Tests for Scylla Clusters
Python Other
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
data_dir
docker/scylla-sct
payload
sdcm
tests
.gitignore
.travis.yml
CMakeLists.txt
LICENSE.AGPL
README.rst
big_cluster_test.py
build_cluster_test.py
corrupt_then_rebuild_test.py
cql_test.py
custom_cs_test.py
destroy_data_then_repair_test.py
enospc_test.py
grow_cluster_test.py
janus_graph_test.py
longevity_test.py
maintenance_test.py
multiple_dc_test.py
partial_upgrade_downgrade_test.py
performance_regression_test.py
performance_regression_user_profiles_test.py
queries-limits
query_limits_test.py
reduce_cluster_test.py
refresh_test.py
requirements-travis.txt
requirements.txt
setup.py
setup_venv
snitch_test.py
sstable_corrupt.py
upgrade_schema_test.py
upgrade_test.py

README.rst

Scylla Cluster Tests

Here you can find some avocado [1] tests for scylla clusters. Those tests can automatically create a scylla cluster, some loader machines and then run operations defined by the test writers, such as database workloads.

What's inside?

  1. A library, called sdcm (stands for scylla distributed cluster manager). The word 'distributed' was used here to differentiate between that and CCM, since with CCM the cluster nodes are usually local processes running on the local machine instead of using actual machines running scylla services as cluster nodes. It contains:
    • sdcm.cluster: Cluster classes that use the boto3 API [2]
    • sdcm.remote: SSH library
    • sdcm.nemesis: Nemesis classes (a nemesis is a class that does disruption in the node)
    • sdcm.tester: Contains the base test class, see below.
  2. A data directory, aptly named data_dir. It contains:
    • scylla repo file (to prepare a loader node)
    • Files that need to be copied to cluster nodes as part of setup/test procedures
    • yaml file containing test config data:
      • AWS machine image ids
      • Security groups
      • Number of loader nodes
      • Number of cluster nodes
  3. Python files with tests. The convention is that test files have the _test.py suffix.

Regular Setup

This guide was written with Red Hat based distributions (Fedora, RHEL and CentOS), and has been tested on recent Fedora and CentOS 7.

Install freetype and C++ compilers and libraries:

sudo yum install freetype-devel gcc-c++

Install boto3 and awscli (the last one is to help you configure aws), matplotlib, aexpect and apache-libcloud:

sudo -H pip install boto3
sudo -H pip install awscli
sudo -H pip install matplotlib==1.5.0
sudo -H pip install aexpect
sudo -H pip install apache-libcloud

Install avocado. Make sure you install the LTS version (36.X), as newer versions have API incompatibilities with scylla-cluster-tests.

You'll follow instructions in:

http://avocado-framework.readthedocs.org/en/latest/GetStartedGuide.html#installing-avocado

The detail here is to ensure you're installing the LTS version.

Example: Following the instructions in the link, after you download the repo file for Fedora, (avocado-fedora.repo) edit it. Before modifying it, its contents are:

[avocado]
name=Avocado
baseurl=https://repos-avocadoproject.rhcloud.com/static/fedora-$releasever-noarch/
skip_if_unavailable=True
gpgkey=https://repos-avocadoproject.rhcloud.com/static/crosa_redhat_com.gpg
gpgcheck=1
enabled=1
enabled_metadata=1

[avocado-lts]
name=Avocado LTS (Long Term Stability)
baseurl=https://repos-avocadoproject.rhcloud.com/static/lts/fedora-$releasever-noarch/
skip_if_unavailable=True
gpgkey=https://repos-avocadoproject.rhcloud.com/static/crosa_redhat_com.gpg
gpgcheck=1
enabled=0

Change enabled=1 in [avocado] to enabled=0, and enabled=0 in [avocado-lts] to enabled=1. Now you can install avocado LTS with the dnf/yum command mentioned in the docs.

If you are using a very recent fedora version (example, 25) for which there is no avocado lts release (>24) then replace $releasever with 24 (or whatever $CURRENT_VERSION -1 is).

