.).
>
> ... Anno himself also replied in an interview that, "We completely ran out of time partway through...." However, the direct cause was not the PTA or a lack of time, but the more pressing issue of "budget".
>
> ... ...finally moving his heavy arse, Anno vastly restructured the production system. First, 75% or more of the production staff from Ep16 onward were outsourced South Korean staff[^episode16outsource]. In terms of the animation as well, when reusing sequences other than bank sequences or for still shots, instead of using the film, these sequences were instead dubbed in at the end using a video deck. This is why character close-ups and other shots that seemed to jiggle increased partway through the series. They even mixed stupid photographs and other stuff into the mental image scenes. In the worst cases some scenes just showed a still screen that lasted for a minute or more. But no matter how much they struggled, they had already exceeded their budget and time limits. And then to top it all off were those last two episodes.
>
> Although budget issues were the main problem, Gainax had also quarreled constantly with TV Tokyo since before the TV airing over moral issues such as how the show would end and other details. These ranged from trivial points such as it being improper to show women's underwear in the hanging laundry, to major items such as the brutal scene at the end of Ep18 "The Choice of Life". It's kind of letting the cat out of the bag now, but the truth is that "Asuka dies from madness (she lives in the TV version)," "Shinji dissolves but reforms," and "Rei also dies" were already determined before the TV airing started, and Gainax had quarreled a number of times with the TV Tokyo producer and related parties over these plot devices. Furthermore, the ending was supposed to have been "The main characters die one after another, and the final battle is Ikari Shinji vs. Ikari Gendo," although there probably isn't any evidence left to support that now. (laugh) Well, except it seems that Hayashibara Megumi (voice actress for Ayanami Rei) said on a radio program something like: "I might end up fighting against Shinji." I also heard talk that "Misato and Ritsuko both die fighting each other, and Misato's death awakens Shinji(?)" Surprisingly, it seems the character who was the key to the climax was not Rei, but Misato. But then I guess it doesn't matter what is said now. (laugh)
>
> ... When Ep20 aired, complaints poured in from the PTA. This infuriated TV Tokyo all the way up to the upper management, which made it impossible for Gainax to take any bold measures. Nowadays it's pretty much taken for granted that the only people who complain over every little thing in children's TV anime or manga are people like Kofuku-no-Kagaku\* pulling a publicity stunt for their "evil book banning movement".... Still, at that point the TV Tokyo upper management issued the severe notice that "Any anime that is deluged with complaints from the PTA even once from now on will be canceled regardless of the reason." The anime "Bakuretsu Hunters" and "Fushigi Yugi" were airing on the same channel at the time, and these also caught flak and received strict warnings even though they had not done anything. (laugh) That's why there were so many unnatural changes in the story contents from Ep20 onward.^[See also Junichi Toyouchi's emails describing the practices his industry friends told him had been put into place thanks to NGE.]
>
> So for these reasons, the Eva [TV] ending was made under conditions with Gainax's hands tied in terms of budget, time and content. Considering that the last two episodes were made under those conditions, Director Anno might even be viewed as amazing.... Nope, I just can't view him like that. (laugh) After all it was his own damn fault that things turned out that way.
>
> ... Anno said in some anime magazine that "Katsuragi Misato is modeled in part on my first love," but do you know who he was talking about? It's Hidaka Noriko, the voice actress for Jean in "Nadia and the Secret of Blue Water". (laugh) When the TV version of "Nadia" launched, Anno confessed his feelings to Hidaka Noriko. This is a famous story in the industry. Apparently Anno told her that he "looked at her not as an object of adoration/longing, but as a serious love interest!" (ROTFL!) Apparently he was even seriously thinking of marriage. However, Hidaka Noriko refused him flatly, saying "I have no intention of marrying someone in the anime industry." Wait, what? Don't we know now that she was married to some anime-related producer at the time? (ROTFL!) But Anno would not give up, and told her, "Well, watch my next work, and then decide!" In other words Anno was proposing an affair to the already married Hidaka Noriko. (laugh) Anyway, Anno next work was "Evangelion", so... Evangelion might be considered a work that embodies something of a stalker obsession.
>
> ... But it looks like there is no shortage of people willing to get paid and become famous for writing magazine articles on the subject. Isn't that right? Okada-san? Takekuma-san? Otsuki Kenji-san?^[Not the producer Toshimichi Otsuki.] (ROTFL!)
--[The Kaibunsho](http://www.evaotaku.com/html/kaibunsho-main.html); Carl Horn's criticism of the above Kaibunsho (but see his article mentioning 'gossip' linking Anno & Miyamura): <http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2006-September/003726.html> <http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2006-September/003730.html>. [Olivier Hagué](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-April/039558.html) gave in 2001 the same story about Anno & Noriko, but it's unclear whether he's drawing on the Kaibunsho or whether that story had been circulating independently.
[^episode16outsource]: [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2006-September/003724.html) says that "according to those in the know (and as far as I have been able to narrow his identity), the author is one of the lower level production staff that got unceremoniously dumped around episode 16." That the Japanese staff got dumped does not seem to be *explicitly* said by the Kaibunsho, but seems possible - possibly this has something to do with the Tatsunoko incidents. A quote from Toshio Okada in ["Conscience of the Otaking" part 2](#conscience-of-the-otaking):
> `Okada:` **_NADIA_** was *true* chaos, good chaos and bad chaos! [LAUGHS] On **_NADIA_**, Anno didn't direct the middle episodes, Shinji Higuchi did. And some episodes were directed in Korea--why, no one knows exactly. [LAUGHS] That's *real* chaos, not good! What I mean to say is, *controlled* chaos--that's good. Controlled chaos is where you've got all the staff in the same room, looking at each other. But on **_NADIA_** you had Higuchi saying, "Oh, I'll surprise Anno", hide, and change the screenplay! Screenplays and storyboards got changed when people went home, and the next morning, if no one could find the original, I authorized them to go ahead with the changes. No one can be a real director or a real scriptwriter in such a chaos situation. But on **_GUNBUSTER_**, that chaos was controlled, because we were all friends, and all working in the same place. But on **_NADIA_**, half our staff was Korean, living overseas. We never met them. No control.
