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WAV Trigger Serial Control Arduino Library
C++ Arduino
branch: master

Updated readme

Signed-off-by: robertsonics <jamie@robertsonics.com>
latest commit 934cf0d389
@robertsonics authored

README.md

WAV-Trigger-Arduino-Serial-Library

WAV Trigger Serial Control Arduino Library

This version of the library uses the AltSoftwareSerial library from PJRC by default, so you'll need to download and install that library as well. Be sure to include both library headers at the top of your sketch.

#include <AltSoftSerial.h>
#include <wavTrigger.h>

If you want to use a hardware serial port instead, you'll need to make one small change to the library's wavTrigger.h file. Near the top of the file, look for:

// ==================================================================
// The following defines are used to control which serial class is
//  used. Uncomment only the one you wish to use. If all of them are
//  commented out, the library will use Hardware Serial
#define __WT_USE_ALTSOFTSERIAL__
//#define __WT_USE_SERIAL1__
//#define __WT_USE_SERIAL2__
//#define __WT_USE_SERIAL3__
// ==================================================================

Comment out the __WT_USER_ALTSOFTSERIAL__ line and uncomment the line correspond- ing to the hardware port you want to use. If all the lines are commented out, the library will use Serial (the only hardware serial port on an Uno.)

This version currently only sends commands TO the WAV Trigger. I've not yet implemented any functions to receive info FROM the WAV Trigger.

I make no attempt to throttle the amount of messages that are sent. If you send continuous volume or sample-rate commands at full speed, you risk overflowing the WAV Trigger's serial input buffer and/or causing clicks in the WAV Triggers audio output due to excessive serial interrupt processing stealing cycles from audio playback. If you are connecting a continuous controller that can change rapidly for volume or sample-rate control, you should use a timer to send changes only every 10 or more msecs. You can, of course, experiment with this. If you're only ever playing 1 or 2 tracks at a time, you'll likely be able to get away with send- ing volume changes more frequently than if you are playing 8 tracks at a time.

Beginning with WAV Trigger firmware v0.80 and higher, track fade and crossfade functions are supported, allowing you to achieve smooth volume ramps (up or down) and crossfades with a single serial command. Also beginning with v.080 and higher it is possible to pre-load multiple tracks and issue a single resume message that allows them start and play in sample locked synchronization.

The library now includes an example sketch for the Arduino Uno that demonstrates many of the library commands with a set of demo tracks which you can download from www.robertsonics.com.

Usage:

In all cases below, the range for t (track number) is 1 through 999;

wavTrigger wTtrig;

wTrig.start() - you must call this method first to initialize the serial communications.

wTrig.masterGain(int gain) - this function immediately sets the gain of the final output stage to the specified value. The range for gain is -70 to +4. If audio is playing, you will hear the result immediately. If audio is not playing, the new gain will be used the next time a track is started.

wTrig.samplerateOffset(int offset) - this function immediately sets sample- rate offset, or playback speed / pitch, of the main output mix. The range for for the offset is -32767 to +32676, giving a speed range of 1/2x to 2x, or a pitch range of down one octave to up one octave. If audio is playing, you will hear the result immediately. If audio is not playing, the new sample-rate offset will be used the next time a track is started.

wTrig.trackPlaySolo(int t) - this function stops any and all tracks that are currently playing and starts track number t from the beginning.

wTrig.trackPlayPoly(int t) - this function starts track number t from the beginning, blending it with any other tracks that are currently playing, including potentially another copy of the same track.

wTrig.trackLoad(int t) - this function loads track number t and pauses it at the beginning of the track. Loading muiltiple tracks and then un-pausing them all with resumeAllInSync() function below allows for starting multiple tracks in sample sync.

wTrig.trackStop(int t) - this function stops track number t if it's currently playing. If track t is not playing, this function does nothing. No other tracks are affected.

wTrig.trackPause(int t) - this function pauses track number t if it's currently playing. If track t is not playing, this function does nothing. Keep in mind that a paused track is still using one of the 8 voice slots. A voice allocated to playing a track becomes free only when that sound is stopped or the track reaches the end of the file (and is not looping).

wTrig.trackResume(int t) - this function resumes track number t if it's currently paused. If track number t is not paused, this function does nothing.

wTrig.trackLoop(int t, bool enable) - this function enables (true) or disables (false) the loop flag for track t. This command does not actually start a track, only determines how it behaves once it is playing and reaches the end. If the loop flag is set, that track will loop continuously until it's stopped, in which case it will stop immediately but the loop flag will remain set, or until the loop flag is cleared, in which case it will stop when it reaches the end of the track. This command may be used either before a track is started or while it's playing.

wTrig.trackGain(int t, int gain) - this function immediately sets the gain of track t to the specified value. The range for gain is -70 to +10. A value of 0 (no gain) plays the track at the nominal value in the wav file. This is the default gain for every track until changed. A value of -70 is completely muted. If the track is playing, you will hear the result immediately. If the track is not playing, the gain will be used the next time the track is started. Every track can have its own gain.

Because the effect is immediate, large changes can produce ubrupt results. If you want to fade in or fade out a track, send small changes spaced out at regular intervals. Increment or decrementing by 1 every 20 to 50 msecs produces nice smooth fades. Better yet, use the new trackFade() and trackCrossFade() commands below.

wTrig.stopAllTracks() - this commands stops any and all tracks that are currently playing.

wTrig.resumeAllInSync() - this command resumes all paused tracks within the same audio buffer. Any tracks that were loaded using the trackLoad() function will start and remain sample locked (in sample sync) with one another.

wTrig.trackFade(int t, int gain, int time, bool stopFlag) - this command initiates a hardware volume fade on track number t if it is currently playing. The track volume will transition smoothly from the current value to the target gain in the specified number of milliseconds. If the stopFlag is non-zero, the track will be stopped at the completion of the fade (for fade-outs.)

wTrig.trackCrossFade(int tFrom, int tTo, int gain, int time) - this command initiates a hardware crossfade from one track to another in a specified number of milliseconds. The From track will be faded out and stopped, and the To track will be started and faded in to the specified volume.

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