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Finalizing (most) details.

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Sam Jacoby
Sam Jacoby committed Apr 6, 2013
1 parent 9eca327 commit a98569e4ef699112a415cd670d56c85e6c174f9f
Showing with 58 additions and 14 deletions.
  1. +58 −14 site/content/posts/posts/sparkfun-workshop.html
@@ -5,18 +5,30 @@
---
*This is a compendium of resources assembled for a workshop over the weekend of April 6 and 7 at SparkFun Electronics in Boulder, Colorado.*
+
## Workshop Description
We’ll explore conductive inks and other materials to create unique, interactive musical instruments. Learn the basics of embedded microcontroller programming and circuit design, while crafting miniature synthesizers using a combination of electronics, programming, and art materials. For those interested, we can delve into the mysteries of FM sound generation and work on creating structed, pictorial representations of sound. No experience necessary—but you’ve got to love crafts, drawing, sound, and learning new ways of making electronics.
-## Surveys
+
+## Contents
+
+- [Surveys](#surveys)
+- [Schedule](#schedule)
+- [Paper Speakers](#paper-speakers)
+- [TinyProgrammer](#tinyprogrammer)
+- [TinySynth](#tinysynth)
+- [Battery Holder](#battery-holder)
+- [Helpful Information](#helpful-information)
+
+## <a id="surveys"></a>Surveys
For our ongoing research at [High-Low Tech](http://hlt.media.mit.edu) and my own thesis, there is a pre-and-post workshop survey that should be filled out. There'll be paper copies available, but filling it out online is quicker and easier!
- [Pre-Workshop Survey](https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/HXQLFJ2)
- [Post-Workshop Survey](http://#)
If you've happened to stumble on this survey and *won't* be attending the workshop, make my life a little easier and don't fill it out!
-## Schedule (tentative)
+## <a id="schedule"></a>Schedule (theoretically)
<table>
<tr><td>**9:00** </td><td>Surveys!</td></tr>
<tr><td>**9:15** </td><td>Introductions (me, mostly)</td></tr>
@@ -29,10 +41,11 @@
<tr><td>**1:15** </td><td>Programming TinySynth </td></tr>
<tr><td>**1:30** </td><td>Code overview</td></tr>
<tr><td>**1:45** </td><td>Make some Synths!</td></tr>
+<tr><td>**2:10** </td><td> <span style="color: red">Break</span></td></tr>
<tr><td>**4:45** </td><td>Fill out post-workshop survey</td></tr>
</table>
-## Paper Speakers
+## <a id="paper-speakers"></a>Paper Speakers
I've written up the basics, gleaned from many-a-resource, here:
@@ -50,38 +63,69 @@
- [Printed + Handmade Headphones](http://www.karich.cl/?p=601)
- [Dollar Bill Ghetto Blaster](http://www.karich.cl/?p=172)
-## TinySynth
+### <a id="templates"></a> Templates
+I put together a simple template, that guides you on how to make the design shown here, [Speakers Paperish](http://localhost:8080/posts/2013/4/1/speaker-paperish). It's just a rough guideline, but can give you some ideas. Download the the PDF here: [Business Card Paper Speaker Template](/files/paper-speaker-template.pdf).
+
+### <a id="tinyprogrammer"></a> TinyProgrammer
+
+- TinyProgrammer ([SparkFun](https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11460))
+
+The TinyProgrammer is a sweet little tool that vastly simplifies the programming of Atmel's ATTiny45/85 microcontrollers. The ATTiny can do just about everything an Arduino can do (Atmel makes the ATmega168/32U4), but are much cheaper, smaller, and more easily embedded. If you want to make twenty of something, it's a lot easier to get your hands on 20 ATTiny's (they're [$.95]() on SparkFun) than 20 Arduinos. [David Mellis](http://media.mit.edu/~mellis) designed this one. Or actually, he designed one, and SparkFun redesigned it to make it way better.
+
+To get started with it on your computer, you'll need (a) to have the Arduino IDE installed (get it [here](http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Software) if you haven't already) and (b) have ATTiny installed (it doesn't come with the normal download). While the ATTiny is an Atmel chip (like the chips that power the Arduino), Arduino doesn't come with support for the ATTiny family out-of-the-box, so you'll have to follow the tutorial below to add ATTiny Support. Hopefully this'll change at some point.
+
+- [TinyProgrammer Tutorial](http://hlt.media.mit.edu/?p=1695)
+## <a id="tinysynth"></a>TinySynth
+
+The TinySynth is a simple circuit that used an eight-bit microcontroller to make sounds. We'll need:
-The TinySynth is an eight-bit microcontroller that makes sounds. We'll need:
- TinyProgrammer
-- Tiny45V
+- ATTiny45/85
- Coin Cell
- [Paper Speaker](/posts/2013/4/1/speaker-paperish/)
- Conductive Ink
-Getting up and playing with the Tiny is simple enough. Most of the default Arduino sketches work with the ATTIny outt've of the box. Some things will have to be tweaked, though, as the default Arduino pins don't necessarily map to anything useful on the Tiny--pin 13, which by default is connected to an LED on an Arduino board doesn't go anywhere on a Tiny:
+Getting up and playing with the Tiny is simple enough. Most of the default Arduino sketches work with the ATTiny outt've of the box. Some things will have to be tweaked, though, as the default Arduino pins don't necessarily map to anything useful on the Tiny--pin 13, which by default is connected to an LED on an Arduino board doesn't go anywhere on a Tiny:
{{ macros.render_figure('<img class="no-border" src="/media/img/attiny45_85pinout.png"/>', "Arduino-compatible pinout for Tiny45 (image courtesy of [David Mellis](http://hlt.media.mit.edu/?p=1695)).") }}
The program that we'll be loading onto our Tiny's is a basic sound generation library I've written. You can peruse the source over on [GitHub](https://github.com/samjacoby/tinysynth), and down a .zip of the necessary files here: [zip archive](https://github.com/samjacoby/tinysynth/archive/master.zip).