>
> `ANIMERICA:` Was **_NADIA_** the first Gainax film to have Korean animators?
>
> `Okada:` No, we used Korean animators even on **_GUNBUSTER_**. But we had never before used a Korean director or animation director. It was real chaos, just like hell.
One final note: the unattributed Anno biography mentions that of the 1997 Sahara trip that "This was the first time he [Anno] had traveled somewhere overseas beyond the United States and Korea."
Mari Kotani's _Immaculate Virgin_:
- Patrick Yip's transcription of [English section](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-October/008098.html)
- Gwern's [transcript](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2009-October/004934.html)
> "Dec. issue of NewType has an interview with Sadamoto Yoshiyuki. With my very limited skill in Japanese, I think Sadamoto talked about the fact that the differences between the TV and manga is something he did very deliberately-with a more traditional Shonen Manga approach . Maybe Patrick should translate that interview for us which I find will be much valuable... [wink to Patrick]"
- [George Chen](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-December/003824.html)
## 1997 T
- 1997-animationplanet-nge01.pdf
- 1997-animationplanet-nge04.pdf
- 1997-animerica-amandwinninterview.pdf
- 1997-animerica-genericdescription.pdf
- 1997-animerica-interviews19921997.pdf
- 1997-animerica-maskorface.pdf
- 1997-animerica-spikespencerinterview.pdf
- 1997-marikotani-newmillennialist.txt
- 1997-newswire-cartoonevavoidyouth.txt
> The ending scene has burnt in my mind. It is a scene that is hard to forget.... I actually saw people sobbing at the end when I was at the cinema watching EoE.
<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1997-October/006527.html>
> Anno, as late as the November '96 issue of Newtype magazine, still denied that the last two episodes were a "lousy job" and argued that the Gainax crew worked incredibly hard to finish the series, which he thinks "ended beautifully." He regretted that fans cannot appreciate Gainax's efforts.
>
> Asked about the violence and uncharacteristic sex scene in episodes 18 and 19, Anno said that the scenes were necessary to develop the story and "to understand real life." He felt that children should be exposed early to the realities of life so that they do not grow up weak and sheltered and so that they will become immune to some of the harsh situations they will eventually experience. Many fans at the convention thought that this was an interesting viewpoint on his part.
>
> Do you wonder why Eva got so dark and psychological near the end? After all, Anno is the guy who directed Nadia of the Mysterious Seas, one of the liveliest and funniest anime I've ever watched. According to Anno, from episode 16 on, he began reading books about human psychology and became very interested. He wanted to explore "what the human mind is all about inside."
>
> "I wrote about myself. My friend lent me a book on psychological illness and this gave me a shock, as if I finally found what I needed to say," he says in the November Newtype.^[This quote is from "the November issue of NEWTYPE magazine (1996-11, pg. 20-23)"; see Miyako Graham's AX96 excerpts, which has a longer quote.]
--<http://www.cjas.org/~echen/articles/spring97/05_03b.html>/<http://www.evaotaku.com/omake/anno.html>
- [NGE bibliography](http://www.mars.dti.ne.jp/~yato/eva/magazine.htm), c. 1997: Japanese magazines, newspaper, radio, TV; [Google Translate](http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mars.dti.ne.jp%2F~yato%2Feva%2Fmagazine.htm&sl=ja&tl=en)
> The original show ended in April, but EVA's success has continued unabated, with bestselling sales on laserdisc and video- even its music has gone through the roof, with volume 3 of the EVA soundtrack being the first anime album to hit #1 on the Japanese pop charts since GALAXY EXPRESS 999, seventeen years before.
>
>...
>
> but its nontraditional structure, narrative techniques, and an ending that over ten million Japanese tuned in to, only to raise a national howl of protest by the time the closing credits rolled.
--['Anno Mirabilis: The Triumph and Controversy of Gainax's NEON GENESIS'](http://web.archive.org/web/20010217062324/j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/03_evangelion/anno1.html); part 1
> Much of the premise and many of the early elements of EVA are familiar, indeed stereotyped elements of Japanese TV science fiction: teenage boy is chosen to pilot a robot his father built and fight against the enemy. It's reminiscent of anime from GIGANTOR to GIANT ROBO ( on which Anno was special - effects director ) , and the weird organic forms of the enemy, who attack one at a time, are reminiscent of the " monster of the week " tokusatsu shows such as ULTRAMAN ( Anno's favorite television show ) . The director of EVANGELION began from an immediately familiar and recognizable template, but in an interview before the show first aired, put the question up front: " If a person likes robot or cute girl animation, can they still be happy with it after the age of twenty? " It may seem like an odd question for Anno, 36 year - old super - otaku, who created in EVA an anime full of robots and cute girls, to pose.
>
> But the director was quite serious: his studio, Gainax is known as the otaku who examine themselves. The personal, allegorical nature of their work was treated seriously in HONNEAMISE and humorously in OTAKU NO VIDEO, and it emerges throughout the length of EVANGELION, many of whose multi - generational cast of characters are painted masks for the show's staff and most especially for Hideaki Anno himself.
>
> ... but Gainax's continuing challenge to the industry is in some ways more intriguing, as it attempts to effect a revolution from deep inside-its otaku building their intricate fantasy castles in a super - detailed style of obsessive detail, then dismantling them brick by brick to show their sense of an underlying and inescapable reality.
--[part 2](http://web.archive.org/web/20010220143006/j-pop.com/anime/archive/feature/03_evangelion/anno2.html)
-Scott Rider, [EoE review](http://www.ex.org/2.7/09-exclusive_evangelion.html)
>> If you're on the newsgroup and read this, could you perhaps answer a question about End of Evangelion?
