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# -*- ruby encoding: utf-8 -*-
require 'ostruct'
module Net # :nodoc:
class LDAP
begin
require 'openssl'
##
# Set to +true+ if OpenSSL is available and LDAPS is supported.
HasOpenSSL = true
rescue LoadError
# :stopdoc:
HasOpenSSL = false
# :startdoc:
end
end
end
require 'socket'
require 'net/ber'
require 'net/ldap/pdu'
require 'net/ldap/filter'
require 'net/ldap/dataset'
require 'net/ldap/password'
require 'net/ldap/entry'
# == Quick-start for the Impatient
# === Quick Example of a user-authentication against an LDAP directory:
#
# require 'rubygems'
# require 'net/ldap'
#
# ldap = Net::LDAP.new
# ldap.host = your_server_ip_address
# ldap.port = 389
# ldap.auth "joe_user", "opensesame"
# if ldap.bind
# # authentication succeeded
# else
# # authentication failed
# end
#
#
# === Quick Example of a search against an LDAP directory:
#
# require 'rubygems'
# require 'net/ldap'
#
# ldap = Net::LDAP.new :host => server_ip_address,
# :port => 389,
# :auth => {
# :method => :simple,
# :username => "cn=manager, dc=example, dc=com",
# :password => "opensesame"
# }
#
# filter = Net::LDAP::Filter.eq("cn", "George*")
# treebase = "dc=example, dc=com"
#
# ldap.search(:base => treebase, :filter => filter) do |entry|
# puts "DN: #{entry.dn}"
# entry.each do |attribute, values|
# puts " #{attribute}:"
# values.each do |value|
# puts " --->#{value}"
# end
# end
# end
#
# p ldap.get_operation_result
#
#
# == A Brief Introduction to LDAP
#
# We're going to provide a quick, informal introduction to LDAP terminology
# and typical operations. If you're comfortable with this material, skip
# ahead to "How to use Net::LDAP." If you want a more rigorous treatment of
# this material, we recommend you start with the various IETF and ITU
# standards that relate to LDAP.
#
# === Entities
# LDAP is an Internet-standard protocol used to access directory servers.
# The basic search unit is the <i>entity, </i> which corresponds to a person
# or other domain-specific object. A directory service which supports the
# LDAP protocol typically stores information about a number of entities.
#
# === Principals
# LDAP servers are typically used to access information about people, but
# also very often about such items as printers, computers, and other
# resources. To reflect this, LDAP uses the term <i>entity, </i> or less
# commonly, <i>principal, </i> to denote its basic data-storage unit.
#
# === Distinguished Names
# In LDAP's view of the world, an entity is uniquely identified by a
# globally-unique text string called a <i>Distinguished Name, </i> originally
# defined in the X.400 standards from which LDAP is ultimately derived. Much
# like a DNS hostname, a DN is a "flattened" text representation of a string
# of tree nodes. Also like DNS (and unlike Java package names), a DN
# expresses a chain of tree-nodes written from left to right in order from
# the most-resolved node to the most-general one.
#
# If you know the DN of a person or other entity, then you can query an
# LDAP-enabled directory for information (attributes) about the entity.
# Alternatively, you can query the directory for a list of DNs matching a
# set of criteria that you supply.
#
# === Attributes
#
# In the LDAP view of the world, a DN uniquely identifies an entity.
# Information about the entity is stored as a set of <i>Attributes.</i> An
# attribute is a text string which is associated with zero or more values.
# Most LDAP-enabled directories store a well-standardized range of
# attributes, and constrain their values according to standard rules.
#
# A good example of an attribute is <tt>sn, </tt> which stands for "Surname."
# This attribute is generally used to store a person's surname, or last
# name. Most directories enforce the standard convention that an entity's
# <tt>sn</tt> attribute have <i>exactly one</i> value. In LDAP jargon, that
# means that <tt>sn</tt> must be <i>present</i> and <i>single-valued.</i>
#
# Another attribute is <tt>mail, </tt> which is used to store email
# addresses. (No, there is no attribute called "email, " perhaps because
# X.400 terminology predates the invention of the term <i>email.</i>)
# <tt>mail</tt> differs from <tt>sn</tt> in that most directories permit any
# number of values for the <tt>mail</tt> attribute, including zero.
#
# === Tree-Base
# We said above that X.400 Distinguished Names are <i>globally unique.</i>
# In a manner reminiscent of DNS, LDAP supposes that each directory server
# contains authoritative attribute data for a set of DNs corresponding to a
# specific sub-tree of the (notional) global directory tree. This subtree is
# generally configured into a directory server when it is created. It
# matters for this discussion because most servers will not allow you to
# query them unless you specify a correct tree-base.
#
# Let's say you work for the engineering department of Big Company, Inc.,
# whose internet domain is bigcompany.com. You may find that your
# departmental directory is stored in a server with a defined tree-base of
# ou=engineering, dc=bigcompany, dc=com
# You will need to supply this string as the <i>tree-base</i> when querying
# this directory. (Ou is a very old X.400 term meaning "organizational
# unit." Dc is a more recent term meaning "domain component.")
#
# === LDAP Versions
# (stub, discuss v2 and v3)
#
# === LDAP Operations
# The essential operations are: #bind, #search, #add, #modify, #delete, and
# #rename.
#
# ==== Bind
# #bind supplies a user's authentication credentials to a server, which in
# turn verifies or rejects them. There is a range of possibilities for
# credentials, but most directories support a simple username and password
# authentication.
#
# Taken by itself, #bind can be used to authenticate a user against
# information stored in a directory, for example to permit or deny access to
# some other resource. In terms of the other LDAP operations, most
# directories require a successful #bind to be performed before the other
# operations will be permitted. Some servers permit certain operations to be
# performed with an "anonymous" binding, meaning that no credentials are
# presented by the user. (We're glossing over a lot of platform-specific
# detail here.)
#
# ==== Search
# Calling #search against the directory involves specifying a treebase, a
# set of <i>search filters, </i> and a list of attribute values. The filters
# specify ranges of possible values for particular attributes. Multiple
# filters can be joined together with AND, OR, and NOT operators. A server
# will respond to a #search by returning a list of matching DNs together
# with a set of attribute values for each entity, depending on what
# attributes the search requested.
#
# ==== Add
# #add specifies a new DN and an initial set of attribute values. If the
# operation succeeds, a new entity with the corresponding DN and attributes
# is added to the directory.
#
# ==== Modify
# #modify specifies an entity DN, and a list of attribute operations.
# #modify is used to change the attribute values stored in the directory for
# a particular entity. #modify may add or delete attributes (which are lists
# of values) or it change attributes by adding to or deleting from their
# values. Net::LDAP provides three easier methods to modify an entry's
# attribute values: #add_attribute, #replace_attribute, and
# #delete_attribute.
#
# ==== Delete
# #delete specifies an entity DN. If it succeeds, the entity and all its
# attributes is removed from the directory.
