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README.rst

SCT - Scylla Cluster Tests

SCT tests are designed to test Scylla database on physical/virtual servers under high read/write load. Currently the tests are run using built in unittest These tests automatically create:

  • Scylla clusters - Run Scylla database
  • Loader machines - used to run load generators like cassandra-stress
  • Monitoring server - uses official Scylla Monitoring repo to monitor Scylla clusters and Loaders

What's inside?

  1. A library, called sdcm (stands for scylla distributed cluster manager). The word 'distributed' was used here to differentiate between that and CCM, since with CCM the cluster nodes are usually local processes running on the local machine instead of using actual machines running scylla services as cluster nodes. It contains:
    • sdcm.cluster: Base classes for Clusters
    • sdcm.remote: SSH library
    • sdcm.nemesis: Nemesis classes (a nemesis is a class that does disruption in the node)
    • sdcm.tester: Contains the base test class, see below.
  2. A data directory, aptly named data_dir. It contains:
    • scylla repo file (to prepare a loader node)
    • Files that need to be copied to cluster nodes as part of setup/test procedures
    • yaml file containing test config data:
      • AWS machine image ids
      • Security groups
      • Number of loader nodes
      • Number of cluster nodes
    • SCT dashboards definition files for Grafana
  3. Python files with tests. The convention is that test files have the _test.py suffix.
  4. Utilities directory named utils. Contains help utilities for log analizing

Maintained branches

https://github.com/scylladb/scylla-cluster-tests/wiki

Contribution

Since we are trying to keep the code neat, please install this git precommit hooks, that would fix the code style, and run more checks:

pip install pre-commit==1.14.4
pre-commit install
pre-commit install --hook-type commit-msg

If you want to remove the hook:

pre-commit uninstall

Doing a commit without the hook checks:

git commit ... -n

Setting up SCT environment

Currently we support Red Hat like operating systems that use YUM package manager. SCT tests can run on two environments: on local RHEL like OS (tested on Fedora) or inside SCT docker container. Note: When running following commands, please clone this repo and cd into it. During SCT environment setup, you will be asked to configure your AWS CLI tool. This is needed to retrieve QA private keys from secure S3 Bucket during automated setup. The keys will be needed to connect to the Scylla clusters under test via SSH.

Ask your AWS account admin to create a user and access key for AWS) and then configure AWS:

> aws configure
AWS Access Key ID [****************7S5A]:
AWS Secret Access Key [****************5NcH]:
Default region name [us-east-1]:
Default output format [None]:

From here you can proceed with on of the 2 options

Option 1: Setup SCT in Docker

As mentioned before, instead of installing all the prerequisites on your machine, you can also use SCT Docker container (aka Hydra) to run SCT tests:

sudo ./install-hydra.sh

Notes for Hydra

  • When running Hydra for the first time it will build the SCT Docker image. Please be patient and let the process complete till the end
  • Your home directory is exposed into the docker container to the root user, so all the SSH/AWS/GCE configurations are "automatically" visible to the SCT container.
  • SCT is the current working directory in the container ( Run hydra ls -l to check)
  • QA private keys existence is checked each time when Hydra is run.
  • Hydra will check for update on each run and when update will be available the Docker image will be rebuilt

Option 2: Setup SCT locally

To run SCT tests locally run following:

sudo ./install-prereqs.sh
./get-qa-ssh-keys.sh

# install python3.8 via pyenv
curl https://pyenv.run | bash
exec $SHELL
# go to: https://github.com/pyenv/pyenv/wiki/Common-build-problems#prerequisites
# and follow the instructions for your distribution, to install the prerequisites
# for compiling python from source
pyenv install 3.8.3

