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RStudio includes other open source software components. The following
is a list of these components (full copies of the license agreements
used by these components are included below):
- Qt (LGPL v2.1)
- QtSingleApplication
- Ace (LGPL v2.1)
- Boost
- RapidXml
- JSON Spirit
- Google Web Toolkit
- Guice
- GIN
- AOP Alliance
- RSA-JS
- tree.hh
- Hunspell (MPL)
- Chromium Hunspell Dictionaries (MPL)
- pdf.js
- SyncTeX
- ZLib
- Sundown
- highlight.js
- MathJax
- reveal.js
- JSCustomBadge
- DataTables
- jQuery
- jQuery UI
- Catch
RStudio also includes a binary copy of libclang. This component is
licensed to your under the University of Illinois/NCSA Open Source
License (a BSD-style license), the terms of which are included below.
You can obtain the source code for libclang at:
http://llvm.org/
RStudio also includes a binary copy of pandoc. This component is licensed
to you under the GPLv2, the terms of which are included below. You can
obtain the source code for pandoc at:
https://github.com/jgm/pandoc
In addition, RStudio is bundled with a binary archive of the rmarkdown
package; and RStudio for Windows is bundled with binary copies of GNU
DiffUtils, GNU Grep, SumatraPDF, and several components of MSYS. These
components are licensed to you under the GPLv3, the terms of which are
included below. You can obtain source code for these components at:
https://github.com/rstudio/rmarkdown
http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/diffutils/
http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/grep/
http://sourceforge.net/projects/mingw/files/MSYS/
http://code.google.com/p/sumatrapdf/
In the alternate, you may request a copy of the source code for
any of these components by e-mail to info@rstudio.com.
GNU LGPL v2.1
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