#
# ==== Rename (or Modify RDN)
# #rename (or #modify_rdn) is an operation added to version 3 of the LDAP
# protocol. It responds to the often-arising need to change the DN of an
# entity without discarding its attribute values. In earlier LDAP versions,
# the only way to do this was to delete the whole entity and add it again
# with a different DN.
#
# #rename works by taking an "old" DN (the one to change) and a "new RDN, "
# which is the left-most part of the DN string. If successful, #rename
# changes the entity DN so that its left-most node corresponds to the new
# RDN given in the request. (RDN, or "relative distinguished name, " denotes
# a single tree-node as expressed in a DN, which is a chain of tree nodes.)
#
# == How to use Net::LDAP
# To access Net::LDAP functionality in your Ruby programs, start by
# requiring the library:
#
# require 'net/ldap'
#
# If you installed the Gem version of Net::LDAP, and depending on your
# version of Ruby and rubygems, you _may_ also need to require rubygems
# explicitly:
#
# require 'rubygems'
# require 'net/ldap'
#
# Most operations with Net::LDAP start by instantiating a Net::LDAP object.
# The constructor for this object takes arguments specifying the network
# location (address and port) of the LDAP server, and also the binding
# (authentication) credentials, typically a username and password. Given an
# object of class Net:LDAP, you can then perform LDAP operations by calling
# instance methods on the object. These are documented with usage examples
# below.
#
# The Net::LDAP library is designed to be very disciplined about how it
# makes network connections to servers. This is different from many of the
# standard native-code libraries that are provided on most platforms, which
# share bloodlines with the original Netscape/Michigan LDAP client
# implementations. These libraries sought to insulate user code from the
# workings of the network. This is a good idea of course, but the practical
# effect has been confusing and many difficult bugs have been caused by the
# opacity of the native libraries, and their variable behavior across
# platforms.
#
# In general, Net::LDAP instance methods which invoke server operations make
# a connection to the server when the method is called. They execute the
# operation (typically binding first) and then disconnect from the server.
# The exception is Net::LDAP#open, which makes a connection to the server
# and then keeps it open while it executes a user-supplied block.
# Net::LDAP#open closes the connection on completion of the block.
class Net::LDAP
VERSION = "0.4.0"
class LdapError < StandardError; end
SearchScope_BaseObject = 0
SearchScope_SingleLevel = 1
SearchScope_WholeSubtree = 2
SearchScopes = [ SearchScope_BaseObject, SearchScope_SingleLevel,
SearchScope_WholeSubtree ]
primitive = { 2 => :null } # UnbindRequest body
constructed = {
0 => :array, # BindRequest
1 => :array, # BindResponse
2 => :array, # UnbindRequest
3 => :array, # SearchRequest
4 => :array, # SearchData
5 => :array, # SearchResult
6 => :array, # ModifyRequest
7 => :array, # ModifyResponse
8 => :array, # AddRequest
9 => :array, # AddResponse
10 => :array, # DelRequest
11 => :array, # DelResponse
12 => :array, # ModifyRdnRequest
13 => :array, # ModifyRdnResponse
14 => :array, # CompareRequest
15 => :array, # CompareResponse
16 => :array, # AbandonRequest
19 => :array, # SearchResultReferral
24 => :array, # Unsolicited Notification
}
application = {
:primitive => primitive,
:constructed => constructed,
}
primitive = {
0 => :string, # password
1 => :string, # Kerberos v4
2 => :string, # Kerberos v5
3 => :string, # SearchFilter-extensible
4 => :string, # SearchFilter-extensible
7 => :string, # serverSaslCreds
}
constructed = {
0 => :array, # RFC-2251 Control and Filter-AND
1 => :array, # SearchFilter-OR
2 => :array, # SearchFilter-NOT
3 => :array, # Seach referral
4 => :array, # unknown use in Microsoft Outlook
5 => :array, # SearchFilter-GE
6 => :array, # SearchFilter-LE
7 => :array, # serverSaslCreds
9 => :array, # SearchFilter-extensible
}
context_specific = {
:primitive => primitive,
:constructed => constructed,
}
AsnSyntax = Net::BER.compile_syntax(:application => application,
:context_specific => context_specific)
DefaultHost = "127.0.0.1"
DefaultPort = 389
DefaultAuth = { :method => :anonymous }
DefaultTreebase = "dc=com"
DefaultForceNoPage = false
StartTlsOid = "1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.20037"
ResultStrings = {
0 => "Success",
1 => "Operations Error",
2 => "Protocol Error",
3 => "Time Limit Exceeded",
4 => "Size Limit Exceeded",
10 => "Referral",
12 => "Unavailable crtical extension",
14 => "saslBindInProgress",
16 => "No Such Attribute",
17 => "Undefined Attribute Type",
19 => "Constraint Violation",
20 => "Attribute or Value Exists",
32 => "No Such Object",
34 => "Invalid DN Syntax",
48 => "Inappropriate Authentication",
49 => "Invalid Credentials",
50 => "Insufficient Access Rights",
51 => "Busy",
52 => "Unavailable",
53 => "Unwilling to perform",
65 => "Object Class Violation",
68 => "Entry Already Exists"
}
module LDAPControls
PAGED_RESULTS = "1.2.840.113556.1.4.319" # Microsoft evil from RFC 2696
SORT_REQUEST = "1.2.840.113556.1.4.473"
SORT_RESPONSE = "1.2.840.113556.1.4.474"
DELETE_TREE = "1.2.840.113556.1.4.805"
end
def self.result2string(code) #:nodoc:
ResultStrings[code] || "unknown result (#{code})"
end
attr_accessor :host
attr_accessor :port
attr_accessor :base
# Instantiate an object of type Net::LDAP to perform directory operations.
# This constructor takes a Hash containing arguments, all of which are
# either optional or may be specified later with other methods as
# described below. The following arguments are supported:
# * :host => the LDAP server's IP-address (default 127.0.0.1)
# * :port => the LDAP server's TCP port (default 389)
# * :auth => a Hash containing authorization parameters. Currently
# supported values include: {:method => :anonymous} and {:method =>
# :simple, :username => your_user_name, :password => your_password }
# The password parameter may be a Proc that returns a String.
# * :base => a default treebase parameter for searches performed against
# the LDAP server. If you don't give this value, then each call to
# #search must specify a treebase parameter. If you do give this value,
# then it will be used in subsequent calls to #search that do not
# specify a treebase. If you give a treebase value in any particular
# call to #search, that value will override any treebase value you give
# here.
# * :encryption => specifies the encryption to be used in communicating
# with the LDAP server. The value is either a Hash containing additional
# parameters, or the Symbol :simple_tls, which is equivalent to
# specifying the Hash {:method => :simple_tls}. There is a fairly large
# range of potential values that may be given for this parameter. See
# #encryption for details.
# * :force_no_page => Set to true to prevent paged results even if your
# server says it supports them. This is a fix for MS Active Directory
#
# Instantiating a Net::LDAP object does <i>not</i> result in network
# traffic to the LDAP server. It simply stores the connection and binding
# parameters in the object.
def initialize(args = {})
@host = args[:host] || DefaultHost
@port = args[:port] || DefaultPort
@verbose = false # Make this configurable with a switch on the class.
