Find file History
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
..
Failed to load latest commit information.
BUGS
CHANGELOG
COPYING
INSTALL
Makefile
README
TODO
VERSION
create-localdecls
installwatch
installwatch.c
libctest.c
test-installwatch.c

README

######################################
# Welcome to installwatch 0.7.0beta7 #
######################################

================
The short story:

   Installwatch is Copyright 1998 by Pancrazio `Ezio' de Mauro
   <p@demauro.net>

   * Installwatch is no longer mantained by Pancrazio, you should now contact
      me with any issues relating to it:

      Felipe Eduardo Sanchez Diaz Duran <izto at asic-linux.com.mx>
      http://asic-linux.com.mx/~izto

   This package is distributed under the GPL license. Have a look at
   COPYING if you don't know what it means.

   To use it, just type:

           installwatch <command>

   This monitors <command> and logs using the syslog(3) facility every created
   or modified file.

           installwatch -o <filename> <command>

   does the same thing, but writing data in <filename>, which is truncated
   if it already exixts.

   The typical use is:

           installwatch -o ~/install/foobar-x.y make install

   Extra options are displayed by running:

           installwatch --help

===============
The long story:

   Installwatch is an extremely simple utility I wrote to keep track of
   created and modified files during the installation of a new program.

   It's fast and easy to use. It doesn't require a ``pre-install'' phase
   because it monitors processes while they run.

   Installwatch works with every dynamically linked ELF program,
   overriding system calls that cause file system alterations. Some of
   such system calls are open(2) and unlink(2).

   Installwatch is especially useful on RedHat, Debian and similar
   distributions, where you can use a package system to keep track
   of installed software.  (See specific package details below).

   Of course a simple `make install' does not update the package database,
   making your installation ``dirty'' -- well, kind of.

   If your room is a mess but you make RPMS even for your home directory,
   then installwatch is for you.  (See RPMS below).

   Here's a typical installwatch use. After compiling your brand new
   package, just type

           installwatch make install

   instead of a simple make install. Then have a look at your logs.

   Installwatch logs by default using syslog(3), with a
   ``LOG_USER | LOG_INFO'' priority.

   Usually the log file is /var/log/messages, but if may vary.

   If you want to log on a particular file (my preferred method) just
   type:

           installwatch -o filename make install

   The log format may look ugly at first glance, but it is designed to
   be easily processed by programs.

   Every record ends with a newline, every field is delimited with a TAB
   character (it is ``^I'' when you use syslog.)

   The fields of a record are, in order:

	   <return-value> <syscall-name> <arguments> #<comment>

   So made lines are really easy to process, if arguments don't contain
   TABs or pound signs.

=====
RPMS:

   Ok, so you've done a "installwatch -o logfile make install", but how do
   you tell the RPM database about this? You use CheckInstall.

   http://asic-linux.com.mx/~izto/checkinstall

   The inst2rpm script that used to be distributed along with installwatch
   is not supported by me, it has been superseeded by CheckInstall.

   If you still want it, you can get an older version of installwatch (0.5.6),
   where you will find it inside the contrib directory. Installwatch's versions
   starting from 0.5.5 are available at
   
   http://asic-linux.com.mx/~izto/installwatch.html

===============
$Id: README,v 0.7.0.2 2006/11/01 07:34:36 izto Exp $