>
> What actually happens in the movie is that as Nine Inch Nails' "March of the Pigs" blares, Anno, backed by strobe lights, nude except for a tip of the hat to William Burroughs, and visibly aroused, blows away successive EVA characters with a 12-gauge Mossberg airsoft, the six millimeter pellets shredding acetate avatars. At the end, covered by flecked and filmy remnants, he inserts the gun into his own mouth, only to find the bore choked by wads of merchandising cash.
>
> --Carl "I wear this crown of shit/Upon my liar's chair" Horn
from [`rec.arts.anime.misc`](https://groups.google.com/group/rec.arts.anime.misc/tree/browse_frm/thread/a9050bc3876a64ab/c0b4303c84f4490d)
# 1998
## 1998 P
- 1998-animerica-sadamotointerview-fr-opening.txt
- 1998-animerica-sadamotointerview.pdf
> "Feb/98 issue of Animage features Anno Hideaki...The "Love & Pop" feature in Animage is really wide-ranging: There are interviews with all 4 actresses, interview with Anno Hideaki (He got a special interviewer, who is a woman manga artist), interview with Ryuu Murakami (the original author of the eponymous novel), interview with Miyuki Nanri (the producer of the movie), interview with Yuki Masa (the casting of the movie, also director of "Death and Rebirth: Evangelion"), interview with Takahide Shibanushi (the film photographer of the movie), and excerpts of feedback from people (aged from 16 to 30) who saw the premiere show of the movie. Finally there is a report of Anno winning the 18th SF Award of Japan. Altogether there are 26 pages covering the movie, a real tribute to Anno, especially one coming from an anime magazine."
--<http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-January/008175.html>
> from the May 1998 issue of EVANGELION:
>
> > On Anno's severe depression, his "crisis of the soul," as a motive in the development of Evangelion.
>
> > YAMAGA: Well, I think Anno may have appeared in the Japanese media as you suggest; he's made comments about wanting to die, and so forth, but at least from my perspective, things were never as serious as they appeared in the press. [LAUGHS]
>
> > On the reasons for use of Judeo-Christian symbology in Eva
>
> > YAMAGA: I don't know exactly why. I suspect that Mr. Anno may have read some book on it, and there was some thoughts he wanted to express on it. I personally am glad that, rather than Christianity, he didn't express some obscure Buddhist theme, because then it would have been linked more with Aum Shinrikyo. [LAUGHS]
>
> > On whether Anno and Yamaga are fans of David Lynch, and whether Anno is "the Kurt Cobain of anime."
>
> > YAMAGA: As far as Mr. Anno committing suicide or anything like that [LAUGHS], I'm not really sure how to say this, but, while sometimes he might seem very emotional, when you get to know him, he doesn't come off like that at all. [LAUGHS] As far as David Lynch is concerned, I don't dislike David Lynch, but on the other hand, he's not someone I'm a huge fan of, either. As far as Anno, there have been people who have called Evangelion the anime equivalent of Twin Peaks. [LAUGHS]
--<http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2006-September/003693.html> (see also <http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-June/015609.html>); these comments are sourced from the 1998 Fanime panel with Yamaga; Peter Svensson confirms the 'some book' comment (see <http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-February/010543.html> and personal communication, but also later says ["Well, at Fanime Con, Yamaga said that Anno was influenced(on the religious aspects of EVA) by a novel...](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-June/015544.html). A mistake or were 2 books discussed? TODO emailed Svensson again)
- [Excerpts from the Introduction to Animerica's Interview; Animerica Vol.6 #8 p9, 23, & 28](http://web.archive.org/web/20071113012850/www.aoianime.hu/evangelion/index.php?page=intersadamoto1)
- "The following interview with Yoshiyuki Sadamoto was printed in ANIMERICA Vol. 6 No. 8, in 1998" <http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1999-January/024322.html> / <http://forum.anime-club.ro/forum/index.php?showtopic=1677&mode=threaded&pid=30834>
> Asahi Newspaper publishes a weekly magazine "AERA." AERA 08/31/1998 issue dealt with an interview with Hideaki Anno.
>
> As you know, he is 180 cm tall. He is a kind of giant for normal Japanese.
>
> He always fears something. But he himself is a kind of fear.
>
> He was born in 1960 in Ube city, Yamaguchi Prefecture. In his childhood, Ube city has shipyards. His inside proto-landscape is like such a shipyard, say, NERV base. (Faculty of Medicine, Yamaguchi University is located at Ube city.)
>
> His father Takuya Anno lost his left leg like Touji Suzuhara.
>
> Hideaki Anno fears animal. Therefore he is a vegetarian.
>
> He said, "I cannot break my own heart shell. However I think I can enlarge it because I completed EVA."
>
> He is shy in fact.
>
> He made EVA as his private anime. After EVA, he escaped from work. He tried to kill himself^[This is almost correct; it was while he was living at Gainax that he made his very half-hearted suicide attempt, see that interview.]. In order not to kill himself, he had to live at the building of GAiNAX, Musashino-city, Tokyo.
>
> But he lost his everything because he wasted out his all inside to make EVA.
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20071207235755/www.geocities.com/Tokyo/4081/file425.html#3> cf. <http://webspace.webring.com/people/cu/um_2708/colj089.html> (But did his father lose a leg? The only known footage of him is _Hideaki Anno Talks to Kids_, and the video doesn't show very much: he sits normally, and is standing normally, and his bow doesn't seem odd - but those are undemanding actions which wouldn't be odd with a good prosthetic.)
> [Anno] The reason the game business prospered and grew so fast is because it was a venture. But games have finally tanked too. It happened pretty fast, didn't it? Our generation is naturally a shallow one, and there's no-one who's trying to overturn things. There isn't anyone trying to make "me-anime" now, is there?
