New issue

Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community.

By clicking “Sign up for GitHub”, you agree to our terms of service and privacy statement. We’ll occasionally send you account related emails.

Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account

Implement flexible target specs #16093

Closed
brson opened this Issue Jul 30, 2014 · 2 comments

Comments

Projects
None yet
2 participants
@brson
Contributor

brson commented Jul 30, 2014

@brson

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@brson

brson Jul 30, 2014

Contributor

@cmr @mneumann just ported to DragonFly and had some final suggestions in the RFC thread

Contributor

brson commented Jul 30, 2014

@cmr @mneumann just ported to DragonFly and had some final suggestions in the RFC thread

@bharrisau

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@bharrisau

bharrisau Jul 30, 2014

Contributor

Something to plan for, but not implement this pass, is creating a #[cfg(target_libc = "")]. liblibc uses the target_os to work out which libc to use. Linux is glibc, Windows is msvcrt, android is Bionic, Mac/BSD is BSD libc, many other platforms are moving to newlib. Changing liblibc to be thinking about the libc instead of the OS might/should make porting easier (as you'd probably be using an existing libc).

Contributor

bharrisau commented Jul 30, 2014

Something to plan for, but not implement this pass, is creating a #[cfg(target_libc = "")]. liblibc uses the target_os to work out which libc to use. Linux is glibc, Windows is msvcrt, android is Bionic, Mac/BSD is BSD libc, many other platforms are moving to newlib. Changing liblibc to be thinking about the libc instead of the OS might/should make porting easier (as you'd probably be using an existing libc).

cmr added a commit that referenced this issue Aug 1, 2014

Implement flexible target specification
Removes all target-specific knowledge from rustc. Changes the targets we
accept to:

arm-apple-darwin
arm-linux-androideabi
arm-unknown-linux-gnueabi
arm-unknown-linux-gnueabihf

i686-apple-darwin
i686-pc-windows-gnu
i686-unknown-freebsd
i686-unknown-linux-gnu

mips-unknown-linux-gnu
mipsel-unknown-linux-gnu

x86_64-apple-darwin
x86_64-unknown-freebsd
x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu
x86_64-pc-windows-gnu

Closes #16093

[breaking-change]

vadimcn added a commit to vadimcn/rust that referenced this issue Aug 21, 2014

Implement flexible target specification
Removes all target-specific knowledge from rustc. Some targets have changed
during this, but none of these should be very visible outside of
cross-compilation. The changes make our targets more consistent.

iX86-unknown-linux-gnu is now only available as i686-unknown-linux-gnu. We
used to accept any value of X greater than 1. i686 was released in 1995, and
should encompass the bare nimimum of what Rust supports on x86 CPUs.

The only two windows targets are now i686-pc-windows-gnu and
x86_64-pc-windows-gnu.

The iOS target has been renamed from arm-apple-ios to arm-apple-darwin.

A complete list of the targets we accept now:

arm-apple-darwin
arm-linux-androideabi
arm-unknown-linux-gnueabi
arm-unknown-linux-gnueabihf

i686-apple-darwin
i686-pc-windows-gnu
i686-unknown-freebsd
i686-unknown-linux-gnu

mips-unknown-linux-gnu
mipsel-unknown-linux-gnu

x86_64-apple-darwin
x86_64-unknown-freebsd
x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu
x86_64-pc-windows-gnu

Closes #16093

[breaking-change]

Conflicts:
	src/librustc/back/link.rs
	src/librustc/middle/trans/cabi_x86.rs
	src/librustc_back/archive.rs

cmr added a commit that referenced this issue Aug 24, 2014

Implement flexible target specification
Removes all target-specific knowledge from rustc. Some targets have changed
during this, but none of these should be very visible outside of
cross-compilation. The changes make our targets more consistent.

iX86-unknown-linux-gnu is now only available as i686-unknown-linux-gnu. We
used to accept any value of X greater than 1. i686 was released in 1995, and
should encompass the bare nimimum of what Rust supports on x86 CPUs.

The only two windows targets are now i686-pc-windows-gnu and
x86_64-pc-windows-gnu.

The iOS target has been renamed from arm-apple-ios to arm-apple-darwin.