@auth = args[:auth] || DefaultAuth
@base = args[:base] || DefaultTreebase
@force_no_page = args[:force_no_page] || DefaultForceNoPage
encryption args[:encryption] # may be nil
if pr = @auth[:password] and pr.respond_to?(:call)
@auth[:password] = pr.call
end
# This variable is only set when we are created with LDAP::open. All of
# our internal methods will connect using it, or else they will create
# their own.
@open_connection = nil
end
# Convenience method to specify authentication credentials to the LDAP
# server. Currently supports simple authentication requiring a username
# and password.
#
# Observe that on most LDAP servers, the username is a complete DN.
# However, with A/D, it's often possible to give only a user-name rather
# than a complete DN. In the latter case, beware that many A/D servers are
# configured to permit anonymous (uncredentialled) binding, and will
# silently accept your binding as anonymous if you give an unrecognized
# username. This is not usually what you want. (See
# #get_operation_result.)
#
# <b>Important:</b> The password argument may be a Proc that returns a
# string. This makes it possible for you to write client programs that
# solicit passwords from users or from other data sources without showing
# them in your code or on command lines.
#
# require 'net/ldap'
#
# ldap = Net::LDAP.new
# ldap.host = server_ip_address
# ldap.authenticate "cn=Your Username, cn=Users, dc=example, dc=com", "your_psw"
#
# Alternatively (with a password block):
#
# require 'net/ldap'
#
# ldap = Net::LDAP.new
# ldap.host = server_ip_address
# psw = proc { your_psw_function }
# ldap.authenticate "cn=Your Username, cn=Users, dc=example, dc=com", psw
#
def authenticate(username, password)
password = password.call if password.respond_to?(:call)
@auth = {
:method => :simple,
:username => username,
:password => password
}
end
alias_method :auth, :authenticate
# Convenience method to specify encryption characteristics for connections
# to LDAP servers. Called implicitly by #new and #open, but may also be
# called by user code if desired. The single argument is generally a Hash
# (but see below for convenience alternatives). This implementation is
# currently a stub, supporting only a few encryption alternatives. As
# additional capabilities are added, more configuration values will be
# added here.
#
# Currently, the only supported argument is { :method => :simple_tls }.
# (Equivalently, you may pass the symbol :simple_tls all by itself,
# without enclosing it in a Hash.)
#
# The :simple_tls encryption method encrypts <i>all</i> communications
# with the LDAP server. It completely establishes SSL/TLS encryption with
# the LDAP server before any LDAP-protocol data is exchanged. There is no
# plaintext negotiation and no special encryption-request controls are
# sent to the server. <i>The :simple_tls option is the simplest, easiest
# way to encrypt communications between Net::LDAP and LDAP servers.</i>
# It's intended for cases where you have an implicit level of trust in the
# authenticity of the LDAP server. No validation of the LDAP server's SSL
# certificate is performed. This means that :simple_tls will not produce
# errors if the LDAP server's encryption certificate is not signed by a
# well-known Certification Authority. If you get communications or
# protocol errors when using this option, check with your LDAP server
# administrator. Pay particular attention to the TCP port you are
# connecting to. It's impossible for an LDAP server to support plaintext
# LDAP communications and <i>simple TLS</i> connections on the same port.
# The standard TCP port for unencrypted LDAP connections is 389, but the
# standard port for simple-TLS encrypted connections is 636. Be sure you
# are using the correct port.
#
# <i>[Note: a future version of Net::LDAP will support the STARTTLS LDAP
# control, which will enable encrypted communications on the same TCP port
# used for unencrypted connections.]</i>
def encryption(args)
case args
when :simple_tls, :start_tls
args = { :method => args }
end
@encryption = args
end
# #open takes the same parameters as #new. #open makes a network
# connection to the LDAP server and then passes a newly-created Net::LDAP
# object to the caller-supplied block. Within the block, you can call any
# of the instance methods of Net::LDAP to perform operations against the
# LDAP directory. #open will perform all the operations in the
# user-supplied block on the same network connection, which will be closed
# automatically when the block finishes.
#
# # (PSEUDOCODE)
# auth = { :method => :simple, :username => username, :password => password }
# Net::LDAP.open(:host => ipaddress, :port => 389, :auth => auth) do |ldap|
# ldap.search(...)
# ldap.add(...)
# ldap.modify(...)
# end
def self.open(args)
ldap1 = new(args)
ldap1.open { |ldap| yield ldap }
end
# Returns a meaningful result any time after a protocol operation (#bind,
# #search, #add, #modify, #rename, #delete) has completed. It returns an
# #OpenStruct containing an LDAP result code (0 means success), and a
# human-readable string.
#
# unless ldap.bind
# puts "Result: #{ldap.get_operation_result.code}"
# puts "Message: #{ldap.get_operation_result.message}"
# end
#
# Certain operations return additional information, accessible through
# members of the object returned from #get_operation_result. Check
# #get_operation_result.error_message and
# #get_operation_result.matched_dn.
#
#--
# Modified the implementation, 20Mar07. We might get a hash of LDAP
# response codes instead of a simple numeric code.
#++
def get_operation_result
result = @result
result = result.result if result.is_a?(Net::LDAP::PDU)
os = OpenStruct.new
if result.is_a?(Hash)
# We might get a hash of LDAP response codes instead of a simple
# numeric code.
os.code = (result[:resultCode] || "").to_i
os.error_message = result[:errorMessage]
os.matched_dn = result[:matchedDN]
elsif result
os.code = result
else
os.code = 0
end
os.message = Net::LDAP.result2string(os.code)
os
end
# Opens a network connection to the server and then passes <tt>self</tt>
# to the caller-supplied block. The connection is closed when the block
# completes. Used for executing multiple LDAP operations without requiring
# a separate network connection (and authentication) for each one.
# <i>Note:</i> You do not need to log-in or "bind" to the server. This
# will be done for you automatically. For an even simpler approach, see
# the class method Net::LDAP#open.
#
# # (PSEUDOCODE)
# auth = { :method => :simple, :username => username, :password => password }
# ldap = Net::LDAP.new(:host => ipaddress, :port => 389, :auth => auth)
# ldap.open do |ldap|
# ldap.search(...)
# ldap.add(...)
# ldap.modify(...)
# end
def open
# First we make a connection and then a binding, but we don't do
# anything with the bind results. We then pass self to the caller's
# block, where he will execute his LDAP operations. Of course they will
# all generate auth failures if the bind was unsuccessful.
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "Open already in progress" if @open_connection
begin
@open_connection = Net::LDAP::Connection.new(:host => @host,
:port => @port,
:encryption =>
@encryption)
@open_connection.bind(@auth)