>
> ...[Anno] The first time I saw "Virtua Fighter"[2], I thought, is _this_ what anime is up against? It was quite a shock. That's when I realized I'd have to level up somewhere other than the visuals, I guess right before I did "EVA". Visual impact is anime's strong point, but since games had followed on anime's heels, it had become a time when a methodology no different from the others just wouldn't cut it. All the cards had already been dealt, so we had no choice but to change the combination, or turn over cards that were thought to be taboo. That's what I mean when I say that "EVA" didn't use even a single new methodology.
>
> [Ikuhara] Ah, like what the media talks about as creatorhood when discussing animated works. But that's just an illusion, and actually in the anime business no such thing as a creator is anywhere to be found. All there are are people who were brought along by the founding of the system. The people who devise the form of the anime of today.
>
> ...[Anno] Recently I watched some "Kinchuu" ("Kingiyo Chuuihou!")[9]. As research for "Kare Kano". I thought that perhaps that was what gags and shoujo manga were. But it felt a little old.
>
> [Ikuhara] Old? It feels like things are divided into the time before and after "Sailor Moon". I feel like it really infected the tastes at Comiket. [Anno] Yeah. Whether something's major or not at Comiket amounts to whether or not it gets made into erotic stuff. After all, the sex industry is strong no matter what era it is. As Tsurumaki (Kazuya) said, earnestly value all things equally. Both Hiromatsu Junko and Ayanami Rei. I can't express it in words, but I feel the same chasm within myself.
>
> [Ikuhara] I think it's the feeling of anti-septicness. The impression that they don't smell like anything is good.
>
> [Anno] Yes, yes, exactly.
>
> [Ikuhara] Apparently stuff like unnecessary hair, or nose hair, isn't absolute. Of course, in pictures the characters don't actually have nostrils (laugh). I bet everyone would start hating pictures of girls if we drew nostrils on them.
>
> [Anno] Cel anime fans are more sterile than that.
>
> [Ikuhara] The idols of a decade ago felt really sterile. But recently actresses and TV talents are feeling less remote and more realistic.
>
> [Anno] Does that include us, by any chance? It's an existence where courage and familiarity seem to be draining away.
>
> [Ikuhara] If so, the place that the people who recognize the feeling of sterility are carrying with them in their thoughts will disappear.
>
> [Anno] That's why I'm going with the cel anime system.
>
> [Ikuhara] There's somewhere where we'll give up, isn't there. We're trying to fulfill our own ambitions virtually. I suppose if we were doing it for real we should be trying to make more properly ideal cities and better human relations. I can't really say it in anything but pedestrian terms, but, like with things like the Aum[*1] incident, I can understand the feelings of the people who want to reorganize the world.
>
> [Anno] In order to see a made-up drama, there are even people who neglect their real lives, right? That kind of person does things like become a seiyuu fan.
>
> [Ikuhara] I bet what they really wanted was to touch an anime character.
>
> [Anno] For something that could connect the virtual and the real, I too turned to the seiyuu. But that was a mistake. That's why I tried to show something different in "Kare Kano". But altering the existing system is tough.
>
> ...[Anno] Yes, a world where something is done with the body alone. Nothing else befits a documentary. A world that shows nothing of creation.
>
> [Ikuhara] Take "Utena" and "EVA". They take a fragment of our work and talk about us introducing impact into our animation, saying it's like Terayama Shushi[12]'s work or something. It's nothing that narrow, is it? I think that what appears in our works is the complex about the body that people who make made-up anime feel.
>
> [Anno] I use the word "lifelike-ness". Compared to that, cel anime is pretty and virtual. Because I feel a sense of thwarted life in current cel anime, I want to try to peek at it from a slightly different direction. Like trying not to use any of the established seiyuu.
--[Newtype October 1998 interview](http://www.cjas.org/~leng/anno-ikuhara.txt); [EML copy](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-November/022933.html) of original Usenet translation
["Is Anno sane?"](http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-February/010401.html) (see also http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2006-August/003688.html and http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2006-August/003689.html)
Horn's affirmation that Peter Svensson really did ask at '98 Fanime of Yamaga whether Anno was sane: <http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/evangelion/2006-August/003688.html>
> "The May 1998 issue would have been called "Book Two, Issue #3" on its cover (that is, it contained the third chapter from vol. 2, Stage 9). It contained a special feature transcribing some of Hiroyuki Yamaga's answers to audience questions at Fanime Con '98 after a screening of Evangelion: Death (True) and Evangelion (Rebirth). I believe Mr. Yamaga's panel was also covered in Protoculture Addicts, but they may have included some remarks and not others (and the reverse is likely true for my piece)."
--personal email with Carl Horn
- Missing primary source books (listed in _E-Mono_):
> 'As for the books by Hideaki Anno. They were not written by Anno. The Blue one "Sukina Evangelion" (EVA that I love) is supposed to be a very "detailed" interview with Anno. The yellow one "Barano Evangelion" (EVA like rose) is supposed to be a very detailed interview with the production staff "when Anno was not around".' <http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-February/010670.html>
> 'I've checked the E-MONO book and now I know which two books you are talking about. The ones with blue and yellow cover respectively, right? Unfortunately, they were not "written" by Anno. The "sukina" (blue) book is supposed to be a "very detailed" interview with Anno; while the "barano" (yellow) book is supposed to be also a "very detailed" interview with the production staff "when Anno was not around". I don't have them in possession though.' <http://lists.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-February/010182.html>
> "the unforgiving other
>
> the substitute opposite sex
>
> the sudden humiliation
>
> the anxiety of departure (from other)
>
> the horror (scare?) of the other
>
> dangerous thinking (wisdom)
>
> the proud of taking chance (????)
>
> mercy of the weak
>
> the unhappy photo
>
> the scar of the pass
>
> the uncomfortable/embarrassing stage (?)
>
> beyond common sense
>
> question the value
>
> combination of lust and love
>
> return to the womb (!!!)
>
> empty time ( the time here I think is being used as noun....so timelessness?)
