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8  build/archive.html
@@ -30,6 +30,10 @@
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           <div class="slot-2-3-4-5"> 
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             <ul class="archives">
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               <li>
  33
+                <h1> <a href="/articles/National-Geographic-1958/">National Geographic CXIV - Volumes 2-4, 1958
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+                    <p>Some snaps from the three editions of National Geographic I picked up on Etsy and which scratch my mid-century itch as well as just being lovely to look at.</p></a></h1>
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+              </li>
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+              <li>
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                 <h1> <a href="/articles/you-can-tell-a-lot-about-a-man-from-his-unread-email-count/">You can tell a lot about a man from his unread email count
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                     <p>Because good enough isn't good enough anymore</p></a></h1>
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               </li>
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                     <p></p></a></h1>
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               </li>
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               <li>
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-                <h1> <a href="/articles/desk/">Desk
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+                <h1> <a href="/articles/a-bicycle/">A Bicycle
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                     <p></p></a></h1>
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               </li>
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               <li>
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-                <h1> <a href="/articles/a-bicycle/">A Bicycle
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+                <h1> <a href="/articles/desk/">Desk
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                     <p></p></a></h1>
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               </li>
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               <li>
4  build/index.html
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         <div class="slot-6-7-8 contents">
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           <h1>Journal Entries</h1>
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           <ol>
  25
+            <li><span class="date">Oct 24</span><a href="/articles/National-Geographic-1958/">National Geographic CXIV - Volumes 2-4, 1958</a>
  26
+            </li>
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             <li><span class="date">Sep 17</span><a href="/articles/you-can-tell-a-lot-about-a-man-from-his-unread-email-count/">You can tell a lot about a man from his unread email count</a>
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             </li>
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             <li><span class="date">Jul 9</span><a href="/articles/simple-keyboard-navigation/">Simple keyboard navigation</a>
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             </li>
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             <li><span class="date">Dec 19</span><a href="/articles/iphone-top-5/">iPhone top 5</a>
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             </li>
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-            <li><span class="date">Nov 27</span><a href="/articles/murder-in-the-city/">Murder in the City</a>
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-            </li>
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           </ol><a href="archive.html" id="archive" class="view_more">Archives</a>
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         </div>
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         <div class="slot-9 profile">	<img src="http://mrfrisby.com/stu.png"></div>
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     <atom:link href="http://mrfrisby.com/feed.xml" rel="self" type="application/rss+xml"></atom:link>
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     <link>http://mrfrisby.com</link>
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     <description>Stuart Frisby is a designer based in Amsterdam</description>
8  
-    <pubDate>Tue, 27 Dec 2011 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
  8
+    <pubDate>Sun, 24 Apr 2011 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
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     <generator>The mighty Wintersmith</generator>
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     <language>en</language>
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     <item>
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-      <title>2012</title>
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-      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/2012/</link>
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-      <pubDate>Tue, 27 Dec 2011 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
15  
-      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/2012/</guid>
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-      <author></author>
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-      <description>&lt;p&gt;Whilst I haven&apos;t given up all hope of being selected for the Great Britain and Northern Ireland Olympic football team for London 2012, I thought I would assemble some additional thoughts &amp; aims for the coming year–if only to provide reference as to the extent of my failures to look back on in glorious self-loathing.
18  
-
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-&lt;/p&gt;
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-&lt;h4&gt;Stay Home&lt;/h4&gt;
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-&lt;p&gt;This year I have flown around the world twice &amp; have crossed the English Channel twelve times. I hope next year to travel a lot less. I am tired, I&apos;m sick of airports and I&apos;m fed up of sleeping in unfamiliar beds. I&apos;d rather spend weekends getting to know Amsterdam better, not visiting – and thus being reminded of all of my many reasons for wanting to leave – England.
22  
-
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-&lt;/p&gt;
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-&lt;h4&gt;Be Less&lt;/h4&gt;
25  
-&lt;p&gt;My gluttony, laziness &amp; lack of consideration for this–my only vessel has scaled new heights in 2011; I hope to eat less, weigh less, exercise more and generally take better care of myself. I don&apos;t quite know what that means in practical terms yet.
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-
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-&lt;/p&gt;
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-&lt;h4&gt;Make Stuff&lt;/h4&gt;
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-&lt;p&gt;I want to write more music, make more bits of internet &amp; become better at doing both. I have a couple of side-projects lined-up which I hope will provide adequate creative outlet. I keep lamenting my lack of tactile skills, maybe that is something I can fix too.
30  
-
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-&lt;/p&gt;
32  
-&lt;h4&gt;Get Hitched&lt;/h4&gt;
33  
-&lt;p&gt;In December Victoria &amp; I will be getting married, the year will therefore be full of plans and bills and the build up to the big, awesome day. We have chosen a venue, have a vague plan for our day and will be figuring out all of the details in the coming months. I know this is going to be a stressful, expensive and fraught process &amp; so remembering why we are getting married and that it is a joyous and amazing thing to do is definitely something I have to continue to do.&lt;/p&gt;
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-</description>
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-    </item>
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-    <item>
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       <title>Amsterdam (1)</title>
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       <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/amsterdam-1/</link>
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       <pubDate>Sun, 24 Apr 2011 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
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 </description>
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     <item>
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-      <title>A Bicycle</title>
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-      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/a-bicycle/</link>
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+      <title>Desk</title>
  31
+      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/desk/</link>
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       <pubDate>Sat, 30 Jul 2011 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
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-      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/a-bicycle/</guid>
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+      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/desk/</guid>
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       <author></author>
60  
-      <description>&lt;p&gt;When I lived in Fukuoka I used to zip around on a little city bike, it was white - really white - and so I named it (as a football geek would) after Andrés Iniesta, the pale impresario at the heart of the Barcelona &amp; Spain midfield. 
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-
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-&lt;/p&gt;
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-&lt;p&gt;Andrés was a great little bike, and being in Japan meant that I was never in danger of being maimed by a passing car or having my bike stolen from some far-flung outreach of the city. I would just jump on it of an evening and ride off in one direction or another, ending up in places which the few foreigners in the city rarely visited. I&apos;d cycle through suburban neighbourhoods and out of town retail complexes, to fishing outposts and motorway intersections none of which I could tell you the names of. It was on my bike that I saw the best of Fukuoka, and through cycling that I was able to enjoy Japan properly, watching it pass by me, passing by it &amp; being a part of a giant, moving ecosystem of people and machines.
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-
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-&lt;/p&gt;
66  
-&lt;p&gt;And so here I am in Amsterdam - the European Capital of the bicycle - and I&apos;ve only just got around to buying a bike, and I&apos;ve yet to ride it anywhere I haven&apos;t needed to go. For Amsterdam is not quite the same as Fukuoka, one isn&apos;t part of an ecosystem here so much as a rusting nail in an violent sea of rusting nails, all scraping against each other and vying for top spot and causing harm, and popping tyres and severing arteries. Trams &amp; tramlines, throngs of camera-toting tourists,stupid scooters and their moronic-drivers, one gets the feeling that Amsterdam is designed not for cyclists, but for a transportationary conflict designed to extinguish all but the victorious. And so I&apos;ve yet to venture south of home in the direction of the sprawling-flats on North Holland, I&apos;ve yet to cross the Amstel in east to explore. I have however decided upon a new name for my new bike. As white as Andrés was, my new bike is black. And so whilst fearing some sort of racial faux-pas I have decided to name this bike after a black footballer - and could think of no more enjoyable a name to utter than that of the DR Congo &amp; former Newcastle United striker; Lomana LuaLua. I&apos;ll be calling him LuaLua for short.
  35
+      <description>&lt;p&gt;With a few days off from work I&apos;ve finally found time to sort out somewhere other than the dining table from which to work. Still in the dining room, and for the timebeing still sitting on a dining chair, but I do now at least have somewhere to put all of my tat, and to keep the laptop and iThingies.
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68 37
 &lt;/p&gt;
69  
-&lt;h5&gt;Other candidates were (in alphabetical order):&lt;/h5&gt;
70  
-&lt;ul&gt;
71  
-&lt;li&gt;Didier Drogba&lt;/li&gt;
72  
-&lt;li&gt;Danger Fourpence&lt;/li&gt;
73  
-&lt;li&gt;Kazenga LuaLua&lt;/li&gt;
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-&lt;li&gt;Peter Ndlovu&lt;/li&gt;
75  
-&lt;/ul&gt;
  38
+&lt;p&gt;&lt;img src=&quot;http://images.instagram.com/media/2011/05/31/2630ade1501945fb97d8209e6c487d02_7.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;Desk&quot;&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
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 </description>
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     </item>
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     <item>
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-      <title>booking.com — One Year In.</title>
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-      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/booking-com-one-year-in/</link>
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-      <pubDate>Fri, 02 Mar 2012 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
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-      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/booking-com-one-year-in/</guid>
  42
+      <title>From Xero to Hero</title>
  43
+      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/from-xero-to-hero/</link>
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+      <pubDate>Mon, 28 Feb 2011 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
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+      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/from-xero-to-hero/</guid>
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       <author></author>
84  
-      <description>&lt;p&gt;I wrote a year ago about the process of interviewing with &lt;a href=&quot;http://booking.com&quot;&gt;booking.com&lt;/a&gt; &amp; have managed to mention little of what its been like to actually work here for the past twelve months. I get lots of traffic coming my way from people trying to find out what it&apos;s like to do my job, and so I figured I&apos;d talk a little bit about what we do, and the philosophy which I think sets us apart from lots of other companies operating at our scale on the web, maybe this&apos;ll be a better source of information than my post from last April.
  47
+      <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;Edit:&lt;/strong&gt; My thanks to Philip from Xero for adding a comment to this blog post, and then sending me his feedback from the interview process yesterday afternoon. I&apos;d like to add that I think the Xero guys do a fantastic job and that I wish them every success in their search for more fantastic people, and their progress to the top table of web applications - they do great work and my experiences in the process I outlined below are I&apos;m sure anomalous to the way the company operates in general terms.
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 &lt;/p&gt;
87  
-&lt;p&gt;Coming from agency-land, and having worked for clients for the entirety of my short career, I was excited at the prospect of having a direct connection with the people interacting with my work, and that has proven to be a continuously motivating factor in my role with booking.com. We - the front-end team of approximately 60 people - have a sharp, constant focus on our users. Everything we seek to do is aimed at making the experience of using our website measurably better for our customers. We have a common language which encourages us to constantly reflect on a single question, &apos;How does this help our users?&apos;. Note that the question isn&apos;t &apos;How does this make us more money?&apos; - Whilst money is of course a key measurement for success, our focus is on making improvements to the user experience which in turn make our users happier &amp; more loyal. We could come up with a thousand ideas to increase revenue tomorrow, but we are encouraged to be cognisant of the distinction between short-term gains, and long-term improvements. When we assess and critique ideas from the perspective of the user, we are able to differentiate between the two, and be the advocates for our millions of customers.
