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require 'rspec/support'
RSpec::Support.require_rspec_support "caller_filter"
RSpec::Support.require_rspec_support "warnings"
RSpec::Support.require_rspec_support "object_formatter"
require 'rspec/matchers'
RSpec::Support.define_optimized_require_for_rspec(:expectations) { |f| require_relative(f) }
%w[
expectation_target
configuration
fail_with
handler
version
].each { |file| RSpec::Support.require_rspec_expectations(file) }
module RSpec
# RSpec::Expectations provides a simple, readable API to express
# the expected outcomes in a code example. To express an expected
# outcome, wrap an object or block in `expect`, call `to` or `to_not`
# (aliased as `not_to`) and pass it a matcher object:
#
# expect(order.total).to eq(Money.new(5.55, :USD))
# expect(list).to include(user)
# expect(message).not_to match(/foo/)
# expect { do_something }.to raise_error
#
# The last form (the block form) is needed to match against ruby constructs
# that are not objects, but can only be observed when executing a block
# of code. This includes raising errors, throwing symbols, yielding,
# and changing values.
#
# When `expect(...).to` is invoked with a matcher, it turns around
# and calls `matcher.matches?(<object wrapped by expect>)`. For example,
# in the expression:
#
# expect(order.total).to eq(Money.new(5.55, :USD))
#
# ...`eq(Money.new(5.55, :USD))` returns a matcher object, and it results
# in the equivalent of `eq.matches?(order.total)`. If `matches?` returns
# `true`, the expectation is met and execution continues. If `false`, then
# the spec fails with the message returned by `eq.failure_message`.
#
# Given the expression:
#
# expect(order.entries).not_to include(entry)
#
# ...the `not_to` method (also available as `to_not`) invokes the equivalent of
# `include.matches?(order.entries)`, but it interprets `false` as success, and
# `true` as a failure, using the message generated by
# `include.failure_message_when_negated`.
#
# rspec-expectations ships with a standard set of useful matchers, and writing
# your own matchers is quite simple.
#
# See [RSpec::Matchers](../RSpec/Matchers) for more information about the
# built-in matchers that ship with rspec-expectations, and how to write your
# own custom matchers.
module Expectations
# Exception raised when an expectation fails.
#
# @note We subclass Exception so that in a stub implementation if
# the user sets an expectation, it can't be caught in their
# code by a bare `rescue`.
# @api public
class ExpectationNotMetError < Exception
end
# Exception raised from `aggregate_failures` when multiple expectations fail.
#
# @note The constant is defined here but the extensive logic of this class
# is lazily defined when `FailureAggregator` is autoloaded, since we do
# not need to waste time defining that functionality unless
# `aggregate_failures` is used.
class MultipleExpectationsNotMetError < ExpectationNotMetError
end
autoload :FailureAggregator, "rspec/expectations/failure_aggregator"
end
end
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