A complete list of the targets we accept now:

arm-apple-darwin
arm-linux-androideabi
arm-unknown-linux-gnueabi
arm-unknown-linux-gnueabihf

i686-apple-darwin
i686-pc-windows-gnu
i686-unknown-freebsd
i686-unknown-linux-gnu

mips-unknown-linux-gnu
mipsel-unknown-linux-gnu

x86_64-apple-darwin
x86_64-unknown-freebsd
x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu
x86_64-pc-windows-gnu

Closes #16093

[breaking-change]

Conflicts:
	src/librustc/back/link.rs
	src/librustc/middle/trans/cabi_x86.rs
	src/librustc_back/archive.rs

eddyb added a commit to eddyb/rust that referenced this issue Sep 20, 2014

Implement flexible target specification
Removes all target-specific knowledge from rustc. Some targets have changed
during this, but none of these should be very visible outside of
cross-compilation. The changes make our targets more consistent.

iX86-unknown-linux-gnu is now only available as i686-unknown-linux-gnu. We
used to accept any value of X greater than 1. i686 was released in 1995, and
should encompass the bare minimum of what Rust supports on x86 CPUs.

The only two windows targets are now i686-pc-windows-gnu and
x86_64-pc-windows-gnu.

The iOS target has been renamed from arm-apple-ios to arm-apple-darwin.

A complete list of the targets we accept now:

arm-apple-darwin
arm-linux-androideabi
arm-unknown-linux-gnueabi
arm-unknown-linux-gnueabihf

i686-apple-darwin
i686-pc-windows-gnu
i686-unknown-freebsd
i686-unknown-linux-gnu

mips-unknown-linux-gnu
mipsel-unknown-linux-gnu

x86_64-apple-darwin
x86_64-unknown-freebsd
x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu
x86_64-pc-windows-gnu

Closes #16093

[breaking-change]

vadimcn added a commit to vadimcn/rust that referenced this issue Oct 30, 2014

Implement flexible target specification
Removes all target-specific knowledge from rustc. Some targets have changed
during this, but none of these should be very visible outside of
cross-compilation. The changes make our targets more consistent.

iX86-unknown-linux-gnu is now only available as i686-unknown-linux-gnu. We
used to accept any value of X greater than 1. i686 was released in 1995, and
should encompass the bare minimum of what Rust supports on x86 CPUs.

The only two windows targets are now i686-pc-windows-gnu and
x86_64-pc-windows-gnu.

The iOS target has been renamed from arm-apple-ios to arm-apple-darwin.

A complete list of the targets we accept now:

arm-apple-darwin
arm-linux-androideabi
arm-unknown-linux-gnueabi
arm-unknown-linux-gnueabihf

i686-apple-darwin
i686-pc-windows-gnu
i686-unknown-freebsd
i686-unknown-linux-gnu

mips-unknown-linux-gnu
mipsel-unknown-linux-gnu

x86_64-apple-darwin
x86_64-unknown-freebsd
x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu
x86_64-pc-windows-gnu

Closes #16093

[breaking-change]

vadimcn added a commit to vadimcn/rust that referenced this issue Nov 1, 2014

Implement flexible target specification
Removes all target-specific knowledge from rustc. Some targets have changed
during this, but none of these should be very visible outside of
cross-compilation. The changes make our targets more consistent.

iX86-unknown-linux-gnu is now only available as i686-unknown-linux-gnu. We
used to accept any value of X greater than 1. i686 was released in 1995, and
should encompass the bare minimum of what Rust supports on x86 CPUs.

The only two windows targets are now i686-pc-windows-gnu and
x86_64-pc-windows-gnu.

The iOS target has been renamed from arm-apple-ios to arm-apple-darwin.

A complete list of the targets we accept now:

arm-apple-darwin
arm-linux-androideabi
arm-unknown-linux-gnueabi
arm-unknown-linux-gnueabihf

i686-apple-darwin
i686-pc-windows-gnu
i686-unknown-freebsd
i686-unknown-linux-gnu

mips-unknown-linux-gnu
mipsel-unknown-linux-gnu

x86_64-apple-darwin
x86_64-unknown-freebsd
x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu
x86_64-pc-windows-gnu

Closes #16093

[breaking-change]

@cmr cmr closed this in 6b130e3 Nov 4, 2014

Sign up for free to join this conversation on GitHub. Already have an account? Sign in to comment