>
> the vision of distraction
>
> the fictional beginning
>
> the continuation of reality
>
> this, is the end of the dream"
--The Symphony of Evangelion concert had a number of telops flashed during EoE pieces; [George Chen](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-May/013979.html) made the preceding list.
> Episode 23
>
> A-Part
1. Cut 1-51 Added Ritsuko's room scene. Corrections on various background.
2. Cut 52-118 When the Angel trying to get into Unit-00, added one "Monitor scene".
3. Cut 139-163 The inner Universe of Rei. Huge corrections on the drawings (note: according to the newsletter anyway)
4. Cut 139-163, 335-378, 182-190. Here, there are a lot of new scenes. We are suppose to see a "Giant Rei" before Unit 00 explodes (note: Like I said, I will not be able to confirm these notes till Sunday night. ^_^)
> B-Part
5. 191-223 Various corrections of scenes of Misato and Shinji.
6. Cut 223B-F Gendo and Fuyutsuki in front of the Dummy Plug. New scenes (Note: !!!!! Will see it Sunday night!!!!!)
7. Rei III. Various corrections but no new footage.
8. Cut 256-278 Agent's room. The composition which Fuyutsuki's in is different. Seele with the nude Ritsuko; composition of the scene is different.
9. Cut 279-303. Minor corrections in the elevator scenes with Ritsuko, Misato and Shinji. There seems to be more "space" after the modifications.
10. Cut 304-334. While Ritsuko describe the nature of Rei. There are added scenes of discovery of Adam, and creation of Eva.
> Episode 24
>
> A-Part
11. Cut 1-14. The scenes which Asuka learned that Kaji is dead is added.
12. Cut 15-58. The bathtub scenes are much more "clear" now due to the TV vs. LD (Note: no censorship).
13. Cut 71-79. The Rei and Kaworu scenes. New dialogue between the 2 added. (!!!)
14. Cut 319-337 Seele and Kaworu---Misato's monitor (????). New Scenes. (Note: Since this is just notes....plus I am doing a literal translations of those notes....I will have to put this into context later on...again...Sunday night)
15. Cut 150-310. News scenes which Unit 02 descending into Central Dogma. Seele's dialogue is new. Lilith started to grow legs. (Which in the original the scenes only contain Lilith without lower part of the body).
16. Cut 311-318. Light pole had been added to the scenes by the lake (Note: So? A_A ). Reflection on near the shore had been corrected.
> Additional changes:
>
> In the preview section: The original preview of TV 25, 26 are retained but *also* added the preview of "Air" and "My Pure Heart for you".
--[George Chen](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-July/017258.html), describing the notes accompanying the Japanese release of Genesis 0:12 and describing the changes & additions made as part of the Director's Cut
> Anno: Before that I read Mr. Matsumoto's Battlefield manga series, and I also liked Wadachi. I was hanging out in my neighborhood browsing through an issue of Adventure King when I saw the announcement for the first episode: "New series, Space Battleship Yamato." The title caught my fascination immediately. In our house we had one TV and the rest of my family wanted to watch Heidi, but I wanted Yamato. That was how it first pulled me in and got me devoted. These days we call it a 'hammer.' I think that was the first work to give me such an experience.
>
> Matsumoto: Well, one of the few people who was in our audience! Our ratings were close to zero.
>
> Anno: I went out and proselytized for it. I told all my schoolmates, "watch Yamato!" They could always catch Heidi in reruns. Or maybe not. (Laughter)
>
> ...Anno: If not for that, I don't think I'd be doing my job now. That's for sure. I recorded episodes on cassette then, because there were no VCRs, so I think Miyagawa-sensei's music was the only kind I listened to. (Laughter)
>
> Yamato was an epic. It made us feel like we were seeing adult anime for the first time. It wasn't directed at children. The music was very adult, too. Of course, it had a huge visual impact, but since I was in the generation that listened to Yamato on tape, it's what gave me an ear for music. By the virtue of those two things, that's why I'm here now.
>
> Matsumoto: An eighth-grader, about 14 years old. That was the first age where you could really get into it. That's how it was with my generation, too, but we drifted away when it didn't suit us anymore. Yours is the generation that was assimilated into the screen.
>
> Anno: The influence of Captain Okita was very big. Goro Naya's voice telling us to overcome our fears and believe in tomorrow. I said, "Yes! That's it!" (Laughter)
>
> My view of life and the way I think about things was surely influenced by that.
>
> ...[Leiji Matsumoto]: Anyway, it [_Space Battleship Yamato_] was my first animation job. It was pretty hard. Honestly, I wasn't concerned about the ratings. I brought it up, but I don't mind it particularly.
>
> Anno: It had a lot of energy. The work of [Animation Director] Noboru Ishiguro was very good.
>
> Matsumoto: We're the same age. We were about 36 then. The main staff was generally about that age. That was the generation that wouldn't go down without a fight. We'd have shouting matches or turn a deaf ear and kick up a big fuss about things and stay up all night.
>
> Anno: Ishiguro once asked me if I was over 30. I said I was already 32, and he said "you've got three more years. You'll do the best work of your life at 35." That's about how old he was when he made Yamato, so it's true.
>
> I was 35 when I made Evangelion, so I guess that's my best work. 35 or 36 may be the right age.
>
> ...Matsumoto: It's a very powerful thing, a dream inspired by the feminine. It gives men a lust for life. To persevere through many hardships for the sake of a matchless beauty.
>
> Anno: Like hearing the voice of Starsha and flying all the way to Iscandar? I'd go for her, but if it was some scruffy guy instead, I wouldn't answer the call no matter how urgent. I wouldn't believe him! (Laughter)
>
> Matsumoto: Neither would I!
>
> Anno: If there isn't an incredibly beautiful woman at the end of the journey, there's no use. I'd want to go just to meet the woman.
