Skip to content
Browse files

remove deprecated PERL_OBJECT cruft, it has long since stopped

working in 5.7.x

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@11803
  • Loading branch information...
1 parent 25f58ae commit acfe0abcedaf592fb4b9cb69ce3468308ae99d91 Gurusamy Sarathy committed
Showing with 1,637 additions and 13,369 deletions.
  1. +1 −1 EXTERN.h
  2. +1 −2 MANIFEST
  3. +2 −2 Makefile.SH
  4. +1 −1 Makefile.micro
  5. +4 −37 NetWare/Makefile
  6. +1 −2 NetWare/config_h.PL
  7. +8 −12 NetWare/dl_netware.xs
  8. +2 −18 NetWare/interface.c
  9. +5 −5 NetWare/nw5.c
  10. +0 −5 NetWare/nw5sck.c
  11. +0 −6 NetWare/nw5thread.c
  12. +0 −10 NetWare/nwperlsys.c
  13. +7 −7 NetWare/nwperlsys.h
  14. +0 −1 Porting/makerel
  15. +722 −722 README.win32
  16. +5 −6 XSUB.h
  17. +3 −10 bytecode.pl
  18. +1 −1 cv.h
  19. +3 −3 cygwin/cygwin.c
  20. +2 −2 emacs/ptags
  21. +40 −3,022 embed.h
  22. +36 −329 embed.pl
  23. +4 −435 embedvar.h
  24. +3 −3 epoc/epoc.c
  25. +0 −9 ext/B/B.xs
  26. +1 −1 ext/B/B/C.pm
  27. +2 −2 ext/ByteLoader/ByteLoader.xs
  28. +1 −1 ext/ByteLoader/bytecode.h
  29. +2 −9 ext/ByteLoader/byterun.c
  30. +3 −3 ext/DynaLoader/dlutils.c
  31. +0 −2 ext/Opcode/Opcode.xs
  32. +1 −1 ext/POSIX/POSIX.xs
  33. +0 −68 globals.c
  34. +0 −5 iperlsys.h
  35. +2 −6 lib/ExtUtils/Embed.pm
  36. +0 −1 lib/ExtUtils/MM_NW5.pm
  37. +1 −25 lib/ExtUtils/MM_Unix.pm
  38. +0 −1 lib/ExtUtils/MM_Win32.pm
  39. +1 −12 lib/ExtUtils/MakeMaker.pm
  40. +1 −6 lib/ExtUtils/xsubpp
  41. +3 −15 makedef.pl
  42. +11 −15 mg.c
  43. +0 −2,493 objXSUB.h
  44. +2 −2 op.c
  45. +55 −120 perl.c
  46. +19 −172 perl.h
  47. +5 −4,393 perlapi.c
  48. +424 −431 perlapi.h
  49. +1 −1 perlio.c
  50. +2 −6 perly.c
  51. +1 −1 perly.y
  52. +2 −6 perly_c.diff
  53. +14 −31 pod/perlguts.pod
  54. +26 −56 pp_ctl.c
  55. +3 −3 pp_hot.c
  56. +0 −33 proto.h
  57. +3 −13 regcomp.c
  58. +4 −14 regexec.c
  59. +1 −1 scope.c
  60. +11 −45 sv.c
  61. +1 −1 sv.h
  62. +7 −11 toke.c
  63. +3 −3 universal.c
  64. +4 −7 vms/descrip_mms.template
  65. +2 −6 vms/perly_c.vms
  66. +4 −37 win32/Makefile
  67. +1 −2 win32/config_h.PL
  68. +9 −13 win32/dl_win32.xs
  69. +5 −33 win32/makefile.mk
  70. +20 −32 win32/perlhost.h
  71. +3 −131 win32/perllib.c
  72. +55 −82 win32/win32.c
  73. +1 −54 win32/win32.h
  74. +18 −23 win32/win32sck.c
  75. +0 −6 win32/win32thread.c
  76. +3 −21 wince/Makefile.ce
  77. +1 −2 wince/config_h.PL
  78. +9 −13 wince/dl_win32.xs
  79. +2 −130 wince/perllib.c
  80. +1 −54 wince/win32.h
  81. +0 −6 wince/win32thread.c
  82. +10 −27 wince/wince.c
  83. +17 −22 wince/wincesck.c
  84. +8 −8 xsutils.c
View
2 EXTERN.h
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@
# define EXTCONST globalref
# define dEXTCONST globaldef {"$GLOBAL_RO_VARS"} readonly
#else
-# if defined(WIN32) && !defined(PERL_STATIC_SYMS) && !defined(PERL_OBJECT)
+# if defined(WIN32) && !defined(PERL_STATIC_SYMS)
# ifdef PERLDLL
# define EXT extern __declspec(dllexport)
# define dEXT
View
3 MANIFEST
@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@ emacs/cperl-mode.el An alternate perl-mode
emacs/e2ctags.pl etags to ctags converter
emacs/ptags Creates smart TAGS file
embed.h Maps symbols to safer names
-embed.pl Produces {embed,embedvar,objXSUB,proto}.h, global.sym
+embed.pl Produces {embed,embedvar,proto}.h, global.sym
embedvar.h C namespace management
epoc/config.sh EPOC port config.sh template
epoc/createpkg.pl EPOC port generate PKG file
@@ -1606,7 +1606,6 @@ NetWare/testnlm/type/type.c Netware port
NetWare/win32ish.h Netware port
nostdio.h Cause compile error on stdio calls
numeric.c Miscellaneous numeric conversion routines
-objXSUB.h Scoping macros for Perl Object in extensions
op.c Opcode syntax tree code
op.h Opcode syntax tree header
opcode.h Automatically generated opcode header
View
4 Makefile.SH
@@ -773,7 +773,7 @@ CHMOD_W = chmod +w
# keywords.pl: keywords.h
# opcode.pl: opcode.h opnames.h pp_proto.h pp.sym
# [* embed.pl needs pp.sym generated by opcode.pl! *]
-# embed.pl: proto.h embed.h embedvar.h global.sym objXSUB.h
+# embed.pl: proto.h embed.h embedvar.h global.sym
# perlapi.h perlapi.c pod/perlintern.pod
# pod/perlapi.pod
# bytecode.pl: ext/ByteLoader/byterun.h ext/ByteLoader/byterun.c
@@ -788,7 +788,7 @@ CHMOD_W = chmod +w
AUTOGEN_FILES = keywords.h opcode.h opnames.h pp_proto.h pp.sym proto.h \
embed.h embedvar.h global.sym \
pod/perlintern.pod pod/perlapi.pod \
- objXSUB.h perlapi.h perlapi.c ext/ByteLoader/byterun.h \
+ perlapi.h perlapi.c ext/ByteLoader/byterun.h \
ext/ByteLoader/byterun.c ext/B/B/Asmdata.pm regnodes.h \
warnings.h lib/warnings.pm
View
2 Makefile.micro
@@ -122,7 +122,7 @@ ulocale$(_O): $(HE) locale.c
unumeric$(_O): $(HE) numeric.c
$(CC) -c -o $@ $(CFLAGS) numeric.c
-uuniversal$(_O): $(HE) universal.c objXSUB.h XSUB.h
+uuniversal$(_O): $(HE) universal.c XSUB.h
$(CC) -c -o $@ $(CFLAGS) universal.c
uutf8$(_O): $(HE) utf8.c
View
41 NetWare/Makefile
@@ -463,17 +463,6 @@ USE_IMP_SYS = define
#
#USE_5005THREADS= define
-#
-# WARNING! This option is deprecated and will eventually go away (enable
-# USE_MULTI instead).
-#
-# uncomment next line if you want to use the PERL_OBJECT build option.
-# DO NOT ENABLE unless you have legacy code that relies on the C++
-# CPerlObj class that was available in 5.005. This cannot be enabled
-# if you ask for USE_5005THREADS above.