# create a virtualenv for SCT
pyenv virtualenv 3.8.3 sct38
pyenv activate sct38
pip install -r requirements-python.txt

Preparing AWS Cloud environment

To run tests in different regions SCT needs pre-configured environment. To configure a region: create VPC and all related environment elements (Subnet, Security Group, etc.) use:

hydra prepare-aws-region --region <region_name>

SCT can run locally and on remote Runner instance. First of all we before creating a Runner instance we need to create an image using:

hydra create-runner-image --region <region_name>

Then create a Runner instance:

hydra create-runner-instance -r <region_name> -z <az> -t <test-id> -d <run_duration>

Run a test

Example running test using Hydra using test-cases/PR-provision-test.yaml configuration file

on AWS:

hydra "run-test longevity_test.LongevityTest.test_custom_time --backend aws --config test-cases/PR-provision-test.yaml"

on AWS using SCT Runner:

hydra --execute-on-runner <runner-ip|`cat sct_runner_ip> "run-test longevity_test.LongevityTest.test_custom_time --backend aws --config test-cases/PR-provision-test.yaml"

on GCE:

hydra "run-test longevity_test.LongevityTest.test_custom_time --backend gce --config test-cases/PR-provision-test.yaml"

You can also enter the containerized SCT environment using:

hydra bash

Depending on which backend hardware/cloud provider/virtualization you will use, relevant configuration of those backend services should be done.

List resources being used:

# google cloud engine
gcloud compute instances list --filter="metadata.items.key['RunByUser']['value']='`whoami`'"

# amazon
aws ec2 describe-instances --query 'Reservations[].Instances[].InstanceId' --filter "Name=tag:RunByUser,Values=`whoami`"

# both GCE and AWS
hydra list-resources --user `whoami`

Configuring test run configuration YAML

Take a look at the test-cases/PR-provision-test.yaml file. It contains a number of configurable test parameters, such as DB cluster instance types and AMI IDs. In this example, we're assuming that you have copied test-cases/PR-provision-test.yaml to test-cases/your_config.yaml.

All the test run configurations are stored in test-cases directory.

Important: Some tests use custom hardcoded operations due to their nature, so those tests won't honor what is set in test-cases/your_config.yaml.

Run the tests

AWS - Amazon Web Services

Change your current working directory to this test suite base directory, then run test. Example command line:

hydra run-test longevity_test.LongevityTest.test_custom_time --backend aws --config test-cases/your_config.yaml

This command line is to run the test method test_custom_time, in the class Longevitytest, that lies inside the file longevity_test.py, and the test will run using the AWS data defined in the branch eu_west_1 of data_dir/your_config.yaml.

Reuse Cluster (AWS)

Running a test with already provisioned cluster, you can get the test_id in the AWS console of the one of the nodes tags tab:

# add the following to your config yaml
reuse_cluster: 7c86f6de-f87d-45a8-9e7f-61fe7b7dbe84

# or with using the new configuration, before the run test command
export SCT_REUSE_CLUSTER=7c86f6de-f87d-45a8-9e7f-61fe7b7dbe84

GCE - Google Compute Engine

In order to run tests using the GCE backend, you'll need:

  1. A GCE account
  2. cp data_dir/scylla.yaml data_dir/your_config.yaml
  3. Edit the configuration file (data_dir/your_config.yaml) to tweak values present in the gce: session of that file. One of the values you might want to tweak is the scylla yum repository used to install scylla on the CentOS 7 image.

With that said and done, you can run your test using the command line:

hydra run-test longevity_test.LongevityTest.test_custom_time --backend gce --config test-cases/scylla-lmr.yaml

Docker

NOTE: for docker run work with monitoring stack, user should be part of sudo group, and setup with passwordless access, see https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/468417 for example on how to setup

We can also enable running with scylla formal docker images:

# example of running specific docker version
export SCT_SCYLLA_VERSION=3.2.rc1
hydra run-test longevity_test.LongevityTest.test_custom_time --backend docker --config test-cases/PR-provision-test-docker.yaml

(Optional) Follow what the test is doing

What you can do while the test is running to see what's happening:

tail -f ~/sct-results/latest/sct.log

Test operations

On a high level overview, the test operations are:

Setup

  1. Instantiate a Cluster DB, with the specified number of nodes (the number of nodes can be specified through the config file, or the test writer can set a specific number depending on the test needs).