  50
+&lt;p&gt;Having decided a couple of months ago that I would begin to look for a new challenge in my professional life, I had dealings with two companies with whom positions were available for someone fitting my broad description. Those two companies were Xero, and booking.com, and I&apos;d like to just offer here a comparison of the processes I encountered with the two organisations.
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89 52
 &lt;/p&gt;
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-&lt;p&gt;And behind that mass of users for whom we aim to please is a mass of data to which we - designers, developers, product owners - are given free access. We operate at a scale where we are very quickly able to see if what we&apos;re doing is an improvement, and we encourage and are encouraged to be mindful, commercially focused and vigilant. Throughout my pre-booking.com career I was used to creating work to a brief, with no access to the end users, and no opportunities to measure if what I&apos;d done had actually made a positive difference. I would fall-back on the knowledge I&apos;d gained from blogs and books and experience and expertise. Luckily I no longer have to do that, and I say luckily because I know now that in the vast majority of cases, I was wrong. I still am. I&apos;m wrong the majority of the time. Once I&apos;d have called myself an expert, now I&apos;m constantly aware of how little I - or anyone - really knows about how people behave on the web, what they do and don&apos;t understand, like, enjoy and delight in. I&apos;m wrong more often than I&apos;m right, and yet somehow I still haven&apos;t been shown out of the building…
  53
+&lt;p&gt;nb: I should say at the outset that I have been offered and have accepted a job at booking.com, though I hope that fact does not get in the way of my accurate reporting of my experiences with both companies. I appreciate that I could seem embittered by my experiences; I have made deliberate efforts to offer a factual representation of events, and my considered opinion as to their significance.
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 &lt;/p&gt;
93  
-&lt;p&gt;We embrace failure like an over-enthusiastic grandma embraces her favourite grandson, for every failure is a deposit in a vault of knowledge. Every failure is a step towards a subsequent success, or a debunking of a popular belief, and at best a raised middle-finger to our industry&apos;s all-too-many &apos;experts&apos;. But failure isn&apos;t our goal, learning is. Failing for the sake of failing would be stupid, failing so that you can later succeed is brilliant, especially when - as at booking.com - the endorsement of this kind of failure comes from the very top of the organisation.
  56
+&lt;p&gt;I learnt that Xero were looking for design staff through twitter, and made arrangements with the head of the design team to drop in to their Wellington office to have an initial, informal chat about what I was looking for, my processes and philosophies and what xero were looking for in the role they were seeking to fill. It was a pleasant chat, I talked about my work for my current employer, the key tenets of my professional outlook and the things I consider important for my satisfaction in my work. I guess it must have gone well since the folks at xero next asked me to do some spec work for them in the guise of a practical test of my skills.
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95 58
 &lt;/p&gt;
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-&lt;p&gt;My favourite thing about working at booking is that I&apos;m surrounded by an incredibly diverse group of people, most of whom - like me - moved to the Netherlands for their job, and who are chosen because amongst other things, they are passionate about the work they do. I used to be the only designer working on websites, and whilst that gives you great freedom, it also gives you an easy ride. I know that at booking.com I will be tapped gently on the shoulder when I&apos;ve overlooked something, or when I could&apos;ve done a better job. Our millions of users, and my front-end colleagues will see to that.
  59
+&lt;p&gt;The task was two-fold: Conduct some research into the xero product and offer feedback as to what did and didn&apos;t work with the site and product, and then propose an overhaul of a single page within the xero application using wireframes, sketches or design work as I saw fit. I was reluctant to agree, spec work being spec work, but decided that the potential position at the end of the process would be worth the unease I&apos;d feel at completing work for xero without any form of compensation.
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 &lt;/p&gt;
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-&lt;p&gt;In terms of process, structure, pace and agility, booking is quite unlike most businesses of its size. There is no prescribed way of working, no defined set of tools, no rigid working hours. I rock up at 8:30 in the morning, others stroll in at 10:30. I use a notepad and a set of preposterously over-elaborate pens for wireframing, others use whiteboards, post-its and hallway conversations &amp; so long as you can push commits to a git repository, no-one cares what you crafted them with. Our large team is sub-divided into small teams of ~5 people, a mix of designers, developers, copywriters, product owners &amp; specialists (language specialists, statisticians, usability researchers, platform developers, psychologists, etc.) - that gives us a small, scrum-like style of work. We work quickly, innovate &amp; ideate quickly, and try not to build complex, rigid processes which put barriers between ideas and execution. Of course there is an ebb and flow, some days that works flawlessly, some days less so - we are always improving and monitoring our way of working, and with a growing team, always making adjustments which aim to make it as easy as possible for designers to design, developers to develop, and users to use our website.
  62
+&lt;p&gt;In all I spent about eight hours completing the task.
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 &lt;/p&gt;
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-&lt;p&gt;All-in-all, working as a designer at booking.com has proven to be an eye-opening, challenging, rewarding experience - and one which continues to to be all three on a daily basis. I can&apos;t imagine there are many companies where a designer is given the privilege of serving so many users, and the freedom to serve them in whatever way suits them best.&lt;/p&gt;
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-</description>
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-    </item>
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-    <item>
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-      <title>Delight as a Differentiator</title>
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-      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/delight-as-a-differentiator/</link>
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-      <pubDate>Mon, 11 Jun 2012 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
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-      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/delight-as-a-differentiator/</guid>
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-      <author></author>
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-      <description>&lt;p&gt;Living in Amsterdam (where I&apos;m very happy!), I&apos;m becoming accustomed to dreadful - or completely absent - customer service. There doesn&apos;t seem to be a correlation here between the quality of a product, and the service with which it&apos;s delivered. Some of my favourite restaurants are staffed by people verging on hostile, and it doesn&apos;t improve inline with cost.
  65
+&lt;p&gt;I submitted interactive sketches notated with my thinking, block level wireframes outlining the key aspects of my approach and my report on the xero site. I waited a while for feedback and after a bit of discussion was asked to do a further piece of work, this time a more complete design piece for the same page of the xero product at the centre of the previous task. Again, I was reluctant. Purely from the point of view of fitting this stuff in around my busy job and busy life was tricky - but again the increasingly more likely prospect of securing a position with a company so feted for ‘doing things right&apos; was too big a lure to ignore. I spent another eight or so hours working on design work, which I submitted a few days later to the Head of Design at Xero. I didn&apos;t hear anything back for a while, and followed up, keen to make sure that my 16 hours of work was indeed being appraised and that a process was ongoing within Xero which I hoped would lead to my being offered a job, or at the least being invited for a further, formal interview.
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113 67
 &lt;/p&gt;
114  
-&lt;p&gt;At the low-end of most markets, the internet works in much the same way. Consider Ryanair: where the product and the way in which it is sold are perfectly congruous. You&apos;re treated on their website just like you&apos;re treated on their planes - packed in, confused into extra spending &amp; generally made to feel like a piece of abnormal-freight.
  68
+&lt;p&gt;A couple of weeks passed and I got an email from the Head of Design at Xero to inform me that they would not be continuing with the process due to ‘some concerns&apos;, and that they would be ‘happy to provide some feedback at to what they were should I wish&apos;. I was surprised to say the least, having been very generous with my time and having submitted a high quality of work on a blind task. I asked for the afore mentioned feedback; suggesting that I should like to know what areas they felt I could improve upon, as much for my professional progress as anything else. That feedback failed to materialise despite my following up on that offer on at least two further occasions.
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 &lt;/p&gt;
117  
-&lt;p&gt;At the other end of the market, you have niche, luxury operators who know that the customer experience is end-to-end, from the first impression on their website, to the post-transactional communications. JetSetter.com is a good example of this kind of application of delight in an interface: High quality images, restrained UI elements, space &amp; a gentle, assured tone of voice. A website sets an expectation for the experience to follow. JetSetter.com treats you like a valued and respected individual, just like a diligent concierge at the sort of high-class hotel you&apos;ll find on the site.
  71
+&lt;p&gt;To say the process left a sour taste would be an understatement, and I should have listened to the conventional wisdom which suggests one should never work for free, even if there is a potentially lucrative position at the end of it. I should have inferred from the request that this company - a shining light in the New Zealand digital industry - were perhaps less than I had expected in that regard. I was however accepting of the decision. Sometimes you&apos;re just not a good fit, or your technical styles aren&apos;t a good match for an organisation, or any number of acceptable and understandable and often sensible reasons.
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119 73
 &lt;/p&gt;
120  
-&lt;h2&gt;But what about the wide middle?&lt;/h2&gt;
121  
-&lt;p&gt;The vast majority of companies exist somewhere between these two poles, serving varied product to varied customers - and requiring such in order to prosper. For these businesses, delightfulness in a user interface can become a key differentiator which elevates it above the competition who default to the ordinary, and fail to delight. Given the choice of two stores selling the same range of products, would you chose the one staffed by the ryanair-esque shopkeeper, or the jetsetter-like assistant? Your UI is your shopfront and your shopstaff. It&apos;s the language with which you talk to your customers, the space you give them to make a decision, the gentle hand in the right direction at the right moment that turns an average user experience into an enjoyable one. And it&apos;s my belief that people will always gravitate towards the companies and services which treat them well and make them feel empowered, not embarrassed. The effect might be magnified as the purchase price goes up, but even when you&apos;re spending €5 on a paperback, you&apos;d sooner do it in a beautiful old book store than a soulless warehouse.
  74
+&lt;p&gt;What I don&apos;t accept however is that having occupied my time and effort in 16 hours of free work - plus the additional time spent attending the informal interview - is that it is too much to expect the courtesy of an email explaining why at the summation of that process it had been decided that I was not a good fit for the organisation. That strikes me as being a pretty shoddy way of operating, and not something one would expect if they were - as I am - familiar with the image Xero portrays of itself as an organisation and an employer. An email was the least I could expect in return for my considerable effort. I didn&apos;t get one, I didn&apos;t get anything from Xero at all. The next I saw of them was at Webstock where they would be again on the lookout for design staff who would no doubt also be asked to give up a slice of their free time for the same process to which I now feel unfortunate to have consented.
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 &lt;/p&gt;
124  
-&lt;p&gt;The challenge for UX designers is to figure out how to find this balance, to offer an appropriate experience inline with the full gamut of products on offer - to optimise for sales, and build for delight. To build something which adds to even the most high-cost purchase, and can massively elevate the experience of buying the most mundane, inexpensive goods.
  77
+&lt;p&gt;Having moved on from that rather souring experience, I decided for a number of personal and professional reasons that my next career move would be back in Europe, and put the feelers out across my professional network for potential roles in that part of the world. I was invited to submit my CV to booking.com where positions were available and after sitting for a phone interview with two members of the technical team was invited to fly to Amsterdam to interview formally for the position.
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 &lt;/p&gt;
127  
-&lt;p&gt;And surely this truth is universal. Surely everyone wants to be treated well, people&apos;s ability to recognise good customer experience when online may be less established than in a physical store - but that&apos;s only going to improve. People are going to be more able to distinguish between Ryanair.com &amp; JetSetter.com, not less, and why would anyone knowingly choose that which makes them less happy?
