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Fast ruby package management for unix
Shell C Ruby
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doc
misc
.gitignore
COPYING
HACKING
Makefile
README
configure
munge.rb
rpg-build.sh
rpg-complete.sh
rpg-config.sh
rpg-env.sh
rpg-fetch.sh
rpg-fsck.sh
rpg-help.sh
rpg-install.sh
rpg-list.sh
rpg-outdated.sh
rpg-package-index.sh
rpg-package-install.sh
rpg-package-list.sh
rpg-package-register.sh
rpg-package-spec.rb
rpg-parse-index.rb
rpg-prepare.sh
rpg-resolve.sh
rpg-sh-setup.sh
rpg-shit-list.sh
rpg-solve.sh
rpg-steal.sh
rpg-sync.sh
rpg-uninstall.sh
rpg-unpack.sh
rpg-upgrade.sh
rpg-version-test.sh
rpg.sh
shc

README

                                    RPG
                       manage gem packages, quickly.

OVERVIEW

    rpg is a package management utility for unix based on the popular
    Rubygems packaging system. rpg's primary goal is to allow Ruby libraries
    and programs packaged as gems and distributed from rubygems.org to be
    installed and managed in a way that's natural on unix systems and that
    takes advantage of unix's unique features.

    It's also really fast.

    rpg can be thought of as an alternative to the gem command. Most gem
    features are implemented in rpg, though usually in ways that are very
    different.

    rpg and Rubygems can co-exist on a system, though Rubygems is not
    required for rpg to operate.

STATUS

    Incubating. This thing probably isn't going to run for you yet. Check
    back in a bit.

INSTALLING

    To install rpg under the default location (/usr/local):

        ./configure
        make
        sudo make install

    To install rpg into a self-contained directory off your home:

        ./configure --prefix=~/.rpg
        make
        make install

    You may need to add the "<prefix>/bin" to your PATH if its not there
    already:

        PATH="$PATH:<prefix>/bin"

    See `rpg --help' once installed for a list of available commands and
    general program usage.

VERSUS RUBYGEMS

  * Like gem, rpg uses rubygems.org as its package repository and gem
    files as its package format. Installing from other sources is not yet
    supported, but is likely to be added in the future.

  * Like gem, rpg supports dependency resolution using the information
    included in a gem's spec.

  * Like gem, rpg supports building and installing native / dynamic library
    extensions.

  * Like gem, rpg has a rich set of commands for installing, upgrading,
    and uninstalling packages; listing installed, available, and outdated
    packages; and utilities for unpacking gem files and inspecting gem
    specifications.

  * Like gem, rpg is made up of exactly three characters.

  * Unlike gem, rpg organizes the files it installs by type, not by package.
    For instance, Ruby library files are placed directly under a single
    lib directory (the currently active site_ruby directory by default),
    executables under /usr/local/bin (configurable), manpages under
    /usr/local/share/man, etc.

  * Unlike gem, rpg is not capable of installing multiple versions of the
    same package into a rpg environment -- they would overwrite each other.

  * Unlike gem, rpg has no runtime component (e.g., `require 'rubygems'`).
    Because all library files are placed under a common lib directory, and
    because package versions are sussed at install time, there's no need for
    a component to select which packages are active at runtime.
 
  * Unlike gem, rpg's installed package database is filesystem based,
    documented, and built for extension.

  * Unlike gem, rpg is written in (mostly)-POSIX shell and requires a unix
    environment.                                          Wait. What? Yeah.

  * Unlike gem, rpg does not provide commands for building gems or running
    gem servers.

  * Unlike gem, rpg installs packages in two stages: 1.) fetch package files
    and resolve dependencies, and 2.) install package contents. This allows
    for staged/later installs and conflict detection before install.

  * Unlike gem, rpg is fast. Nearly every compareable operation is an order
    of magnitude more performant. This includes installing and upgrading
    packages, listing outdated packages, updating the remote package index,
    show help screens. Everything.

ABOUT

    rpg's design is inspired by a great number of existing tools. Rubygems
    itself, of course, gets many things right in UI, and you can't argue with
    the popularity of the package format and repository.

    Many of the ideas -- and maybe even some code -- were taken from
    Rip <http://defunkt.github.com/rip/>. That's understating it, really. rpg
    started out just a couple of loose shell scripts to experiment with
    potential ideas for integrating gem package and gem dependency support into
    rip. The plan was to port them over to Ruby and into Rip if they panned
    out. Within a few days, I had a more or less entire implementation of
    Rubygems's gem command in POSIX shell staring back at me and it was
    *fast*. I will very likely propose many of the ideas in rpg be taken into
    Rip. Surely the Ruby portions of rpg that read release indexes and gemspecs
    could be useful at least.

    Debian's apt and dpkg, FreeBSD's ports system, and Redhat/Fedora's yum
    all influenced rpg's design in various ways.

    Git's overall design influenced rpg signficantly. Git's internal project
    organization provides a roadmap for writing largish systems using many
    small specialized programs. Its granular use of the filesystem as a
    database (the .git/refs and .git/objects hierarchies, especially) informed
    much of rpg's package database design.

COPYING

    Copyright (c) 2010 by Ryan Tomayko <tomayko.com/about>
    This is Free Software distributed under the terms of the MIT license.
    See the COPYING file for license rights and limitations.
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