  2. Instantiate a set of loader nodes. They will be the ones to initiate cassandra stress, and possibly other database stress inducing activities.

  3. Instantiate a set of monitoring nodes. They will run prometheus [3], to store metrics information about the database cluster, and also grafana [4], to let the user see real time dashboards of said metrics while the test is running. This is very useful in case you want to run the test suite and keep watching the behavior of each node.

  4. Wait until the loaders are ready (SSH up and cassandra-stress is present)

  5. Wait until the DB nodes are ready (SSH up and DB services are up, port 9042 occupied)

  6. Wait until the monitoring nodes are ready. If you are following the job log, you will see a message with the address you can point your browser to while the test is executing

    02:09:37 INFO | Node lmr-scylla-monitor-node-235cdfb0-1 [54.86.66.156 | 172.30.0.105] (seed: None): Grafana Web UI: http://54.86.66.156:3000
    

Actual test

  1. Loader nodes execute cassandra stress on the DB cluster (optional)
  2. If configured, a Nemesis class, will execute periodically, introducing some disruption activity to the cluster (stop/start a node, destroy data, kill scylla processes on a node). the nemesis starts after an interval, to give cassandra-stress on step 1 to stabilize

Keep in mind that the suite libraries are flexible, and will allow you to set scenarios that differ from this base one.

Making sense of logs

In order to try to establish a timeline of what is going on, we opted for dumping a lot of information in the test main log. That includes:

  1. Labels for each Node and cluster, including SSH access info in case you want to debug what's going on. Example:

    15:43:23 DEBUG| Node lmr-scylla-db-node-88c994d5-1 [54.183.240.195 | 172.31.18.109] (seed: None): SSH access -> 'ssh -i /var/tmp/lmr-longevity-test-8b95682d.pem centos@54.183.240.195'
    ...
    15:47:52 INFO | Cluster lmr-scylla-db-cluster-88c994d5 (AMI: ami-1da7d17d Type: c4.xlarge): (6/6) DB nodes ready. Time elapsed: 79 s
    
  2. Scylla logs for all the DB nodes, logged as they happen. Example line:

    15:44:35 DEBUG| [54.183.193.208] [stdout] Feb 10 17:44:17 ip-172-30-0-123.ec2.internal systemd[1]: Starting Scylla Server...
    
  3. Coredump watching thread, that runs every 30 seconds and will tell you if scylla dumped core

  4. Cassandra-stress output. As cassandra-stress runs only after all the nodes are properly set up, you'll see it clearly separated from the initial flurry of Node init information:

    15:47:55 INFO | [54.193.84.90] Running '/usr/bin/ssh -a -x  -o ControlPath=/var/tmp/ssh-masterTQ3hZu/socket -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no -o UserKnownHostsFile=/var/tmp/tmpOjFA9Q -o BatchMode=yes -o ConnectTimeout=300 -o ServerAliveInterval=300 -l centos -p 22 -i /var/tmp/lmr-longevity-test-8b95682d.pem 54.193.84.90 "cassandra-stress write cl=QUORUM duration=30m -schema 'replication(factor=3)' -port jmx=6868 -mode cql3 native -rate threads=4 -node 172.31.18.109"'
    15:48:02 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:01 Found Netty's native epoll transport in the classpath, using it
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 Using data-center name 'datacenter1' for DCAwareRoundRobinPolicy (if this is incorrect, please provide the correct datacenter name with DCAwareRoundRobinPolicy constructor)
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 New Cassandra host /172.31.18.109:9042 added
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 New Cassandra host /172.31.18.114:9042 added
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 New Cassandra host /172.31.18.113:9042 added
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 New Cassandra host /172.31.18.112:9042 added
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 New Cassandra host /172.31.18.111:9042 added
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] INFO  17:48:03 New Cassandra host /172.31.18.110:9042 added
    15:48:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] Connected to cluster: lmr-scylla-db-cluster-88c994d5
    ...
    