--["A Yamato Discussion with Hideaki Anno, Leiji Matsumoto, and Hiroshi Miyagawa; translated from the 1998 _Railway of Fantasy_ Concert Program"](http://www.starblazers.com/html.php?page_id=252)
> Tell us about your feelings vis-a-vis your character.
>
> As far as I'm concerned, Shinji is all grown up, as of the end of the movie. Everyone has their own feelings on the subject, starting with the director, but to me, he's finished wandering from child to adult. Thus I was pretty stuck when it came to doing this game. You see, this is still Shinji at that time in his life when he's lost, and it was pretty tough for me to recall that period. That may well have caused me to blank out at times, which might be just like Shinji, in some perverse way (laughs).
> To me personally, Shinji grew up, very naturally...and wouldn't want to go back to the way things were. I may well have made him a different character from the way he was before, in fact. I'm sorry (laughs).
>
> ... --What was it like squaring off with other characters?
>
> I only played off Hidaka Noriko, and the shows she worked on (Top and Nadia) had pretty different worldviews from Eva, which left me kind of stuck. Shinji was a very real sort of character, in that he didn't act like an anime character, but typically talked very quietly and sparingly, and it was like he was suddenly thrust into an anime world (laughs). Here I was, talking with Shinji's gloomy voice, and right next to me is Hidaka Noriko, with her positive, impassioned manner of speech. I thought that this must be what your average anime hero is really like (laughs). The gap in tension levels between these characters was so great that I'm worried that it might have put a crimp in her performance too.
>
> ...If you use Shinji, you're likely to lose, so I recommend against it (laughs)."
--[Megumi Ogata](http://web.archive.org/web/20010722114001/http://www.gainax.co.jp/soft/mahjong/ss/chara/shinji-e.html), seiyuu interviews for Gainax website on mahjong game (likely translated by Michael House); that is the only translated interview available in IA, although an [old email](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-November/023265.html) may imply that other interviews were translated. The more interesting of the other mahjong interviews:
- [Gendo](http://web.archive.org/web/20011227155516/http://www.gainax.co.jp/soft/mahjong/ss/chara/gendo.html)
- [Mary (from _Nadia_)](http://web.archive.org/web/20020127003526/http://www.gainax.co.jp/soft/mahjong/ss/chara/mary.html)
- [Rei](http://web.archive.org/web/20011227153221/http://www.gainax.co.jp/soft/mahjong/ss/chara/rei.html)
- [Touji](http://web.archive.org/web/20011227155058/http://www.gainax.co.jp/soft/mahjong/ss/chara/touji.html)
> On the 9th (final) volume of the film comics, the comments for episode.26 starts with several lines ending with "At last, the HCP has been executed. ... How about the complementation of Shinji? How about the complementation of Shinji's heart? Here the path of Shinji's complementation is described. This is just one form [katachi: shape, form; I am tempted to translate it as scenario, but I think I'd better preserve the original word as much as possible. The Japanese here "Kore wa mata hitotsu no katachi de atta" has the connotation that there are other "forms", which I interpret as other possibilities, or other endings.].
>
> At the very end of the episode, when Shinji is smiling and all that. The comment said, "Shinji's blissful smile. This is the smile of complemented Shinji. This is just one form, one of the many possibilities."
--[Patrick Yip](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/1998-September/020422.html)
### _Karekano_ research
> Here, I've found what I had lost--Anno said this with a heartfelt voice.
>
> How could Toyoko Academy have nothing but nice people like this? No bullying, no violence, no failures to communicate...the editorial staff were themselves profoundly moved to find that a school such as this exists in a society full of ugliness, hate, and despair. Is it really like this, though? We asked the students to tell us more.
>
> ... Kashiwara: Even within a given class, we respect one another. It makes me feel good to have such good friends. We pat one another on the back when we do something good, and cry together when something sad happens.
>
> Anno: Here, I have found what I had lost. I guess I've just gotten hard and crusty. But my heart is bursting at the thought that people like you still exist.
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20050211083730/www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/toyoko02-e.html>
> Anno: There's really nothing I can say here. I mean, I've been aware of the existence of high-school students like you, intellectually. Right now, I'm working on an anime series based on a girls' manga, but the world of girls' comics, where everyone is nice, looks completely unreal to me. It's a major surprise to find that there are people in the world who praise others so unreservedly. I guess such people really do exist after all.
>
> Kashiwara: Do unpleasant things really exist?
>
> Anno: There's no need to go out of your way to find them.
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20050211081520/www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/toyoko04-e.html>
Anno picture: <http://web.archive.org/web/20050211083507/http://www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/toyoko06.jpg>
> Kasagi: I think that's one of your good points, though, Aya (Kashiwara). You're confident in yourself, so you can't let anyone see even a little bit of breakdown. You practice in secret, out of pride.
>
> Anno: You should start by throwing away your public image.
>
> All: "Public image?"
>
> Anno: Yes, the image you decide on, where you are this or that character type.
>
> Kashiwara: There are times, though, when you think that you can't cry because you are who you are. You do have your particular character. I get the feeling that that's how the teachers really see the students. There are harsh things which they would say to me because I can handle it, but that they wouldn't say to a student who's more easily hurt by such things. I've never cried, even when I'm hurting, because I practice hard at home. I've made modifications to my home. I installed a barre and other stuff, and did it all myself.
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20050211083507/www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/toyoko06-e.html>
> Murayama: I'd like to work with film and video. I was really impressed by Evangelion, and it's gotten me interested in anime and stuff like that lately.
>
> Anno: I apologize for getting you all worked up. You'd best stay away from it.
>
> ... Murayama: It looks incredible from where I'm sitting.
>
> Anno: I can't really be all that proud of my own work.
>
> Murayama: Is that so? I think it's terrific.
>
> Anno: It doesn't matter whether one does this kind of work or not, so you're better off not doing it.
>
> Murayama: I think it's great to be doing what you want.