-#
-#USE_OBJECT = define
-
# For now let this be here
#
#CRYPT_SRC = fcrypt.c
@@ -510,13 +499,6 @@ D_CRYPT = define
CRYPT_FLAG = -DHAVE_DES_FCRYPT
!ENDIF
-!IF "$(USE_OBJECT)" == "define"
-PERL_MALLOC = undef
-USE_5005THREADS = undef
-USE_MULTI = undef
-USE_IMP_SYS = define
-!ENDIF
-
!IF "$(PERL_MALLOC)" == ""
PERL_MALLOC = undef
!ENDIF
@@ -537,10 +519,6 @@ PERL_MALLOC = undef
USE_MULTI = undef
!ENDIF
-!IF "$(USE_OBJECT)" == ""
-USE_OBJECT = undef
-!ENDIF
-
!IF "$(USE_ITHREADS)" == ""
USE_ITHREADS = undef
!ENDIF
@@ -553,16 +531,16 @@ USE_IMP_SYS = undef
USE_PERLCRT = undef
!ENDIF
-!IF "$(USE_IMP_SYS)$(USE_MULTI)$(USE_5005THREADS)$(USE_OBJECT)" == "defineundefundefundef"
+!IF "$(USE_IMP_SYS)$(USE_MULTI)$(USE_5005THREADS)" == "defineundefundef"
USE_MULTI = define
!ENDIF
-!IF "$(USE_ITHREADS)$(USE_MULTI)$(USE_OBJECT)" == "defineundefundef"
+!IF "$(USE_ITHREADS)$(USE_MULTI)" == "defineundef"
USE_MULTI = define
USE_5005THREADS = undef
!ENDIF
-!IF "$(USE_MULTI)$(USE_5005THREADS)$(USE_OBJECT)" != "undefundefundef"
+!IF "$(USE_MULTI)$(USE_5005THREADS)" != "undefundef"
BUILDOPT = $(BUILDOPT) -DPERL_IMPLICIT_CONTEXT
!ENDIF
@@ -574,9 +552,6 @@ BUILDOPT = $(BUILDOPT) -DPERL_IMPLICIT_SYS
PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE = x86
!ENDIF
-!IF "$(USE_OBJECT)" == "define"
-ARCHNAME = NetWare-$(PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE)-object
-!ELSE
!IF "$(USE_5005THREADS)" == "define"
ARCHNAME = NetWare-$(PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE)-thread
!ELSE
@@ -586,9 +561,8 @@ ARCHNAME = NetWare-$(PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE)-multi
ARCHNAME = NetWare-$(PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE)
!ENDIF
!ENDIF
-!ENDIF
-!IF "$(USE_MULTI)$(USE_5005THREADS)$(USE_OBJECT)" != "undefundefundef"
+!IF "$(USE_MULTI)$(USE_5005THREADS)" != "undefundef"
ADD_BUILDOPT = $(ADD_BUILDOPT) -DPERL_IMPLICIT_CONTEXT
!ENDIF
@@ -630,11 +604,6 @@ INST_HTML = $(INST_POD)\html
# Options
#
-!IF "$(USE_OBJECT)" == "define"
-OPTIMIZE = $(OPTIMIZE) $(CXX_FLAG)
-BUILDOPT = $(BUILDOPT) -DPERL_OBJECT
-!ENDIF
-
OBJOUT_FLAG = -Fo
EXEOUT_FLAG = -Fe
@@ -736,9 +705,7 @@ MICROCORE_SRC = \
EXTRACORE_SRC = $(EXTRACORE_SRC) ..\malloc.c
!ENDIF
-#!IF "$(USE_OBJECT)" != "define"
#EXTRACORE_SRC = $(EXTRACORE_SRC) ..\perlio.c
-#!ENDIF
!IF "$(CRYPT_SRC)" != ""
NW_SRC = $(NW_SRC) .\$(CRYPT_SRC)
View
3 NetWare/config_h.PL
@@ -2,7 +2,6 @@
use Config;
use File::Compare qw(compare);
use File::Copy qw(copy);
-my $OBJ = 1 if $Config{'ccflags'} =~ /PERL_OBJECT/i;
my $name = $0;
$name =~ s#^(.*)\.PL$#../$1.SH#;
my %opt;
@@ -78,7 +77,7 @@ chmod(0666,"../lib/CORE/config.h");
copy("$file.new","../lib/CORE/config.h") || die "Cannot copy:$!";
chmod(0444,"../lib/CORE/config.h");
-if (!$OBJ && compare("$file.new",$file))
+if (compare("$file.new",$file))
{
warn "$file has changed\n";
chmod(0666,$file);
View
20 NetWare/dl_netware.xs
@@ -27,23 +27,19 @@ NetWare related modifications done on dl_win32.xs file created by Wei-Yuen Tan t
//function pointer for UCSInitialize
typedef void (*PFUCSINITIALIZE) ();
-#ifdef PERL_OBJECT
-
-#endif /* PERL_OBJECT */
-
#include "dlutils.c" /* SaveError() etc */
static void
-dl_private_init(pTHXo)
+dl_private_init(pTHX)
{
- (void)dl_generic_private_init(aTHXo);
+ (void)dl_generic_private_init(aTHX);
}
MODULE = DynaLoader PACKAGE = DynaLoader
BOOT:
- (void)dl_private_init(aTHXo);
+ (void)dl_private_init(aTHX);
void *
@@ -130,8 +126,8 @@ dl_load_file(filename,flags=0)
DLDEBUG(2,PerlIO_printf(Perl_debug_log," libref=%x\n", nlmHandle));
ST(0) = sv_newmortal() ;
if (nlmHandle == NULL)
- //SaveError(aTHXo_ "load_file:%s",
- // OS_Error_String(aTHXo)) ;
+ //SaveError(aTHX_ "load_file:%s",
+ // OS_Error_String(aTHX)) ;
ConsolePrintf("load_file error : %s\n", mod_name8);
else
sv_setiv( ST(0), (IV)nlmHandle);
@@ -156,8 +152,8 @@ dl_find_symbol(libhandle, symbolname)
DLDEBUG(2,PerlIO_printf(Perl_debug_log," symbolref = %x\n", RETVAL));
ST(0) = sv_newmortal() ;
if (RETVAL == NULL)
- //SaveError(aTHXo_ "find_symbol:%s",
- // OS_Error_String(aTHXo)) ;
+ //SaveError(aTHX_ "find_symbol:%s",
+ // OS_Error_String(aTHX)) ;
ConsolePrintf("find_symbol error \n");
else
sv_setiv( ST(0), (IV)RETVAL);
@@ -178,7 +174,7 @@ dl_install_xsub(perl_name, symref, filename="$Package")
DLDEBUG(2,PerlIO_printf(Perl_debug_log,"dl_install_xsub(name=%s, symref=%x)\n",
perl_name, symref));
ST(0) = sv_2mortal(newRV((SV*)newXS(perl_name,
- (void(*)(pTHXo_ CV *))symref,
+ (void(*)(pTHX_ CV *))symref,
filename)));
View
20 NetWare/interface.c
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ static void xs_init(pTHX);
EXTERN_C int RunPerl(int argc, char **argv, char **env);
EXTERN_C void Perl_nw5_init(int *argcp, char ***argvp);
-EXTERN_C void boot_DynaLoader (pTHXo_ CV* cv);
+EXTERN_C void boot_DynaLoader (pTHX_ CV* cv);
ClsPerlHost::ClsPerlHost()
@@ -141,23 +141,7 @@ int RunPerl(int argc, char **argv, char **env)
if(exitstatus == 0)
{
#if defined(TOP_CLONE) && defined(USE_ITHREADS) // XXXXXX testing
- # ifdef PERL_OBJECT
- CPerlHost *h = new CPerlHost();
- new_perl = perl_clone_using(my_perl, 1,
- h->m_pHostperlMem,
- h->m_pHostperlMemShared,
- h->m_pHostperlMemParse,
- h->m_pHostperlEnv,
- h->m_pHostperlStdIO,
- h->m_pHostperlLIO,
- h->m_pHostperlDir,
- h->m_pHostperlSock,
- h->m_pHostperlProc
- );
- CPerlObj *pPerl = (CPerlObj*)new_perl;
- # else
- new_perl = perl_clone(my_perl, 1);
- # endif
+ new_perl = perl_clone(my_perl, 1);
exitstatus = perl_run(new_perl); // Run Perl.
PERL_SET_THX(my_perl);
View
10 NetWare/nw5.c
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@
-#include <perl.h> // For dTHXo, etc.
+#include <perl.h> // For dTHX, etc.
#include "nwpipe.h"
@@ -211,7 +211,7 @@ nw_stdout()
long
nw_telldir(DIR *dirp)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
Perl_croak(aTHX_ "telldir function is not implemented");
return 0l;
}
@@ -292,7 +292,7 @@ nw_write(int fd, const void *buf, unsigned int cnt)
char *
nw_crypt(const char *txt, const char *salt)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
#ifdef HAVE_DES_FCRYPT
dTHR;
@@ -752,7 +752,7 @@ nw_rename(const char *oname, const char *newname)
void
nw_rewinddir(DIR *dirp)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
Perl_croak(aTHX_ "rewinddir function is not implemented");
}
@@ -766,7 +766,7 @@ nw_rewind(FILE *pf)
void
nw_seekdir(DIR *dirp, long loc)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
Perl_croak(aTHX_ "seekdir function is not implemented");
}
View
5 NetWare/nw5sck.c
@@ -20,11 +20,6 @@
#include "EXTERN.h"
#include "perl.h"
-#if defined(PERL_OBJECT)
-#define NO_XSLOCKS
-#include "XSUB.h"
-#endif
-
#include "nw5iop.h"
#include "nw5sck.h"
#include <fcntl.h>
View
6 NetWare/nw5thread.c
@@ -20,12 +20,6 @@
#include "EXTERN.h"
#include "perl.h"
-#if defined(PERL_OBJECT)
-#define NO_XSLOCKS
-extern CPerlObj* pPerl;
-#include "XSUB.h"
-#endif
-
//For Thread Local Storage
#include "win32ish.h" // For "BOOL", "TRUE" and "FALSE"
#include "nwtinfo.h"
View
10 NetWare/nwperlsys.c
@@ -20,10 +20,6 @@
#include "perl.h"
-#ifdef PERL_OBJECT
-#define NO_XSLOCKS
-#endif
-
//CHKSGP
//Including this is giving premature end-of-file error during compilation
//#include "XSUB.h"
@@ -102,9 +98,6 @@ perl_alloc(void)
&perlSock,
&perlProc);
if (my_perl) {
-#ifdef PERL_OBJECT
- CPerlObj* pPerl = (CPerlObj*)my_perl;
-#endif
//nw5_internal_host = m_allocList;
}
return my_perl;
@@ -188,9 +181,6 @@ perl_alloc_override(struct IPerlMem** ppMem, struct IPerlMem** ppMemShared,
lpProc);
if (my_perl) {
-#ifdef PERL_OBJECT
- CPerlObj* pPerl = (CPerlObj*)my_perl;
-#endif
//nw5_internal_host = pHost;
}
return my_perl;
View
14 NetWare/nwperlsys.h
@@ -647,7 +647,7 @@ PerlLIOChmod(struct IPerlLIO* piPerl, const char *filename, int pmode)
int
PerlLIOChown(struct IPerlLIO* piPerl, const char *filename, uid_t owner, gid_t group)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
Perl_croak(aTHX_ "chown not implemented!\n");
return 0;
}
@@ -861,7 +861,7 @@ PerlProc_Exit(struct IPerlProc* piPerl, int status)
int
PerlProcExecl(struct IPerlProc* piPerl, const char *cmdname, const char *arg0, const char *arg1, const char *arg2, const char *arg3)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
Perl_croak(aTHX_ "execl not implemented!\n");
return 0;
}
@@ -917,7 +917,7 @@ PerlProcKill(struct IPerlProc* piPerl, int pid, int sig)
int
PerlProcKillpg(struct IPerlProc* piPerl, int pid, int sig)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
Perl_croak(aTHX_ "killpg not implemented!\n");
return 0;
}
@@ -931,7 +931,7 @@ PerlProcPauseProc(struct IPerlProc* piPerl)
PerlIO*
PerlProcPopen(struct IPerlProc* piPerl, const char *command, const char *mode)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
PERL_FLUSHALL_FOR_CHILD;
return (PerlIO*)nw_Popen((char *)command, (char *)mode, (int *)errno);
@@ -1300,7 +1300,7 @@ PerlSockSetservent(struct IPerlSock* piPerl, int stayopen)
int
PerlSockSetsockopt(struct IPerlSock* piPerl, SOCKET s, int level, int optname, const char* optval, int optlen)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
Perl_croak(aTHX_ "setsockopt not implemented!\n");
return 0;
}
@@ -1320,7 +1320,7 @@ PerlSockSocket(struct IPerlSock* piPerl, int af, int type, int protocol)
int
PerlSockSocketpair(struct IPerlSock* piPerl, int domain, int type, int protocol, int* fds)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
Perl_croak(aTHX_ "socketpair not implemented!\n");
return 0;
}
@@ -1328,7 +1328,7 @@ PerlSockSocketpair(struct IPerlSock* piPerl, int domain, int type, int protocol,
int
PerlSockIoctlsocket(struct IPerlSock* piPerl, SOCKET s, long cmd, u_long *argp)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
Perl_croak(aTHX_ "ioctlsocket not implemented!\n");
return 0;
}
View
1 Porting/makerel
@@ -117,7 +117,6 @@ my @writables = qw(
global.sym
pod/perlintern.pod
pod/perlapi.pod
- objXSUB.h
perlapi.h
perlapi.c
ext/ByteLoader/byterun.h
View
1,444 README.win32
@@ -1,722 +1,722 @@
-If you read this file _as_is_, just ignore the funny characters you
-see. It is written in the POD format (see pod/perlpod.pod) which is
-specially designed to be readable as is.