yield self
ensure
@open_connection.close if @open_connection
@open_connection = nil
end
end
# Searches the LDAP directory for directory entries. Takes a hash argument
# with parameters. Supported parameters include:
# * :base (a string specifying the tree-base for the search);
# * :filter (an object of type Net::LDAP::Filter, defaults to
# objectclass=*);
# * :attributes (a string or array of strings specifying the LDAP
# attributes to return from the server);
# * :return_result (a boolean specifying whether to return a result set).
# * :attributes_only (a boolean flag, defaults false)
# * :scope (one of: Net::LDAP::SearchScope_BaseObject,
# Net::LDAP::SearchScope_SingleLevel,
# Net::LDAP::SearchScope_WholeSubtree. Default is WholeSubtree.)
# * :size (an integer indicating the maximum number of search entries to
# return. Default is zero, which signifies no limit.)
#
# #search queries the LDAP server and passes <i>each entry</i> to the
# caller-supplied block, as an object of type Net::LDAP::Entry. If the
# search returns 1000 entries, the block will be called 1000 times. If the
# search returns no entries, the block will not be called.
#
# #search returns either a result-set or a boolean, depending on the value
# of the <tt>:return_result</tt> argument. The default behavior is to
# return a result set, which is an Array of objects of class
# Net::LDAP::Entry. If you request a result set and #search fails with an
# error, it will return nil. Call #get_operation_result to get the error
# information returned by
# the LDAP server.
#
# When <tt>:return_result => false, </tt> #search will return only a
# Boolean, to indicate whether the operation succeeded. This can improve
# performance with very large result sets, because the library can discard
# each entry from memory after your block processes it.
#
# treebase = "dc=example, dc=com"
# filter = Net::LDAP::Filter.eq("mail", "a*.com")
# attrs = ["mail", "cn", "sn", "objectclass"]
# ldap.search(:base => treebase, :filter => filter, :attributes => attrs,
# :return_result => false) do |entry|
# puts "DN: #{entry.dn}"
# entry.each do |attr, values|
# puts ".......#{attr}:"
# values.each do |value|
# puts " #{value}"
# end
# end
# end
def search(args = {})
unless args[:ignore_server_caps]
args[:paged_searches_supported] = paged_searches_supported?
end
args[:base] ||= @base
return_result_set = args[:return_result] != false
result_set = return_result_set ? [] : nil
if @open_connection
@result = @open_connection.search(args) { |entry|
result_set << entry if result_set
yield entry if block_given?
}
else
begin
conn = Net::LDAP::Connection.new(:host => @host, :port => @port,
:encryption => @encryption)
if (@result = conn.bind(args[:auth] || @auth)).result_code == 0
@result = conn.search(args) { |entry|
result_set << entry if result_set
yield entry if block_given?
}
end
ensure
conn.close if conn
end
end
if return_result_set
(!@result.nil? && @result.result_code == 0) ? result_set : nil
else
@result.success?
end
end
# #bind connects to an LDAP server and requests authentication based on
# the <tt>:auth</tt> parameter passed to #open or #new. It takes no
# parameters.
#
# User code does not need to call #bind directly. It will be called
# implicitly by the library whenever you invoke an LDAP operation, such as
# #search or #add.
#
# It is useful, however, to call #bind in your own code when the only
# operation you intend to perform against the directory is to validate a
# login credential. #bind returns true or false to indicate whether the
# binding was successful. Reasons for failure include malformed or
# unrecognized usernames and incorrect passwords. Use
# #get_operation_result to find out what happened in case of failure.
#
# Here's a typical example using #bind to authenticate a credential which
# was (perhaps) solicited from the user of a web site:
#
# require 'net/ldap'
# ldap = Net::LDAP.new
# ldap.host = your_server_ip_address
# ldap.port = 389
# ldap.auth your_user_name, your_user_password
# if ldap.bind
# # authentication succeeded
# else
# # authentication failed
# p ldap.get_operation_result
# end
#
# Here's a more succinct example which does exactly the same thing, but
# collects all the required parameters into arguments:
#
# require 'net/ldap'
# ldap = Net::LDAP.new(:host => your_server_ip_address, :port => 389)
# if ldap.bind(:method => :simple, :username => your_user_name,
# :password => your_user_password)
# # authentication succeeded
# else
# # authentication failed
# p ldap.get_operation_result
# end
#
# You don't need to pass a user-password as a String object to bind. You
# can also pass a Ruby Proc object which returns a string. This will cause
# bind to execute the Proc (which might then solicit input from a user
# with console display suppressed). The String value returned from the
# Proc is used as the password.
#
# You don't have to create a new instance of Net::LDAP every time you
# perform a binding in this way. If you prefer, you can cache the
# Net::LDAP object and re-use it to perform subsequent bindings,
# <i>provided</i> you call #auth to specify a new credential before
# calling #bind. Otherwise, you'll just re-authenticate the previous user!
# (You don't need to re-set the values of #host and #port.) As noted in
# the documentation for #auth, the password parameter can be a Ruby Proc
# instead of a String.
def bind(auth = @auth)
if @open_connection
@result = @open_connection.bind(auth)
else
begin
conn = Connection.new(:host => @host, :port => @port,
:encryption => @encryption)
@result = conn.bind(auth)
ensure
conn.close if conn
end
end
@result.success?
end
# #bind_as is for testing authentication credentials.
#
# As described under #bind, most LDAP servers require that you supply a
# complete DN as a binding-credential, along with an authenticator such as
# a password. But for many applications (such as authenticating users to a
# Rails application), you often don't have a full DN to identify the user.
# You usually get a simple identifier like a username or an email address,
# along with a password. #bind_as allows you to authenticate these
# user-identifiers.
#
# #bind_as is a combination of a search and an LDAP binding. First, it
# connects and binds to the directory as normal. Then it searches the
# directory for an entry corresponding to the email address, username, or
# other string that you supply. If the entry exists, then #bind_as will
# <b>re-bind</b> as that user with the password (or other authenticator)
# that you supply.
#
# #bind_as takes the same parameters as #search, <i>with the addition of
# an authenticator.</i> Currently, this authenticator must be
# <tt>:password</tt>. Its value may be either a String, or a +proc+ that
# returns a String. #bind_as returns +false+ on failure. On success, it
# returns a result set, just as #search does. This result set is an Array
# of objects of type Net::LDAP::Entry. It contains the directory
# attributes corresponding to the user. (Just test whether the return
# value is logically true, if you don't need this additional information.)
#
# Here's how you would use #bind_as to authenticate an email address and
# password:
#
# require 'net/ldap'
#
# user, psw = "joe_user@yourcompany.com", "joes_psw"
#
# ldap = Net::LDAP.new
# ldap.host = "192.168.0.100"
# ldap.port = 389
# ldap.auth "cn=manager, dc=yourcompany, dc=com", "topsecret"
#
# result = ldap.bind_as(:base => "dc=yourcompany, dc=com",
# :filter => "(mail=#{user})",
# :password => psw)
# if result
# puts "Authenticated #{result.first.dn}"
# else
# puts "Authentication FAILED."
# end
def bind_as(args = {})
result = false
open { |me|
rs = search args
if rs and rs.first and dn = rs.first.dn
password = args[:password]
password = password.call if password.respond_to?(:call)
result = rs if bind(:method => :simple, :username => dn,
:password => password)
end
}
result
end
# Adds a new entry to the remote LDAP server.
# Supported arguments:
# :dn :: Full DN of the new entry
# :attributes :: Attributes of the new entry.
#
# The attributes argument is supplied as a Hash keyed by Strings or
# Symbols giving the attribute name, and mapping to Strings or Arrays of
# Strings giving the actual attribute values. Observe that most LDAP
# directories enforce schema constraints on the attributes contained in
# entries. #add will fail with a server-generated error if your attributes
# violate the server-specific constraints.
#
# Here's an example:
#
# dn = "cn=George Smith, ou=people, dc=example, dc=com"
# attr = {
# :cn => "George Smith",
# :objectclass => ["top", "inetorgperson"],
# :sn => "Smith",
# :mail => "gsmith@example.com"
# }
# Net::LDAP.open(:host => host) do |ldap|
# ldap.add(:dn => dn, :attributes => attr)
# end
def add(args)
if @open_connection
@result = @open_connection.add(args)
else
@result = 0
begin
conn = Connection.new(:host => @host, :port => @port,
:encryption => @encryption)
if (@result = conn.bind(args[:auth] || @auth)).result_code == 0
@result = conn.add(args)
end
ensure
conn.close if conn
end
end
@result.success?