Configure aws:

aws configure

That will ask you for your region, aws_access_key_id, aws_secret_access_key. Please complete that setup.

Note: aws configure will also ask for Default output format, but you can just use the default value (None) as a valid answer.

You'll also need to install cassandra-driver (needed to support issuing CQL queries to nodes):

sudo -H pip install cassandra-driver

That install command requires gcc, python-devel and redhat-rpm-config, so if you still don't have either, please install them:

sudo dnf install gcc python-devel redhat-rpm-config.noarch -y

Take a look at the data_dir/scylla.yaml file. It contains a number of configurable test parameters, such as DB cluster instance types and AMI IDs. In this example, we're assuming that you have copied data_dir/scylla.yaml to data_dir/your_config.yaml.

Important: Some tests use custom hardcoded operations due to their nature, so those tests won't honor what is set in data_dir/your_config.yaml.

Before running the suite, you should make avocado aware of the scdm libraries. In order to do that, you can issue a:

sudo python setup.py develop

That will put sdcm in the python library path, while still allowing you to edit the code and make changes if you want. If you don't perform this step, you'll end up with the following error messages in the avocado test runner output, when trying to execute the tests:

Error receiving message from test: <type 'exceptions.ImportError'> -> No module named sdcm.cluster

Reproduced traceback from: /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/avocado/core/runner.py:75
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/usr/lib64/python2.7/multiprocessing/queues.py", line 378, in get
    return recv()
ImportError: No module named sdcm.cluster

That happens because avocado does not know about the sdcm library, place where the resource cleanup functions are defined. Once avocado knows about that library, you won't get this error anymore.

Setup - Virtual Environment

For people seeking to run the tests using a self contained virtual environment, we provide a script to help you out with installing all the python dependencies. You will need to install a few development packages for the install process to work though:

sudo dnf install gcc python-devel libpng-devel libfreetype-devel libev libev-devel libyaml-devel libvirt-devel -y

This is of course if you are running Fedora. Please adapt this instruction if you are running on another distro that won't have the same package names.

Then you can run the setup_venv script:

./setup_venv

That will install everything you need then give you the command to start the virtual environment:

...
Scylla Cluster Tests successfully configured
Now run 'source .sct_venv/bin/activate' to work from the created virtual environment

As you can see, the dir of the virtual environment is .sct_venv, and that will be created inside the suite top level dir.

Setup Notes - Making your regular user able to access qemu:///session

You might want to setup libvirt to access the qemu system session as your regular user. You might want to refer to [3], in case that is not available, here's the gist of the procedure:

With Fedora 20 onwards, virt-manager implements PolicyKit (I recommend reading the man page). If you want to allow a certain group of users access to virt-manager without providing root credentials, you can create a new rules file in /etc/polkit-1/rules.d and add a rule to permit users who are local, logged in, and in the group you specify (wheel in the example below) access to the virt-manager software:

sudo vim /etc/polkit-1/rules.d/80-libvirt.rules

And then write:

polkit.addRule(function(action, subject) {
  if (action.id == "org.libvirt.unix.manage" && subject.local && subject.active && subject.isInGroup("wheel")) {
      return polkit.Result.YES;
  }
});

Run the tests

AWS - Amazon Web Services

Change your current working directory to this test suite base directory, then run avocado. Example command line:

avocado run longevity_test.py:LongevityTest.test_custom_time --multiplex data_dir/your_config.yaml --filter-only /run/backends/aws/us_east_1 /run/databases/scylla --filter-out /run/backends/libvirt /run/backends/openstack /run/backends/gce --open-browser

This command line is to run the test method test_custom_time, in the class Longevitytest, that lies inside the file longevity_test.py, and the test will run using the AWS data defined in the branch us_east_1 of data_dir/your_config.yaml. The flag --open-browser opens the avocado test job report on your default browser at the end of avocado's execution.