-
-=head1 NAME
-
-perlwin32 - Perl under Win32
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-These are instructions for building Perl under Windows (9x, NT and
-2000).
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-Before you start, you should glance through the README file
-found in the top-level directory to which the Perl distribution
-was extracted. Make sure you read and understand the terms under
-which this software is being distributed.
-
-Also make sure you read L<BUGS AND CAVEATS> below for the
-known limitations of this port.
-
-The INSTALL file in the perl top-level has much information that is
-only relevant to people building Perl on Unix-like systems. In
-particular, you can safely ignore any information that talks about
-"Configure".
-
-You may also want to look at two other options for building
-a perl that will work on Windows NT: the README.cygwin and
-README.os2 files, each of which give a different set of rules to
-build a Perl that will work on Win32 platforms. Those two methods
-will probably enable you to build a more Unix-compatible perl, but
-you will also need to download and use various other build-time and
-run-time support software described in those files.
-
-This set of instructions is meant to describe a so-called "native"
-port of Perl to Win32 platforms. The resulting Perl requires no
-additional software to run (other than what came with your operating
-system). Currently, this port is capable of using one of the
-following compilers:
-
- Borland C++ version 5.02 or later
- Microsoft Visual C++ version 4.2 or later
- Mingw32 with GCC version 2.95.2 or better
-
-The last of these is a high quality freeware compiler. Support
-for it is still experimental. (Older versions of GCC are known
-not to work.)
-
-This port currently supports MakeMaker (the set of modules that
-is used to build extensions to perl). Therefore, you should be
-able to build and install most extensions found in the CPAN sites.
-See L<Usage Hints for Perl on Win32> below for general hints about this.
-
-=head2 Setting Up Perl on Win32
-
-=over 4
-
-=item Make
-
-You need a "make" program to build the sources. If you are using
-Visual C++ under Windows NT or 2000, nmake will work. All other
-builds need dmake.
-
-dmake is a freely available make that has very nice macro features
-and parallelability.
-
-A port of dmake for Windows is available from:
-
- http://www.cpan.org/authors/id/GSAR/dmake-4.1pl1-win32.zip
-
-(This is a fixed version of the original dmake sources obtained from
-http://www.wticorp.com/dmake/. As of version 4.1PL1, the original
-sources did not build as shipped and had various other problems.
-A patch is included in the above fixed version.)
-
-Fetch and install dmake somewhere on your path (follow the instructions
-in the README.NOW file).
-
-There exists a minor coexistence problem with dmake and Borland C++
-compilers. Namely, if a distribution has C files named with mixed
-case letters, they will be compiled into appropriate .obj-files named
-with all lowercase letters, and every time dmake is invoked
-to bring files up to date, it will try to recompile such files again.
-For example, Tk distribution has a lot of such files, resulting in
-needless recompiles everytime dmake is invoked. To avoid this, you
-may use the script "sync_ext.pl" after a successful build. It is
-available in the win32 subdirectory of the Perl source distribution.
-
-=item Command Shell
-
-Use the default "cmd" shell that comes with NT. Some versions of the
-popular 4DOS/NT shell have incompatibilities that may cause you trouble.
-If the build fails under that shell, try building again with the cmd
-shell.
-
-The nmake Makefile also has known incompatibilities with the
-"command.com" shell that comes with Windows 9x. You will need to
-use dmake and makefile.mk to build under Windows 9x.
-
-The surest way to build it is on Windows NT, using the cmd shell.
-
-Make sure the path to the build directory does not contain spaces. The
-build usually works in this circumstance, but some tests will fail.
-
-=item Borland C++
-
-If you are using the Borland compiler, you will need dmake.
-(The make that Borland supplies is seriously crippled and will not
-work for MakeMaker builds.)
-
-See L</"Make"> above.
-
-=item Microsoft Visual C++
-
-The nmake that comes with Visual C++ will suffice for building.
-You will need to run the VCVARS32.BAT file, usually found somewhere
-like C:\MSDEV4.2\BIN. This will set your build environment.
-
-You can also use dmake to build using Visual C++; provided, however,
-you set OSRELEASE to "microsft" (or whatever the directory name
-under which the Visual C dmake configuration lives) in your environment
-and edit win32/config.vc to change "make=nmake" into "make=dmake". The
-latter step is only essential if you want to use dmake as your default
-make for building extensions using MakeMaker.
-
-=item Mingw32 with GCC
-
-GCC-2.95.2 binaries can be downloaded from:
-
- ftp://ftp.xraylith.wisc.edu/pub/khan/gnu-win32/mingw32/
-
-You also need dmake. See L</"Make"> above on how to get it.
-
-The GCC-2.95.2 bundle comes with Mingw32 libraries and headers.
-
-Make sure you install the binaries that work with MSVCRT.DLL as indicated
-in the README for the GCC bundle. You may need to set up a few environment
-variables (usually ran from a batch file).
-
-There are a couple of problems with the version of gcc-2.95.2-msvcrt.exe
-released 7 November 1999:
-
-=over
-
-=item *
-
-It left out a fix for certain command line quotes. To fix this, be sure
-to download and install the file fixes/quote-fix-msvcrt.exe from the above
-ftp location.
-
-=item *
-
-The definition of the fpos_t type in stdio.h may be wrong. If your
-stdio.h has this problem, you will see an exception when running the
-test t/lib/io_xs.t. To fix this, change the typedef for fpos_t from
-"long" to "long long" in the file i386-mingw32msvc/include/stdio.h,
-and rebuild.
-
-=back
-
-A potentially simpler to install (but probably soon-to-be-outdated) bundle
-of the above package with the mentioned fixes already applied is available
-here:
-
- http://downloads.ActiveState.com/pub/staff/gsar/gcc-2.95.2-msvcrt.zip
- ftp://ftp.ActiveState.com/pub/staff/gsar/gcc-2.95.2-msvcrt.zip
-
-=back
-
-=head2 Building
-
-=over 4
-
-=item *
-
-Make sure you are in the "win32" subdirectory under the perl toplevel.
-This directory contains a "Makefile" that will work with
-versions of nmake that come with Visual C++, and a dmake "makefile.mk"
-that will work for all supported compilers. The defaults in the dmake
-makefile are setup to build using the GCC compiler.
-
-=item *
-
-Edit the makefile.mk (or Makefile, if you're using nmake) and change
-the values of INST_DRV and INST_TOP. You can also enable various
-build flags. These are explained in the makefiles.
-
-You will have to make sure that CCTYPE is set correctly and that
-CCHOME points to wherever you installed your compiler.
-
-The default value for CCHOME in the makefiles for Visual C++
-may not be correct for some versions. Make sure the default exists
-and is valid.
-
-If you have either the source or a library that contains des_fcrypt(),
-enable the appropriate option in the makefile. des_fcrypt() is not
-bundled with the distribution due to US Government restrictions
-on the export of cryptographic software. Nevertheless, this routine
-is part of the "libdes" library (written by Eric Young) which is widely
-available worldwide, usually along with SSLeay (for example,
-"ftp://ftp.funet.fi/pub/crypt/mirrors/dsi/libdes/"). Set CRYPT_SRC to the
-name of the file that implements des_fcrypt(). Alternatively, if
-you have built a library that contains des_fcrypt(), you can set
-CRYPT_LIB to point to the library name. The location above contains
-many versions of the "libdes" library, all with slightly different
-implementations of des_fcrypt(). Older versions have a single,
-self-contained file (fcrypt.c) that implements crypt(), so they may be
-easier to use. A patch against the fcrypt.c found in libdes-3.06 is
-in des_fcrypt.patch.
-
-An easier alternative may be to get the pre-patched and ready-to-use
-fcrypt.c that can be found here:
-
- http://downloads.ActiveState.com/pub/staff/gsar/fcrypt.c
- ftp://ftp.ActiveState.com/pub/staff/gsar/fcrypt.c
-
-Perl will also build without des_fcrypt(), but the crypt() builtin will
-fail at run time.
-
-Be sure to read the instructions near the top of the makefiles carefully.
-
-=item *
-
-Type "dmake" (or "nmake" if you are using that make).
-
-This should build everything. Specifically, it will create perl.exe,
-perl56.dll at the perl toplevel, and various other extension dll's
-under the lib\auto directory. If the build fails for any reason, make
-sure you have done the previous steps correctly.
-
-=back
-
-=head2 Testing Perl on Win32
-
-Type "dmake test" (or "nmake test"). This will run most of the tests from
-the testsuite (many tests will be skipped).
-
-There should be no test failures when running under Windows NT 4.0 or
-Windows 2000. Many tests I<will> fail under Windows 9x due to the inferior
-command shell.
-
-Some test failures may occur if you use a command shell other than the
-native "cmd.exe", or if you are building from a path that contains
-spaces. So don't do that.
-
-If you are running the tests from a emacs shell window, you may see
-failures in op/stat.t. Run "dmake test-notty" in that case.
-
-If you're using the Borland compiler, you may see a failure in op/taint.t
-arising from the inability to find the Borland Runtime DLLs on the system
-default path. You will need to copy the DLLs reported by the messages
-from where Borland chose to install it, into the Windows system directory
-(usually somewhere like C:\WINNT\SYSTEM32) and rerun the test.
-
-If you're using Borland compiler versions 5.2 and below, you may run into
-problems finding the correct header files when building extensions. For
-example, building the "Tk" extension may fail because both perl and Tk
-contain a header file called "patchlevel.h". The latest Borland compiler
-(v5.5) is free of this misbehaviour, and it even supports an
-option -VI- for backward (bugward) compatibility for using the old Borland
-search algorithm to locate header files.
-
-Please report any other failures as described under L<BUGS AND CAVEATS>.
-
-=head2 Installation of Perl on Win32
-
-Type "dmake install" (or "nmake install"). This will put the newly
-built perl and the libraries under whatever C<INST_TOP> points to in the
-Makefile. It will also install the pod documentation under
-C<$INST_TOP\$VERSION\lib\pod> and HTML versions of the same under
-C<$INST_TOP\$VERSION\lib\pod\html>. To use the Perl you just installed,
-you will need to add two components to your PATH environment variable,
-C<$INST_TOP\$VERSION\bin> and C<$INST_TOP\$VERSION\bin\$ARCHNAME>.