  5. As the DB logs thread will still be active, you'll see messages from nodes (normally compaction) mingled with cassandra-stress output. Example:

    16:01:43 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       2265875,    4887,    4887,    4887,     0.8,     0.6,     2.5,     3.6,     9.8,    13.8,  493.7,  0.00632,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    16:01:44 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       2270561,    4679,    4679,    4679,     0.8,     0.6,     2.5,     3.6,     8.1,    10.1,  494.7,  0.00630,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    16:01:45 DEBUG| [54.183.240.195] [stdout] Feb 10 18:01:45 ip-172-31-18-109 scylla[2103]: INFO  [shard 1] compaction - Compacting [/var/lib/scylla/data/keyspace1/standard1-71035bf0d01e11e58c82000000000001/keyspace1-standard1-ka-5-Data.db:level=0, /var/lib/scylla/data/keyspace1/standard1-71035bf0d01e11e58c82000000000001/keyspace1-standard1-ka-9-Data.db:level=0, /var/lib/scylla/data/keyspace1/standard1-71035bf0d01e11e58c82000000000001/keyspace1-standard1-ka-13-Data.db:level=0, /var/lib/scylla/data/keyspace1/standard1-71035bf0d01e11e58c82000000000001/keyspace1-standard1-ka-17-Data.db:level=0, ]
    16:01:45 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       2275544,    4963,    4963,    4963,     0.8,     0.6,     2.4,     3.4,     9.7,    18.9,  495.7,  0.00629,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    16:01:46 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       2280432,    4883,    4883,    4883,     0.8,     0.6,     2.5,     3.6,    15.4,    20.2,  496.7,  0.00628,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    16:01:47 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       2285011,    4562,    4562,    4562,     0.9,     0.6,     2.5,     3.8,    18.2,    30.9,  497.7,  0.00627,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    
  6. You'll also see Nemesis messages. The cool thing about this is that you can see the cluster reaction to the disruption event. Here's an example of a nemesis that stops and then starts the AWS instance of one of our DB nodes. Ellipsis were added for brevity purposes. You can see the gossiping for the node down, then for the Node up, all of that happening while the loader nodes churning cassandra-stress output:

    15:57:55 DEBUG| sdcm.nemesis.StopStartMonkey: <function disrupt at 0x7fd5aec38c80> Start
    15:57:55 INFO | sdcm.nemesis.StopStartMonkey: Stop Node lmr-scylla-db-node-88c994d5-3 [54.193.37.181 | 172.31.18.111] (seed: False) then restart it
    15:57:55 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1257018,    4989,    4989,    4989,     0.8,     0.6,     2.4,     2.9,     9.9,    23.1,  265.3,  0.00651,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:57:56 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1262289,    5248,    5248,    5248,     0.7,     0.6,     2.4,     2.8,     5.9,     7.0,  266.4,  0.00650,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.193.37.181] [stdout] Feb 10 17:57:56 ip-172-31-18-111 systemd[1]: Stopping Scylla JMX...
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.183.195.134] [stdout] Feb 10 17:57:57 ip-172-31-18-112 scylla[2108]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - InetAddress 172.31.18.111 is now DOWN
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.183.193.208] [stdout] Feb 10 17:57:57 ip-172-31-18-113 scylla[2114]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - InetAddress 172.31.18.111 is now DOWN
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.193.37.222] [stdout] Feb 10 17:57:57 ip-172-31-18-114 scylla[2098]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - InetAddress 172.31.18.111 is now DOWN
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.193.61.5] [stdout] Feb 10 17:57:57 ip-172-31-18-110 scylla[2107]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - InetAddress 172.31.18.111 is now DOWN
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.183.240.195] [stdout] Feb 10 17:57:57 ip-172-31-18-109 scylla[2103]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - InetAddress 172.31.18.111 is now DOWN
    15:57:57 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1267035,    4739,    4739,    4739,     0.8,     0.6,     2.4,     4.8,    17.7,    30.2,  267.4,  0.00647,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    ...
    15:58:01 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1283680,    4219,    4219,    4219,     0.9,     0.6,     2.6,     4.4,     8.1,    11.9,  271.4,  0.00651,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:58:02 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1285139,    1452,    1452,    1452,     2.7,     1.7,     9.2,    22.3,    54.8,    55.2,  272.4,  0.00699,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:58:02 DEBUG| [54.183.240.195] [stdout] Feb 10 17:58:02 ip-172-31-18-109 scylla[2103]: INFO  [shard 0] rpc - client 172.31.18.111: client connection dropped: read: Connection reset by peer
    15:58:02 DEBUG| [54.193.37.222] [stdout] Feb 10 17:58:02 ip-172-31-18-114 scylla[2098]: INFO  [shard 0] rpc - client 172.31.18.111: client connection dropped: read: Connection reset by peer
    15:58:02 DEBUG| [54.193.61.5] [stdout] Feb 10 17:58:02 ip-172-31-18-110 scylla[2107]: INFO  [shard 0] rpc - client 172.31.18.111: client connection dropped: read: Connection reset by peer
    15:58:02 DEBUG| [54.183.193.208] [stdout] Feb 10 17:58:02 ip-172-31-18-113 scylla[2114]: INFO  [shard 0] rpc - client 172.31.18.111: client connection dropped: read: Connection reset by peer
    15:58:03 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1288782,    3515,    3515,    3515,     1.1,     0.6,     2.6,     7.7,    56.3,   143.6,  273.4,  0.00701,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    ...
    15:58:59 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1532519,    4846,    4846,    4846,     0.8,     0.6,     2.5,     3.8,     9.5,    10.9,  328.8,  0.00715,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:58:59 DEBUG| Node lmr-scylla-db-node-88c994d5-3 [54.193.37.181 | 172.31.18.111] (seed: None): Got new public IP 54.67.92.86
    15:59:00 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1537219,    4681,    4681,    4681,     0.8,     0.6,     2.5,     3.9,    18.8,    28.3,  329.8,  0.00713,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    ...
    15:59:51 DEBUG| [54.193.37.222] [stdout] Feb 10 17:59:51 ip-172-31-18-114 scylla[2098]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - Node 172.31.18.111 has restarted, now UP
    15:59:52 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1767965,    4869,    4869,    4869,     0.8,     0.6,     2.5,     3.0,    12.3,    15.0,  382.1,  0.00677,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:59:52 DEBUG| [54.183.240.195] [stdout] Feb 10 17:59:52 ip-172-31-18-109 scylla[2103]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - Node 172.31.18.111 has restarted, now UP
    15:59:53 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1771279,    3291,    3291,    3291,     1.2,     0.6,     3.4,    13.2,    32.3,    39.8,  383.1,  0.00680,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:59:53 DEBUG| [54.193.61.5] [stdout] Feb 10 17:59:53 ip-172-31-18-110 scylla[2107]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - Node 172.31.18.111 has restarted, now UP
    15:59:54 DEBUG| [54.193.84.90] [stdout] total,       1775909,    4622,    4622,    4622,     0.9,     0.6,     2.5,     3.7,     9.9,    16.3,  384.1,  0.00678,      0,      0,       0,       0,       0,       0
    15:59:54 DEBUG| [54.183.195.134] [stdout] Feb 10 17:59:54 ip-172-31-18-112 scylla[2108]: INFO  [shard 0] gossip - Node 172.31.18.111 has restarted, now UP
    

With all that information going, the main log is hard to read, but at least you now have an outline of what is going on. We store the scylla logs on per node files, you can find them all in the test log directory

SCT utilities

  1. utils/fetch_and_decode_stalls_from_job_database_logs.sh

This script searches in the log all reactor stalles, find unique stalles and decode them. The script analyzes the database.logs that are located under ~/sct-results/<job-folder>/<test-folder>/<cluster-folder>. The script is going through nodes folders and analyze database.log for every node.