If you want to use the us_west_2 region, you can always change /run/regions/us_east_1 to /run/regions/us_west_2 in the command above. You can also change the value /run/databases/scylla bit to /run/databases/cassandra to run the same test on a cassandra node.

Also, please note that scylla.yaml is a sample configuration. On your organization, you really have to update values with ones you actually have access to.

You'll see something like:

JOB ID     : ca47ccbaa292c4d414e08f2167c41776f5c3da61
JOB LOG    : /home/lmr/avocado/job-results/job-2016-01-05T20.45-ca47ccb/job.log
TESTS      : 1
 (1/1) longevity_test.py:LongevityTest.test_custom_time : /

A throbber, that will spin until the test ends. This will hopefully evolve to:

JOB ID     : ca47ccbaa292c4d414e08f2167c41776f5c3da61
JOB LOG    : /home/lmr/avocado/job-results/job-2016-01-05T20.45-ca47ccb/job.log
TESTS      : 1
 (1/1) longevity_test.py:LongevityTest.test_custom_time : PASS (1083.19 s)
RESULTS    : PASS 1 | ERROR 0 | FAIL 0 | SKIP 0 | WARN 0 | INTERRUPT 0
JOB HTML   : /home/lmr/avocado/job-results/job-2016-01-05T20.45-ca47ccb/html/results.html
TIME       : 1083.19 s

Libvirt

In order to run tests using the libvirt backend, you'll need:

  1. One qcow2 base image with CentOS 7 installed. This image needs to have a user named 'centos', and this user needs to be configured to not require a password when running commands with sudo.
  2. cp data_dir/scylla.yaml data_dir/your_config.yaml
  3. Edit the configuration file (data_dir/your_config.yaml) to add the path to the CentOS image mentioned on step 1, as well as tweak values present in the libvirt: session of that file. One of the values you might want to tweak is the scylla yum repository used to install scylla on the CentOS 7 VM.

With that said and done, you can run your test using the command line:

avocado run longevity_test.py:LongevityTest.test_custom_time --multiplex data_dir/scylla-lmr.yaml --filter-only /run/backends/libvirt /run/databases/scylla --filter-out /run/backends/aws /run/backends/openstack /run/backends/gce --open-browser

OpenStack

In order to run tests using the openstack backend, you'll need:

  1. A deployed OpenStack lab
  2. One CentOS 7 image. This image needs to have a user named 'centos', and this user needs to be configured to not require a password when running commands with sudo.
  3. cp data_dir/scylla.yaml data_dir/your_config.yaml
  4. Edit the configuration file (data_dir/your_config.yaml) to tweak values present in the openstack: session of that file. One of the values you might want to tweak is the scylla yum repository used to install scylla on the CentOS 7 image.

With that said and done, you can run your test using the command line:

avocado run longevity_test.py:LongevityTest.test_custom_time --multiplex data_dir/scylla-lmr.yaml --filter-only /run/backends/libvirt /run/databases/scylla --filter-out /run/backends/aws /run/backends/libvirt /run/backends/gce --open-browser

GCE - Google Compute Engine

In order to run tests using the GCE backend, you'll need:

  1. A GCE account
  2. cp data_dir/scylla.yaml data_dir/your_config.yaml
  3. Edit the configuration file (data_dir/your_config.yaml) to tweak values present in the gce: session of that file. One of the values you might want to tweak is the scylla yum repository used to install scylla on the CentOS 7 image.

With that said and done, you can run your test using the command line:

avocado run longevity_test.py:LongevityTest.test_custom_time --multiplex data_dir/scylla-lmr.yaml --filter-only /run/backends/libvirt /run/databases/scylla --filter-out /run/backends/aws /run/backends/libvirt /run/backends/openstack --open-browser

(Optional) Follow what the test is doing

What you can do while the test is running to see what's happening:

tail -f ~/avocado/job-results/latest/job.log

or:

tail -f ~/avocado/job-results/latest/test-results/longevity_test.py\:LongevityTest.test_custom_time/debug.log

At the end of the test, there's a path to an HTML file with the job report. The flag --open-browser actually opens that at the end of the test.