-For example:
-
- set PATH c:\perl\5.6.0\bin;c:\perl\5.6.0\bin\MSWin32-x86;%PATH%
-
-If you opt to comment out INST_VER and INST_ARCH in the makefiles, the
-installation structure is much simpler. In that case, it will be
-sufficient to add a single entry to the path, for instance:
-
- set PATH c:\perl\bin;%PATH%
-
-=head2 Usage Hints for Perl on Win32
-
-=over 4
-
-=item Environment Variables
-
-The installation paths that you set during the build get compiled
-into perl, so you don't have to do anything additional to start
-using that perl (except add its location to your PATH variable).
-
-If you put extensions in unusual places, you can set PERL5LIB
-to a list of paths separated by semicolons where you want perl
-to look for libraries. Look for descriptions of other environment
-variables you can set in L<perlrun>.
-
-You can also control the shell that perl uses to run system() and
-backtick commands via PERL5SHELL. See L<perlrun>.
-
-Perl does not depend on the registry, but it can look up certain default
-values if you choose to put them there. Perl attempts to read entries from
-C<HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Perl> and C<HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Perl>.
-Entries in the former override entries in the latter. One or more of the
-following entries (of type REG_SZ or REG_EXPAND_SZ) may be set:
-
- lib-$] version-specific standard library path to add to @INC
- lib standard library path to add to @INC
- sitelib-$] version-specific site library path to add to @INC
- sitelib site library path to add to @INC
- vendorlib-$] version-specific vendor library path to add to @INC
- vendorlib vendor library path to add to @INC
- PERL* fallback for all %ENV lookups that begin with "PERL"
-
-Note the C<$]> in the above is not literal. Substitute whatever version
-of perl you want to honor that entry, e.g. C<5.6.0>. Paths must be
-separated with semicolons, as usual on win32.
-
-=item File Globbing
-
-By default, perl handles file globbing using the File::Glob extension,
-which provides portable globbing.
-
-If you want perl to use globbing that emulates the quirks of DOS
-filename conventions, you might want to consider using File::DosGlob
-to override the internal glob() implementation. See L<File::DosGlob> for
-details.
-
-=item Using perl from the command line
-
-If you are accustomed to using perl from various command-line
-shells found in UNIX environments, you will be less than pleased
-with what Windows offers by way of a command shell.
-
-The crucial thing to understand about the Windows environment is that
-the command line you type in is processed twice before Perl sees it.
-First, your command shell (usually CMD.EXE on Windows NT, and
-COMMAND.COM on Windows 9x) preprocesses the command line, to handle
-redirection, environment variable expansion, and location of the
-executable to run. Then, the perl executable splits the remaining
-command line into individual arguments, using the C runtime library
-upon which Perl was built.
-
-It is particularly important to note that neither the shell nor the C
-runtime do any wildcard expansions of command-line arguments (so
-wildcards need not be quoted). Also, the quoting behaviours of the
-shell and the C runtime are rudimentary at best (and may, if you are
-using a non-standard shell, be inconsistent). The only (useful) quote
-character is the double quote ("). It can be used to protect spaces
-and other special characters in arguments.
-
-The Windows NT documentation has almost no description of how the
-quoting rules are implemented, but here are some general observations
-based on experiments: The C runtime breaks arguments at spaces and
-passes them to programs in argc/argv. Double quotes can be used to
-prevent arguments with spaces in them from being split up. You can
-put a double quote in an argument by escaping it with a backslash and
-enclosing the whole argument within double quotes. The backslash and
-the pair of double quotes surrounding the argument will be stripped by
-the C runtime.
-
-The file redirection characters "<", ">", and "|" can be quoted by
-double quotes (although there are suggestions that this may not always
-be true). Single quotes are not treated as quotes by the shell or
-the C runtime, they don't get stripped by the shell (just to make
-this type of quoting completely useless). The caret "^" has also
-been observed to behave as a quoting character, but this appears
-to be a shell feature, and the caret is not stripped from the command
-line, so Perl still sees it (and the C runtime phase does not treat
-the caret as a quote character).
-
-Here are some examples of usage of the "cmd" shell:
-
-This prints two doublequotes:
-
- perl -e "print '\"\"' "
-
-This does the same:
-
- perl -e "print \"\\\"\\\"\" "
-
-This prints "bar" and writes "foo" to the file "blurch":
-
- perl -e "print 'foo'; print STDERR 'bar'" > blurch
-
-This prints "foo" ("bar" disappears into nowhereland):
-
- perl -e "print 'foo'; print STDERR 'bar'" 2> nul
-
-This prints "bar" and writes "foo" into the file "blurch":
-
- perl -e "print 'foo'; print STDERR 'bar'" 1> blurch
-
-This pipes "foo" to the "less" pager and prints "bar" on the console:
-
- perl -e "print 'foo'; print STDERR 'bar'" | less
-
-This pipes "foo\nbar\n" to the less pager:
-
- perl -le "print 'foo'; print STDERR 'bar'" 2>&1 | less
-
-This pipes "foo" to the pager and writes "bar" in the file "blurch":
-
- perl -e "print 'foo'; print STDERR 'bar'" 2> blurch | less
-
-
-Discovering the usefulness of the "command.com" shell on Windows 9x
-is left as an exercise to the reader :)
-
-One particularly pernicious problem with the 4NT command shell for
-Windows NT is that it (nearly) always treats a % character as indicating
-that environment variable expansion is needed. Under this shell, it is
-therefore important to always double any % characters which you want
-Perl to see (for example, for hash variables), even when they are
-quoted.
-
-=item Building Extensions
-
-The Comprehensive Perl Archive Network (CPAN) offers a wealth
-of extensions, some of which require a C compiler to build.
-Look in http://www.cpan.org/ for more information on CPAN.
-
-Note that not all of the extensions available from CPAN may work
-in the Win32 environment; you should check the information at
-http://testers.cpan.org/ before investing too much effort into
-porting modules that don't readily build.
-
-Most extensions (whether they require a C compiler or not) can
-be built, tested and installed with the standard mantra:
-
- perl Makefile.PL
- $MAKE
- $MAKE test
- $MAKE install
-
-where $MAKE is whatever 'make' program you have configured perl to
-use. Use "perl -V:make" to find out what this is. Some extensions
-may not provide a testsuite (so "$MAKE test" may not do anything or
-fail), but most serious ones do.
-
-It is important that you use a supported 'make' program, and
-ensure Config.pm knows about it. If you don't have nmake, you can
-either get dmake from the location mentioned earlier or get an
-old version of nmake reportedly available from:
-
- ftp://ftp.microsoft.com/Softlib/MSLFILES/nmake15.exe
-
-Another option is to use the make written in Perl, available from
-CPAN:
-
- http://www.cpan.org/authors/id/NI-S/Make-0.03.tar.gz
-
-You may also use dmake. See L</"Make"> above on how to get it.
-
-Note that MakeMaker actually emits makefiles with different syntax
-depending on what 'make' it thinks you are using. Therefore, it is
-important that one of the following values appears in Config.pm:
-
- make='nmake' # MakeMaker emits nmake syntax
- make='dmake' # MakeMaker emits dmake syntax
- any other value # MakeMaker emits generic make syntax
- (e.g GNU make, or Perl make)
-
-If the value doesn't match the 'make' program you want to use,
-edit Config.pm to fix it.
-
-If a module implements XSUBs, you will need one of the supported
-C compilers. You must make sure you have set up the environment for
-the compiler for command-line compilation.
-
-If a module does not build for some reason, look carefully for
-why it failed, and report problems to the module author. If
-it looks like the extension building support is at fault, report
-that with full details of how the build failed using the perlbug
-utility.
-
-=item Command-line Wildcard Expansion
-
-The default command shells on DOS descendant operating systems (such
-as they are) usually do not expand wildcard arguments supplied to
-programs. They consider it the application's job to handle that.
-This is commonly achieved by linking the application (in our case,
-perl) with startup code that the C runtime libraries usually provide.
-However, doing that results in incompatible perl versions (since the
-behavior of the argv expansion code differs depending on the
-compiler, and it is even buggy on some compilers). Besides, it may
-be a source of frustration if you use such a perl binary with an
-alternate shell that *does* expand wildcards.
-
-Instead, the following solution works rather well. The nice things
-about it are 1) you can start using it right away; 2) it is more
-powerful, because it will do the right thing with a pattern like
-*/*/*.c; 3) you can decide whether you do/don't want to use it; and
-4) you can extend the method to add any customizations (or even
-entirely different kinds of wildcard expansion).
-
- C:\> copy con c:\perl\lib\Wild.pm
- # Wild.pm - emulate shell @ARGV expansion on shells that don't
- use File::DosGlob;
- @ARGV = map {
- my @g = File::DosGlob::glob($_) if /[*?]/;
- @g ? @g : $_;
- } @ARGV;
- 1;
- ^Z
- C:\> set PERL5OPT=-MWild
- C:\> perl -le "for (@ARGV) { print }" */*/perl*.c
- p4view/perl/perl.c
- p4view/perl/perlio.c
- p4view/perl/perly.c
- perl5.005/win32/perlglob.c
- perl5.005/win32/perllib.c
- perl5.005/win32/perlglob.c
- perl5.005/win32/perllib.c
- perl5.005/win32/perlglob.c
- perl5.005/win32/perllib.c
-
-Note there are two distinct steps there: 1) You'll have to create
-Wild.pm and put it in your perl lib directory. 2) You'll need to
-set the PERL5OPT environment variable. If you want argv expansion
-to be the default, just set PERL5OPT in your default startup
-environment.
-
-If you are using the Visual C compiler, you can get the C runtime's
-command line wildcard expansion built into perl binary. The resulting
-binary will always expand unquoted command lines, which may not be
-what you want if you use a shell that does that for you. The expansion
-done is also somewhat less powerful than the approach suggested above.
-
-=item Win32 Specific Extensions
-
-A number of extensions specific to the Win32 platform are available
-from CPAN. You may find that many of these extensions are meant to
-be used under the Activeware port of Perl, which used to be the only
-native port for the Win32 platform. Since the Activeware port does not
-have adequate support for Perl's extension building tools, these
-extensions typically do not support those tools either and, therefore,
-cannot be built using the generic steps shown in the previous section.
-
-To ensure smooth transitioning of existing code that uses the
-ActiveState port, there is a bundle of Win32 extensions that contains
-all of the ActiveState extensions and most other Win32 extensions from
-CPAN in source form, along with many added bugfixes, and with MakeMaker
-support. This bundle is available at:
-
- http://www.cpan.org/authors/id/GSAR/libwin32-0.151.zip
-
-See the README in that distribution for building and installation
-instructions. Look for later versions that may be available at the
-same location.