  80
+&lt;p&gt;In all I had three interviews, two concentrating on my technical abilities as they related to the specific job, and my suitability in working in the unique environment of the company. The third interview was with one of the directors, focusing on how I would fit into the business and offering a glimpse into how it operated. I spent three days at the company&apos;s expense in Amsterdam, and flew back to New Zealand with a job offer in hand and enthusiastic about working for a company which had seemed at every point to be operating in a respectful, sensible manner to even those people who weren&apos;t yet on the payroll.
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 &lt;/p&gt;
130  
-&lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;Pixels are cheap. We as web designers are the worlds most empowered architects of retail spaces. Let&apos;s build beautiful places where people like to spend their time.&lt;/strong&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
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-</description>
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-    </item>
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-    <item>
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-      <title>Desk</title>
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-      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/desk/</link>
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-      <pubDate>Sat, 30 Jul 2011 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
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-      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/desk/</guid>
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-      <author></author>
139  
-      <description>&lt;p&gt;With a few days off from work I&apos;ve finally found time to sort out somewhere other than the dining table from which to work. Still in the dining room, and for the timebeing still sitting on a dining chair, but I do now at least have somewhere to put all of my tat, and to keep the laptop and iThingies.
  83
+&lt;p&gt;To say that the two processes were miles apart would be to understate the distinction. Booking.com treated me throughout the process as a skilled individual who could add value and expertise to their team, and treated the interview process as an opportunity to examine how I as a person would fit into their organisation.
140 84
 
141 85
 &lt;/p&gt;
142  
-&lt;p&gt;&lt;img src=&quot;http://images.instagram.com/media/2011/05/31/2630ade1501945fb97d8209e6c487d02_7.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;Desk&quot;&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
  86
+&lt;p&gt;The feeling was that whilst I could prove easily that I had the technical ability to do the job, mentality was an equally important consideration for booking.com in making their hiring decisions. With Xero the process seemed to concentrate entirely on the technical aspects of the position available; obsessing over the minutiae and ignoring the fact that someone who has been working in our industry for a decade is able to adapt, and that what is actually important is if that person is passionate about their profession and wants above all else to do great work.
  87
+
  88
+&lt;/p&gt;
  89
+&lt;p&gt;Without the privilege of knowing what Xero&apos;s reservations in hiring me were I can only speculate, but I would suggest that given the nature of the hiring process I outlined above, it could only be of some technical consideration which I contest to the importance of. I&apos;m not so old a dog &amp; in our field of work one is always learning new tricks. That is why this is such a great profession to be in - to be constantly learning, improving and progressing. I have said in previous posts here that as far as I&apos;m concerned an organisation should be looking for the best people they can find, wherever and whatever they happen to be. Without wanting to seem cocksure and immodest, I&apos;d suggest Xero might have missed a trick in my case.
  90
+
  91
+&lt;/p&gt;
  92
+&lt;p&gt;That all being said, I&apos;m delighted, thrilled and really quite excited to be leaving Wellington for Amsterdam and starting a new job with a company who impressed me so greatly in the hiring process. I always think that treating people (staff, suppliers, customers, employees) right is half of the battle for any business; it speaks volumes for a potential employer when they treat their prospective employees with the respect that I was shown in Amsterdam. I&apos;d suggest that Xero could learn a lesson or two from the likes of booking.com if they truly aspire to be held in that same regard. If they really want to attract the most talented people from all over the world, they need to have better processes in place to (a) not insult them with the kind of shoddy treatment I&apos;ve talked about here, and (b) to deal with those who aren&apos;t a suitable fit for the company in the correct, respectful manner which they are right to expect.&lt;/p&gt;
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167  
-      <title>From Xero to Hero</title>
168  
-      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/from-xero-to-hero/</link>
169  
-      <pubDate>Mon, 28 Feb 2011 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
170  
-      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/from-xero-to-hero/</guid>
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+      <title>2012</title>
  118
+      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/2012/</link>
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+      <pubDate>Tue, 27 Dec 2011 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
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+      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/2012/</guid>
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       <author></author>
172  
-      <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;Edit:&lt;/strong&gt; My thanks to Philip from Xero for adding a comment to this blog post, and then sending me his feedback from the interview process yesterday afternoon. I&apos;d like to add that I think the Xero guys do a fantastic job and that I wish them every success in their search for more fantastic people, and their progress to the top table of web applications - they do great work and my experiences in the process I outlined below are I&apos;m sure anomalous to the way the company operates in general terms.
173  
-
174  
-&lt;/p&gt;
175  
-&lt;p&gt;Having decided a couple of months ago that I would begin to look for a new challenge in my professional life, I had dealings with two companies with whom positions were available for someone fitting my broad description. Those two companies were Xero, and booking.com, and I&apos;d like to just offer here a comparison of the processes I encountered with the two organisations.
176  
-
177  
-&lt;/p&gt;
178  
-&lt;p&gt;nb: I should say at the outset that I have been offered and have accepted a job at booking.com, though I hope that fact does not get in the way of my accurate reporting of my experiences with both companies. I appreciate that I could seem embittered by my experiences; I have made deliberate efforts to offer a factual representation of events, and my considered opinion as to their significance.
179  
-
180  
-&lt;/p&gt;
181  
-&lt;p&gt;I learnt that Xero were looking for design staff through twitter, and made arrangements with the head of the design team to drop in to their Wellington office to have an initial, informal chat about what I was looking for, my processes and philosophies and what xero were looking for in the role they were seeking to fill. It was a pleasant chat, I talked about my work for my current employer, the key tenets of my professional outlook and the things I consider important for my satisfaction in my work. I guess it must have gone well since the folks at xero next asked me to do some spec work for them in the guise of a practical test of my skills.
182  
-
183  
-&lt;/p&gt;
184  
-&lt;p&gt;The task was two-fold: Conduct some research into the xero product and offer feedback as to what did and didn&apos;t work with the site and product, and then propose an overhaul of a single page within the xero application using wireframes, sketches or design work as I saw fit. I was reluctant to agree, spec work being spec work, but decided that the potential position at the end of the process would be worth the unease I&apos;d feel at completing work for xero without any form of compensation.
185  
-
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-&lt;/p&gt;
187  
-&lt;p&gt;In all I spent about eight hours completing the task.
188  
-
189  
-&lt;/p&gt;
190  
-&lt;p&gt;I submitted interactive sketches notated with my thinking, block level wireframes outlining the key aspects of my approach and my report on the xero site. I waited a while for feedback and after a bit of discussion was asked to do a further piece of work, this time a more complete design piece for the same page of the xero product at the centre of the previous task. Again, I was reluctant. Purely from the point of view of fitting this stuff in around my busy job and busy life was tricky - but again the increasingly more likely prospect of securing a position with a company so feted for ‘doing things right&apos; was too big a lure to ignore. I spent another eight or so hours working on design work, which I submitted a few days later to the Head of Design at Xero. I didn&apos;t hear anything back for a while, and followed up, keen to make sure that my 16 hours of work was indeed being appraised and that a process was ongoing within Xero which I hoped would lead to my being offered a job, or at the least being invited for a further, formal interview.
191  
-
192  
-&lt;/p&gt;
193  
-&lt;p&gt;A couple of weeks passed and I got an email from the Head of Design at Xero to inform me that they would not be continuing with the process due to ‘some concerns&apos;, and that they would be ‘happy to provide some feedback at to what they were should I wish&apos;. I was surprised to say the least, having been very generous with my time and having submitted a high quality of work on a blind task. I asked for the afore mentioned feedback; suggesting that I should like to know what areas they felt I could improve upon, as much for my professional progress as anything else. That feedback failed to materialise despite my following up on that offer on at least two further occasions.
194  
-
195  
-&lt;/p&gt;
196  
-&lt;p&gt;To say the process left a sour taste would be an understatement, and I should have listened to the conventional wisdom which suggests one should never work for free, even if there is a potentially lucrative position at the end of it. I should have inferred from the request that this company - a shining light in the New Zealand digital industry - were perhaps less than I had expected in that regard. I was however accepting of the decision. Sometimes you&apos;re just not a good fit, or your technical styles aren&apos;t a good match for an organisation, or any number of acceptable and understandable and often sensible reasons.
197  
-
198  
-&lt;/p&gt;
199  
-&lt;p&gt;What I don&apos;t accept however is that having occupied my time and effort in 16 hours of free work - plus the additional time spent attending the informal interview - is that it is too much to expect the courtesy of an email explaining why at the summation of that process it had been decided that I was not a good fit for the organisation. That strikes me as being a pretty shoddy way of operating, and not something one would expect if they were - as I am - familiar with the image Xero portrays of itself as an organisation and an employer. An email was the least I could expect in return for my considerable effort. I didn&apos;t get one, I didn&apos;t get anything from Xero at all. The next I saw of them was at Webstock where they would be again on the lookout for design staff who would no doubt also be asked to give up a slice of their free time for the same process to which I now feel unfortunate to have consented.
200  
-
201  
-&lt;/p&gt;
202  
-&lt;p&gt;Having moved on from that rather souring experience, I decided for a number of personal and professional reasons that my next career move would be back in Europe, and put the feelers out across my professional network for potential roles in that part of the world. I was invited to submit my CV to booking.com where positions were available and after sitting for a phone interview with two members of the technical team was invited to fly to Amsterdam to interview formally for the position.
203  
-
204  
-&lt;/p&gt;
205  
-&lt;p&gt;In all I had three interviews, two concentrating on my technical abilities as they related to the specific job, and my suitability in working in the unique environment of the company. The third interview was with one of the directors, focusing on how I would fit into the business and offering a glimpse into how it operated. I spent three days at the company&apos;s expense in Amsterdam, and flew back to New Zealand with a job offer in hand and enthusiastic about working for a company which had seemed at every point to be operating in a respectful, sensible manner to even those people who weren&apos;t yet on the payroll.
  122
+      <description>&lt;p&gt;Whilst I haven&apos;t given up all hope of being selected for the Great Britain and Northern Ireland Olympic football team for London 2012, I thought I would assemble some additional thoughts &amp; aims for the coming year–if only to provide reference as to the extent of my failures to look back on in glorious self-loathing.
206 123
 
207 124
 &lt;/p&gt;
208  
-&lt;p&gt;To say that the two processes were miles apart would be to understate the distinction. Booking.com treated me throughout the process as a skilled individual who could add value and expertise to their team, and treated the interview process as an opportunity to examine how I as a person would fit into their organisation.
  125
+&lt;h4&gt;Stay Home&lt;/h4&gt;
  126
+&lt;p&gt;This year I have flown around the world twice &amp; have crossed the English Channel twelve times. I hope next year to travel a lot less. I am tired, I&apos;m sick of airports and I&apos;m fed up of sleeping in unfamiliar beds. I&apos;d rather spend weekends getting to know Amsterdam better, not visiting – and thus being reminded of all of my many reasons for wanting to leave – England.