Test operations

On a high level overview, the test operations are:

Setup

  1. Instantiate a Cluster DB, with the specified number of nodes (the number of nodes can be specified through the config file, or the test writer can set a specific number depending on the test needs).

  2. Instantiate a set of loader nodes. They will be the ones to initiate cassandra stress, and possibly other database stress inducing activities.

  3. Instantiate a set of monitoring nodes. They will run prometheus [4], to store metrics information about the database cluster, and also grafana [5], to let the user see real time dashboards of said metrics while the test is running. This is very useful in case you want to run the test suite and keep watching the behavior of each node.

  4. Wait until the loaders are ready (SSH up and cassandra-stress is present)

  5. Wait until the DB nodes are ready (SSH up and DB services are up, port 9042 occupied)

  6. Wait until the monitoring nodes are ready. If you are following the job log, you will see a message with the address you can point your browser to while the test is executing

    02:09:37 INFO | Node lmr-scylla-monitor-node-235cdfb0-1 [54.86.66.156 | 172.30.0.105] (seed: None): Grafana Web UI: http://54.86.66.156:3000
    

Actual test

  1. Loader nodes execute cassandra stress on the DB cluster (optional)
  2. If configured, a Nemesis class, will execute periodically, introducing some disruption activity to the cluster (stop/start a node, destroy data, kill scylla processes on a node). the nemesis starts after an interval, to give cassandra-stress on step 1 to stabilize

Keep in mind that the suite libraries are flexible, and will allow you to set scenarios that differ from this base one.

Making sense of logs

In order to try to establish a timeline of what is going on, we opted for dumping a lot of information in the test main log. That includes:

  1. Labels for each Node and cluster, including SSH access info in case you want to debug what's going on. Example:

    15:43:23 DEBUG| Node lmr-scylla-db-node-88c994d5-1 [54.183.240.195 | 172.31.18.109] (seed: None): SSH access -> 'ssh -i /var/tmp/lmr-longevity-test-8b95682d.pem centos@54.183.240.195'
    ...
    15:47:52 INFO | Cluster lmr-scylla-db-cluster-88c994d5 (AMI: ami-1da7d17d Type: c4.xlarge): (6/6) DB nodes ready. Time elapsed: 79 s
    
  2. Scylla logs for all the DB nodes, logged as they happen. Example line:

    15:44:35 DEBUG| [54.183.193.208] [stdout] Feb 10 17:44:17 ip-172-30-0-123.ec2.internal systemd[1]: Starting Scylla Server...
    
  3. Coredump watching thread, that runs every 30 seconds and will tell you if scylla dumped core

  4. Cassandra-stress output. As cassandra-stress runs only after all the nodes are properly set up, you'll see it clearly separated from the initial flurry of Node init information:

    15:47:55 INFO | [54.193.84.90] Running '/usr/bin/ssh -a -x  -o ControlPath=/var/tmp/ssh-masterTQ3hZu/socket -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no -o UserKnownHostsFile=/var/tmp/tmpOjFA9Q -o BatchMode=yes -o ConnectTimeout=300 -o ServerAliveInterval=300 -l centos -p 22 -i /var/tmp/lmr-longevity-test-8b95682d.pem 54.193.84.90 "cassandra-stress write cl=QUORUM duration=30m -schema 'replication(factor=3)' -port jmx=6868 -mode cql3 native -rate threads=4 -node 172.31.18.109"'
    15:48:02 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:01 Found Netty's native epoll transport in the classpath, using it
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 Using data-center name 'datacenter1' for DCAwareRoundRobinPolicy (if this is incorrect, please provide the correct datacenter name with DCAwareRoundRobinPolicy constructor)
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 New Cassandra host /172.31.18.109:9042 added
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 New Cassandra host /172.31.18.114:9042 added
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 New Cassandra host /172.31.18.113:9042 added
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 New Cassandra host /172.31.18.112:9042 added
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 New Cassandra host /172.31.18.111:9042 added
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 New Cassandra host /172.31.18.110:9042 added
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] Connected to cluster: lmr-scylla-db-cluster-88c994d5
    ...
    