-
-=item Running Perl Scripts
-
-Perl scripts on UNIX use the "#!" (a.k.a "shebang") line to
-indicate to the OS that it should execute the file using perl.
-Win32 has no comparable means to indicate arbitrary files are
-executables.
-
-Instead, all available methods to execute plain text files on
-Win32 rely on the file "extension". There are three methods
-to use this to execute perl scripts:
-
-=over 8
-
-=item 1
-
-There is a facility called "file extension associations" that will
-work in Windows NT 4.0. This can be manipulated via the two
-commands "assoc" and "ftype" that come standard with Windows NT
-4.0. Type "ftype /?" for a complete example of how to set this
-up for perl scripts (Say what? You thought Windows NT wasn't
-perl-ready? :).
-
-=item 2
-
-Since file associations don't work everywhere, and there are
-reportedly bugs with file associations where it does work, the
-old method of wrapping the perl script to make it look like a
-regular batch file to the OS, may be used. The install process
-makes available the "pl2bat.bat" script which can be used to wrap
-perl scripts into batch files. For example:
-
- pl2bat foo.pl
-
-will create the file "FOO.BAT". Note "pl2bat" strips any
-.pl suffix and adds a .bat suffix to the generated file.
-
-If you use the 4DOS/NT or similar command shell, note that
-"pl2bat" uses the "%*" variable in the generated batch file to
-refer to all the command line arguments, so you may need to make
-sure that construct works in batch files. As of this writing,
-4DOS/NT users will need a "ParameterChar = *" statement in their
-4NT.INI file or will need to execute "setdos /p*" in the 4DOS/NT
-startup file to enable this to work.
-
-=item 3
-
-Using "pl2bat" has a few problems: the file name gets changed,
-so scripts that rely on C<$0> to find what they must do may not
-run properly; running "pl2bat" replicates the contents of the
-original script, and so this process can be maintenance intensive
-if the originals get updated often. A different approach that
-avoids both problems is possible.
-
-A script called "runperl.bat" is available that can be copied
-to any filename (along with the .bat suffix). For example,
-if you call it "foo.bat", it will run the file "foo" when it is
-executed. Since you can run batch files on Win32 platforms simply
-by typing the name (without the extension), this effectively
-runs the file "foo", when you type either "foo" or "foo.bat".
-With this method, "foo.bat" can even be in a different location
-than the file "foo", as long as "foo" is available somewhere on
-the PATH. If your scripts are on a filesystem that allows symbolic
-links, you can even avoid copying "runperl.bat".
-
-Here's a diversion: copy "runperl.bat" to "runperl", and type
-"runperl". Explain the observed behavior, or lack thereof. :)
-Hint: .gnidnats llits er'uoy fi ,"lrepnur" eteled :tniH
-
-=back
-
-=item Miscellaneous Things
-
-A full set of HTML documentation is installed, so you should be
-able to use it if you have a web browser installed on your
-system.
-
-C<perldoc> is also a useful tool for browsing information contained
-in the documentation, especially in conjunction with a pager
-like C<less> (recent versions of which have Win32 support). You may
-have to set the PAGER environment variable to use a specific pager.
-"perldoc -f foo" will print information about the perl operator
-"foo".
-
-If you find bugs in perl, you can run C<perlbug> to create a
-bug report (you may have to send it manually if C<perlbug> cannot
-find a mailer on your system).
-
-=back
-
-=head1 BUGS AND CAVEATS
-
-Norton AntiVirus interferes with the build process, particularly if
-set to "AutoProtect, All Files, when Opened". Unlike large applications
-the perl build process opens and modifies a lot of files. Having the
-the AntiVirus scan each and every one slows build the process significantly.
-Worse, with PERLIO=stdio the build process fails with peculiar messages
-as the virus checker interacts badly with miniperl.exe writing configure
-files (it seems to either catch file part written and treat it as suspicious,
-or virus checker may have it "locked" in a way which inhibits miniperl
-updating it). The build does complete with
-
- set PERLIO=perlio
-
-but that may be just luck. Other AntiVirus software may have similar issues.
-
-Some of the built-in functions do not act exactly as documented in
-L<perlfunc>, and a few are not implemented at all. To avoid
-surprises, particularly if you have had prior exposure to Perl
-in other operating environments or if you intend to write code
-that will be portable to other environments. See L<perlport>
-for a reasonably definitive list of these differences.
-
-Not all extensions available from CPAN may build or work properly
-in the Win32 environment. See L</"Building Extensions">.
-
-Most C<socket()> related calls are supported, but they may not
-behave as on Unix platforms. See L<perlport> for the full list.
-
-Signal handling may not behave as on Unix platforms (where it
-doesn't exactly "behave", either :). For instance, calling C<die()>
-or C<exit()> from signal handlers will cause an exception, since most
-implementations of C<signal()> on Win32 are severely crippled.
-Thus, signals may work only for simple things like setting a flag
-variable in the handler. Using signals under this port should
-currently be considered unsupported.
-
-Please send detailed descriptions of any problems and solutions that
-you may find to <F<perlbug@perl.com>>, along with the output produced
-by C<perl -V>.
-
-=head1 AUTHORS
-
-=over 4
-
-=item Gary Ng E<lt>71564.1743@CompuServe.COME<gt>
-
-=item Gurusamy Sarathy E<lt>gsar@activestate.comE<gt>
-
-=item Nick Ing-Simmons E<lt>nick@ing-simmons.netE<gt>
-
-=back
-
-This document is maintained by Gurusamy Sarathy.
-
-=head1 SEE ALSO
-
-L<perl>
-
-=head1 HISTORY
-
-This port was originally contributed by Gary Ng around 5.003_24,
-and borrowed from the Hip Communications port that was available
-at the time. Various people have made numerous and sundry hacks
-since then.
-
-Borland support was added in 5.004_01 (Gurusamy Sarathy).
-
-GCC/mingw32 support was added in 5.005 (Nick Ing-Simmons).
-
-Support for PERL_OBJECT was added in 5.005 (ActiveState Tool Corp).
-
-Support for fork() emulation was added in 5.6 (ActiveState Tool Corp).
-
-Win9x support was added in 5.6 (Benjamin Stuhl).
-
-Last updated: 1 April 2001
-
-=cut
+If you read this file _as_is_, just ignore the funny characters you
+see. It is written in the POD format (see pod/perlpod.pod) which is
+specially designed to be readable as is.
+
+=head1 NAME
+
+perlwin32 - Perl under Win32
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+These are instructions for building Perl under Windows (9x, NT and
+2000).
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+Before you start, you should glance through the README file
+found in the top-level directory to which the Perl distribution
+was extracted. Make sure you read and understand the terms under
+which this software is being distributed.
+
+Also make sure you read L<BUGS AND CAVEATS> below for the
+known limitations of this port.
+
+The INSTALL file in the perl top-level has much information that is
+only relevant to people building Perl on Unix-like systems. In
+particular, you can safely ignore any information that talks about
+"Configure".
+
+You may also want to look at two other options for building
+a perl that will work on Windows NT: the README.cygwin and
+README.os2 files, each of which give a different set of rules to
+build a Perl that will work on Win32 platforms. Those two methods
+will probably enable you to build a more Unix-compatible perl, but
+you will also need to download and use various other build-time and
+run-time support software described in those files.
+
+This set of instructions is meant to describe a so-called "native"
+port of Perl to Win32 platforms. The resulting Perl requires no
+additional software to run (other than what came with your operating
+system). Currently, this port is capable of using one of the
+following compilers:
+
+ Borland C++ version 5.02 or later
+ Microsoft Visual C++ version 4.2 or later
+ Mingw32 with GCC version 2.95.2 or better
+
+The last of these is a high quality freeware compiler. Support
+for it is still experimental. (Older versions of GCC are known
+not to work.)
+
+This port currently supports MakeMaker (the set of modules that
+is used to build extensions to perl). Therefore, you should be
+able to build and install most extensions found in the CPAN sites.
+See L<Usage Hints for Perl on Win32> below for general hints about this.
+
+=head2 Setting Up Perl on Win32
+
+=over 4
+
+=item Make
+
+You need a "make" program to build the sources. If you are using
+Visual C++ under Windows NT or 2000, nmake will work. All other
+builds need dmake.
+
+dmake is a freely available make that has very nice macro features
+and parallelability.
+
+A port of dmake for Windows is available from:
+
+ http://www.cpan.org/authors/id/GSAR/dmake-4.1pl1-win32.zip
+
+(This is a fixed version of the original dmake sources obtained from
+http://www.wticorp.com/dmake/. As of version 4.1PL1, the original
+sources did not build as shipped and had various other problems.
+A patch is included in the above fixed version.)
+
+Fetch and install dmake somewhere on your path (follow the instructions
+in the README.NOW file).
+
+There exists a minor coexistence problem with dmake and Borland C++
+compilers. Namely, if a distribution has C files named with mixed
+case letters, they will be compiled into appropriate .obj-files named
+with all lowercase letters, and every time dmake is invoked
+to bring files up to date, it will try to recompile such files again.
+For example, Tk distribution has a lot of such files, resulting in
+needless recompiles everytime dmake is invoked. To avoid this, you
+may use the script "sync_ext.pl" after a successful build. It is
+available in the win32 subdirectory of the Perl source distribution.
+
+=item Command Shell
+
+Use the default "cmd" shell that comes with NT. Some versions of the
+popular 4DOS/NT shell have incompatibilities that may cause you trouble.
+If the build fails under that shell, try building again with the cmd
+shell.
+
+The nmake Makefile also has known incompatibilities with the
+"command.com" shell that comes with Windows 9x. You will need to
+use dmake and makefile.mk to build under Windows 9x.
+
+The surest way to build it is on Windows NT, using the cmd shell.
+
+Make sure the path to the build directory does not contain spaces. The
+build usually works in this circumstance, but some tests will fail.
+
+=item Borland C++
+
+If you are using the Borland compiler, you will need dmake.
+(The make that Borland supplies is seriously crippled and will not
+work for MakeMaker builds.)
+
+See L</"Make"> above.
+
+=item Microsoft Visual C++
+
+The nmake that comes with Visual C++ will suffice for building.
+You will need to run the VCVARS32.BAT file, usually found somewhere
+like C:\MSDEV4.2\BIN. This will set your build environment.
+
+You can also use dmake to build using Visual C++; provided, however,
+you set OSRELEASE to "microsft" (or whatever the directory name
+under which the Visual C dmake configuration lives) in your environment
+and edit win32/config.vc to change "make=nmake" into "make=dmake". The
+latter step is only essential if you want to use dmake as your default
+make for building extensions using MakeMaker.
