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Contributing

Table of contents

Collaborative Etiquette

This project follows collaborative etiquette guidelines.

Submitting a Pull Request (PR)

Before you submit your Pull Request (PR) consider the following guidelines:

  • Search GitHub for an open or closed PR that relates to your submission. You don't want to duplicate effort.
  • Make your changes in a new git branch:

    git checkout -b my-fix-branch master
  • Create your patch, following code style guidelines, and including appropriate test cases.

  • Run the full test suite and ensure that all tests pass.
  • Commit your changes using a descriptive commit message that follows our commit message conventions. Adherence to these conventions is necessary because release notes are automatically generated from these messages.

    git commit -a

    Note: the optional commit -a command line option will automatically "add" and "rm" edited files.

  • Push your branch to GitHub:

    git push origin my-fix-branch
  • In GitHub, send a pull request to rstacruz:master.

  • If we suggest changes then:

    • Make the required updates.
    • Re-run the test suites to ensure tests are still passing.
    • Rebase your branch and force push to your GitHub repository (this will update your Pull Request):

      git rebase master -i
      git push -f

That's it! Thank you for your contribution!

After your pull request is merged

After your pull request is merged, you can safely delete your branch and pull the changes from the main (upstream) repository:

  • Delete the remote branch on GitHub either through the GitHub web UI or your local shell as follows:

    git push origin --delete my-fix-branch
  • Check out the master branch:

    git checkout master -f
  • Delete the local branch:

    git branch -D my-fix-branch
  • Update your master with the latest upstream version:

    git pull --ff upstream master

Coding Style Guidelines

js-standard-style

Use the Standard Style.

Commit Message Guidelines

Commitizen friendly

We have very precise rules over how our git commit messages can be formatted. This leads to more readable messages that are easy to follow when looking through the project history. Helper script npm run commit provides command line based wizard to format commit message easily.

Commit Message Format

Each commit message consists of a header, a body and a footer. The header has a special format that includes a type, a scope and a subject:

<type>(<scope>): <subject>
<BLANK LINE>
<body>
<BLANK LINE>
<footer>

The header is mandatory and the scope of the header is optional.

Any line of the commit message cannot be longer 100 characters! This allows the message to be easier to read on GitHub as well as in various git tools.

Revert

If the commit reverts a previous commit, it should begin with revert:, followed by the header of the reverted commit. In the body it should say: This reverts commit <hash>., where the hash is the SHA of the commit being reverted.

Type

Must be one of the following:

  • feat: A new feature
  • fix: A bug fix
  • docs: Documentation only changes
  • style: Changes that do not affect the meaning of the code (white-space, formatting, missing semi-colons, etc)
  • refactor: A code change that neither fixes a bug nor adds a feature
  • perf: A code change that improves performance
  • test: Adding missing tests
  • chore: Changes to the build process or auxiliary tools and libraries such as documentation generation

Scope

The scope could be anything specifying place of the commit change. For example plugin-example, render-md, etc.

Subject

The subject contains succinct description of the change:

  • use the imperative, present tense: "change" not "changed" nor "changes"
  • don't capitalize first letter
  • no dot (.) at the end

Body

Just as in the subject, use the imperative, present tense: "change" not "changed" nor "changes". The body should include the motivation for the change and contrast this with previous behavior.

Footer

The footer should contain any information about Breaking Changes and is also the place to reference GitHub issues that this commit Closes.

Breaking Changes should start with the word BREAKING CHANGE: with a space or two newlines. The rest of the commit message is then used for this.