  5. As the DB logs thread will still be active, you'll see messages from nodes (normally compaction) mingled with cassandra-stress output. Example:

    16:01:43 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       2265875,    4887,    4887,    4887,     0.8,     0.6,     2.5,     3.6,     9.8,    13.8,  493.7,  0.00632,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    16:01:44 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       2270561,    4679,    4679,    4679,     0.8,     0.6,     2.5,     3.6,     8.1,    10.1,  494.7,  0.00630,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    16:01:45 DEBUG| [54.183.240.195] [stdout] Feb 10 18:01:45 ip-172-31-18-109 scylla[2103]: INFO  [shard 1] compaction - Compacting [/var/lib/scylla/data/keyspace1/standard1-71035bf0d01e11e58c82000000000001/keyspace1-standard1-ka-5-Data.db:level=0, /var/lib/scylla/data/keyspace1/standard1-71035bf0d01e11e58c82000000000001/keyspace1-standard1-ka-9-Data.db:level=0, /var/lib/scylla/data/keyspace1/standard1-71035bf0d01e11e58c82000000000001/keyspace1-standard1-ka-13-Data.db:level=0, /var/lib/scylla/data/keyspace1/standard1-71035bf0d01e11e58c82000000000001/keyspace1-standard1-ka-17-Data.db:level=0, ]
    16:01:45 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       2275544,    4963,    4963,    4963,     0.8,     0.6,     2.4,     3.4,     9.7,    18.9,  495.7,  0.00629,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    16:01:46 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       2280432,    4883,    4883,    4883,     0.8,     0.6,     2.5,     3.6,    15.4,    20.2,  496.7,  0.00628,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    16:01:47 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       2285011,    4562,    4562,    4562,     0.9,     0.6,     2.5,     3.8,    18.2,    30.9,  497.7,  0.00627,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    
  6. You'll also see Nemesis messages. The cool thing about this is that you can see the cluster reaction to the disruption event. Here's an example of a nemesis that stops and then starts the AWS instance of one of our DB nodes. Ellipsis were added for brevity purposes. You can see the gossiping for the node down, then for the Node up, all of that happening while the loader nodes churning cassandra-stress output:

    15:57:55 DEBUG| sdcm.nemesis.StopStartMonkey: <function disrupt at 0x7fd5aec38c80> Start
    15:57:55 INFO | sdcm.nemesis.StopStartMonkey: Stop Node lmr-scylla-db-node-88c994d5-3 [54.193.37.181 | 172.31.18.111] (seed: False) then restart it
    15:57:55 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1257018,    4989,    4989,    4989,     0.8,     0.6,     2.4,     2.9,     9.9,    23.1,  265.3,  0.00651,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:57:56 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1262289,    5248,    5248,    5248,     0.7,     0.6,     2.4,     2.8,     5.9,     7.0,  266.4,  0.00650,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.193.37.181] [stdout] Feb 10 17:57:56 ip-172-31-18-111 systemd[1]: Stopping Scylla JMX...
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.183.195.134] [stdout] Feb 10 17:57:57 ip-172-31-18-112 scylla[2108]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - InetAddress 172.31.18.111 is now DOWN
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.183.193.208] [stdout] Feb 10 17:57:57 ip-172-31-18-113 scylla[2114]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - InetAddress 172.31.18.111 is now DOWN
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.193.37.222] [stdout] Feb 10 17:57:57 ip-172-31-18-114 scylla[2098]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - InetAddress 172.31.18.111 is now DOWN
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.193.61.5] [stdout] Feb 10 17:57:57 ip-172-31-18-110 scylla[2107]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - InetAddress 172.31.18.111 is now DOWN
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.183.240.195] [stdout] Feb 10 17:57:57 ip-172-31-18-109 scylla[2103]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - InetAddress 172.31.18.111 is now DOWN
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1267035,    4739,    4739,    4739,     0.8,     0.6,     2.4,     4.8,    17.7,    30.2,  267.4,  0.00647,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    ...
    15:58:01 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1283680,    4219,    4219,    4219,     0.9,     0.6,     2.6,     4.4,     8.1,    11.9,  271.4,  0.00651,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:58:02 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1285139,    1452,    1452,    1452,     2.7,     1.7,     9.2,    22.3,    54.8,    55.2,  272.4,  0.00699,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:58:02 DEBUG| [54.183.240.195] [stdout] Feb 10 17:58:02 ip-172-31-18-109 scylla[2103]: INFO  [shard 0] rpc - client 172.31.18.111: client connection dropped: read: Connection reset by peer
    15:58:02 DEBUG| [54.193.37.222] [stdout] Feb 10 17:58:02 ip-172-31-18-114 scylla[2098]: INFO  [shard 0] rpc - client 172.31.18.111: client connection dropped: read: Connection reset by peer
    15:58:02 DEBUG| [54.193.61.5] [stdout] Feb 10 17:58:02 ip-172-31-18-110 scylla[2107]: INFO  [shard 0] rpc - client 172.31.18.111: client connection dropped: read: Connection reset by peer
    15:58:02 DEBUG| [54.183.193.208] [stdout] Feb 10 17:58:02 ip-172-31-18-113 scylla[2114]: INFO  [shard 0] rpc - client 172.31.18.111: client connection dropped: read: Connection reset by peer
    15:58:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1288782,    3515,    3515,    3515,     1.1,     0.6,     2.6,     7.7,    56.3,   143.6,  273.4,  0.00701,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    ...
    15:58:59 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1532519,    4846,    4846,    4846,     0.8,     0.6,     2.5,     3.8,     9.5,    10.9,  328.8,  0.00715,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:58:59 DEBUG| Node lmr-scylla-db-node-88c994d5-3 [54.193.37.181 | 172.31.18.111] (seed: None): Got new public IP 54.67.92.86
    15:59:00 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1537219,    4681,    4681,    4681,     0.8,     0.6,     2.5,     3.9,    18.8,    28.3,  329.8,  0.00713,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    ...
    15:59:51 DEBUG| [54.193.37.222] [stdout] Feb 10 17:59:51 ip-172-31-18-114 scylla[2098]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - Node 172.31.18.111 has restarted, now UP
    15:59:52 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1767965,    4869,    4869,    4869,     0.8,     0.6,     2.5,     3.0,    12.3,    15.0,  382.1,  0.00677,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:59:52 DEBUG| [54.183.240.195] [stdout] Feb 10 17:59:52 ip-172-31-18-109 scylla[2103]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - Node 172.31.18.111 has restarted, now UP
    15:59:53 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1771279,    3291,    3291,    3291,     1.2,     0.6,     3.4,    13.2,    32.3,    39.8,  383.1,  0.00680,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:59:53 DEBUG| [54.193.61.5] [stdout] Feb 10 17:59:53 ip-172-31-18-110 scylla[2107]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - Node 172.31.18.111 has restarted, now UP
    15:59:54 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1775909,    4622,    4622,    4622,     0.9,     0.6,     2.5,     3.7,     9.9,    16.3,  384.1,  0.00678,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:59:54 DEBUG| [54.183.195.134] [stdout] Feb 10 17:59:54 ip-172-31-18-112 scylla[2108]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - Node 172.31.18.111 has restarted, now UP
    

With all that information going, the main log is hard to read, but at least you now have an outline of what is going on. We store the scylla logs on per node files, you can find them all in the test log directory (the avocado HTML report will help you locate and visualize all those files, just click on the test name link and you'll see the dir structure.

TODO

  • Set up buildable HTML documentation, and a hosted version of it.
  • Write more tests, improve test API (always in progress, I guess).

Known issues

  • No test API guide. Bear with us while we set up hosted test API documentation, and take a look at the current tests and the sdcm library for more information.

Footnotes