+
+=item Mingw32 with GCC
+
+GCC-2.95.2 binaries can be downloaded from:
+
+ ftp://ftp.xraylith.wisc.edu/pub/khan/gnu-win32/mingw32/
+
+You also need dmake. See L</"Make"> above on how to get it.
+
+The GCC-2.95.2 bundle comes with Mingw32 libraries and headers.
+
+Make sure you install the binaries that work with MSVCRT.DLL as indicated
+in the README for the GCC bundle. You may need to set up a few environment
+variables (usually ran from a batch file).
+
+There are a couple of problems with the version of gcc-2.95.2-msvcrt.exe
+released 7 November 1999:
+
+=over
+
+=item *
+
+It left out a fix for certain command line quotes. To fix this, be sure
+to download and install the file fixes/quote-fix-msvcrt.exe from the above
+ftp location.
+
+=item *
+
+The definition of the fpos_t type in stdio.h may be wrong. If your
+stdio.h has this problem, you will see an exception when running the
+test t/lib/io_xs.t. To fix this, change the typedef for fpos_t from
+"long" to "long long" in the file i386-mingw32msvc/include/stdio.h,
+and rebuild.
+
+=back
+
+A potentially simpler to install (but probably soon-to-be-outdated) bundle
+of the above package with the mentioned fixes already applied is available
+here:
+
+ http://downloads.ActiveState.com/pub/staff/gsar/gcc-2.95.2-msvcrt.zip
+ ftp://ftp.ActiveState.com/pub/staff/gsar/gcc-2.95.2-msvcrt.zip
+
+=back
+
+=head2 Building
+
+=over 4
+
+=item *
+
+Make sure you are in the "win32" subdirectory under the perl toplevel.
+This directory contains a "Makefile" that will work with
+versions of nmake that come with Visual C++, and a dmake "makefile.mk"
+that will work for all supported compilers. The defaults in the dmake
+makefile are setup to build using the GCC compiler.
+
+=item *
+
+Edit the makefile.mk (or Makefile, if you're using nmake) and change
+the values of INST_DRV and INST_TOP. You can also enable various
+build flags. These are explained in the makefiles.
+
+You will have to make sure that CCTYPE is set correctly and that
+CCHOME points to wherever you installed your compiler.
+
+The default value for CCHOME in the makefiles for Visual C++
+may not be correct for some versions. Make sure the default exists
+and is valid.
+
+If you have either the source or a library that contains des_fcrypt(),
+enable the appropriate option in the makefile. des_fcrypt() is not
+bundled with the distribution due to US Government restrictions
+on the export of cryptographic software. Nevertheless, this routine
+is part of the "libdes" library (written by Eric Young) which is widely
+available worldwide, usually along with SSLeay (for example,
+"ftp://ftp.funet.fi/pub/crypt/mirrors/dsi/libdes/"). Set CRYPT_SRC to the
+name of the file that implements des_fcrypt(). Alternatively, if
+you have built a library that contains des_fcrypt(), you can set
+CRYPT_LIB to point to the library name. The location above contains
+many versions of the "libdes" library, all with slightly different
+implementations of des_fcrypt(). Older versions have a single,
+self-contained file (fcrypt.c) that implements crypt(), so they may be
+easier to use. A patch against the fcrypt.c found in libdes-3.06 is
+in des_fcrypt.patch.
+
+An easier alternative may be to get the pre-patched and ready-to-use
+fcrypt.c that can be found here:
+
+ http://downloads.ActiveState.com/pub/staff/gsar/fcrypt.c
+ ftp://ftp.ActiveState.com/pub/staff/gsar/fcrypt.c
+
+Perl will also build without des_fcrypt(), but the crypt() builtin will
+fail at run time.
+
+Be sure to read the instructions near the top of the makefiles carefully.
+
+=item *
+
+Type "dmake" (or "nmake" if you are using that make).
+
+This should build everything. Specifically, it will create perl.exe,
+perl56.dll at the perl toplevel, and various other extension dll's
+under the lib\auto directory. If the build fails for any reason, make
+sure you have done the previous steps correctly.
+
+=back
+
+=head2 Testing Perl on Win32
+
+Type "dmake test" (or "nmake test"). This will run most of the tests from
+the testsuite (many tests will be skipped).
+
+There should be no test failures when running under Windows NT 4.0 or
+Windows 2000. Many tests I<will> fail under Windows 9x due to the inferior
+command shell.
+
+Some test failures may occur if you use a command shell other than the
+native "cmd.exe", or if you are building from a path that contains
+spaces. So don't do that.
+
+If you are running the tests from a emacs shell window, you may see
+failures in op/stat.t. Run "dmake test-notty" in that case.
+
+If you're using the Borland compiler, you may see a failure in op/taint.t
+arising from the inability to find the Borland Runtime DLLs on the system
+default path. You will need to copy the DLLs reported by the messages
+from where Borland chose to install it, into the Windows system directory
+(usually somewhere like C:\WINNT\SYSTEM32) and rerun the test.
+
+If you're using Borland compiler versions 5.2 and below, you may run into
+problems finding the correct header files when building extensions. For
+example, building the "Tk" extension may fail because both perl and Tk
+contain a header file called "patchlevel.h". The latest Borland compiler
+(v5.5) is free of this misbehaviour, and it even supports an
+option -VI- for backward (bugward) compatibility for using the old Borland
+search algorithm to locate header files.
+
+Please report any other failures as described under L<BUGS AND CAVEATS>.
+
+=head2 Installation of Perl on Win32
+
+Type "dmake install" (or "nmake install"). This will put the newly
+built perl and the libraries under whatever C<INST_TOP> points to in the
+Makefile. It will also install the pod documentation under
+C<$INST_TOP\$VERSION\lib\pod> and HTML versions of the same under
+C<$INST_TOP\$VERSION\lib\pod\html>. To use the Perl you just installed,
+you will need to add two components to your PATH environment variable,
+C<$INST_TOP\$VERSION\bin> and C<$INST_TOP\$VERSION\bin\$ARCHNAME>.
+For example:
+
+ set PATH c:\perl\5.6.0\bin;c:\perl\5.6.0\bin\MSWin32-x86;%PATH%
+
+If you opt to comment out INST_VER and INST_ARCH in the makefiles, the
+installation structure is much simpler. In that case, it will be
+sufficient to add a single entry to the path, for instance:
+
+ set PATH c:\perl\bin;%PATH%
+
+=head2 Usage Hints for Perl on Win32
+
+=over 4
+
+=item Environment Variables
+
+The installation paths that you set during the build get compiled
+into perl, so you don't have to do anything additional to start
+using that perl (except add its location to your PATH variable).
+
+If you put extensions in unusual places, you can set PERL5LIB
+to a list of paths separated by semicolons where you want perl
+to look for libraries. Look for descriptions of other environment
+variables you can set in L<perlrun>.
+
+You can also control the shell that perl uses to run system() and
+backtick commands via PERL5SHELL. See L<perlrun>.
+
+Perl does not depend on the registry, but it can look up certain default
+values if you choose to put them there. Perl attempts to read entries from
+C<HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Perl> and C<HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Perl>.
+Entries in the former override entries in the latter. One or more of the
+following entries (of type REG_SZ or REG_EXPAND_SZ) may be set:
+
+ lib-$] version-specific standard library path to add to @INC
+ lib standard library path to add to @INC
+ sitelib-$] version-specific site library path to add to @INC
+ sitelib site library path to add to @INC
+ vendorlib-$] version-specific vendor library path to add to @INC
+ vendorlib vendor library path to add to @INC
+ PERL* fallback for all %ENV lookups that begin with "PERL"
+
+Note the C<$]> in the above is not literal. Substitute whatever version
+of perl you want to honor that entry, e.g. C<5.6.0>. Paths must be
+separated with semicolons, as usual on win32.
+
+=item File Globbing
+
+By default, perl handles file globbing using the File::Glob extension,
+which provides portable globbing.
+
+If you want perl to use globbing that emulates the quirks of DOS
+filename conventions, you might want to consider using File::DosGlob
+to override the internal glob() implementation. See L<File::DosGlob> for
+details.
+
+=item Using perl from the command line
+
+If you are accustomed to using perl from various command-line
+shells found in UNIX environments, you will be less than pleased
+with what Windows offers by way of a command shell.
+
+The crucial thing to understand about the Windows environment is that
+the command line you type in is processed twice before Perl sees it.
+First, your command shell (usually CMD.EXE on Windows NT, and
+COMMAND.COM on Windows 9x) preprocesses the command line, to handle
+redirection, environment variable expansion, and location of the
+executable to run. Then, the perl executable splits the remaining
+command line into individual arguments, using the C runtime library
+upon which Perl was built.
+
+It is particularly important to note that neither the shell nor the C
+runtime do any wildcard expansions of command-line arguments (so
+wildcards need not be quoted). Also, the quoting behaviours of the
+shell and the C runtime are rudimentary at best (and may, if you are
+using a non-standard shell, be inconsistent). The only (useful) quote
+character is the double quote ("). It can be used to protect spaces
+and other special characters in arguments.
+
+The Windows NT documentation has almost no description of how the
+quoting rules are implemented, but here are some general observations
+based on experiments: The C runtime breaks arguments at spaces and
+passes them to programs in argc/argv. Double quotes can be used to
+prevent arguments with spaces in them from being split up. You can
+put a double quote in an argument by escaping it with a backslash and
+enclosing the whole argument within double quotes. The backslash and
+the pair of double quotes surrounding the argument will be stripped by
+the C runtime.
+
+The file redirection characters "<", ">", and "|" can be quoted by
+double quotes (although there are suggestions that this may not always
+be true). Single quotes are not treated as quotes by the shell or
+the C runtime, they don't get stripped by the shell (just to make
+this type of quoting completely useless). The caret "^" has also
+been observed to behave as a quoting character, but this appears
+to be a shell feature, and the caret is not stripped from the command
+line, so Perl still sees it (and the C runtime phase does not treat
+the caret as a quote character).