209 127
 
210 128
 &lt;/p&gt;
211  
-&lt;p&gt;The feeling was that whilst I could prove easily that I had the technical ability to do the job, mentality was an equally important consideration for booking.com in making their hiring decisions. With Xero the process seemed to concentrate entirely on the technical aspects of the position available; obsessing over the minutiae and ignoring the fact that someone who has been working in our industry for a decade is able to adapt, and that what is actually important is if that person is passionate about their profession and wants above all else to do great work.
  129
+&lt;h4&gt;Be Less&lt;/h4&gt;
  130
+&lt;p&gt;My gluttony, laziness &amp; lack of consideration for this–my only vessel has scaled new heights in 2011; I hope to eat less, weigh less, exercise more and generally take better care of myself. I don&apos;t quite know what that means in practical terms yet.
212 131
 
213 132
 &lt;/p&gt;
214  
-&lt;p&gt;Without the privilege of knowing what Xero&apos;s reservations in hiring me were I can only speculate, but I would suggest that given the nature of the hiring process I outlined above, it could only be of some technical consideration which I contest to the importance of. I&apos;m not so old a dog &amp; in our field of work one is always learning new tricks. That is why this is such a great profession to be in - to be constantly learning, improving and progressing. I have said in previous posts here that as far as I&apos;m concerned an organisation should be looking for the best people they can find, wherever and whatever they happen to be. Without wanting to seem cocksure and immodest, I&apos;d suggest Xero might have missed a trick in my case.
  133
+&lt;h4&gt;Make Stuff&lt;/h4&gt;
  134
+&lt;p&gt;I want to write more music, make more bits of internet &amp; become better at doing both. I have a couple of side-projects lined-up which I hope will provide adequate creative outlet. I keep lamenting my lack of tactile skills, maybe that is something I can fix too.
215 135
 
216 136
 &lt;/p&gt;
217  
-&lt;p&gt;That all being said, I&apos;m delighted, thrilled and really quite excited to be leaving Wellington for Amsterdam and starting a new job with a company who impressed me so greatly in the hiring process. I always think that treating people (staff, suppliers, customers, employees) right is half of the battle for any business; it speaks volumes for a potential employer when they treat their prospective employees with the respect that I was shown in Amsterdam. I&apos;d suggest that Xero could learn a lesson or two from the likes of booking.com if they truly aspire to be held in that same regard. If they really want to attract the most talented people from all over the world, they need to have better processes in place to (a) not insult them with the kind of shoddy treatment I&apos;ve talked about here, and (b) to deal with those who aren&apos;t a suitable fit for the company in the correct, respectful manner which they are right to expect.&lt;/p&gt;
  137
+&lt;h4&gt;Get Hitched&lt;/h4&gt;
  138
+&lt;p&gt;In December Victoria &amp; I will be getting married, the year will therefore be full of plans and bills and the build up to the big, awesome day. We have chosen a venue, have a vague plan for our day and will be figuring out all of the details in the coming months. I know this is going to be a stressful, expensive and fraught process &amp; so remembering why we are getting married and that it is a joyous and amazing thing to do is definitely something I have to continue to do.&lt;/p&gt;
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248  
-      <title>Instaface</title>
249  
-      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/instaface/</link>
250  
-      <pubDate>Sat, 10 Mar 2012 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
251  
-      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/instaface/</guid>
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+      <title>Delight as a Differentiator</title>
  170
+      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/delight-as-a-differentiator/</link>
  171
+      <pubDate>Mon, 11 Jun 2012 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
  172
+      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/delight-as-a-differentiator/</guid>
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       <author></author>
253  
-      <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;All of the whining on twitter over the FB/IG deal has cemented my thinking on the way I want to use these types of online services. I see people scrambling to backup their Instagram accounts or even shut them down, because presumably they think that facebook can determine persuasion profiles based on faux-fifties-photo-filter preferences.&lt;/strong&gt;
  174
+      <description>&lt;p&gt;Living in Amsterdam (where I&apos;m very happy!), I&apos;m becoming accustomed to dreadful - or completely absent - customer service. There doesn&apos;t seem to be a correlation here between the quality of a product, and the service with which it&apos;s delivered. Some of my favourite restaurants are staffed by people verging on hostile, and it doesn&apos;t improve inline with cost.
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255 176
 &lt;/p&gt;
256  
-&lt;p&gt;Here&apos;s the way I think of Instagram: It&apos;s the easiest way for me to take photographs on my phone, have them synced to my dropbox, populate an album on my Picasa account, post them to a Facebook album, tweet a link to them and post them to a page on my website. When I hit the share button in the Instagram app on my phone, an incredibly complicated sequence of events take place which seeds my silly little photo to an array of places from which I can derive some value, some enjoyment from them. That could change tomorrow, but because I value the photographs I take as petty records of time well spent, I have them. Physically have them. They&apos;re mine. The rack of servers through which they pass on their way to being liberated is irrelevant, and easily changed. I don&apos;t care that they also reside on the servers of Instagram, Facebook, Google &amp; Dropbox.
  177
+&lt;p&gt;At the low-end of most markets, the internet works in much the same way. Consider Ryanair: where the product and the way in which it is sold are perfectly congruous. You&apos;re treated on their website just like you&apos;re treated on their planes - packed in, confused into extra spending &amp; generally made to feel like a piece of abnormal-freight.
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258 179
 &lt;/p&gt;
259  
-&lt;p&gt;I think if you care about having absolute control the content you&apos;re creating with an application, you should definitely not be renouncing ownership and guardianship of it to anyone who isn&apos;t you. Crying foul when a company is under new ownership is idiotic. Why should you trust Instagram any more than you do Facebook? If you really cared, you&apos;d never use a third-party service, or you&apos;d already be treating these services as mere conduits for content creation and liberation, regardless of who owned them. I know it&apos;s cool to bash Facebook, to assume nefarious intent. But the size of a company is not a proxy value for their trustworthiness. North Korea is a minnow in the population stakes, but is at the top table in the cuntery charts, who is to say that the same isn&apos;t true for the makers of Instagram? I know nothing about them, I&apos;m not willing to entrust them with anything of importance to me anymore than I am facebook.
  180
+&lt;p&gt;At the other end of the market, you have niche, luxury operators who know that the customer experience is end-to-end, from the first impression on their website, to the post-transactional communications. JetSetter.com is a good example of this kind of application of delight in an interface: High quality images, restrained UI elements, space &amp; a gentle, assured tone of voice. A website sets an expectation for the experience to follow. JetSetter.com treats you like a valued and respected individual, just like a diligent concierge at the sort of high-class hotel you&apos;ll find on the site.
260 181
 
261 182
 &lt;/p&gt;
262  
-&lt;p&gt;&lt;em&gt;Don&apos;t let your snobbery get in the way of your objectiveness. Be consistent, or be quiet.&lt;/em&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
  183
+&lt;h2&gt;But what about the wide middle?&lt;/h2&gt;
  184
+&lt;p&gt;The vast majority of companies exist somewhere between these two poles, serving varied product to varied customers - and requiring such in order to prosper. For these businesses, delightfulness in a user interface can become a key differentiator which elevates it above the competition who default to the ordinary, and fail to delight. Given the choice of two stores selling the same range of products, would you chose the one staffed by the ryanair-esque shopkeeper, or the jetsetter-like assistant? Your UI is your shopfront and your shopstaff. It&apos;s the language with which you talk to your customers, the space you give them to make a decision, the gentle hand in the right direction at the right moment that turns an average user experience into an enjoyable one. And it&apos;s my belief that people will always gravitate towards the companies and services which treat them well and make them feel empowered, not embarrassed. The effect might be magnified as the purchase price goes up, but even when you&apos;re spending €5 on a paperback, you&apos;d sooner do it in a beautiful old book store than a soulless warehouse.
  185
+
  186
+&lt;/p&gt;
  187
+&lt;p&gt;The challenge for UX designers is to figure out how to find this balance, to offer an appropriate experience inline with the full gamut of products on offer - to optimise for sales, and build for delight. To build something which adds to even the most high-cost purchase, and can massively elevate the experience of buying the most mundane, inexpensive goods.
  188
+
  189
+&lt;/p&gt;
  190
+&lt;p&gt;And surely this truth is universal. Surely everyone wants to be treated well, people&apos;s ability to recognise good customer experience when online may be less established than in a physical store - but that&apos;s only going to improve. People are going to be more able to distinguish between Ryanair.com &amp; JetSetter.com, not less, and why would anyone knowingly choose that which makes them less happy?
  191
+
  192
+&lt;/p&gt;
  193
+&lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;Pixels are cheap. We as web designers are the worlds most empowered architects of retail spaces. Let&apos;s build beautiful places where people like to spend their time.&lt;/strong&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
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306  
-      <title>Lua Lua</title>
307  
-      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/lua-lua/</link>
308  
-      <pubDate>Mon, 01  Aug 2011 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
309  
-      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/lua-lua/</guid>
  237
+      <title>National Geographic CXIV - Volumes 2-4, 1958</title>
  238
+      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/National-Geographic-1958/</link>
  239
+      <pubDate>Wed, 24 Oct 2012 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
  240
+      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/National-Geographic-1958/</guid>
310 241
       <author></author>
311  
-      <description>&lt;h6&gt;The afore mentioned bicycle during today&apos;s ride down the Amstel&lt;/h6&gt;
312  
-&lt;p&gt;&lt;img src=&quot;http://mrfrisby.com/entries/assets/15/lualua.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;Lua Lua&quot;&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
  242
+      <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;assets/Covers.jpg&quot;&gt;&lt;img src=&quot;assets/Covers.jpg&quot; title=&quot;covers&quot; alt=&quot;The covers of three volumes of National GeographicMagazine from 1958&quot; style=&quot;border: 18px solid #000; width: 94%;&quot; /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  243
+
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+&lt;/p&gt;
  245
+&lt;p&gt;I couldn&apos;t resist these when I saw them on the &lt;a href=&quot;http://etsy.com&quot;&gt;Etsy&lt;/a&gt; store of &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.etsy.com/shop/peonyandthistle?ref=seller_info&quot;&gt;Peony &amp; Thistle&lt;/a&gt;. They&apos;re full of glorious mid-century design, the covers alone are wonderful, and the advertising inside is like going for a wander around the set of Mad Men.
  246
+
  247
+&lt;/p&gt;
  248
+&lt;p&gt;I&apos;ve found myself leaning on Magazine&apos;s more and more for inspiration of late. &lt;a href=&quot;http://monocle.com&quot;&gt;Monocle&lt;/a&gt; was a great source of ideas when I was reworking this website, and &lt;a href=&quot;http://offscreenmag.com&quot;&gt;Off Screen&lt;/a&gt; manages to inspire me to be a better design whilst letting me read about designers. These old editions of National Geographic will join those other titles in providing something pretty and well designed to enjoy in those few hours a day when I&apos;m not staring at a screen. 