>
> Anno: You've got it all wrong. This is the only thing I can do. Getting married, having kids, and raising them to be adults--that's far and away more of an accomplishment than making a movie. And the biggest accomplishment of all is to do all of that and make anime at the same time. In my case, I've managed to get this far because I gave up everything else. I don't see any need for anyone else to sacrifice everything else in life for this, though.
>
> ... Anno: But if you like it, who cares? You need to like this sort of thing a certain amount to be able to do it. And once you've given it up, you'll be OK.
>
> Takahashi: Once you've given it up?
>
> Anno: Right. The instant you wake up to reality again. When you realize that enjoyment alone won't see you through.
>
> Shibasaki: You mean, you give it up, but even then, you still keep doing it?
>
> Anno: Well, that's where you find out what you're really made of. To some extent, anyone can each a certain level of achievement if they try. Whether they can go beyond that point depends on the given individual. Going beyond that point requires quality. Hard work alone won't do it. And there will always be someone better than you. If you get carried away by how good you are, what do you suppose will happen when you discover that there are far better people in the world already?
>
> ... Anno: Exactly. I put my work ahead of everything, which makes me cold. I sacrifice people, including myself. Going that far is like being prepared to die.
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20050211080410/www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/fujimi04-e.html>
> Takahashi: But don't your parents tell you things like, "That's why Japan is going into the toilet"? When I say that I think things are OK, my folks reply with, "That's what's wrong with the Japanese way of thinking."
>
> Mutoo: I hate America.
>
> Anno: (laughs)
>
> Mutoo: I've learned to hate it.
>
> Takahashi: I bet people who debate international relations all hate America.
>
> Mutoo: Is all they do in America to criticize others without looking at themselves? Don't they act like they're the greatest? Always saying they're the world's best.
>
> Hirata: I don't like America either. Right now, Japan's economy is bad. But when it was really good, America said that it was doing too well, and now that it's bad, they won't help us out. They just say that it's our own fault. Makes me think, who do they think they are, anyway?
>
> All: (laughter)
>
> ... Anno: Asia is where it's at now. We'd best get in good with our neighbors. The previous generation is with America. Those currently in their 50's typically think in terms of America. In reaction to losing the War to America, they all want to live the American lifestyle. Like all going to Europe, that sort of thing.
>
> Takahashi: I get that feeling when I read theses written by people of that time.
>
> Anno: It's like an America-first philosophy. In my generation, though, you turn more and more to domestic matters, look more inward. When I was in the boondocks of Yamaguchi, Tokyo as I saw it on TV looked so incredible, so I always wanted to go there. I wanted to go to Tokyo to attend college, that sort of thing.
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20050211082632/www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/fujimi06-e.html>
> Anno: Put it on TV, though, and old ladies with time on their hands watch it. We got one such old lady calling the TV station while "Evangelion" was on the air, saying that we shouldn't have sexy scenes.
>
> Miyabu: Just for that?
>
> Anno: Yep. There's no sense of realism about high school students having a romance without sex, is there. I'm thinking about putting a message at the beginning of each episode telling grade-school students not to watch.
>
> Miyabu: Are the main characters of "Kareshi Kanojo no Jijoo" going to be junior-high or high school students?
>
> Anno: They're in their first year of high school, and in the manga they've recently had sex. And it just happened, without any buildup. I'm trying to figure out how to make something dramatic out of this. Could that be the way it is? Do they just do it?
>
> Miyabu: What do you think?
>
> Anno: I think I'm stuck. The male lead seemed to me to be so terribly upstanding, I figured he'd treat her better than that, when he up and has sex with her. He's not the character I thought he was. Maybe that's what it's like nowadays. People don't waste time, or something.
>
> ... Anno: Everyone defines pure love differently. But old biddies like the one who complained (about Eva) have never experienced it. They do things like that to kill time, because they're dissatisfied with kids today. They're not dissatisfied with themselves, but with their environment, their surroundings. They ignore any blame they may have for their situations, instead blaming everything on anime. I never thought I'd get caught up in it. Nobody sounds as loud as old biddies like those. They have so much time on their hands that instead of calling telephone dating clubs, they call TV stations.
>
<http://web.archive.org/web/20050211082031/www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/ikuta03-e.html>
>
>
> Anno: I didn't have any girlfriends in high school. I did manga and astronomy, as well as watch anime and play mah jongg. When there was a test, I'd tell my folks I was going to a friend's house to study. We'd play all-night mah jongg, then we'd catch a nap before eventually going to school, and when the test was over we'd go back and play mah jongg some more. It was all anime and mah jongg. Back then, girls avoided me like the plague, because I was so gloomy.
>
> ... Anno: In junior high, I had a little fling that seemed like love, but wasn't. It turned into a triangle with a pal of mine, and that turned into a crisis. All through high school, I decided that being the way I was, was fine, and had no romances the whole time. Some underclasswomen came on to me, but I showed them no interest. The world was full of things more interesting than women. I was much more interested in making movies back then than dating. I regret it now, though. My life might be different now if I'd had sex back then.
>
> ... Anno: I don't recommend technical schools. Everyone who goes to one of those places starts off by having the same field of specialty, after all, so monotony soon sets in. Take anime schools for example. You go to one of those, and you've got a gathering of people who've all been social and class outcasts up to now. You'll start suffering the illusion that the world revolves around you as a result. I haven't yet seen anyone who liked anime and who'd ever gotten any use out of what he learned in those places.
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20050211082224/www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/ikuta04-e.html>
> Anno: I hate school, you know? And the thing I hate about it is no different from 20 years ago. Teachers also ought to have hated school, seeing as how they were about the same age as me. So they should have hated it too, you know? Why did becoming teachers change them into teachers?
>
> All: Sad but true.
>
> Anno: And it's scary to think that they had to have been students too. The world changes people. Parents too: they had to have been kids themselves once, and yet as parents they're so different.