+
+Here are some examples of usage of the "cmd" shell:
+
+This prints two doublequotes:
+
+ perl -e "print '\"\"' "
+
+This does the same:
+
+ perl -e "print \"\\\"\\\"\" "
+
+This prints "bar" and writes "foo" to the file "blurch":
+
+ perl -e "print 'foo'; print STDERR 'bar'" > blurch
+
+This prints "foo" ("bar" disappears into nowhereland):
+
+ perl -e "print 'foo'; print STDERR 'bar'" 2> nul
+
+This prints "bar" and writes "foo" into the file "blurch":
+
+ perl -e "print 'foo'; print STDERR 'bar'" 1> blurch
+
+This pipes "foo" to the "less" pager and prints "bar" on the console:
+
+ perl -e "print 'foo'; print STDERR 'bar'" | less
+
+This pipes "foo\nbar\n" to the less pager:
+
+ perl -le "print 'foo'; print STDERR 'bar'" 2>&1 | less
+
+This pipes "foo" to the pager and writes "bar" in the file "blurch":
+
+ perl -e "print 'foo'; print STDERR 'bar'" 2> blurch | less
+
+
+Discovering the usefulness of the "command.com" shell on Windows 9x
+is left as an exercise to the reader :)
+
+One particularly pernicious problem with the 4NT command shell for
+Windows NT is that it (nearly) always treats a % character as indicating
+that environment variable expansion is needed. Under this shell, it is
+therefore important to always double any % characters which you want
+Perl to see (for example, for hash variables), even when they are
+quoted.
+
+=item Building Extensions
+
+The Comprehensive Perl Archive Network (CPAN) offers a wealth
+of extensions, some of which require a C compiler to build.
+Look in http://www.cpan.org/ for more information on CPAN.
+
+Note that not all of the extensions available from CPAN may work
+in the Win32 environment; you should check the information at
+http://testers.cpan.org/ before investing too much effort into
+porting modules that don't readily build.
+
+Most extensions (whether they require a C compiler or not) can
+be built, tested and installed with the standard mantra:
+
+ perl Makefile.PL
+ $MAKE
+ $MAKE test
+ $MAKE install
+
+where $MAKE is whatever 'make' program you have configured perl to
+use. Use "perl -V:make" to find out what this is. Some extensions
+may not provide a testsuite (so "$MAKE test" may not do anything or
+fail), but most serious ones do.
+
+It is important that you use a supported 'make' program, and
+ensure Config.pm knows about it. If you don't have nmake, you can
+either get dmake from the location mentioned earlier or get an
+old version of nmake reportedly available from:
+
+ ftp://ftp.microsoft.com/Softlib/MSLFILES/nmake15.exe
+
+Another option is to use the make written in Perl, available from
+CPAN:
+
+ http://www.cpan.org/authors/id/NI-S/Make-0.03.tar.gz
+
+You may also use dmake. See L</"Make"> above on how to get it.
+
+Note that MakeMaker actually emits makefiles with different syntax
+depending on what 'make' it thinks you are using. Therefore, it is
+important that one of the following values appears in Config.pm:
+
+ make='nmake' # MakeMaker emits nmake syntax
+ make='dmake' # MakeMaker emits dmake syntax
+ any other value # MakeMaker emits generic make syntax
+ (e.g GNU make, or Perl make)
+
+If the value doesn't match the 'make' program you want to use,
+edit Config.pm to fix it.
+
+If a module implements XSUBs, you will need one of the supported
+C compilers. You must make sure you have set up the environment for
+the compiler for command-line compilation.
+
+If a module does not build for some reason, look carefully for
+why it failed, and report problems to the module author. If
+it looks like the extension building support is at fault, report
+that with full details of how the build failed using the perlbug
+utility.
+
+=item Command-line Wildcard Expansion
+
+The default command shells on DOS descendant operating systems (such
+as they are) usually do not expand wildcard arguments supplied to
+programs. They consider it the application's job to handle that.
+This is commonly achieved by linking the application (in our case,
+perl) with startup code that the C runtime libraries usually provide.
+However, doing that results in incompatible perl versions (since the
+behavior of the argv expansion code differs depending on the
+compiler, and it is even buggy on some compilers). Besides, it may
+be a source of frustration if you use such a perl binary with an
+alternate shell that *does* expand wildcards.
+
+Instead, the following solution works rather well. The nice things
+about it are 1) you can start using it right away; 2) it is more
+powerful, because it will do the right thing with a pattern like
+*/*/*.c; 3) you can decide whether you do/don't want to use it; and
+4) you can extend the method to add any customizations (or even
+entirely different kinds of wildcard expansion).
+
+ C:\> copy con c:\perl\lib\Wild.pm
+ # Wild.pm - emulate shell @ARGV expansion on shells that don't
+ use File::DosGlob;
+ @ARGV = map {
+ my @g = File::DosGlob::glob($_) if /[*?]/;
+ @g ? @g : $_;
+ } @ARGV;
+ 1;
+ ^Z
+ C:\> set PERL5OPT=-MWild
+ C:\> perl -le "for (@ARGV) { print }" */*/perl*.c
+ p4view/perl/perl.c
+ p4view/perl/perlio.c
+ p4view/perl/perly.c
+ perl5.005/win32/perlglob.c
+ perl5.005/win32/perllib.c
+ perl5.005/win32/perlglob.c
+ perl5.005/win32/perllib.c
+ perl5.005/win32/perlglob.c
+ perl5.005/win32/perllib.c
+
+Note there are two distinct steps there: 1) You'll have to create
+Wild.pm and put it in your perl lib directory. 2) You'll need to
+set the PERL5OPT environment variable. If you want argv expansion
+to be the default, just set PERL5OPT in your default startup
+environment.
+
+If you are using the Visual C compiler, you can get the C runtime's
+command line wildcard expansion built into perl binary. The resulting
+binary will always expand unquoted command lines, which may not be
+what you want if you use a shell that does that for you. The expansion
+done is also somewhat less powerful than the approach suggested above.
+
+=item Win32 Specific Extensions
+
+A number of extensions specific to the Win32 platform are available
+from CPAN. You may find that many of these extensions are meant to
+be used under the Activeware port of Perl, which used to be the only
+native port for the Win32 platform. Since the Activeware port does not
+have adequate support for Perl's extension building tools, these
+extensions typically do not support those tools either and, therefore,
+cannot be built using the generic steps shown in the previous section.
+
+To ensure smooth transitioning of existing code that uses the
+ActiveState port, there is a bundle of Win32 extensions that contains
+all of the ActiveState extensions and most other Win32 extensions from
+CPAN in source form, along with many added bugfixes, and with MakeMaker
+support. This bundle is available at:
+
+ http://www.cpan.org/authors/id/GSAR/libwin32-0.151.zip
+
+See the README in that distribution for building and installation
+instructions. Look for later versions that may be available at the
+same location.
+
+=item Running Perl Scripts
+
+Perl scripts on UNIX use the "#!" (a.k.a "shebang") line to
+indicate to the OS that it should execute the file using perl.
+Win32 has no comparable means to indicate arbitrary files are
+executables.
+
+Instead, all available methods to execute plain text files on
+Win32 rely on the file "extension". There are three methods
+to use this to execute perl scripts:
+
+=over 8
+
+=item 1
+
+There is a facility called "file extension associations" that will
+work in Windows NT 4.0. This can be manipulated via the two
+commands "assoc" and "ftype" that come standard with Windows NT
+4.0. Type "ftype /?" for a complete example of how to set this
+up for perl scripts (Say what? You thought Windows NT wasn't
+perl-ready? :).
+
+=item 2
+
+Since file associations don't work everywhere, and there are
+reportedly bugs with file associations where it does work, the
+old method of wrapping the perl script to make it look like a
+regular batch file to the OS, may be used. The install process
+makes available the "pl2bat.bat" script which can be used to wrap
+perl scripts into batch files. For example:
+
+ pl2bat foo.pl
+
+will create the file "FOO.BAT". Note "pl2bat" strips any
+.pl suffix and adds a .bat suffix to the generated file.
+
+If you use the 4DOS/NT or similar command shell, note that
+"pl2bat" uses the "%*" variable in the generated batch file to
+refer to all the command line arguments, so you may need to make
+sure that construct works in batch files. As of this writing,
+4DOS/NT users will need a "ParameterChar = *" statement in their
+4NT.INI file or will need to execute "setdos /p*" in the 4DOS/NT
+startup file to enable this to work.
+
+=item 3
+
+Using "pl2bat" has a few problems: the file name gets changed,
+so scripts that rely on C<$0> to find what they must do may not
+run properly; running "pl2bat" replicates the contents of the
+original script, and so this process can be maintenance intensive
+if the originals get updated often. A different approach that
+avoids both problems is possible.
+
+A script called "runperl.bat" is available that can be copied
+to any filename (along with the .bat suffix). For example,
+if you call it "foo.bat", it will run the file "foo" when it is
+executed. Since you can run batch files on Win32 platforms simply
+by typing the name (without the extension), this effectively
+runs the file "foo", when you type either "foo" or "foo.bat".
+With this method, "foo.bat" can even be in a different location
+than the file "foo", as long as "foo" is available somewhere on
+the PATH. If your scripts are on a filesystem that allows symbolic
+links, you can even avoid copying "runperl.bat".
+
+Here's a diversion: copy "runperl.bat" to "runperl", and type
+"runperl". Explain the observed behavior, or lack thereof. :)
+Hint: .gnidnats llits er'uoy fi ,"lrepnur" eteled :tniH
+
+=back
+
+=item Miscellaneous Things
+
+A full set of HTML documentation is installed, so you should be
+able to use it if you have a web browser installed on your
+system.
+
+C<perldoc> is also a useful tool for browsing information contained
+in the documentation, especially in conjunction with a pager
+like C<less> (recent versions of which have Win32 support). You may
+have to set the PAGER environment variable to use a specific pager.
+"perldoc -f foo" will print information about the perl operator
+"foo".
+
+If you find bugs in perl, you can run C<perlbug> to create a
+bug report (you may have to send it manually if C<perlbug> cannot
+find a mailer on your system).
+
+=back
+
+=head1 BUGS AND CAVEATS
+
+Norton AntiVirus interferes with the build process, particularly if
+set to "AutoProtect, All Files, when Opened". Unlike large applications
+the perl build process opens and modifies a lot of files. Having the
+the AntiVirus scan each and every one slows build the process significantly.
+Worse, with PERLIO=stdio the build process fails with peculiar messages
+as the virus checker interacts badly with miniperl.exe writing configure
+files (it seems to either catch file part written and treat it as suspicious,
+or virus checker may have it "locked" in a way which inhibits miniperl
+updating it). The build does complete with
+
+ set PERLIO=perlio
+
+but that may be just luck. Other AntiVirus software may have similar issues.
+
+Some of the built-in functions do not act exactly as documented in
+L<perlfunc>, and a few are not implemented at all. To avoid
+surprises, particularly if you have had prior exposure to Perl
+in other operating environments or if you intend to write code
+that will be portable to other environments. See L<perlport>
+for a reasonably definitive list of these differences.