  249
+
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+&lt;/p&gt;
  251
+&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;assets/Coke.jpg&quot;&gt;&lt;img src=&quot;assets/Coke.jpg&quot; style=&quot;width: 47.5%;&quot; /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  252
+&lt;a href=&quot;assets/Cavalcade.jpg&quot;&gt;&lt;img src=&quot;assets/Cavalcade.jpg&quot; style=&quot;width: 47.5%;&quot; /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  253
+&lt;a href=&quot;assets/Kodak.jpg&quot;&gt;&lt;img src=&quot;assets/Kodak.jpg&quot; style=&quot;width: 47.5%;&quot; /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;
  254
+&lt;a href=&quot;assets/Optical.jpg&quot;&gt;&lt;img src=&quot;assets/Optical.jpg&quot; style=&quot;width: 47.5%;&quot; /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
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@@ -345,6 +287,30 @@
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  290
+      <title>Responsiving</title>
  291
+      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/responsiving/</link>
  292
+      <pubDate>Wed, 02 Nov 2011 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
  293
+      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/responsiving/</guid>
  294
+      <author></author>
  295
+      <description>&lt;p&gt;So, yesterday I deployed a half-arsed joke to my website for nothing more than shits and equal quantities of giggles (one must get their shiggle ratio right). My intention wasn&apos;t to offend or upset anyone, just to play a little practical joke on those people who are inclined to resize their browser window.                
  296
+
  297
+&lt;/p&gt;
  298
+&lt;p&gt;&lt;img src=&quot;http://goo.gl/BKFxT&quot; alt=&quot;&quot;&gt;
  299
+
  300
+&lt;/p&gt;
  301
+&lt;p&gt;Turns out that quite a lot of people thought it was funny, which was nice, I thought it was funny too. What it did show however is that for every ten normal, well-humoured adults with whom I am honoured to share a profession, there is one small-minded, humourless cretin just waiting to take everything way too seriously.&lt;/p&gt;
  302
+
  303
+&lt;/p&gt;
  304
+&lt;h4&gt;Here are some links:&lt;/h4&gt;
  305
+&lt;ul&gt;
  306
+&lt;li&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;http://www.reddit.com/r/web_design/comments/lxjyu/best_responsive_design_ive_seen/&quot;&gt;Reddit Thread&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/li&gt;
  307
+&lt;li&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;https://plus.google.com/u/0/112760662546196815444/posts/ioybN9drxLv&quot;&gt;Google+ Post&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/li&gt;
  308
+&lt;li&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;https://twitter.com/#!/MrTinNilsson/status/131717934908313601&quot;&gt;Twitter #1&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/li&gt;
  309
+&lt;li&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;https://twitter.com/#!/gilestalbot/status/131679856940421120&quot;&gt;Twitter #2&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/li&gt;
  310
+&lt;/ul&gt;
  311
+</description>
  312
+    </item>
  313
+    <item>
348 314
       <title>Our New House</title>
349 315
       <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/our-new-house/</link>
350 316
       <pubDate>Wed, 01 Jun 2011 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
@@ -371,30 +337,6 @@
371 337
 </description>
372 338
     </item>
373 339
     <item>
374  
-      <title>Responsiving</title>
375  
-      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/responsiving/</link>
376  
-      <pubDate>Wed, 02 Nov 2011 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
377  
-      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/responsiving/</guid>
378  
-      <author></author>
379  
-      <description>&lt;p&gt;So, yesterday I deployed a half-arsed joke to my website for nothing more than shits and equal quantities of giggles (one must get their shiggle ratio right). My intention wasn&apos;t to offend or upset anyone, just to play a little practical joke on those people who are inclined to resize their browser window.                
380  
-
381  
-&lt;/p&gt;
382  
-&lt;p&gt;&lt;img src=&quot;http://goo.gl/BKFxT&quot; alt=&quot;&quot;&gt;
383  
-
384  
-&lt;/p&gt;
385  
-&lt;p&gt;Turns out that quite a lot of people thought it was funny, which was nice, I thought it was funny too. What it did show however is that for every ten normal, well-humoured adults with whom I am honoured to share a profession, there is one small-minded, humourless cretin just waiting to take everything way too seriously.&lt;/p&gt;
386  
-
387  
-&lt;/p&gt;
388  
-&lt;h4&gt;Here are some links:&lt;/h4&gt;
389  
-&lt;ul&gt;
390  
-&lt;li&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;http://www.reddit.com/r/web_design/comments/lxjyu/best_responsive_design_ive_seen/&quot;&gt;Reddit Thread&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/li&gt;
391  
-&lt;li&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;https://plus.google.com/u/0/112760662546196815444/posts/ioybN9drxLv&quot;&gt;Google+ Post&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/li&gt;
392  
-&lt;li&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;https://twitter.com/#!/MrTinNilsson/status/131717934908313601&quot;&gt;Twitter #1&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/li&gt;
393  
-&lt;li&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;https://twitter.com/#!/gilestalbot/status/131679856940421120&quot;&gt;Twitter #2&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/li&gt;
394  
-&lt;/ul&gt;
395  
-</description>
396  
-    </item>
397  
-    <item>
398 340
       <title>Simple keyboard navigation</title>
399 341
       <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/simple-keyboard-navigation/</link>
400 342
       <pubDate>Mon, 09 Jul 2012 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
@@ -413,45 +355,13 @@
413 355
 </description>
414 356
     </item>
415 357
     <item>
416  
-      <title>The Baseline has Shifted</title>
417  
-      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/the-baseline-has-shifted/</link>
418  
-      <pubDate>Thu, 05 Jul 2012 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
419  
-      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/the-baseline-has-shifted/</guid>
420  
-      <author></author>
421  
-      <description>&lt;p&gt;When I was 15 I used to spend all of the money I could wangle out of my parents to buy bootleg CDs of my favourite bands playing live versions of as-yet-unreleased material. They sounded like shit. They sounded like shit and I paid for them. I paid for them because my fervour demanded I have them, and because the shitty version was the only version, it was the version I&apos;d buy.
422  
-
423  
-&lt;/p&gt;
424  
-&lt;p&gt;Fast-forward a dozen years: My fervour has cooled and I&apos;m happy to wait for a song to be released before buying it. The bootlegs are still available, but when it comes to making a decision between the shitty version recorded in a loud concert hall, and the version recorded in a studio and intended for home play, there&apos;s an obvious winner.
425  
-
426  
-&lt;/p&gt;
427  
-&lt;p&gt;And that long-winded introduction is a clumsy metaphor for the internet. An internet where just a few years ago the base expectation was that everything was a bit shitty. It was the best we had, and we used it and revelled in it - but it really was a bit crap. Google didn&apos;t know what you were looking for, browsers weren&apos;t capable of rendering consistently, services were information silos and the patterns of design for the web hadn&apos;t been established and honed and everything was confusing and inconsistent and odd.
428  
-
429  
-&lt;/p&gt;
430  
-&lt;p&gt;Things are better now. People have decent internet connections, Google knows more about you than Tesco, your data is liberated from the clutches of corporations and the internet increasingly looks great, and works wonderfully. Mobile devices and platforms are bringing the best of Human Interface Design to the masses, and the big internet heavyweights - Google, Facebook, Twitter, etc. - are investing in design like never before. Just like when I stopped buying those bootleg CDs, I&apos;ve stopped being forgiving of crap user experience, inconsistent design &amp; poorly considered user-flow. And I don&apos;t think it&apos;s just me. Apple - whether you like it or not - are educating a generation of consumers that user experience need not be analogous to a shitty bootleg, that design is synonymous with quality, with security, with integrity. That if something looks like shit, feels like shit &amp; treats you like shit - it probably is shit.
431  
-
432  
-&lt;/p&gt;
433  
-&lt;p&gt;Hundreds of millions of people are carrying iPhones &amp; using facebook. They know good design, even if they don&apos;t know the jargon. Startup folks are right to identify designers as the kingmakers of new online companies; but big business needs to get there too: In a global marketplace, where design has a value of its own, it&apos;s not going to suffice to be good enough anymore. And what a fantastic challenge it is that lays before all of us who make websites. To stop settling for the mediocre, to talk about design not in terms of window-dressing, but experience-forming. To switch the pivot point from satisfaction to &lt;a href=&quot;http://talks.webstock.org.nz/speakers/doug-bowman/delivering-delight/&quot;&gt;delight&lt;/a&gt;.
434  
-
435  
-&lt;/p&gt;
436  
-&lt;p&gt;If you design websites and don&apos;t aim to delight - do something else. If you design websites and think good enough is good enough - do something else. If this brave new world where design is a currency and you hold the cheque book doesn&apos;t make your heart flutter and your mind run wild with possibilities - do something else. The years in which web designers could get away with being average are coming to an end, and it is the engaged, enthusiastic, eager-to-please who are going to see their value rise in this new design-cognisant digital economy. Excited? Fucking right I am.&lt;/p&gt;
437  
-</description>
438  
-    </item>
439  
-    <item>
440  
-      <title>Why I shall be a Clarke-Frisby</title>
441  
-      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/why-i-shall-be-a-clarke-frisby/</link>
442  
-      <pubDate>Mon, 07 Nov 2011 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
443  
-      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/why-i-shall-be-a-clarke-frisby/</guid>
  358
+      <title>Lua Lua</title>
  359
+      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/lua-lua/</link>
  360
+      <pubDate>Mon, 01  Aug 2011 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
  361
+      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/lua-lua/</guid>
444 362
       <author></author>
445  
-      <description>&lt;p&gt;Either-side of proposing to my darling Victoria last December - and in the months since - a battle has raged in the Clarke/Frisby household over the naming of my wife-to-be and our would-be offspring. I had defaulted to a position borne of a warm-fuzzy sense of traditionalism, of asserting my claim to ownership over my family, of following blindly in the footsteps of my father, and his father before him.
446  
-
447  
-&lt;/p&gt;
448  
-&lt;p&gt;Victoria was never going to stand for that, and so we argued on at least three occasions over what her married name would be. There was - after the third bout - an uneasy concession on either-side which would see Victoria take my name &amp; add it to hers. The war was over, my territory had remained unthreatened.
449  
-
450  
-&lt;/p&gt;
451  
-&lt;p&gt;However, riding along with my lovely fiancée on her tireless, spirited fight for gender equality, and realising the error of my ways - I decided that the fairest, most equitable, warm-fuzziest thing to do is for both of us to take both of our names. And so once married I shall be Stuart Clarke-Frisby and Victoria will become Victoria (Clarkey) Clarke-Frisby. It occurred to me that there really is little sense in Victoria taking my name, for starters: it&apos;s faintly ridiculous &amp; my families form par-excellence in the reproductive stakes means there is no threat to the good name Frisby from dying out anytime soon. But, there is something to be said for uniting under a single banner, for forming a public alliance, for nailing your flag to a syllabically-rich pole. And there is also something to be said for starting our married life under such a banner. We both know in our relationship that no quarter is given to the traditionally-demeaning gender roles of old, and that we are - and will remain - equals. And so in taking our name we demonstrate.
452  
-
453  
-&lt;/p&gt;
454  
-&lt;p&gt;Yes, it&apos;s going to be an administrative nightmare, no I haven&apos;t checked if mrclarkefrisby.com is available for purchase and yes I do worry what will happen if our children in turn marry double-barrelled beaus. The thought of a &lt;a href=&quot;http://youtu.be/SjxY9rZwNGU&quot;&gt;Chumley-Warner-Clarke-Frisby&lt;/a&gt; is not worth thinking about; but neither is the idea that enforcing my name upon Victoria is the right way to formalise my promise to love &amp; respect her for the rest of our lives.&lt;/p&gt;
  363
+      <description>&lt;h6&gt;The afore mentioned bicycle during today&apos;s ride down the Amstel&lt;/h6&gt;
  364
+&lt;p&gt;&lt;img src=&quot;http://mrfrisby.com/entries/assets/15/lualua.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;Lua Lua&quot;&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
455 365
 </description>
456 366
     </item>
457 367
     <item>
@@ -528,5 +438,116 @@
528 438
 &lt;/p&gt;
529 439
 </description>
530 440
     </item>
  441
+    <item>
  442
+      <title>The Baseline has Shifted</title>
  443
+      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/the-baseline-has-shifted/</link>
  444
+      <pubDate>Thu, 05 Jul 2012 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
  445
+      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/the-baseline-has-shifted/</guid>
  446
+      <author></author>
  447
+      <description>&lt;p&gt;When I was 15 I used to spend all of the money I could wangle out of my parents to buy bootleg CDs of my favourite bands playing live versions of as-yet-unreleased material. They sounded like shit. They sounded like shit and I paid for them. I paid for them because my fervour demanded I have them, and because the shitty version was the only version, it was the version I&apos;d buy.
  448
+
  449
+&lt;/p&gt;
  450
+&lt;p&gt;Fast-forward a dozen years: My fervour has cooled and I&apos;m happy to wait for a song to be released before buying it. The bootlegs are still available, but when it comes to making a decision between the shitty version recorded in a loud concert hall, and the version recorded in a studio and intended for home play, there&apos;s an obvious winner.
  451
+
  452
+&lt;/p&gt;
  453
+&lt;p&gt;And that long-winded introduction is a clumsy metaphor for the internet. An internet where just a few years ago the base expectation was that everything was a bit shitty. It was the best we had, and we used it and revelled in it - but it really was a bit crap. Google didn&apos;t know what you were looking for, browsers weren&apos;t capable of rendering consistently, services were information silos and the patterns of design for the web hadn&apos;t been established and honed and everything was confusing and inconsistent and odd.
  454
+
  455
+&lt;/p&gt;
  456
+&lt;p&gt;Things are better now. People have decent internet connections, Google knows more about you than Tesco, your data is liberated from the clutches of corporations and the internet increasingly looks great, and works wonderfully. Mobile devices and platforms are bringing the best of Human Interface Design to the masses, and the big internet heavyweights - Google, Facebook, Twitter, etc. - are investing in design like never before. Just like when I stopped buying those bootleg CDs, I&apos;ve stopped being forgiving of crap user experience, inconsistent design &amp; poorly considered user-flow. And I don&apos;t think it&apos;s just me. Apple - whether you like it or not - are educating a generation of consumers that user experience need not be analogous to a shitty bootleg, that design is synonymous with quality, with security, with integrity. That if something looks like shit, feels like shit &amp; treats you like shit - it probably is shit.
  457
+
  458
+&lt;/p&gt;
  459
+&lt;p&gt;Hundreds of millions of people are carrying iPhones &amp; using facebook. They know good design, even if they don&apos;t know the jargon. Startup folks are right to identify designers as the kingmakers of new online companies; but big business needs to get there too: In a global marketplace, where design has a value of its own, it&apos;s not going to suffice to be good enough anymore. And what a fantastic challenge it is that lays before all of us who make websites. To stop settling for the mediocre, to talk about design not in terms of window-dressing, but experience-forming. To switch the pivot point from satisfaction to &lt;a href=&quot;http://talks.webstock.org.nz/speakers/doug-bowman/delivering-delight/&quot;&gt;delight&lt;/a&gt;.
  460
+
  461
+&lt;/p&gt;
  462
+&lt;p&gt;If you design websites and don&apos;t aim to delight - do something else. If you design websites and think good enough is good enough - do something else. If this brave new world where design is a currency and you hold the cheque book doesn&apos;t make your heart flutter and your mind run wild with possibilities - do something else. The years in which web designers could get away with being average are coming to an end, and it is the engaged, enthusiastic, eager-to-please who are going to see their value rise in this new design-cognisant digital economy. Excited? Fucking right I am.&lt;/p&gt;
  463
+</description>
  464
+    </item>
  465
+    <item>
  466
+      <title>Why I shall be a Clarke-Frisby</title>
  467
+      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/why-i-shall-be-a-clarke-frisby/</link>
  468
+      <pubDate>Mon, 07 Nov 2011 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
  469
+      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/why-i-shall-be-a-clarke-frisby/</guid>
  470
+      <author></author>
  471
+      <description>&lt;p&gt;Either-side of proposing to my darling Victoria last December - and in the months since - a battle has raged in the Clarke/Frisby household over the naming of my wife-to-be and our would-be offspring. I had defaulted to a position borne of a warm-fuzzy sense of traditionalism, of asserting my claim to ownership over my family, of following blindly in the footsteps of my father, and his father before him.
  472
+
  473
+&lt;/p&gt;
  474
+&lt;p&gt;Victoria was never going to stand for that, and so we argued on at least three occasions over what her married name would be. There was - after the third bout - an uneasy concession on either-side which would see Victoria take my name &amp; add it to hers. The war was over, my territory had remained unthreatened.
  475
+
  476
+&lt;/p&gt;
  477
+&lt;p&gt;However, riding along with my lovely fiancée on her tireless, spirited fight for gender equality, and realising the error of my ways - I decided that the fairest, most equitable, warm-fuzziest thing to do is for both of us to take both of our names. And so once married I shall be Stuart Clarke-Frisby and Victoria will become Victoria (Clarkey) Clarke-Frisby. It occurred to me that there really is little sense in Victoria taking my name, for starters: it&apos;s faintly ridiculous &amp; my families form par-excellence in the reproductive stakes means there is no threat to the good name Frisby from dying out anytime soon. But, there is something to be said for uniting under a single banner, for forming a public alliance, for nailing your flag to a syllabically-rich pole. And there is also something to be said for starting our married life under such a banner. We both know in our relationship that no quarter is given to the traditionally-demeaning gender roles of old, and that we are - and will remain - equals. And so in taking our name we demonstrate.
  478
+
  479
+&lt;/p&gt;
  480
+&lt;p&gt;Yes, it&apos;s going to be an administrative nightmare, no I haven&apos;t checked if mrclarkefrisby.com is available for purchase and yes I do worry what will happen if our children in turn marry double-barrelled beaus. The thought of a &lt;a href=&quot;http://youtu.be/SjxY9rZwNGU&quot;&gt;Chumley-Warner-Clarke-Frisby&lt;/a&gt; is not worth thinking about; but neither is the idea that enforcing my name upon Victoria is the right way to formalise my promise to love &amp; respect her for the rest of our lives.&lt;/p&gt;
  481
+</description>
  482
+    </item>
  483
+    <item>
  484
+      <title>Instaface</title>
  485
+      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/instaface/</link>
  486
+      <pubDate>Sat, 10 Mar 2012 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
  487
+      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/instaface/</guid>
  488
+      <author></author>
  489
+      <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;All of the whining on twitter over the FB/IG deal has cemented my thinking on the way I want to use these types of online services. I see people scrambling to backup their Instagram accounts or even shut them down, because presumably they think that facebook can determine persuasion profiles based on faux-fifties-photo-filter preferences.&lt;/strong&gt;
  490
+
  491
+&lt;/p&gt;
  492
+&lt;p&gt;Here&apos;s the way I think of Instagram: It&apos;s the easiest way for me to take photographs on my phone, have them synced to my dropbox, populate an album on my Picasa account, post them to a Facebook album, tweet a link to them and post them to a page on my website. When I hit the share button in the Instagram app on my phone, an incredibly complicated sequence of events take place which seeds my silly little photo to an array of places from which I can derive some value, some enjoyment from them. That could change tomorrow, but because I value the photographs I take as petty records of time well spent, I have them. Physically have them. They&apos;re mine. The rack of servers through which they pass on their way to being liberated is irrelevant, and easily changed. I don&apos;t care that they also reside on the servers of Instagram, Facebook, Google &amp; Dropbox.
  493
+
  494
+&lt;/p&gt;
  495
+&lt;p&gt;I think if you care about having absolute control the content you&apos;re creating with an application, you should definitely not be renouncing ownership and guardianship of it to anyone who isn&apos;t you. Crying foul when a company is under new ownership is idiotic. Why should you trust Instagram any more than you do Facebook? If you really cared, you&apos;d never use a third-party service, or you&apos;d already be treating these services as mere conduits for content creation and liberation, regardless of who owned them. I know it&apos;s cool to bash Facebook, to assume nefarious intent. But the size of a company is not a proxy value for their trustworthiness. North Korea is a minnow in the population stakes, but is at the top table in the cuntery charts, who is to say that the same isn&apos;t true for the makers of Instagram? I know nothing about them, I&apos;m not willing to entrust them with anything of importance to me anymore than I am facebook.
  496
+
  497
+&lt;/p&gt;
  498
+&lt;p&gt;&lt;em&gt;Don&apos;t let your snobbery get in the way of your objectiveness. Be consistent, or be quiet.&lt;/em&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
  499
+</description>
  500
+    </item>
  501
+    <item>
  502
+      <title>A Bicycle</title>
  503
+      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/a-bicycle/</link>
  504
+      <pubDate>Sat, 30 Jul 2011 15:00:00 +0200</pubDate>
  505
+      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/a-bicycle/</guid>
  506
+      <author></author>
  507
+      <description>&lt;p&gt;When I lived in Fukuoka I used to zip around on a little city bike, it was white - really white - and so I named it (as a football geek would) after Andrés Iniesta, the pale impresario at the heart of the Barcelona &amp; Spain midfield. 
  508
+
  509
+&lt;/p&gt;
  510
+&lt;p&gt;Andrés was a great little bike, and being in Japan meant that I was never in danger of being maimed by a passing car or having my bike stolen from some far-flung outreach of the city. I would just jump on it of an evening and ride off in one direction or another, ending up in places which the few foreigners in the city rarely visited. I&apos;d cycle through suburban neighbourhoods and out of town retail complexes, to fishing outposts and motorway intersections none of which I could tell you the names of. It was on my bike that I saw the best of Fukuoka, and through cycling that I was able to enjoy Japan properly, watching it pass by me, passing by it &amp; being a part of a giant, moving ecosystem of people and machines.
  511
+
  512
+&lt;/p&gt;
  513
+&lt;p&gt;And so here I am in Amsterdam - the European Capital of the bicycle - and I&apos;ve only just got around to buying a bike, and I&apos;ve yet to ride it anywhere I haven&apos;t needed to go. For Amsterdam is not quite the same as Fukuoka, one isn&apos;t part of an ecosystem here so much as a rusting nail in an violent sea of rusting nails, all scraping against each other and vying for top spot and causing harm, and popping tyres and severing arteries. Trams &amp; tramlines, throngs of camera-toting tourists,stupid scooters and their moronic-drivers, one gets the feeling that Amsterdam is designed not for cyclists, but for a transportationary conflict designed to extinguish all but the victorious. And so I&apos;ve yet to venture south of home in the direction of the sprawling-flats on North Holland, I&apos;ve yet to cross the Amstel in east to explore. I have however decided upon a new name for my new bike. As white as Andrés was, my new bike is black. And so whilst fearing some sort of racial faux-pas I have decided to name this bike after a black footballer - and could think of no more enjoyable a name to utter than that of the DR Congo &amp; former Newcastle United striker; Lomana LuaLua. I&apos;ll be calling him LuaLua for short.
  514
+
  515
+&lt;/p&gt;
  516
+&lt;h5&gt;Other candidates were (in alphabetical order):&lt;/h5&gt;
  517
+&lt;ul&gt;
  518
+&lt;li&gt;Didier Drogba&lt;/li&gt;
  519
+&lt;li&gt;Danger Fourpence&lt;/li&gt;
  520
+&lt;li&gt;Kazenga LuaLua&lt;/li&gt;
  521
+&lt;li&gt;Peter Ndlovu&lt;/li&gt;
  522
+&lt;/ul&gt;
  523
+</description>
  524
+    </item>
  525
+    <item>
  526
+      <title>booking.com — One Year In.</title>
  527
+      <link>http://mrfrisby.com/articles/booking-com-one-year-in/</link>
  528
+      <pubDate>Fri, 02 Mar 2012 15:00:00 +0100</pubDate>
  529
+      <guid isPermaLink="true">http://mrfrisby.com/articles/booking-com-one-year-in/</guid>
  530
+      <author></author>
  531
+      <description>&lt;p&gt;I wrote a year ago about the process of interviewing with &lt;a href=&quot;http://booking.com&quot;&gt;booking.com&lt;/a&gt; &amp; have managed to mention little of what its been like to actually work here for the past twelve months. I get lots of traffic coming my way from people trying to find out what it&apos;s like to do my job, and so I figured I&apos;d talk a little bit about what we do, and the philosophy which I think sets us apart from lots of other companies operating at our scale on the web, maybe this&apos;ll be a better source of information than my post from last April.
  532
+
  533
+&lt;/p&gt;
  534
+&lt;p&gt;Coming from agency-land, and having worked for clients for the entirety of my short career, I was excited at the prospect of having a direct connection with the people interacting with my work, and that has proven to be a continuously motivating factor in my role with booking.com. We - the front-end team of approximately 60 people - have a sharp, constant focus on our users. Everything we seek to do is aimed at making the experience of using our website measurably better for our customers. We have a common language which encourages us to constantly reflect on a single question, &apos;How does this help our users?&apos;. Note that the question isn&apos;t &apos;How does this make us more money?&apos; - Whilst money is of course a key measurement for success, our focus is on making improvements to the user experience which in turn make our users happier &amp; more loyal. We could come up with a thousand ideas to increase revenue tomorrow, but we are encouraged to be cognisant of the distinction between short-term gains, and long-term improvements. When we assess and critique ideas from the perspective of the user, we are able to differentiate between the two, and be the advocates for our millions of customers.
  535
+
  536
+&lt;/p&gt;
  537
+&lt;p&gt;And behind that mass of users for whom we aim to please is a mass of data to which we - designers, developers, product owners - are given free access. We operate at a scale where we are very quickly able to see if what we&apos;re doing is an improvement, and we encourage and are encouraged to be mindful, commercially focused and vigilant. Throughout my pre-booking.com career I was used to creating work to a brief, with no access to the end users, and no opportunities to measure if what I&apos;d done had actually made a positive difference. I would fall-back on the knowledge I&apos;d gained from blogs and books and experience and expertise. Luckily I no longer have to do that, and I say luckily because I know now that in the vast majority of cases, I was wrong. I still am. I&apos;m wrong the majority of the time. Once I&apos;d have called myself an expert, now I&apos;m constantly aware of how little I - or anyone - really knows about how people behave on the web, what they do and don&apos;t understand, like, enjoy and delight in. I&apos;m wrong more often than I&apos;m right, and yet somehow I still haven&apos;t been shown out of the building…
  538
+
  539
+&lt;/p&gt;
  540
+&lt;p&gt;We embrace failure like an over-enthusiastic grandma embraces her favourite grandson, for every failure is a deposit in a vault of knowledge. Every failure is a step towards a subsequent success, or a debunking of a popular belief, and at best a raised middle-finger to our industry&apos;s all-too-many &apos;experts&apos;. But failure isn&apos;t our goal, learning is. Failing for the sake of failing would be stupid, failing so that you can later succeed is brilliant, especially when - as at booking.com - the endorsement of this kind of failure comes from the very top of the organisation.
  541
+
  542
+&lt;/p&gt;
  543
+&lt;p&gt;My favourite thing about working at booking is that I&apos;m surrounded by an incredibly diverse group of people, most of whom - like me - moved to the Netherlands for their job, and who are chosen because amongst other things, they are passionate about the work they do. I used to be the only designer working on websites, and whilst that gives you great freedom, it also gives you an easy ride. I know that at booking.com I will be tapped gently on the shoulder when I&apos;ve overlooked something, or when I could&apos;ve done a better job. Our millions of users, and my front-end colleagues will see to that.
  544
+
  545
+&lt;/p&gt;
  546
+&lt;p&gt;In terms of process, structure, pace and agility, booking is quite unlike most businesses of its size. There is no prescribed way of working, no defined set of tools, no rigid working hours. I rock up at 8:30 in the morning, others stroll in at 10:30. I use a notepad and a set of preposterously over-elaborate pens for wireframing, others use whiteboards, post-its and hallway conversations &amp; so long as you can push commits to a git repository, no-one cares what you crafted them with. Our large team is sub-divided into small teams of ~5 people, a mix of designers, developers, copywriters, product owners &amp; specialists (language specialists, statisticians, usability researchers, platform developers, psychologists, etc.) - that gives us a small, scrum-like style of work. We work quickly, innovate &amp; ideate quickly, and try not to build complex, rigid processes which put barriers between ideas and execution. Of course there is an ebb and flow, some days that works flawlessly, some days less so - we are always improving and monitoring our way of working, and with a growing team, always making adjustments which aim to make it as easy as possible for designers to design, developers to develop, and users to use our website.
  547
+
  548
+&lt;/p&gt;
  549
+&lt;p&gt;All-in-all, working as a designer at booking.com has proven to be an eye-opening, challenging, rewarding experience - and one which continues to to be all three on a daily basis. I can&apos;t imagine there are many companies where a designer is given the privilege of serving so many users, and the freedom to serve them in whatever way suits them best.&lt;/p&gt;
  550
+</description>
  551
+    </item>
531 552
   </channel>
532 553
 </rss>
5  contents/css/entry.css
@@ -137,4 +137,9 @@ cite {
137 137
 	text-align: right;
138 138
 	padding: .25em .5em;
139 139
 	font-style: normal;
  140
+}
  141
+#disqus_thread {
  142
+	border-top: 1px solid #DDD;
  143
+	margin-top: 1em;
  144
+	padding-top: 1em;
140 145
 }
122  npm-debug.log
... ...
@@ -1,122 +0,0 @@
1  
-0 info it worked if it ends with ok
2  
-1 verbose cli [ 'node', '/usr/local/bin/npm', 'install', 'moment', '-g' ]
3  
-2 info using npm@1.1.62
4  
-3 info using node@v0.8.11
5  
-4 verbose read json /usr/local/lib/package.json
6  
-5 verbose read json /usr/local/lib/package.json
7  
-6 verbose cache add [ 'moment', null ]
8  
-7 silly cache add name=undefined spec="moment" args=["moment",null]
9  
-8 verbose parsed url { pathname: 'moment', path: 'moment', href: 'moment' }
10  
-9 silly lockFile b56def36-moment moment
11  
-10 verbose lock moment /Users/Stu/.npm/b56def36-moment.lock
12  
-11 silly lockFile b56def36-moment moment
13  
-12 verbose addNamed [ 'moment', '' ]
14  
-13 verbose addNamed [ null, '' ]
15  
-14 silly lockFile 42aa250a-moment moment@
16  
-15 verbose lock moment@ /Users/Stu/.npm/42aa250a-moment.lock
17  
-16 silly addNameRange { name: 'moment', range: '', hasData: false }
18  
-17 verbose url raw moment
19  
-18 verbose url resolving [ 'https://registry.npmjs.org/', './moment' ]
20  
-19 verbose url resolved https://registry.npmjs.org/moment
21  
-20 info trying registry request attempt 1 at 21:57:24
22  
-21 verbose etag "1B1NW3JIXH3206F7M4B2NYA7Z"
23  
-22 http GET https://registry.npmjs.org/moment
24  
-23 http 304 https://registry.npmjs.org/moment
25  
-24 silly registry.get cb [ 304,
26  
-24 silly registry.get   { server: 'CouchDB/1.2.0 (Erlang OTP/R15B)',
27  
-24 silly registry.get     etag: '"1B1NW3JIXH3206F7M4B2NYA7Z"',
28  
-24 silly registry.get     date: 'Thu, 11 Oct 2012 19:57:24 GMT',
29  
-24 silly registry.get     'content-length': '0' } ]
30  
-25 verbose etag moment from cache
31  
-26 silly addNameRange number 2 { name: 'moment', range: '', hasData: true }
32  
-27 silly addNameRange versions [ 'moment',
33  
-27 silly addNameRange   [ '1.0.0',
34  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.0.1',
35  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.1.0',
36  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.1.1',
37  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.2.0',
38  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.3.0',
39  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.4.0',
40  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.5.0',
41  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.5.1',
42  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.6.0',
43  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.6.1',
44  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.6.2',
45  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.7.0',
46  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.7.1',
47  
-27 silly addNameRange     '1.7.2' ] ]
48  
-28 verbose addNamed [ 'moment', '1.7.2' ]
49  
-29 verbose addNamed [ '1.7.2', '1.7.2' ]
50  
-30 silly lockFile e082cc8f-moment-1-7-2 moment@1.7.2
51  
-31 verbose lock moment@1.7.2 /Users/Stu/.npm/e082cc8f-moment-1-7-2.lock
52  
-32 verbose read json /Users/Stu/.npm/moment/1.7.2/package/package.json
53  
-33 silly lockFile e082cc8f-moment-1-7-2 moment@1.7.2
54  
-34 silly lockFile 42aa250a-moment moment@
55  
-35 silly resolved [ { name: 'moment',
56  
-35 silly resolved     version: '1.7.2',
57  
-35 silly resolved     description: 'Parse, manipulate, and display dates.',
58  
-35 silly resolved     homepage: 'http://momentjs.com',
59  
-35 silly resolved     author:
60  
-35 silly resolved      { name: 'Tim Wood',
61  
-35 silly resolved        email: 'washwithcare@gmail.com',
62  
-35 silly resolved        url: 'http://timwoodcreates.com/' },
63  
-35 silly resolved     contributors: [ [Object] ],
64  
-35 silly resolved     keywords:
65  
-35 silly resolved      [ 'moment',
66  
-35 silly resolved        'date',
67  
-35 silly resolved        'time',
68  
-35 silly resolved        'parse',
69  
-35 silly resolved        'format',
70  
-35 silly resolved        'validate',
71  
-35 silly resolved        'i18n',
72  
-35 silly resolved        'l10n',
73  
-35 silly resolved        'ender' ],
74  
-35 silly resolved     main: './moment.js',
75  
-35 silly resolved     engines: { node: '*' },
76  
-35 silly resolved     repository: { type: 'git', url: 'https://github.com/timrwood/moment.git' },
77  
-35 silly resolved     bugs: { url: 'https://github.com/timrwood/moment/issues' },
78  
-35 silly resolved     licenses: [ [Object] ],
79  
-35 silly resolved     devDependencies: { jshint: 'latest', 'uglify-js': 'latest', nodeunit: 'latest' },
80  
-35 silly resolved     scripts: { test: 'make test' },
81  
-35 silly resolved     ender: './ender.js',
82  
-35 silly resolved     readme: '[Moment.js](http://momentjs.com)\n================================\n\nA lightweight javascript date library for parsing, validating, manipulating, and formatting dates.\n\n### [Check out the website](http://momentjs.com)\n\n### [Read the documentation](http://momentjs.com/docs/)\n\n### [Run the unit tests](http://momentjs.com/test/)\n\n\nUpgrading to 1.6.0\n==================\n\nThere are a few things being deprecated in the 1.6.0 release.\n\n1. The format tokens `z` and `zz` (timezone abbreviations like EST CST MST etc) will no longer be supported. Due to inconsistent browser support, we are unable to consistently produce this value. See [this issue](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/issues/162) for more background.\n\n2. The method `moment.fn.native` is deprecated in favor of `moment.fn.toDate`. There continue to be issues with Google Closure Compiler throwing errors when using `native`, even in valid instances.\n\n3. The way to customize am/pm strings is being changed. This would only affect you if you created a custom language file. For more information, see [this issue](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/pull/222).\n\n\nChangelog\n=========\n\n\n### 1.7.0 [See discussion](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/issues/288)\n\nAdded `moment.fn.endOf()` and `moment.fn.startOf()`.\n\nAdded validation via `moment.fn.isValid()`.\n\nMade formatting method 3x faster. http://jsperf.com/momentjs-cached-format-functions\n\nAdd support for month/weekday callbacks in `moment.fn.format()`\n\nAdded instance specific languages.\n\nAdded two letter weekday abbreviations with the formatting token `dd`.\n\nVarious language updates.\n\nVarious bugfixes.\n\n### 1.6.0 [See discussion](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/pull/268)\n\nAdded Durations.\n\nRevamped parser to support parsing non-separated strings (YYYYMMDD vs YYYY-MM-DD).\n\nAdded support for millisecond parsing and formatting tokens (S SS SSS)\n\nAdded a getter for `moment.lang()`\n\nVarious bugfixes.\n\n### 1.5.0 [See milestone](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/issues?milestone=10&page=1&state=closed)\n\nAdded UTC mode.\n\nAdded automatic ISO8601 parsing.\n\nVarious bugfixes.\n\n### 1.4.0 [See milestone](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/issues?milestone=8&state=closed)\n\nAdded `moment.fn.toDate` as a replacement for `moment.fn.native`.\n\nAdded `moment.fn.sod` and `moment.fn.eod` to get the start and end of day.\n\nVarious bugfixes.\n\n### 1.3.0 [See milestone](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/issues?milestone=7&state=closed)\n\nAdded support for parsing month names in the current language.\n\nAdded escape blocks for parsing tokens.\n\nAdded `moment.fn.calendar` to format strings like \'Today 2:30 PM\', \'Tomorrow 1:25 AM\', and \'Last Sunday 4:30 AM\'.\n\nAdded `moment.fn.day` as a setter.\n\nVarious bugfixes\n\n### 1.2.0 [See milestone](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/issues?milestone=4&state=closed)\n\nAdded timezones to parser and formatter.\n\nAdded `moment.fn.isDST`.\n\nAdded `moment.fn.zone` to get the timezone offset in minutes.\n\n### 1.1.2 [See milestone](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/issues?milestone=6&state=closed)\n\nVarious bugfixes\n\n### 1.1.1 [See milestone](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/issues?milestone=5&state=closed)\n\nAdded time specific diffs (months, days, hours, etc)\n\n### 1.1.0\n\nAdded `moment.fn.format` localized masks. \'L LL LLL LLLL\' [issue 29](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/pull/29)\n\nFixed [issue 31](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/pull/31).\n\n### 1.0.1\n\nAdded `moment.version` to get the current version.\n\nRemoved `window !== undefined` when checking if module exists to support browserify. [issue 25](https://github.com/timrwood/moment/pull/25)\n\n### 1.0.0\n\nAdded convenience methods for getting and setting date parts.\n\nAdded better support for `moment.add()`.\n\nAdded better lang support in NodeJS.\n\nRenamed library from underscore.date to Moment.js\n\n### 0.6.1\n\nAdded Portuguese, Italian, and French language support\n\n### 0.6.0\n\nAdded _date.lang() support.\nAdded support for passing multiple formats to try to parse a date. _date("07-10-1986", ["MM-DD-YYYY", "YYYY-MM-DD"]);\nMade parse from string and single format 25% faster.\n\n### 0.5.2\n\nBuxfix for [issue 8](https://github.com/timrwood/underscore.date/pull/8) and [issue 9](https://github.com/timrwood/underscore.date/pull/9).\n\n### 0.5.1\n\nBuxfix for [issue 5](https://github.com/timrwood/underscore.date/pull/5).\n\n### 0.5.0\n\nDropped the redundant `_date.date()` in favor of `_date()`.\nRemoved `_date.now()`, as it is a duplicate of `_date()` with no parameters.\nRemoved `_date.isLeapYear(yearNuumber)`. Use `_date([yearNumber]).isLeapYear()` instead.\nExposed customization options through the `_date.relativeTime`, `_date.weekdays`, `_date.weekdaysShort`, `_date.months`, `_date.monthsShort`, and `_date.ordinal` variables instead of the `_date.customize()` function.\n\n### 0.4.1\n\nAdded date input formats for input strings.\n\n### 0.4.0\n\nAdded underscore.date to npm. Removed dependancies on underscore.\n\n### 0.3.2\n\nAdded `\'z\'` and `\'zz\'` to `_.date().format()`. Cleaned up some redundant code to trim off some bytes.\n\n### 0.3.1\n\nCleaned up the namespace. Moved all date manipulation and display functions to the _.date() object.\n\n### 0.3.0\n\nSwitched to the Underscore methodology of not mucking with the native objects\' prototypes.\nMade chaining possible.\n\n### 0.2.1\n\nChanged date names to be a more pseudo standardized \'dddd, MMMM Do YYYY, h:mm:ss a\'.\nAdded `Date.prototype` functions `add`, `subtract`, `isdst`, and `isleapyear`.\n\n### 0.2.0\n\nChanged function names to be more concise.\nChanged date format from php date format to custom format.\n\n### 0.1.0\n\nInitial release\n\nLicense\n=======\n\nMoment.js is freely distributable under the terms of the MIT license.\n\nCopyright (c) 2011-2012 Tim Wood\n\nPermission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation\nfiles (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use,\ncopy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:\n\nThe above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.\n\nTHE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.\n',
83  
-35 silly resolved     _id: 'moment@1.7.2',
84  
-35 silly resolved     _from: 'moment' } ]
85  
-36 info install moment@1.7.2 into /usr/local/lib
86  
-37 info installOne moment@1.7.2
87  
-38 verbose from cache /Users/Stu/.npm/moment/1.7.2/package/package.json
88  
-39 info /usr/local/lib/node_modules/moment unbuild
89  
-40 verbose read json /usr/local/lib/node_modules/moment/package.json
90  
-41 verbose tar unpack /Users/Stu/.npm/moment/1.7.2/package.tgz
91  
-42 silly lockFile 18b875c0-sr-local-lib-node-modules-moment /usr/local/lib/node_modules/moment
92  
-43 verbose lock /usr/local/lib/node_modules/moment /Users/Stu/.npm/18b875c0-sr-local-lib-node-modules-moment.lock
93  
-44 silly gunzTarPerm modes [ '755', '644' ]
94  
-45 error Error: EACCES, mkdir '/usr/local/lib/node_modules/moment'
95  
-45 error  { [Error: EACCES, mkdir '/usr/local/lib/node_modules/moment']
96  
-45 error   errno: 3,
97  
-45 error   code: 'EACCES',
98  
-45 error   path: '/usr/local/lib/node_modules/moment',
99  
-45 error   fstream_type: 'Directory',
100  
-45 error   fstream_path: '/usr/local/lib/node_modules/moment',
101  
-45 error   fstream_class: 'DirWriter',
102  
-45 error   fstream_stack:
103  
-45 error    [ 'DirWriter._create (/usr/local/lib/node_modules/npm/node_modules/fstream/lib/dir-writer.js:36:23)',
104  
-45 error      '/usr/local/lib/node_modules/npm/node_modules/mkdirp/index.js:37:53',
105  
-45 error      'Object.oncomplete (fs.js:297:15)' ] }
106  
-46 error Please try running this command again as root/Administrator.
107  
-47 error System Darwin 12.2.0
108  
-48 error command "node" "/usr/local/bin/npm" "install" "moment" "-g"
109  
-49 error cwd /Users/Stu/Sites/beta
110  
-50 error node -v v0.8.11
111  
-51 error npm -v 1.1.62
112  
-52 error path /usr/local/lib/node_modules/moment
113  
-53 error fstream_path /usr/local/lib/node_modules/moment
114  
-54 error fstream_type Directory
115  
-55 error fstream_class DirWriter
116  
-56 error code EACCES
117  
-57 error errno 3
118  
-58 error stack Error: EACCES, mkdir '/usr/local/lib/node_modules/moment'
119  
-59 error fstream_stack DirWriter._create (/usr/local/lib/node_modules/npm/node_modules/fstream/lib/dir-writer.js:36:23)
120  
-59 error fstream_stack /usr/local/lib/node_modules/npm/node_modules/mkdirp/index.js:37:53
121  
-59 error fstream_stack Object.oncomplete (fs.js:297:15)
122  
-60 verbose exit [ 3, true ]
4  templates/article.jade
@@ -16,4 +16,6 @@ block content
16 16
        &mdash;
17 17
        = page.metadata.ds
18 18
    div.slot-2-3-4-5  
19  
-    article.post!= page.html
  19
+    article.post!= page.html
  20
+    if page.metadata.comments == "on"
  21
+     include comments

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