end
# Modifies the attribute values of a particular entry on the LDAP
# directory. Takes a hash with arguments. Supported arguments are:
# :dn :: (the full DN of the entry whose attributes are to be modified)
# :operations :: (the modifications to be performed, detailed next)
#
# This method returns True or False to indicate whether the operation
# succeeded or failed, with extended information available by calling
# #get_operation_result.
#
# Also see #add_attribute, #replace_attribute, or #delete_attribute, which
# provide simpler interfaces to this functionality.
#
# The LDAP protocol provides a full and well thought-out set of operations
# for changing the values of attributes, but they are necessarily somewhat
# complex and not always intuitive. If these instructions are confusing or
# incomplete, please send us email or create a bug report on rubyforge.
#
# The :operations parameter to #modify takes an array of
# operation-descriptors. Each individual operation is specified in one
# element of the array, and most LDAP servers will attempt to perform the
# operations in order.
#
# Each of the operations appearing in the Array must itself be an Array
# with exactly three elements: an operator:: must be :add, :replace, or
# :delete an attribute name:: the attribute name (string or symbol) to
# modify a value:: either a string or an array of strings.
#
# The :add operator will, unsurprisingly, add the specified values to the
# specified attribute. If the attribute does not already exist, :add will
# create it. Most LDAP servers will generate an error if you try to add a
# value that already exists.
#
# :replace will erase the current value(s) for the specified attribute, if
# there are any, and replace them with the specified value(s).
#
# :delete will remove the specified value(s) from the specified attribute.
# If you pass nil, an empty string, or an empty array as the value
# parameter to a :delete operation, the _entire_ _attribute_ will be
# deleted, along with all of its values.
#
# For example:
#
# dn = "mail=modifyme@example.com, ou=people, dc=example, dc=com"
# ops = [
# [:add, :mail, "aliasaddress@example.com"],
# [:replace, :mail, ["newaddress@example.com", "newalias@example.com"]],
# [:delete, :sn, nil]
# ]
# ldap.modify :dn => dn, :operations => ops
#
# <i>(This example is contrived since you probably wouldn't add a mail
# value right before replacing the whole attribute, but it shows that
# order of execution matters. Also, many LDAP servers won't let you delete
# SN because that would be a schema violation.)</i>
#
# It's essential to keep in mind that if you specify more than one
# operation in a call to #modify, most LDAP servers will attempt to
# perform all of the operations in the order you gave them. This matters
# because you may specify operations on the same attribute which must be
# performed in a certain order.
#
# Most LDAP servers will _stop_ processing your modifications if one of
# them causes an error on the server (such as a schema-constraint
# violation). If this happens, you will probably get a result code from
# the server that reflects only the operation that failed, and you may or
# may not get extended information that will tell you which one failed.
# #modify has no notion of an atomic transaction. If you specify a chain
# of modifications in one call to #modify, and one of them fails, the
# preceding ones will usually not be "rolled back, " resulting in a
# partial update. This is a limitation of the LDAP protocol, not of
# Net::LDAP.
#
# The lack of transactional atomicity in LDAP means that you're usually
# better off using the convenience methods #add_attribute,
# #replace_attribute, and #delete_attribute, which are are wrappers over
# #modify. However, certain LDAP servers may provide concurrency
# semantics, in which the several operations contained in a single #modify
# call are not interleaved with other modification-requests received
# simultaneously by the server. It bears repeating that this concurrency
# does _not_ imply transactional atomicity, which LDAP does not provide.
def modify(args)
if @open_connection
@result = @open_connection.modify(args)
else
@result = 0
begin
conn = Connection.new(:host => @host, :port => @port,
:encryption => @encryption)
if (@result = conn.bind(args[:auth] || @auth)).result_code == 0
@result = conn.modify(args)
end
ensure
conn.close if conn
end
end
@result.success?
end
# Add a value to an attribute. Takes the full DN of the entry to modify,
# the name (Symbol or String) of the attribute, and the value (String or
# Array). If the attribute does not exist (and there are no schema
# violations), #add_attribute will create it with the caller-specified
# values. If the attribute already exists (and there are no schema
# violations), the caller-specified values will be _added_ to the values
# already present.
#
# Returns True or False to indicate whether the operation succeeded or
# failed, with extended information available by calling
# #get_operation_result. See also #replace_attribute and
# #delete_attribute.
#
# dn = "cn=modifyme, dc=example, dc=com"
# ldap.add_attribute dn, :mail, "newmailaddress@example.com"
def add_attribute(dn, attribute, value)
modify(:dn => dn, :operations => [[:add, attribute, value]])
end
# Replace the value of an attribute. #replace_attribute can be thought of
# as equivalent to calling #delete_attribute followed by #add_attribute.
# It takes the full DN of the entry to modify, the name (Symbol or String)
# of the attribute, and the value (String or Array). If the attribute does
# not exist, it will be created with the caller-specified value(s). If the
# attribute does exist, its values will be _discarded_ and replaced with
# the caller-specified values.
#
# Returns True or False to indicate whether the operation succeeded or
# failed, with extended information available by calling
# #get_operation_result. See also #add_attribute and #delete_attribute.
#
# dn = "cn=modifyme, dc=example, dc=com"
# ldap.replace_attribute dn, :mail, "newmailaddress@example.com"
def replace_attribute(dn, attribute, value)
modify(:dn => dn, :operations => [[:replace, attribute, value]])
end
# Delete an attribute and all its values. Takes the full DN of the entry
# to modify, and the name (Symbol or String) of the attribute to delete.
#
# Returns True or False to indicate whether the operation succeeded or
# failed, with extended information available by calling
# #get_operation_result. See also #add_attribute and #replace_attribute.
#
# dn = "cn=modifyme, dc=example, dc=com"
# ldap.delete_attribute dn, :mail
def delete_attribute(dn, attribute)
modify(:dn => dn, :operations => [[:delete, attribute, nil]])
end
# Rename an entry on the remote DIS by changing the last RDN of its DN.
#
# _Documentation_ _stub_
def rename(args)
if @open_connection
@result = @open_connection.rename(args)
else
@result = 0
begin
conn = Connection.new(:host => @host, :port => @port,
:encryption => @encryption)
if (@result = conn.bind(args[:auth] || @auth)).result_code == 0
@result = conn.rename(args)
end
ensure
conn.close if conn
end
end
@result.success?
end
alias_method :modify_rdn, :rename
# Delete an entry from the LDAP directory. Takes a hash of arguments. The
# only supported argument is :dn, which must give the complete DN of the
# entry to be deleted.
#
# Returns True or False to indicate whether the delete succeeded. Extended
# status information is available by calling #get_operation_result.
#
# dn = "mail=deleteme@example.com, ou=people, dc=example, dc=com"
# ldap.delete :dn => dn
def delete(args)
if @open_connection
@result = @open_connection.delete(args)
else
@result = 0
begin
conn = Connection.new(:host => @host, :port => @port,
:encryption => @encryption)
if (@result = conn.bind(args[:auth] || @auth)).result_code == 0
@result = conn.delete(args)
end
ensure
conn.close
end
end
@result.success?