>
> ... Noguchi: When it comes to law, you've got privacy safeguards, for example, but there are also things that need to be made public, and in cases where a choice has to be made, it ends up in a courtroom, with the decision being left up to the judge to make.
>
> Anno: Laws in the light of a trial are unreasonable things. School is acclimatizing you to that, so you won't complain about it.
>
> Ichikawa: We're being trained, like pets.
>
> Anno: Absolutely.
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20050211080453/www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/meidai02-e.html>
> Kawakami: When did you know what you wanted to do with your life, Mr. Anno?
>
> Anno: I just let life carry me along, like that guy over there said.
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20050211083050/www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/meidai04-e.html>
> Anno: I was basically the honor-student type up until junior high. I was always on student council, that sort of thing. I got into the best feeder schools in my area, up to high school. I swore that I wouldn't do any more studying once I passed my exams. I didn't like to study, so I studied only the areas and sentences that interested me, and that as little as possible. What good is algebra going to do me in real life, after all?
>
> ... Anno: When I got a zero, the school not annoyed because they were supposed to be a feeder school. So I made sure not to get negative marks. When I got to high school, all I did was play mah jongg and make 8mm movies. I spent all my high school years just goofing off. So naturally there were no universities I could get into, and at the time, Osaka College of Art had no entrance exams. Rather, I got in on my accomplishments. But I stopped going in my third year, and ended up getting expelled.
>
> ... Anno: What it boils down to is, society only sees the numbers. When it comes to movies too, there's a need to apply either of two labels, either that it was interesting or that it wasn't. School grades are the same way, because Japan only has one evaluation method, that of negative test scoring. I think cumulative test scoring would be more interesting, personally. In the final analysis, the system is about how can you avoid making mistakes. The top score is set at 100 points. It's a game, and the object is to figure out how to minimize your mistakes and keep teachers from reducing your points. I'd say that the problem lies with this negative scoring system, but if asked, I'd also have to say that cumulative scoring wouldn't solve things either.
>
> ... Anno: I think it's clear that they're a far cry from when I was in high school. They're smart. I get the feeling that they can see their own lives in an instant, by observing their parents and other grown-ups around them. And I'm enjoying that.
>
> Kawakami: I heard something to the effect that as part of making anime, you meet and talk with lots of different people.
>
> Anno: I think that's more or less what I said. Anime and manga are completely fictional picture worlds, and thus what happens in them is impossible in real life. Now, there are two approaches you can take. You can either make it look like a dream all the way to the end, where you bring it back to reality, or you can show reality all the way to the end, and finish up with a dream. A lot of anime starts out as a dream, and ends as a dream. This is no good, because it feels like you're using dreams as a retreat. And Japan is not such a tough place to live.
>
> I can't help but wonder why people are withdrawing into dreams in a reasonably prosperous country. A lot of these people in particular are anime fans, and for a while I couldn't deal with that. I got fed up with Evangelion too, for that reason. I can't stand people who run away, who refuse to face reality. Surely you'll find something for yourself if you face reality head on. If nothing else, take a good look at your immediate surroundings. Don't turn away from unpleasantness. Have a look at it too. With this in mind, ultimately I want to show a little reality in my works. If nothing else, I don't feel any realism in something that has no reality mixed in with it. Thus, while my next production will be a girl's manga about a high-school girl, it's also partly real.
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20050211083241/www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/meidai05-e.html>
> Ikeda: You may get really tired, but if you're not aware of it, it's the same as not being tired at all, isn't it? Even if I should realize it and keel over from exhaustion, that's fine, because my life right now is good. It's great. Right now, I figure I'll keep on going the rest of my life, in just this way.
>
> Anno: Speaking with a sense of grandmotherly concern, the scariest part of that line of reasoning is when you actually do keel over.
>
> Ikeda: As long as each moment of my life is pleasurable, that's fine.
>
> Anno: Exactly. That's just what that kind of person will say.
>
> ... Ikeda: Is it so radical to think that tomorrow may not come?
>
> Anno: Yeah, I think it's better to believe that tomorrow is always with us, rather than that it can be cleanly cut away. That doesn't mean that you do the same thing tomorrow as today, though. It's important to form an image of tomorrow being even just a little different, say, even as little 3% or 5%, from today. If you believe that you want to be a certain way, chances are you'll move in that direction. Having a clear image is the key.
>
> ... Takagi: I want to destroy the system itself.
>
> Anno: It's tougher than you might think. I've tried numerous times, and I'll tell you, it's not at all easy. (Everyone laughs) The work itself is pretty enjoyable. But it's a fleeting pleasure.
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20050211083512/www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/nishiko04-e.html>
> Nagamori: What matters is how the pieces shake out.
>
> Anno: As long as you're not dead, you'll be OK.
>
> Ikeda: Then I'm safe. People tell me I wouldn't die even if I were murdered.
>
> Anno: I've known my share of girls, but it's always the ones who tell you they're absolutely all right, they're the ones you have to watch out for...
>
> ... Uehara: Are you happy with the work you're doing currently?
>
> Anno: Yes, I am.
>
> Takagi: Does it feel like it's a hobby?.
>
> Anno: It feels like a hobby that keeps going on.
>
> ... Ikeda: It's a sure bet that you (Takagi) will end up homeless.
>
> Anno: I think that's OK too.
>
> Ikeda: It's not OK. You end up withering away, saying "It really should have turned out differently."
>
> Anno: And if you end your life that way, that's fine too.
--<http://web.archive.org/web/20050211081114/www.gainax.co.jp/special/kiiteyo/nishiko05-e.html>
- Carl Horn, in the Viz manga letters, mentions that Yamaga in Fanimecon '98 called the religious elements "only window dressing". - in Protoculture Addicts #39? TODO: check this when my PAs come...
- Gainax uninvolved in ADV translations? <http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2001-October/040552.html>; [Bochan_bird](http://eva.onegeek.org/pipermail/oldeva/2000-May/035516.html) quotes a Gainax fax he apparently received: