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[PATCH] Doc spellcheck + podcheck

From: Autrijus Tang <autrijus@egb.elixus.org>
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 22:49:05 -0800
Message-Id: <20011116064905.GA44092@egb.elixus.org>

Subject: [PATCH] podcheck+spellcheck, the rest of the story
From: Autrijus Tang <autrijus@egb.elixus.org>
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 00:42:20 -0800
Message-Id: <20011116084220.GA44295@egb.elixus.org>

Subject: Re: [PATCH] podcheck+spellcheck, the rest of the story
From: Nicholas Clark <nick@ccl4.org>
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 10:32:01 +0000
Message-Id: <20011116103200.F62891@plum.flirble.org>
(Applied after suitable de-mangling.)

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@13041
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1 parent d7ceb7f commit 210b36aa2e9e009554be8970c3315c2658c0384f Abhijit Menon-Sen committed Nov 16, 2001
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@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ an ANSI compliant C-compiler with AIX by default, but binary builds of
gcc for AIX are widely available.
At the moment of writing, AIX supports two different native C compilers,
-for which you have to pay: B<xlc> and B<VAC>. If you decide to use eiter
+for which you have to pay: B<xlc> and B<VAC>. If you decide to use either
of these two (which is quite a lot easier than using gcc), be sure to
upgrade to the latest available patch level. Currently:
@@ -154,7 +154,7 @@ Follow the messages ... and you're done.
=head2 Using GNU's gcc for building perl
-We're woking on this using gcc-3.0 ... (any input highly appreciated)
+We're working on this using gcc-3.0 ... (any input highly appreciated)
=head2 Using Large Files with Perl
View
@@ -57,10 +57,10 @@ machine is to run the command:
This will automatically accept all the defaults and
in particular /usr/local/ as installation directory.
Note that GCC-2.95.x rev(DG/UX) knows the switch
--pthread whcih allows it to link correctly DG/UX's
+-pthread which allows it to link correctly DG/UX's
-lthread library.
-If you want to change the installtion directory or
+If you want to change the installation directory or
have a standard DG/UX with C compiler GCC-2.7.2.x
then you have no choice than to do an interactive
build by issuing the command:
View
@@ -312,7 +312,7 @@ Note that the MAP_TARGET value *must* have the ".exe" extension or you
will not create a "perl.exe" to replace the one in C<($DJDIR)/bin>.
When you are done, the XS-module install process will have added information
-to yout "perllocal" information telling that the perl binary has been replaced,
+to your "perllocal" information telling that the perl binary has been replaced,
and what module was installed. you can view this information at any time
by using the command:
View
@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ start perl with a double click on the camel icon. Be sure to configure
the perl installation drive first. You can even provide a script with
a special commandline, if needed.
-Alternativly you can get ESHELL from symbian:
+Alternatively you can get ESHELL from symbian:
http://developer.epocworld.com/downloads/progs/Eshell.zip
Running ESHELL you can enter: perl -de 0 in order to run the perl
@@ -68,7 +68,7 @@ command line switch '-x'. See L<perlrun> for details.
You can stop a running perl process in the task list by closing the
application `STDOUT'. You cannot stop a running perl process if it has
-not written anyting to stdout or stderr! Be very cautious with I/O
+not written anything to stdout or stderr! Be very cautious with I/O
redirection. You will have to reboot the PDA!
=head1 USING PERL ON EPOC
@@ -129,7 +129,7 @@ backquoting, pipes etc.
=item *
-system() does not inherit ressources like: file descriptors,
+system() does not inherit resources like: file descriptors,
environment etc.
=item *
View
@@ -15,7 +15,7 @@ compiled and/or runs.
=head2 Using perl as shipped with HP-UX
As of application release September 2001, HP-UX 11.00 is shipped with
-perl-5.6.1 in /opt/perl. The first occurrance is on CD 5012-7954 and
+perl-5.6.1 in /opt/perl. The first occurrence is on CD 5012-7954 and
can be installed using
swinstall -s /cdrom perl
@@ -298,7 +298,7 @@ is listed before -lc in the list of libraries to link Perl with. The
hints provided for HP-UX during Configure will try very hard to get
this right for you.
-HP-UX versions before 10.30 require a seperate installation of a POSIX
+HP-UX versions before 10.30 require a separate installation of a POSIX
threads library package. Two examples are the HP DCE package, available
on "HP-UX Hardware Extensions 3.0, Install and Core OS, Release 10.20,
April 1999 (B3920-13941)" or the Freely available PTH package, available
View
@@ -79,14 +79,14 @@ increase cc1's stacksize, if you run out of memory you should
either decrease the stacksize or follow some more hints:
Perl's building process is very handy on machines with a lot
-of virtual memory but may result in a desaster if you are short
+of virtual memory but may result in a disaster if you are short
of memory. If gcc fails to compile many source files you should
reduce the optimization. Grep for "optimize" in the file
config.sh and change the flags.
If only several huge files cause problems (actually it is not a
matter of the file size resp. the amount of code but depends on
-the size of the individual funtions) it is useful to bypass
+the size of the individual functions) it is useful to bypass
the make program and compile these files directly from the
command line. For example if you got something like the
following from make:
@@ -103,7 +103,7 @@ Please note that you have to add the name of the source file
(here toke.c) at the end.
If none of this helps, you're helpless. Wait for a binary
-release. If you have succeded you may encounter another problem
+release. If you have succeeded you may encounter another problem
at the linking process. If gcc complains that it can't find
some libraries within the perl distribution you probably have
an old linker. If it complains for example about "file not
View
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ README.mpeix - Perl/iX for HP e3000 MPE
This is a podified version of the above-mentioned web page,
podified by Jarkko Hietaniemi 2001-Jan-01.
-=head1 What's New in Perl ffor MPE/iX
+=head1 What's New in Perl for MPE/iX
June 1, 2000
View
@@ -61,11 +61,11 @@ The make process runs only under WinNT shell.
The NetWare makefile is located under the NetWare folder.
The makefile for NetWare makes use of miniperl.exe to run some of
the Perl scripts. To create miniperl.exe, run nmake from
-win32 folder through WinNT commond prompt. The build process
+win32 folder through WinNT command prompt. The build process
can be stopped after miniperl.exe is created. Then run nmake
from NetWare folder through WinNT command prompt.
-Currently the follwing two build types are tested on NetWare
+Currently the following two build types are tested on NetWare
=over 4
View
@@ -1847,7 +1847,7 @@ same as for Perl 5.005_53 (same as in a popular binary release). Thus
new Perls will be able to I<resolve the names> of old extension DLLs
if @INC allows finding their directories.
-However, this still does not guarantie that these DLL may be loaded.
+However, this still does not guarantee that these DLL may be loaded.
The reason is the mangling of the name of the I<Perl DLL>. And since
the extension DLLs link with the Perl DLL, extension DLLs for older
versions would load an older Perl DLL, and would most probably
@@ -1872,7 +1872,7 @@ Old perl executable is started when a new executable is running has
loaded an extension compiled for the old executable (ouph!). In this
case the old executable will get a forwarder DLL instead of the old
perl DLL, so would link with the new perl DLL. While not directly
-fatal, it will behave the same as new excutable. This beats the whole
+fatal, it will behave the same as new executable. This beats the whole
purpose of explicitly starting an old executable.
=item *
View
@@ -253,16 +253,16 @@ Out of Memory!
Recent perl test suite is quite memory hunrgy. In addition to the comments
above on memory limitations it is also worth checking for _CEE_RUNOPTS
in your environment. Perl now has (in miniperlmain.c) a C #pragma
-to set CEE run options, but the enviroment variable wins.
+to set CEE run options, but the environment variable wins.
-The C code ask for:
+The C code asks for:
#pragma runopts(HEAP(2M,500K,ANYWHERE,KEEP,8K,4K) STACK(,,ANY,) ALL31(ON))
The important parts of that are the second argument (the increment) to HEAP,
and allowing the stack to be "Above the (16M) line". If the heap
-increment is too small then when perl (for example loading unicode/Name.pl) trys
-to create a "big" (400K+) string it cannot fit in a single segement
+increment is too small then when perl (for example loading unicode/Name.pl) tries
+to create a "big" (400K+) string it cannot fit in a single segment
and you get "Out of Memory!" - even if there is still plenty of memory
available.
View
@@ -84,7 +84,7 @@ WELCOME to Plan 9 Perl, brave soul!
This is a preliminary alpha version of Plan 9 Perl. Still to be
implemented are MakeMaker and DynaLoader. Many perl commands are
missing or currently behave in an inscrutable manner. These gaps will,
-with perserverance and a modicum of luck, be remedied in the near
+with perseverance and a modicum of luck, be remedied in the near
future.To install this software:
1. Create the source directories and libraries for perl by running the
View
@@ -109,6 +109,8 @@ generate a similar cover, but it doesn't handle all the command-line
options that perl throws at it. This might be reasonably placed in
/usr/local/bin.
+=back
+
=head2 Outstanding issues with perl under QNX6
The following tests are still failing for Perl 5.7.1 under QNX 6.1.0:
@@ -118,8 +120,6 @@ The following tests are still failing for Perl 5.7.1 under QNX 6.1.0:
ext/IO/lib/IO/t/io_sock............FAILED at test 12
ext/IO/lib/IO/t/io_udp.............FAILED at test 4
-=back
-
=head1 AUTHOR
Norton T. Allen (allen@huarp.harvard.edu)
View
@@ -381,7 +381,7 @@ need to use perl's malloc, you can rebuild Perl from the sources
and Configure the build with
sh Configure -Dusemymalloc
-
+
You should not use perl's malloc if you are building with gcc. There
are reports of core dumps, especially in the PDL module. The problem
appears to go away under -DDEBUGGING, so it has been difficult to
View
@@ -98,7 +98,7 @@ For Digital Unix 4.x:
Add -lpthread -lc_r to lddlflags
For some reason, the extra includes for pthreads make Digital UNIX
- complain fatally about the sbrk() delcaration in perl's malloc.c
+ complain fatally about the sbrk() declaration in perl's malloc.c
so use the native malloc, e.g. sh Configure -Uusemymalloc, or
manually edit your config.sh as follows:
Change usemymalloc to n
@@ -145,7 +145,7 @@ Now you can do a
make
When you succeed in compiling and testing ("make test" after your
-build) a threaded Perl in a platform previosuly unknown to support
+build) a threaded Perl in a platform previously unknown to support
threaded perl, please let perlbug@perl.com know about your victory.
Explain what you did in painful detail.
@@ -265,7 +265,7 @@ their associated mutex is held. (This constraint simplifies the
implementation of condition variables in certain porting situations.)
For POSIX threads, perl mutexes and condition variables correspond to
POSIX ones. For FAKE_THREADS, mutexes are stubs and condition variables
-are implmented as lists of waiting threads. For FAKE_THREADS, a thread
+are implemented as lists of waiting threads. For FAKE_THREADS, a thread
waits on a condition variable by removing itself from the runnable
list, calling SCHEDULE to change thr to the next appropriate
runnable thread and returning op (i.e. the new threads next op).
View
2 doio.c
@@ -2102,7 +2102,7 @@ Perl_do_shmio(pTHX_ I32 optype, SV **mark, SV **sp)
Function called by C<do_readline> to spawn a glob (or do the glob inside
perl on VMS). This code used to be inline, but now perl uses C<File::Glob>
-this glob starter is only used by miniperl during the build proccess.
+this glob starter is only used by miniperl during the build process.
Moving it away shrinks pp_hot.c; shrinking pp_hot.c helps speed perl up.
=cut
View
@@ -420,7 +420,7 @@ parsing algorithms. See L<Text::Balanced> for more information.
=item *
Tie::RefHash::Nestable, by Edward Avis, allows storing hash references
-(unlike the standard Tie::Refhash) The module is contained within
+(unlike the standard Tie::RefHash) The module is contained within
Tie::RefHash.
=item *
View
@@ -599,7 +599,7 @@ Don't panic. Read INSTALL 'make test' section instead.
The subtests 11 and 12 sometimes fail and sometimes work.
-=head2 HP-UX lib/io_multihomed Fails When LP64-Configur
+=head2 HP-UX lib/io_multihomed Fails When LP64-Configured
The lib/io_multihomed test may hang in HP-UX if Perl has been
configured to be 64-bit. Because other 64-bit platforms do not hang in
@@ -726,7 +726,7 @@ Compaq C V6.2-008 on OpenVMS Alpha V7.1
[.lib]vmsish............................FAILED on test 13
Failed 4/399 tests, 92.48% okay.
-Compac C V6.4-005 on OpenVMS Alpha 7.2.1
+Compaq C V6.4-005 on OpenVMS Alpha 7.2.1
[-.ext.b]showlex........................FAILED on test 1
[-.ext.list.util.t]tainted..............FAILED on test 3
View
@@ -2041,7 +2041,6 @@ Found in file sharedsv.c
=item sortsv
-
Sort an array. Here is an example:
sortsv(AvARRAY(av), av_len(av)+1, Perl_sv_cmp_locale);
View
@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@ above abstraction which allows perl more control over how IO is done
as it decouples IO from the way the operating system and C library
choose to do things. For USE_PERLIO PerlIO * has an extra layer of
indirection - it is a pointer-to-a-pointer. This allows the PerlIO *
-to remain with a known value while swapping the implementation arround
+to remain with a known value while swapping the implementation around
underneath I<at run time>. In this case all the above are true (but
very simple) functions which call the underlying implementation.
@@ -138,7 +138,7 @@ These correspond to fopen()/fdopen() and the arguments are the same.
Return C<NULL> and set C<errno> if there is an error. There may be an
implementation limit on the number of open handles, which may be lower
than the limit on the number of open files - C<errno> may not be set
-when C<NULL> is returned if this limnit is exceeded.
+when C<NULL> is returned if this limit is exceeded.
=item B<PerlIO_reopen(path,mode,f)>
@@ -289,7 +289,7 @@ problem. However in other cases then mechanisms must exist to create a
FILE * which can be passed to library code which is going to use stdio
calls.
-The fisrt step is to add this line:
+The first step is to add this line:
#define PERLIO_NOT_STDIO 0
@@ -432,7 +432,7 @@ case.
=item PerlIO_binmode(f,ptype,imode,layers)
The hook used by perl's C<binmode> operator.
-B<ptype> is perl's charcter for the kind of IO:
+B<ptype> is perl's character for the kind of IO:
=over 8
View
@@ -219,7 +219,7 @@ an array that was previously shortened does not recover values
that were in those elements. (It used to do so in Perl 4, but we
had to break this to make sure destructors were called when expected.)
-You can also gain some miniscule measure of efficiency by pre-extending
+You can also gain some minuscule measure of efficiency by pre-extending
an array that is going to get big. You can also extend an array
by assigning to an element that is off the end of the array. You
can truncate an array down to nothing by assigning the null list
@@ -416,8 +416,8 @@ plain paranoid, you can force the correct interpretation with curly
braces as above.
If you're looking for the information on how to use here-documents,
-which used to be here, that's been moved to L<perlop> in the section on
-L<Quote and Quote-like Operators>.
+which used to be here, that's been moved to
+L<perlop/Quote and Quote-like Operators>.
=head2 List value constructors
View
@@ -1054,7 +1054,7 @@ following will print "Yes indeed\n" on either an ASCII or EBCDIC computer:
$all_byte_chrs = '';
for (0..255) { $all_byte_chrs .= chr($_); }
$uuencode_byte_chrs = pack('u', $all_byte_chrs);
- ($uu = <<' ENDOFHEREDOC') =~ s/^\s*//gm;
+ ($uu = <<'ENDOFHEREDOC') =~ s/^\s*//gm;
M``$"`P0%!@<("0H+#`T.#Q`1$A,4%187&!D:&QP='A\@(2(C)"4F)R@I*BLL
M+2XO,#$R,S0U-C<X.3H[/#T^/T!!0D-$149'2$E*2TQ-3D]045)35%565UA9
M6EM<75Y?8&%B8V1E9F=H:6IK;&UN;W!Q<G-T=79W>'EZ>WQ]?G^`@8*#A(6&
View
@@ -136,13 +136,15 @@ functions is that it works with numbers of ANY size, that it is
optimized for speed on some operations, and for at least some
programmers the notation might be familiar.
+=over 4
+
=item B<How do I convert Hexadecimal into decimal:>
Using perl's built in conversion of 0x notation:
$int = 0xDEADBEEF;
$dec = sprintf("%d", $int);
-
+
Using the hex function:
$int = hex("DEADBEEF");
@@ -247,6 +249,7 @@ Using Bit::Vector:
The remaining transformations (e.g. hex -> oct, bin -> hex, etc.)
are left as an exercise to the inclined reader.
+=back
=head2 Why doesn't & work the way I want it to?
@@ -1849,7 +1852,7 @@ in L<perltoot>.
=head2 How can I use a reference as a hash key?
-You can't do this directly, but you could use the standard Tie::Refhash
+You can't do this directly, but you could use the standard Tie::RefHash
module distributed with Perl.
=head1 Data: Misc
View
@@ -1201,7 +1201,7 @@ C code have superseded it.
If you're looking to use L<dump> to speed up your program, consider
generating bytecode or native C code as described in L<perlcc>. If
you're just trying to accelerate a CGI script, consider using the
-C<mod_perl> extension to B<Apache>, or the CPAN module, Fast::CGI.
+C<mod_perl> extension to B<Apache>, or the CPAN module, CGI::Fast.
You might also consider autoloading or selfloading, which at least
make your program I<appear> to run faster.
View
@@ -1695,7 +1695,7 @@ C<sv_dump> to produce debugging output from Perl-space, so users of that
module should already be familiar with its format.
C<Perl_op_dump> can be used to dump an C<OP> structure or any of its
-derivatives, and produces output similiar to C<perl -Dx>; in fact,
+derivatives, and produces output similar to C<perl -Dx>; in fact,
C<Perl_dump_eval> will dump the main root of the code being evaluated,
exactly like C<-Dx>.
Oops, something went wrong.

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