Small example of how an 'embedded' application can be modularized
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README.md

Example code for 'Provisioning the IoT'

This repo contains a sample application that is used for the presentation 'Provisioning the IoT' by Paul Bakker and Sander Mak. Slides for this talk can be found here.

The application itself is a small dashboard with apps that could run as an in-car entertainment system:

The dashboard with some apps

Technology

The sample app is created with a JavaFX user-interface. Under the hood, OSGi is used to create separate modules for the dashboard and each of the apps. In our demo, we deploy these bundles in a modular fashion to targets using Apache ACE.

Building and running the code

You need a Java 8 JDK installed to build the code. There are two ways two build:

  • offline, using Gradle: ./gradlew build
  • interactive, by importing the projects into an Eclipse installation with the BndTools plugin installed

In both cases, the bundles end up in the generated folders of the subprojects.

You can run the sample by right-clicking carprov.dashboard/carprov.bndrun in Eclipse and selecting 'Run as -> Bnd OSGi Run Launcher'. Alternatively you can create a runnable jar containing all modules. Do this with ./gradlew export and start the exported jar directly: java -jar carprov.dashboard/generated/distributions/executable/carprov.jar

Demo scenario

In order to reproduce the demo scenario of the talk, you need to run an Apache ACE server and at least one target to provision to. They can run on the same machine or on different machines. Start by downloading Apache ACE (binary distribution) and unpack it. Then, run the server:

java -jar server-allinone/server-allinone.jar

You can verify it is running correctly by going to the ACE UI (login with default user/password d/f). Now, we need to run a target that receives the actual software we want to provision. You can do this by running the ace-demo/scripts/car1-target-launch.sh script from the server-allinone/store directory of the ACE installation. You can do this on the same machine or on a different machine. Just make sure to update the address of the agent.discovery.serverurls in the script to point to where your ACE server is running.

After starting the target, you should see car1 coming up as target in the ACE UI after clicking retrieve. You can now proceed and upload the bundles from ace-demo/bundles (or your own bundles) and link them to features/distributions/targets to start provisioning.