+
+Not all extensions available from CPAN may build or work properly
+in the Win32 environment. See L</"Building Extensions">.
+
+Most C<socket()> related calls are supported, but they may not
+behave as on Unix platforms. See L<perlport> for the full list.
+
+Signal handling may not behave as on Unix platforms (where it
+doesn't exactly "behave", either :). For instance, calling C<die()>
+or C<exit()> from signal handlers will cause an exception, since most
+implementations of C<signal()> on Win32 are severely crippled.
+Thus, signals may work only for simple things like setting a flag
+variable in the handler. Using signals under this port should
+currently be considered unsupported.
+
+Please send detailed descriptions of any problems and solutions that
+you may find to <F<perlbug@perl.com>>, along with the output produced
+by C<perl -V>.
+
+=head1 AUTHORS
+
+=over 4
+
+=item Gary Ng E<lt>71564.1743@CompuServe.COME<gt>
+
+=item Gurusamy Sarathy E<lt>gsar@activestate.comE<gt>
+
+=item Nick Ing-Simmons E<lt>nick@ing-simmons.netE<gt>
+
+=back
+
+This document is maintained by Gurusamy Sarathy.
+
+=head1 SEE ALSO
+
+L<perl>
+
+=head1 HISTORY
+
+This port was originally contributed by Gary Ng around 5.003_24,
+and borrowed from the Hip Communications port that was available
+at the time. Various people have made numerous and sundry hacks
+since then.
+
+Borland support was added in 5.004_01 (Gurusamy Sarathy).
+
+GCC/mingw32 support was added in 5.005 (Nick Ing-Simmons).
+
+Support for PERL_OBJECT was added in 5.005 (ActiveState Tool Corp).
+
+Support for fork() emulation was added in 5.6 (ActiveState Tool Corp).
+
+Win9x support was added in 5.6 (Benjamin Stuhl).
+
+Last updated: 1 April 2001
+
+=cut
View
11 XSUB.h
@@ -61,9 +61,9 @@ handled automatically by C<xsubpp>.
#define ST(off) PL_stack_base[ax + (off)]
#if defined(__CYGWIN__) && defined(USE_DYNAMIC_LOADING)
-# define XS(name) __declspec(dllexport) void name(pTHXo_ CV* cv)
+# define XS(name) __declspec(dllexport) void name(pTHX_ CV* cv)
#else
-# define XS(name) void name(pTHXo_ CV* cv)
+# define XS(name) void name(pTHX_ CV* cv)
#endif
#define dAX I32 ax = MARK - PL_stack_base + 1
@@ -92,7 +92,7 @@ handled automatically by C<xsubpp>.
#define dXSFUNCTION(ret) XSINTERFACE_CVT(ret,XSFUNCTION)
#define XSINTERFACE_FUNC(ret,cv,f) ((XSINTERFACE_CVT(ret,))(f))
#define XSINTERFACE_FUNC_SET(cv,f) \
- CvXSUBANY(cv).any_dptr = (void (*) (pTHXo_ void*))(f)
+ CvXSUBANY(cv).any_dptr = (void (*) (pTHX_ void*))(f)
/* Simple macros to put new mortal values onto the stack. */
/* Typically used to return values from XS functions. */
@@ -247,7 +247,6 @@ C<xsubpp>. See L<perlxs/"The VERSIONCHECK: Keyword">.
#endif
#include "perlapi.h"
-#include "objXSUB.h"
#if defined(PERL_IMPLICIT_CONTEXT) && !defined(PERL_NO_GET_CONTEXT) && !defined(PERL_CORE)
# undef aTHX
@@ -256,7 +255,7 @@ C<xsubpp>. See L<perlxs/"The VERSIONCHECK: Keyword">.
# define aTHX_ aTHX,
#endif
-#if (defined(PERL_CAPI) || defined(PERL_IMPLICIT_SYS)) && !defined(PERL_CORE)
+#if defined(PERL_IMPLICIT_SYS) && !defined(PERL_CORE)
# ifndef NO_XSLOCKS
# if defined (NETWARE) && defined (USE_STDIO)
# define times PerlProc_times
@@ -450,6 +449,6 @@ C<xsubpp>. See L<perlxs/"The VERSIONCHECK: Keyword">.
# define socketpair PerlSock_socketpair
# endif /* NETWARE && USE_STDIO */
# endif /* NO_XSLOCKS */
-#endif /* PERL_CAPI */
+#endif /* PERL_IMPLICIT_SYS && !PERL_CORE */
#endif /* _INC_PERL_XSUB_H */ /* include guard */
View
13 bytecode.pl
@@ -71,13 +71,6 @@ package B::Asmdata;
#define NO_XSLOCKS
#include "XSUB.h"
-#ifdef PERL_OBJECT
-#undef CALL_FPTR
-#define CALL_FPTR(fptr) (pPerl->*fptr)
-#undef PL_ppaddr
-#define PL_ppaddr (*get_ppaddr())
-#endif
-
#include "byterun.h"
#include "bytecode.h"
@@ -93,7 +86,7 @@ package B::Asmdata;
};
void *
-bset_obj_store(pTHXo_ struct byteloader_state *bstate, void *obj, I32 ix)
+bset_obj_store(pTHX_ struct byteloader_state *bstate, void *obj, I32 ix)
{
if (ix > bstate->bs_obj_list_fill) {
Renew(bstate->bs_obj_list, ix + 32, void*);
@@ -104,7 +97,7 @@ package B::Asmdata;
}
void
-byterun(pTHXo_ register struct byteloader_state *bstate)
+byterun(pTHX_ register struct byteloader_state *bstate)
{
register int insn;
U32 ix;
@@ -209,7 +202,7 @@ package B::Asmdata;
int bl_getc(struct byteloader_fdata *);
int bl_read(struct byteloader_fdata *, char *, size_t, size_t);
-extern void byterun(pTHXo_ struct byteloader_state *);
+extern void byterun(pTHX_ struct byteloader_state *);
enum {
EOT
View
2 cv.h
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ struct xpvcv {
HV * xcv_stash;
OP * xcv_start;
OP * xcv_root;
- void (*xcv_xsub) (pTHXo_ CV*);
+ void (*xcv_xsub) (pTHX_ CV*);
ANY xcv_xsubany;
GV * xcv_gv;
char * xcv_file;
View
6 cygwin/cygwin.c
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@
static int
do_spawnvp (const char *path, const char * const *argv)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
Sigsave_t ihand,qhand;
int childpid, result, status;
@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ do_spawnvp (const char *path, const char * const *argv)
int
do_aspawn (SV *really, void **mark, void **sp)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
int rc;
char **a,*tmps,**argv;
STRLEN n_a;
@@ -78,7 +78,7 @@ do_aspawn (SV *really, void **mark, void **sp)
int
do_spawn (char *cmd)
{
- dTHXo;
+ dTHX;
char **a,*s,*metachars = "$&*(){}[]'\";\\?>|<~`\n";
const char *command[4];
View
4 emacs/ptags
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ if test ! -z "$OS2_SHELL"; then alias find=gnufind; fi
# Move autogenerated less-informative files to the end:
# Hard to do embed.h and embedvar.h in one sweep:
-topfiles="`echo ' ' *.y *.c *.h ' ' | sed 's/ / /g' | sed 's/ embedvar\.h\|embed\.h\|perlapi\.h\|obj\(pp\|XSUB\)\.h\|\(globals\|perlapi\)\.c / /g'`"
+topfiles="`echo ' ' *.y *.c *.h ' ' | sed 's/ / /g' | sed 's/ embedvar\.h\|embed\.h\|perlapi\.h\|\(globals\|perlapi\)\.c / /g'`"
subdirs="`find ./* -maxdepth 0 -type d`"
subdirfiles="`find $subdirs -name '*.[cy]' -print | sort`"
subdirfiles1="`find $subdirs -name '*.[hH]' -print | sort`"
@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ perl -w014pe 'if (s/^(S_ # 1: First group
}' TAGS.tmp > TAGS.tm1 && mv TAGS.tm1 TAGS.tmp
etags -o TAGS.tmp -a -D -l none -r '/#define.*\t\(Perl_.*\)/\1/' embed.h
-etags -o TAGS.tmp -a globals.c embedvar.h objXSUB.h perlapi.c perlapi.h
+etags -o TAGS.tmp -a globals.c embedvar.h perlapi.c perlapi.h
# The above processes created a lot of descriptions with an
# an explicitly specified tag. Such descriptions have higher
View
3,062 embed.h
40 additions, 3,022 deletions not shown because the diff is too large. Please use a local Git client to view these changes.
View
365 embed.pl
@@ -266,7 +266,7 @@ ($$)
sub bincompat_var ($$) {
my ($pfx, $sym) = @_;
- my $arg = ($pfx eq 'G' ? 'NULL' : 'aTHXo');
+ my $arg = ($pfx eq 'G' ? 'NULL' : 'aTHX');
undefine("PL_$sym") . hide("PL_$sym", "(*Perl_${pfx}${sym}_ptr($arg))");
}
@@ -331,7 +331,6 @@ ($$)
/* Hide global symbols */
-#if !defined(PERL_OBJECT)
#if !defined(PERL_IMPLICIT_CONTEXT)
END
@@ -425,43 +424,11 @@ END
print EM <<'END';
#endif /* PERL_IMPLICIT_CONTEXT */
-#else /* PERL_OBJECT */
END
-walk_table {
- my $ret = "";
- if (@_ == 1) {
- my $arg = shift;
- $ret .= "$arg\n" if $arg =~ /^#\s*(if|ifn?def|else|endif)\b/;
- }
- else {
- my ($flags,$retval,$func,@args) = @_;
- if ($flags =~ /s/) {
- $ret .= hide("S_$func","CPerlObj::S_$func") if $flags !~ /j/;
- $ret .= hide($func,"S_$func");
- }
- elsif ($flags =~ /p/) {
- $ret .= hide("Perl_$func","CPerlObj::Perl_$func") if $flags !~ /j/;
- $ret .= hide($func,"Perl_$func");
- }
- else {
- $ret .= hide($func,"CPerlObj::$func") if $flags !~ /j/;
- }
- }
- $ret;
-} \*EM;
-
-for $sym (sort keys %ppsym) {
- $sym =~ s/^Perl_//;
- print EM hide("Perl_$sym", "CPerlObj::Perl_$sym");
- print EM hide($sym, "Perl_$sym");
-}
-
print EM <<'END';
-#endif /* PERL_OBJECT */
-
/* Compatibility stubs. Compile extensions with -DPERL_NOCOMPAT to
disable them.
*/
@@ -502,7 +469,7 @@ END
an extra argument but grab the context pointer using the macro
dTHX.
*/