Gatsby source plugin for building websites using Sanity.io as a backend.
Branch: master
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
fragments
src Add ability to resolve references within raw fields (#10) Feb 17, 2019
test Remove .only from test Feb 15, 2019
.eslintrc Migrate to Sanity coding standard Dec 12, 2018
.gitignore Add lockfiles to ignore list Jan 6, 2019
.npmignore
.prettierrc Migrate to Sanity coding standard Dec 12, 2018
.travis.yml Add travis config Feb 15, 2019
README.md Add ability to resolve references within raw fields (#10) Feb 17, 2019
gatsby-node.js GraphQL + export prototype Dec 18, 2018
index.js Better publish workflow via Typescript compiler Oct 12, 2018
jest.config.js Fix nested reference fields, array of references Jan 14, 2019
package.json 1.1.0 Feb 17, 2019
tsconfig.json GraphQL + export prototype Dec 18, 2018

README.md

gatsby-source-sanity

Source plugin for pulling data from Sanity.io into Gatsby websites.

Watch a video about the company website built with Gatsby using Sanity.io as a headless CMS

Table of content

Known issues

  • Weak references that point to non-existant documents might break the build
  • Document references in annotations in Portable Text are not joined in the build

Basic usage

See the getting started video

npm i gatsby-source-sanity --save
// in your gatsby-config.js
module.exports = {
  // ...
  plugins: [
    {
      resolve: 'gatsby-source-sanity',
      options: {
        projectId: 'abc123',
        dataset: 'blog',
        // a token with read permissions is required
        // if you have a private dataset
        token: process.env.MY_SANITY_TOKEN
      }
    }
  ]
  // ...
}

At this point you can choose to (and probably should) set up a GraphQL API for your Sanity dataset, if you have not done so already. This will help the plugin in knowing which types and fields exists, so you can query for them even without them being present in any current documents.

Go through http://localhost:8000/___graphql after running gatsby develop to understand the created data and create a new query and checking available collections and fields by typing CTRL + SPACE.

Options

Options Type Default Description
projectId string [required] Your Sanity project's ID
dataset string [required] The dataset to fetch from
token string Authentication token for fetching data from private datasets, or when using overlayDrafts Learn more
overlayDrafts boolean false Set to true in order for drafts to replace their published version. By default, drafts will be skipped.
watchMode boolean false Set to true to keep a listener open and update with the latest changes in realtime.

Missing fields

Getting errors such as these?

Cannot query field "allSanityBlogPost" Unknown field preamble on type BlogPost

By deploying a GraphQL API for your dataset, we are able to introspect and figure out which schema types and fields are available and make them available to prevent this problem. Once the API is deployed it will be transparently be applied. If you have deployed your API and are still seeing similar issues, remember that you have to redeploy the API if your schema changes.

Some background for this problem:

Gatsby cannot know about the types and fields without having documents of the given types that contain the fields you want to query. This is a known problem with Gatsby - luckily there is ongoing work to solve this issue, which will lead to much clearer schemas and less boilerplate.

Using images

Image fields will have the image URL available under the field.asset.url key, but you can also use gatsby-image for a smooth experience. It's a React component that enables responsive images and advanced image loading techniques. It works great with this source plugin, without requiring any additional build steps.

There are two types of responsive images supported; fixed and fluid. To decide between the two, ask yourself: "do I know the exact size this image will be?" If yes, you'll want to use fixed. If no and its width and/or height need to vary depending on the size of the screen, then you'll want to use fluid.

Fluid

import React from 'react'
import Img from 'gatsby-image'

const Person = ({data}) => (
  <article>
    <h2>{data.sanityPerson.name}</h2>
    <Img fluid={data.sanityPerson.profileImage.asset.fluid} />
  </article>
)

export default Person

export const query = graphql`
  query PersonQuery {
    sanityPerson {
      name
      profileImage {
        asset {
          fluid(maxWidth: 700) {
            ...GatsbySanityImageFluid
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
`

Fixed

import React from 'react'
import Img from 'gatsby-image'

const Person = ({data}) => (
  <article>
    <h2>{data.sanityPerson.name}</h2>
    <Img fixed={data.sanityPerson.profileImage.asset.fixed} />
  </article>
)

export default Person

export const query = graphql`
  query PersonQuery {
    sanityPerson {
      name
      profileImage {
        asset {
          fixed(width: 400) {
            ...GatsbySanityImageFixed
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
`

Available fragments

These are the fragments available on image assets, which allows easy lookup of the fields required by gatsby-image in various modes:

  • GatsbySanityImageFixed
  • GatsbySanityImageFixed_noBase64
  • GatsbySanityImageFluid
  • GatsbySanityImageFluid_noBase64

Overlaying drafts

Sometimes you might be working on some new content that is not yet published, which you want to make sure looks alright within your Gatsby site. By setting the overlayDrafts setting to true, the draft versions will as the option says "overlay" the regular document. In terms of Gatsby nodes, it will replace the published document with the draft.