end
# Delete an entry from the LDAP directory along with all subordinate entries.
# the regular delete method will fail to delete an entry if it has subordinate
# entries. This method sends an extra control code to tell the LDAP server
# to do a tree delete. ('1.2.840.113556.1.4.805')
#
# Returns True or False to indicate whether the delete succeeded. Extended
# status information is available by calling #get_operation_result.
#
# dn = "mail=deleteme@example.com, ou=people, dc=example, dc=com"
# ldap.delete_tree :dn => dn
def delete_tree(args)
delete(args.merge(:control_codes => [[Net::LDAP::LDAPControls::DELETE_TREE, true]]))
end
# This method is experimental and subject to change. Return the rootDSE
# record from the LDAP server as a Net::LDAP::Entry, or an empty Entry if
# the server doesn't return the record.
#--
# cf. RFC4512 graf 5.1.
# Note that the rootDSE record we return on success has an empty DN, which
# is correct. On failure, the empty Entry will have a nil DN. There's no
# real reason for that, so it can be changed if desired. The funky
# number-disagreements in the set of attribute names is correct per the
# RFC. We may be called by #search itself, which may need to determine
# things like paged search capabilities. So to avoid an infinite regress,
# set :ignore_server_caps, which prevents us getting called recursively.
#++
def search_root_dse
rs = search(:ignore_server_caps => true, :base => "",
:scope => SearchScope_BaseObject,
:attributes => [ :namingContexts, :supportedLdapVersion,
:altServer, :supportedControl, :supportedExtension,
:supportedFeatures, :supportedSASLMechanisms])
(rs and rs.first) or Net::LDAP::Entry.new
end
# Return the root Subschema record from the LDAP server as a
# Net::LDAP::Entry, or an empty Entry if the server doesn't return the
# record. On success, the Net::LDAP::Entry returned from this call will
# have the attributes :dn, :objectclasses, and :attributetypes. If there
# is an error, call #get_operation_result for more information.
#
# ldap = Net::LDAP.new
# ldap.host = "your.ldap.host"
# ldap.auth "your-user-dn", "your-psw"
# subschema_entry = ldap.search_subschema_entry
#
# subschema_entry.attributetypes.each do |attrtype|
# # your code
# end
#
# subschema_entry.objectclasses.each do |attrtype|
# # your code
# end
#--
# cf. RFC4512 section 4, particulary graff 4.4.
# The :dn attribute in the returned Entry is the subschema name as
# returned from the server. Set :ignore_server_caps, see the notes in
# search_root_dse.
#++
def search_subschema_entry
rs = search(:ignore_server_caps => true, :base => "",
:scope => SearchScope_BaseObject,
:attributes => [:subschemaSubentry])
return Net::LDAP::Entry.new unless (rs and rs.first)
subschema_name = rs.first.subschemasubentry
return Net::LDAP::Entry.new unless (subschema_name and subschema_name.first)
rs = search(:ignore_server_caps => true, :base => subschema_name.first,
:scope => SearchScope_BaseObject,
:filter => "objectclass=subschema",
:attributes => [:objectclasses, :attributetypes])
(rs and rs.first) or Net::LDAP::Entry.new
end
#--
# Convenience method to query server capabilities.
# Only do this once per Net::LDAP object.
# Note, we call a search, and we might be called from inside a search!
# MUST refactor the root_dse call out.
#++
def paged_searches_supported?
# active directory returns that it supports paged results. However
# it returns binary data in the rfc2696_cookie which throws an
# encoding exception breaking searching.
return false if @force_no_page
@server_caps ||= search_root_dse
@server_caps[:supportedcontrol].include?(Net::LDAP::LDAPControls::PAGED_RESULTS)
end
end # class LDAP
# This is a private class used internally by the library. It should not
# be called by user code.
class Net::LDAP::Connection #:nodoc:
LdapVersion = 3
MaxSaslChallenges = 10
def initialize(server)
begin
@conn = TCPSocket.new(server[:host], server[:port])
rescue SocketError
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "No such address or other socket error."
rescue Errno::ECONNREFUSED
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "Server #{server[:host]} refused connection on port #{server[:port]}."
end
if server[:encryption]
setup_encryption server[:encryption]
end
yield self if block_given?
end
module GetbyteForSSLSocket
def getbyte
getc.ord
end
end
def self.wrap_with_ssl(io)
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "OpenSSL is unavailable" unless Net::LDAP::HasOpenSSL
ctx = OpenSSL::SSL::SSLContext.new
conn = OpenSSL::SSL::SSLSocket.new(io, ctx)
conn.connect
conn.sync_close = true
conn.extend(GetbyteForSSLSocket) unless conn.respond_to?(:getbyte)
conn
end
#--
# Helper method called only from new, and only after we have a
# successfully-opened @conn instance variable, which is a TCP connection.
# Depending on the received arguments, we establish SSL, potentially
# replacing the value of @conn accordingly. Don't generate any errors here
# if no encryption is requested. DO raise Net::LDAP::LdapError objects if encryption
# is requested and we have trouble setting it up. That includes if OpenSSL
# is not set up on the machine. (Question: how does the Ruby OpenSSL
# wrapper react in that case?) DO NOT filter exceptions raised by the
# OpenSSL library. Let them pass back to the user. That should make it
# easier for us to debug the problem reports. Presumably (hopefully?) that
# will also produce recognizable errors if someone tries to use this on a
# machine without OpenSSL.
#
# The simple_tls method is intended as the simplest, stupidest, easiest
# solution for people who want nothing more than encrypted comms with the
# LDAP server. It doesn't do any server-cert validation and requires
# nothing in the way of key files and root-cert files, etc etc. OBSERVE:
# WE REPLACE the value of @conn, which is presumed to be a connected
# TCPSocket object.
#
# The start_tls method is supported by many servers over the standard LDAP
# port. It does not require an alternative port for encrypted
# communications, as with simple_tls. Thanks for Kouhei Sutou for
# generously contributing the :start_tls path.
#++
def setup_encryption(args)
case args[:method]
when :simple_tls
@conn = self.class.wrap_with_ssl(@conn)
# additional branches requiring server validation and peer certs, etc.
# go here.
when :start_tls
msgid = next_msgid.to_ber
request = [Net::LDAP::StartTlsOid.to_ber].to_ber_appsequence(Net::LDAP::PDU::ExtendedRequest)
request_pkt = [msgid, request].to_ber_sequence
@conn.write request_pkt
be = @conn.read_ber(Net::LDAP::AsnSyntax)
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "no start_tls result" if be.nil?
pdu = Net::LDAP::PDU.new(be)
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "no start_tls result" if pdu.nil?
if pdu.result_code.zero?
