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minor spacing changes

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1 parent 5c27dcc commit b4fbdd3aed638e3d0baaf78622c913aa5b3f5870 @sarabander committed Nov 12, 2013
Showing with 10 additions and 10 deletions.
  1. BIN sicp.pdf
  2. +5 −5 src/sicp.tex
  3. +5 −5 src/sicp.texi
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BIN sicp.pdf
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@@ -290,7 +290,7 @@
\vspace{1.26em}
\noindent
-Unofficial Texinfo Format \href{http://sicpebook.wordpress.com}{2.andresraba5} (September 20, 2013),\\
+Unofficial Texinfo Format \href{http://sicpebook.wordpress.com}{2.andresraba5.1} (November 12, 2013),\\
based on \href{http://www.neilvandyke.org/sicp-texi/}{2.neilvandyke4} (January 10, 2007).
\end{small}
@@ -304,8 +304,8 @@
% Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, 2e
% Unofficial Texinfo Format
%
-% utfversion 2.andresraba5
-% utfversiondate September 20, 2013
+% utfversion 2.andresraba5.1
+% utfversiondate November 12, 2013
%
% This file is licensed under a Creative Commons
% Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
@@ -1884,7 +1884,7 @@ \subsection{Conditional Expressions and Predicates}
|x| = \left\{ \begin{array}{r@{\quad \mathrm{if} \quad}l}
x & x > 0, \\
0 & x = 0, \\
- -x & x < 0. \end{array} \right.
+ \!\! -x & x < 0. \end{array} \right.
\end{displaymath}
This construct is called a \newterm{case analysis}, and there is a special form
in Lisp for notating such a case analysis. It is called \code{cond} (which
@@ -9568,7 +9568,7 @@ \subsubsection*{Representing algebraic expressions}
We can imagine many ways to use list structure to represent algebraic
expressions. For example, we could use lists of symbols that mirror the usual
algebraic notation, representing \( ax + b \) as the list \code{(a * x +
-b)} . However, one especially straightforward choice is to use the same
+b)}. However, one especially straightforward choice is to use the same
parenthesized prefix notation that Lisp uses for combinations; that is, to
represent \( ax + b \) as \code{(+ (* a x) b)}. Then our data
representation for the differentiation problem is as follows:
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@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ Montreal, Toronto
@sp 1.26
@noindent
-Unofficial Texinfo Format @url{http://sicpebook.wordpress.com, 2.andresraba5} (September 20, 2013),@*
+Unofficial Texinfo Format @url{http://sicpebook.wordpress.com, 2.andresraba5.1} (November 12, 2013),@*
based on @url{http://www.neilvandyke.org/sicp-texi/, 2.neilvandyke4} (January 10, 2007).
\end{small}
@@ -63,8 +63,8 @@ based on @url{http://www.neilvandyke.org/sicp-texi/, 2.neilvandyke4} (January 10
@settitle Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, 2e
@comment Unofficial Texinfo Format
@comment
-@set utfversion 2.andresraba5
-@set utfversiondate September 20, 2013
+@set utfversion 2.andresraba5.1
+@set utfversiondate November 12, 2013
@comment
@comment This file is licensed under a Creative Commons
@comment Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
@@ -1887,7 +1887,7 @@ actions in the different cases according to the rule
|x| = \left\{ \begin{array}{r@{\quad \mathrm{if} \quad}l}
x & x > 0, \\
0 & x = 0, \\
- -x & x < 0. \end{array} \right.
+ \!\! -x & x < 0. \end{array} \right.
@end tex
This construct is called a @newterm{case analysis}, and there is a special form
in Lisp for notating such a case analysis. It is called @code{cond} (which
@@ -9681,7 +9681,7 @@ next.
We can imagine many ways to use list structure to represent algebraic
expressions. For example, we could use lists of symbols that mirror the usual
algebraic notation, representing @math{ax + b} as the list @code{(a * x +
-b)} . However, one especially straightforward choice is to use the same
+b)}. However, one especially straightforward choice is to use the same
parenthesized prefix notation that Lisp uses for combinations; that is, to
represent @math{ax + b} as @code{(+ (* a x) b)}. Then our data
representation for the differentiation problem is as follows:

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