Keep in mind that drafts do not have to conform to any validation rules, so your frontend will usually want to double-check all nested properties before attempting to use them.

Watch mode

While developing, it can often be beneficial to get updates without having to manually restart the build process. By setting watchMode to true, this plugin will set up a listener which watches for changes. When it detects a change, the document in question is updated in real-time and will be reflected immediately.

When setting overlayDrafts to true, each small change to the draft will immediately be applied.

Generating pages

Sanity does not have any concept of a "page", since it's built to be totally agnostic to how you want to present your content and in which medium, but since you're using Gatsby, you'll probably want some pages!

As with any Gatsby site, you'll want to create a gatsby-node.js in the root of your Gatsby site repository (if it doesn't already exist), and declare a createPages function. Within it, you'll use GraphQL to query for the data you need to build the pages.

For instance, if you have a project document type in Sanity that you want to generate pages for, you could do something along the lines of this:

exports.createPages = async ({graphql, actions}) => {
  const {createPage, createPageDependency} = actions

  const result = await graphql(`
    {
      allSanityProject(filter: {slug: {current: {ne: null}}}) {
        edges {
          node {
            title
            description
            tags
            launchDate(format: "DD.MM.YYYY")
            slug {
              current
            }
            image {
              asset {
                url
              }
            }
          }
        }
      }
    }
  `)

  if (result.errors) {
    throw result.errors
  }

  const projects = result.data.allSanityProject.edges || []
  projects.forEach((edge, index) => {
    const path = `/project/${edge.node.slug.current}`

    createPage({
      path,
      component: require.resolve('./src/templates/project.js'),
      context: {slug: edge.node.slug.current}
    })

    createPageDependency({path, nodeId: edge.node.id})
  })
}

The above query will fetch all projects that have a slug.current field set, and generate pages for them, available as /project/<project-slug>. It will use the template defined in src/templates/project.js as the basis for these pages.

Most Gatsby starters have some example of building pages, which you should be able to modify to your needs.

Remember to use the GraphiQL interface to help write the queries you need - it's usually running at http://localhost:8000/___graphql while running gatsby develop.

"Raw" fields

Arrays and object types at the root of documents will get an additional "raw JSON" representation in a field called _raw<FieldName>. For instance, a field named body will be mapped to _rawBody. It's important to note that this is only done for top-level nodes (documents).

Quite often, you'll want to replace reference fields (eg _ref: '<documentId>', or someField___NODE: '<documentId>'), with the actual document that is referenced. This is done automatically for regular fields, but within raw fields, you have to explicitly enable this behavior, by using the field-level resolveReferences argument:

{
  allSanityProject {
    edges {
      node {
        _rawTasks(resolveReferences: {maxDepth: 5})
      }
    }
  }
}

Portable Text / Block Content

Rich text in Sanity is usually represented as Portable Text (previously known as "Block Content").

These data structures can be deep and a chore to query (specifying all the possible fields). As noted above, there is a "raw" alternative available for these fields which is usually what you'll want to use.

You can install block-content-to-react from npm and use it in your Gatsby project to serialize Portable Text. It lets you use your own React components to override defaults and render custom content types. Learn more about Portable Text in our documentation.

Using .env variables

If you don't want to attach your Sanity project's ID to the repo, you can easily store it in .env files by doing the following:

// In your .env file
SANITY_PROJECT_ID = abc123
SANITY_DATASET = production
SANITY_TOKEN = my-super-secret-token

// In your gatsby-config.js file
require('dotenv').config({
  path: `.env.${process.env.NODE_ENV}`
})

module.exports = {
  // ...
  plugins: [
    {
      resolve: 'gatsby-source-sanity',
      options: {
        projectId: process.env.SANITY_PROJECT_ID,
        dataset: process.env.SANITY_DATASET,
        token: process.env.SANITY_TOKEN
        // ...
      }
    }
  ]
  // ...
}

This example is based off Gatsby Docs' implementation.

Credits

Huge thanks to Henrique Cavalieri for doing the initial implementation of this plugin, and for donating it to the Sanity team. Mad props!

Big thanks to the good people backing Gatsby for bringing such a joy to our developer days!