@conn = self.class.wrap_with_ssl(@conn)
else
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "start_tls failed: #{pdu.result_code}"
end
else
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "unsupported encryption method #{args[:method]}"
end
end
#--
# This is provided as a convenience method to make sure a connection
# object gets closed without waiting for a GC to happen. Clients shouldn't
# have to call it, but perhaps it will come in handy someday.
#++
def close
@conn.close
@conn = nil
end
def next_msgid
@msgid ||= 0
@msgid += 1
end
def bind(auth)
meth = auth[:method]
if [:simple, :anonymous, :anon].include?(meth)
bind_simple auth
elsif meth == :sasl
bind_sasl(auth)
elsif meth == :gss_spnego
bind_gss_spnego(auth)
else
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "Unsupported auth method (#{meth})"
end
end
#--
# Implements a simple user/psw authentication. Accessed by calling #bind
# with a method of :simple or :anonymous.
#++
def bind_simple(auth)
user, psw = if auth[:method] == :simple
[auth[:username] || auth[:dn], auth[:password]]
else
["", ""]
end
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "Invalid binding information" unless (user && psw)
msgid = next_msgid.to_ber
request = [LdapVersion.to_ber, user.to_ber,
psw.to_ber_contextspecific(0)].to_ber_appsequence(0)
request_pkt = [msgid, request].to_ber_sequence
@conn.write request_pkt
(be = @conn.read_ber(Net::LDAP::AsnSyntax) and pdu = Net::LDAP::PDU.new(be)) or raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "no bind result"
pdu
end
#--
# Required parameters: :mechanism, :initial_credential and
# :challenge_response
#
# Mechanism is a string value that will be passed in the SASL-packet's
# "mechanism" field.
#
# Initial credential is most likely a string. It's passed in the initial
# BindRequest that goes to the server. In some protocols, it may be empty.
#
# Challenge-response is a Ruby proc that takes a single parameter and
# returns an object that will typically be a string. The
# challenge-response block is called when the server returns a
# BindResponse with a result code of 14 (saslBindInProgress). The
# challenge-response block receives a parameter containing the data
# returned by the server in the saslServerCreds field of the LDAP
# BindResponse packet. The challenge-response block may be called multiple
# times during the course of a SASL authentication, and each time it must
# return a value that will be passed back to the server as the credential
# data in the next BindRequest packet.
#++
def bind_sasl(auth)
mech, cred, chall = auth[:mechanism], auth[:initial_credential],
auth[:challenge_response]
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "Invalid binding information" unless (mech && cred && chall)
n = 0
loop {
msgid = next_msgid.to_ber
sasl = [mech.to_ber, cred.to_ber].to_ber_contextspecific(3)
request = [LdapVersion.to_ber, "".to_ber, sasl].to_ber_appsequence(0)
request_pkt = [msgid, request].to_ber_sequence
@conn.write request_pkt
(be = @conn.read_ber(Net::LDAP::AsnSyntax) and pdu = Net::LDAP::PDU.new(be)) or raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "no bind result"
return pdu unless pdu.result_code == 14 # saslBindInProgress
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "sasl-challenge overflow" if ((n += 1) > MaxSaslChallenges)
cred = chall.call(pdu.result_server_sasl_creds)
}
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "why are we here?"
end
private :bind_sasl
#--
# PROVISIONAL, only for testing SASL implementations. DON'T USE THIS YET.
# Uses Kohei Kajimoto's Ruby/NTLM. We have to find a clean way to
# integrate it without introducing an external dependency.
#
# This authentication method is accessed by calling #bind with a :method
# parameter of :gss_spnego. It requires :username and :password
# attributes, just like the :simple authentication method. It performs a
# GSS-SPNEGO authentication with the server, which is presumed to be a
# Microsoft Active Directory.
#++
def bind_gss_spnego(auth)
require 'ntlm'
user, psw = [auth[:username] || auth[:dn], auth[:password]]
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "Invalid binding information" unless (user && psw)
nego = proc { |challenge|
t2_msg = NTLM::Message.parse(challenge)
t3_msg = t2_msg.response({ :user => user, :password => psw },
{ :ntlmv2 => true })
t3_msg.serialize
}
bind_sasl(:method => :sasl, :mechanism => "GSS-SPNEGO",
:initial_credential => NTLM::Message::Type1.new.serialize,
:challenge_response => nego)
end
private :bind_gss_spnego
#--
# Allow the caller to specify a sort control
#
# The format of the sort control needs to be:
#
# :sort_control => ["cn"] # just a string
# or
# :sort_control => [["cn", "matchingRule", true]] #attribute, matchingRule, direction (true / false)
# or
# :sort_control => ["givenname","sn"] #multiple strings or arrays
#
def encode_sort_controls(sort_definitions)
return sort_definitions unless sort_definitions
sort_control_values = sort_definitions.map do |control|
control = Array(control) # if there is only an attribute name as a string then infer the orderinrule and reverseorder
control[0] = String(control[0]).to_ber,
control[1] = String(control[1]).to_ber,
control[2] = (control[2] == true).to_ber
control.to_ber_sequence
end
sort_control = [
Net::LDAP::LDAPControls::SORT_REQUEST.to_ber,
false.to_ber,
sort_control_values.to_ber_sequence.to_s.to_ber
].to_ber_sequence
end
#--
# Alternate implementation, this yields each search entry to the caller as
# it are received.
#
# TODO: certain search parameters are hardcoded.
# TODO: if we mis-parse the server results or the results are wrong, we
# can block forever. That's because we keep reading results until we get a
# type-5 packet, which might never come. We need to support the time-limit
# in the protocol.
#++
def search(args = {})
search_filter = (args && args[:filter]) ||
Net::LDAP::Filter.eq("objectclass", "*")
search_filter = Net::LDAP::Filter.construct(search_filter) if search_filter.is_a?(String)
search_base = (args && args[:base]) || "dc=example, dc=com"
search_attributes = ((args && args[:attributes]) || []).map { |attr| attr.to_s.to_ber}
return_referrals = args && args[:return_referrals] == true
sizelimit = (args && args[:size].to_i) || 0
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "invalid search-size" unless sizelimit >= 0
paged_searches_supported = (args && args[:paged_searches_supported])
attributes_only = (args and args[:attributes_only] == true)
scope = args[:scope] || Net::LDAP::SearchScope_WholeSubtree
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "invalid search scope" unless Net::LDAP::SearchScopes.include?(scope)
sort_control = encode_sort_controls(args.fetch(:sort_controls){ false })