-To use, simply unzip the folder and open the "tinysynth.ino" file (you need to have Arduino installed).
+To use, unzip the folder and open the "tinysynth.ino" file (you need to have Arduino installed).
TinySynth has been preconfigured to have two touch-sensitive capacitive sensors and two LEDs, as well as a speaker output. See below:
{{ macros.render_figure('<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/samjacoby/8616341819/" title="IMG_4275 by s_jacoby, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8542/8616341819_38f4b4a9c7.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="IMG_4275"></a>', "`TOUCH1` triggers `LED1`, `TOUCH2` triggers `LED2`") }}
-The `RESET` pin is only used while the chip is being programmed. We could disable it, but it means that you'd need some special hardware to ever program the chip again. `POWER` and `GND`, naturally enough, are connected to the positive and negative terminals of your power supply--in our case, a coin-cell battery.
+The `RESET` pin is only used while the chip is being programmed. We could disable it, but it means that you'd need some special hardware to ever program the chip again. `POWER` and `GND`, naturally enough, are connected to the positive and negative terminals of your power supply--in our case, a coin-cell battery or what-have-you.
-### TinyProgrammer
+While we're programming the chip, we can test some of its functions -- but ultimately, we're going to making fancy-pants circuits outt've of conductive ink. Below is a rough schematic of what the circuit looks like. The various symbols correspond to different components: batteries, LEDs, and so forth. Which is which? You decide!
-- TinyProgrammer ([SparkFun](https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11460))
+{{ macros.render_figure('<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/samjacoby/8623874872/" title="IMG_4304 by s_jacoby, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8256/8623874872_e352d6b6f1.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="IMG_4304"></a>', "Your circuit doesn't need to look like this at all. These are just the connections.") }}
-The TinyProgrammer is a sweet little tool that vastly simplifies the programming of Atmel's ATTiny45/85 microcontrollers. The ATTiny can do just about everything an Arduino can do (Atmel makes the ATmega168/32U4), but are much cheaper, smaller, and more easily embedded. If you want to make twenty of something, it's a lot easier to get your hands on 20 ATTiny's than 20 Arduinos. [David Mellis](http://media.mit.edu/~mellis) designed this one.
+Here's an example with a big ol' gramophone cone sticking out. This uses a painted silver speaker (instead of a wound-wire speaker), which works, but without amplification, is very quiet!
-- [TinyProgrammer Tutorial](http://hlt.media.mit.edu/?p=1695)
+{{ macros.render_figure('<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/samjacoby/8465566076/" title="Capactive touch button by s_jacoby, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8233/8465566076_f70ec81291.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="Capactive touch button"></a>', "Speakers need to be coiled in a single direction--so on the back of this sheet, there's a straight line leaving the center.") }}
+
+## <a id="battery-holder"></a>Battery Holders
+Integrating "hard" components, like batteries and microcontrollers, with "soft" materials, like paper and textiles, is always difficult. Here's one way of creating battery a battery holder for a coin-cell battery, using the corner of a sheet of paper and a binder clip.
+
+Fold over the corner of a sheet of paper. It should completely and easily cover the battery.
+{{ macros.render_figure('<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/samjacoby/8623875732/" title="IMG_4311 by s_jacoby, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8522/8623875732_a2e2d02511.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="IMG_4311"></a>', '') }}
+
+Using conductive ink, paint over the fold as shown in the black rectangles below. Because conductive paint doesn't crease well, it can sometimes be a good idea to replace those portions of your circuit with short lengths of copper tape ([SparkFun](https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10561). The configuration has to be relatively precise, because you don't want to short the battery. Position it with the (+) side up.
+
+{{ macros.render_figure('<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/samjacoby/8623875978/" title="IMG_4313 by s_jacoby, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8406/8623875978_d86d1c659b.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="IMG_4313"></a>','') }}
+
+Fasten the folded over corner down over the battery with a binder clip.
+{{ macros.render_figure('<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/samjacoby/8622772695/" title="IMG_4314 by s_jacoby, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8257/8622772695_aea218f794.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="IMG_4314"></a>', '') }}
+
+
+
+
+### <a id="helpful-information"></a>Helpful Information
+[Jie Qi](http://technolojie.com/category/featured-projects/) has put up some useful information about making circuits using copper tape on the High-Low Tech [website](http://hlt.media.mit.edu/?p=2505).
-### Helpful Information
- [Bare Conductive's Paper Battery Holder](http://www.bareconductive.com/paper-battery-holders)
A really nice collection of elegant folded designs. Incorporating power into paper electronic projects has long been tricky, and these are some nice solutions. We've long-used a binder clip and a coin-cell battery, which works pretty well too.

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