Command Line Manager + Interactive Shell for Python Projects
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README.rst

Manage

Command Line Manager + Interactive Shell for Python Projects

Documentation Status Updates

Features

With manage you add a command line manager to your Python project and also it comes with an interactive shell with iPython support.

All you have to do is init your project directory (creating the manage.yml file)

$ pip install manage
$ cd /my_project_root_folder
$ manage init
creating manage.yml....

The file manage.yml describes how manage command should discover your app modules and custom commands and also it defines which objects should be loaded in to the shell

Note

Windows users may need to install proper version of PyYAML depending on the version of that thing you call an operating system, installable available in: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/PyYAML or consider using Linux and don't worry about this as everything works well in Linux except games, photoshop and solitary game :)

The Shell

By default the command manage shell is included, it is a simple Python REPL console with some configurable options.

You can change the banner message to say anything you want, e.g: "Welcome to my shell!" and you can also specify some objects to be automatically imported in to the shell context so when you enter in to the shell you already have your project's common objects available.

Also you can specify a custom function to run or a string based code block to run, useful to init and configure the objects.

Consoles

manage shell can start different consoles by passing the options

  • manage shell --ipython - This is the default (if ipython installed)
  • manage shell --ptpython
  • manage shell --bpython
  • manage shell --python - This is the default Python console including support for autocomplete. (will be default when no other is installed)

The first thing you can do with manage is customizing the objects that will be automatically loaded in to shell, saving you from importing and initializing a lot of stuff every time you need to play with your app via console.

Edit manage.yml with:

project_name: My Awesome Project
help_text: |
  This is the {project_name} interactive shell!
shell:
  console: bpython
  readline_enabled: false  # MacOS has no readline completion support
  banner:
    enabled: true
    message: 'Welcome to {project_name} shell!'
  auto_import:
    display: true
    objects:
      my_system.config.settings:
      my_system.my_module.MyClass:
      my_system.my_module.OtherClass:
        as: NiceClass
      sys.path:
        as: sp
        init:
          insert:
            args:
              - 0
              - /path/to/be/added/automatically/to/sys/path
  init_script: |
    from my_system.config import settings
    print("Initializing settings...")
    settings.configure()

Then the above manage.yaml will give you a shell like this:

$ manage shell
Initializing settings...
Welcome to My Awesome Project shell!
    Auto imported: ['sp', 'settings', 'MyClass', 'NiceCLass']
>>>  NiceClass. <tab> # autocomplete enabled

Watch the demo:

asciicast

Check more examples in:

https://github.com/rochacbruno/manage/tree/master/examples/

The famous naval fate example (used in docopt and click) is in:

https://github.com/rochacbruno/manage/tree/master/examples/naval/

Projects using manage

  • Quokka CMS (A Flask based CMS) is using manage
  • Red Hat Satellite QE tesitng framework (robottelo) is using manage

Custom Commands

Sometimes you need to add custom commands in to your project e.g: A command to add users to your system:

$ manage create_user --name=Bruno --passwd=1234
Creating the user...

manage has some different ways for you to define custom commands, you can use click commands defined in your project modules, you can also use function_commands defined anywhere in your project, and if really needed can define inline_commands inside the manage.yml file

1. Using a custom click_commands module (single file)

Lets say you have a commands module in your application, you write your custom command there and manage will load it

# myproject/commands.py
import click
@click.command()
@click.option('--name')
@click.option('--passwd')
def create_user(name, passwd):
    """Create a new user"""
    click.echo('Creating the user...')
    mysystem.User.create(name, password)

Now you go to your manage.yml or .manage.yml and specify your custom command module.

click_commands:
  - module: commands

Now you run manage --help

$ manage --help
...
Commands:
  create_user  Create a new user
  debug        Shows the parsed manage file
  init         Initialize a manage shell in current...
  shell        Runs a Python shell with context

Using a click_commands package (multiple files)

It is common to have different files to hold your commands so you may prefer having a commands/ package and some python modules inside it to hold commands.

# myproject/commands/user.py
import click
@click.command()
@click.option('--name')
@click.option('--passwd')
def create_user(name, passwd):
    """Create a new user"""
    click.echo('Creating the user...')
    mysystem.User.create(name, password)
# myproject/commands/system.py
import click
@click.command()
def clear_cache():
    """Clear the system cache"""
    click.echo('The cache will be erased...')
    mysystem.cache.clear()

So now you want to add all those commands to your manage editing your manage file with.

click_commands:
  - module: commands

Now you run manage --help and you have commands from both modules

$ manage --help
...
Commands:
  create_user  Create a new user
  clear_cache  Clear the system cache
  debug        Shows the parsed manage file
  init         Initialize a manage shell in current...
  shell        Runs a Python shell with context

Custom click_command names

Sometimes the name of commands differ from the name of the function so you can customize it.

click_commands:
  - module: commands.system
    config:
      clear_cache:
        name: reset_cache
        help_text: This resets the cache
  - module: commands.user
    config:
      create_user:
        name: new_user
        help_text: This creates new user

Having different namespaces

If customizing the name looks too much work for you, and you are only trying to handle naming conflicts you can user namespaced commands.

namespaced: true
click_commands:
  - module: commands

Now you run manage --help and you can see all the commands in the same module will be namespaced by modulename_

$ manage --help
...
Commands:
  user_create_user    Create a new user
  system_clear_cache  Clear the system cache
  debug        Shows the parsed manage file
  init         Initialize a manage shell in current...
  shell        Runs a Python shell with context

And you can even customize namespace for each module separately

Note

If namespaced is true all commands will be namespaced, set it to false in order to define separately

click_commands:
  - module: commands.system
    namespace: sys
  - module: commands.user
    namespace: user

Now you run manage --help and you can see all the commands in the same module will be namespaced.

$ manage --help
...
Commands:
  user_create_user  Create a new user
  sys_clear_cache  Clear the system cache
  debug        Shows the parsed manage file
  init         Initialize a manage shell in current...
  shell        Runs a Python shell with context

2. Defining your inline commands in manage file directly

Sometimes your command is so simple that you do not want (or can't) have a custom module, so you can put all your commands in yaml file directly.

inline_commands:
  - name: clear_cache
    help_text: Executes inline code to clear the cache
    context:
      - sys
      - pprint
    options:
      --days:
        default: 100
    code: |
      pprint.pprint({'clean_days': days, 'path': sys.path})

Now running manage --help

$ manage --help
...
Commands:
  clear_cache  Executes inline code to clear the cache
  debug        Shows the parsed manage file
  init         Initialize a manage shell in current...
  shell        Runs a Python shell with context

And you can run using

$ manage clear_cache --days 15

3. Using general functions as commands

And if you already has some defined function (any callable works).

# my_system.functions.py
def create_user(name, password):
    print("Creating user %s" % name)
function_commands:
  - function: my_system.functions.create_user
    name: new_user
    help_text: Create new user
    options:
      --name:
        required: true
      --password:
        required: true

Now running manage --help

$ manage --help
...
Commands:
  new_user     Create new user
  debug        Shows the parsed manage file
  init         Initialize a manage shell in current...
  shell        Runs a Python shell with context

$ manage new_user --name=Bruno --password=1234
Creating user Bruno

Further Explanations

  • You can say, how this is useful?, There's no need to get a separate package and configure everything in yaml, just use iPython to do it. Besides, IPython configuration has a lot more options and capabilities.
  • So I say: Nice! If you don't like it, dont't use it!

Credits

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