# An interesting value for the size limit would be close to A/D's
# built-in page limit of 1000 records, but openLDAP newer than version
# 2.2.0 chokes on anything bigger than 126. You get a silent error that
# is easily visible by running slapd in debug mode. Go figure.
#
# Changed this around 06Sep06 to support a caller-specified search-size
# limit. Because we ALWAYS do paged searches, we have to work around the
# problem that it's not legal to specify a "normal" sizelimit (in the
# body of the search request) that is larger than the page size we're
# requesting. Unfortunately, I have the feeling that this will break
# with LDAP servers that don't support paged searches!!!
#
# (Because we pass zero as the sizelimit on search rounds when the
# remaining limit is larger than our max page size of 126. In these
# cases, I think the caller's search limit will be ignored!)
#
# CONFIRMED: This code doesn't work on LDAPs that don't support paged
# searches when the size limit is larger than 126. We're going to have
# to do a root-DSE record search and not do a paged search if the LDAP
# doesn't support it. Yuck.
rfc2696_cookie = [126, ""]
result_pdu = nil
n_results = 0
loop {
# should collect this into a private helper to clarify the structure
query_limit = 0
if sizelimit > 0
if paged_searches_supported
query_limit = (((sizelimit - n_results) < 126) ? (sizelimit -
n_results) : 0)
else
query_limit = sizelimit
end
end
request = [
search_base.to_ber,
scope.to_ber_enumerated,
0.to_ber_enumerated,
query_limit.to_ber, # size limit
0.to_ber,
attributes_only.to_ber,
search_filter.to_ber,
search_attributes.to_ber_sequence
].to_ber_appsequence(3)
# rfc2696_cookie sometimes contains binary data from Microsoft Active Directory
# this breaks when calling to_ber. (Can't force binary data to UTF-8)
# we have to disable paging (even though server supports it) to get around this...
controls = []
controls <<
[
Net::LDAP::LDAPControls::PAGED_RESULTS.to_ber,
# Criticality MUST be false to interoperate with normal LDAPs.
false.to_ber,
rfc2696_cookie.map{ |v| v.to_ber}.to_ber_sequence.to_s.to_ber
].to_ber_sequence if paged_searches_supported
controls << sort_control if sort_control
controls = controls.empty? ? nil : controls.to_ber_contextspecific(0)
pkt = [next_msgid.to_ber, request, controls].compact.to_ber_sequence
@conn.write pkt
result_pdu = nil
controls = []
while (be = @conn.read_ber(Net::LDAP::AsnSyntax)) && (pdu = Net::LDAP::PDU.new(be))
case pdu.app_tag
when 4 # search-data
n_results += 1
yield pdu.search_entry if block_given?
when 19 # search-referral
if return_referrals
if block_given?
se = Net::LDAP::Entry.new
se[:search_referrals] = (pdu.search_referrals || [])
yield se
end
end
when 5 # search-result
result_pdu = pdu
controls = pdu.result_controls
if return_referrals && result_code == 10
if block_given?
se = Net::LDAP::Entry.new
se[:search_referrals] = (pdu.search_referrals || [])
yield se
end
end
break
else
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "invalid response-type in search: #{pdu.app_tag}"
end
end
# When we get here, we have seen a type-5 response. If there is no
# error AND there is an RFC-2696 cookie, then query again for the next
# page of results. If not, we're done. Don't screw this up or we'll
# break every search we do.
#
# Noticed 02Sep06, look at the read_ber call in this loop, shouldn't
# that have a parameter of AsnSyntax? Does this just accidentally
# work? According to RFC-2696, the value expected in this position is
# of type OCTET STRING, covered in the default syntax supported by
# read_ber, so I guess we're ok.
more_pages = false
if result_pdu.result_code == 0 and controls
controls.each do |c|
if c.oid == Net::LDAP::LDAPControls::PAGED_RESULTS
# just in case some bogus server sends us more than 1 of these.
more_pages = false
if c.value and c.value.length > 0
cookie = c.value.read_ber[1]
if cookie and cookie.length > 0
rfc2696_cookie[1] = cookie
more_pages = true
end
end
end
end
end
break unless more_pages
} # loop
result_pdu || OpenStruct.new(:status => :failure, :result_code => 1, :message => "Invalid search")
end
MODIFY_OPERATIONS = { #:nodoc:
:add => 0,
:delete => 1,
:replace => 2
}
def self.modify_ops(operations)
ops = []
if operations
operations.each { |op, attrib, values|
# TODO, fix the following line, which gives a bogus error if the
# opcode is invalid.
op_ber = MODIFY_OPERATIONS[op.to_sym].to_ber_enumerated
values = [ values ].flatten.map { |v| v.to_ber if v }.to_ber_set
values = [ attrib.to_s.to_ber, values ].to_ber_sequence
ops << [ op_ber, values ].to_ber
}
end
ops
end
#--
# TODO: need to support a time limit, in case the server fails to respond.
# TODO: We're throwing an exception here on empty DN. Should return a
# proper error instead, probaby from farther up the chain.
# TODO: If the user specifies a bogus opcode, we'll throw a confusing
# error here ("to_ber_enumerated is not defined on nil").
#++
def modify(args)
modify_dn = args[:dn] or raise "Unable to modify empty DN"
ops = self.class.modify_ops args[:operations]
request = [ modify_dn.to_ber,
ops.to_ber_sequence ].to_ber_appsequence(6)
pkt = [ next_msgid.to_ber, request ].to_ber_sequence
@conn.write pkt
(be = @conn.read_ber(Net::LDAP::AsnSyntax)) && (pdu = Net::LDAP::PDU.new(be)) && (pdu.app_tag == 7) or raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "response missing or invalid"
pdu
end
#--
# TODO: need to support a time limit, in case the server fails to respond.
# Unlike other operation-methods in this class, we return a result hash
# rather than a simple result number. This is experimental, and eventually
# we'll want to do this with all the others. The point is to have access
# to the error message and the matched-DN returned by the server.
#++
def add(args)
add_dn = args[:dn] or raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "Unable to add empty DN"
add_attrs = []
a = args[:attributes] and a.each { |k, v|
add_attrs << [ k.to_s.to_ber, Array(v).map { |m| m.to_ber}.to_ber_set ].to_ber_sequence
}
request = [add_dn.to_ber, add_attrs.to_ber_sequence].to_ber_appsequence(8)
pkt = [next_msgid.to_ber, request].to_ber_sequence
@conn.write pkt
(be = @conn.read_ber(Net::LDAP::AsnSyntax)) &&
(pdu = Net::LDAP::PDU.new(be)) &&
(pdu.app_tag == 9) or
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "response missing or invalid"
pdu
end
#--
# TODO: need to support a time limit, in case the server fails to respond.
#++
def rename(args)
old_dn = args[:olddn] or raise "Unable to rename empty DN"
new_rdn = args[:newrdn] or raise "Unable to rename to empty RDN"
delete_attrs = args[:delete_attributes] ? true : false
new_superior = args[:new_superior]
request = [old_dn.to_ber, new_rdn.to_ber, delete_attrs.to_ber]
request << new_superior.to_ber_contextspecific(0) unless new_superior == nil
pkt = [next_msgid.to_ber, request.to_ber_appsequence(12)].to_ber_sequence
@conn.write pkt
(be = @conn.read_ber(Net::LDAP::AsnSyntax)) &&
(pdu = Net::LDAP::PDU.new( be )) && (pdu.app_tag == 13) or
raise Net::LDAP::LdapError.new( "response missing or invalid" )
pdu
end
#--
# TODO, need to support a time limit, in case the server fails to respond.
#++
def delete(args)
dn = args[:dn] or raise "Unable to delete empty DN"
controls = args.include?(:control_codes) ? args[:control_codes].to_ber_control : nil #use nil so we can compact later
request = dn.to_s.to_ber_application_string(10)
pkt = [next_msgid.to_ber, request, controls].compact.to_ber_sequence
@conn.write pkt
(be = @conn.read_ber(Net::LDAP::AsnSyntax)) && (pdu = Net::LDAP::PDU.new(be)) && (pdu.app_tag == 11) or raise Net::LDAP::LdapError, "response missing or invalid"
pdu
end
end # class Connection
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