  1. utils/fetch_and_decode_stalls_from_journalctl_logs_all_nodes.sh -

This script searches in the journalctl all reactor stalles, find unique stalles and decode them. Save the journalctl from every node to the database.log and move to the folders by node. Organize all folders in one folder, like:

logs/node1/database.log
logs/node2/database.log
  1. utils/fetch_and_decode_stalls_from_one_journalctl_log.sh

This script searches in the one journalctl all reactor stalles, find unique stalles and decode them. Save the journalctl of one node to the database.log and move to the folder

For examples see utilities documentation

Building Hydra Docker image

Once you have changes in the requirements-python.txt or in Hydra Dockerfile

  • change the version in docker/env/version
  • run ./docker/env/build_n_push.sh to build and push to Docker Hub

SCT test profiling

  • set environment variable "SCT_ENABLE_TEST_PROFILING" to 1, or add "enable_test_profiling: true" into yaml file
  • run test

After test is done there are following ways to use collected stats: - cat ~/latest/profile.stats/stats.txt - snakeviz ~/latest/profile.stats/stats.bin - tuna ~/latest/profile.stats/stats.bin - gprof2dot -f pstats ~/latest/profile.stats/stats.bin | dot -Tpng -o ~/latest/profile.stats/stats.png

Another way to profile is py-spy: - pip install py-spy Run recording: - py-spy record -s -o ./py-spy.svg -- python3 sct.py ... Run 'top' mode: - py-spy top -s -- python3 sct.py ...

Creating pipeline jobs for new branch

Once a new branch is create, we could build all the need job for this branch with the following script

JENKINS_USERNAME=[jenkins username] JENKINS_PASSWORD=[token from jenkins] hydra create-test-release-jobs scylla-4.0 --sct_branch branch-4.0
# enterprise features
JENKINS_USERNAME=[jenkins username] JENKINS_PASSWORD=[token from jenkins] hydra create-test-release-jobs-enterprise enterprise-2020.1 --sct_branch branch-2020.1

FAQ

Q: My c-s and memesis metrics are not exposed to the monitor while running locally, why ?

A: since your computer isn't exposed to the internet, the monitor can't reach it:

# ngrok can be used to help with it
# goto https://ngrok.com/download, then in a separate terminal window
./ngrok start --none

# back when you want to run your test
export SCT_NGROK_NAME=`whoami`

# run you test
hydra run-test ....

# while test running your metrics api would be exposed for example:
# http://fruch.ngrok.io

Q: How to use SCT_UPDATE_DB_PACKAGES on my job, and what does it do ?

A: SCT has the ability to run an upgrade to a given RPM, that will happen either after a regular installation or a deployment of an instance. The desired RPM must be placed somewhere in the builder, that will copy it to the DB node and run a rpm command to upgrade the installed package (be sure that your RPM has a version bigger than the one installed).:

# from your environment variables set like this:
# be sure to put a slash after the path !
export SCT_UPDATE_DB_PACKAGES=<path_to_my_rpm>/

# from your jenkinsfile file you could set like this (inside your pipeline settings):
update_db_packages: '<path_to_my_rpm>/'

# from your yaml file set like this:
update_db_packages: '<path_to_my_rpm>/'

Q: I want to use SCT_UPDATE_DB_PACKAGES but Jenkins keep selecting different builder, what can I do

A: SCT now support passing s3:// or gs:// urls in update_db_packages, for example

# uploading to s3
aws s3 cp s3://downloads.scylladb.com/
aws s3 cp --recursive rpms s3://scylla-qa-public/`whoami`/

# download from s3 path
export SCT_UPDATE_DB_PACKAGES=s3://scylla-qa-public/`whoami`/rpms

# uploading to google storage
gsutil cp rpms/* gs://scratch.scylladb.com/`whoami`/rpms/

# download for google storage
export SCT_UPDATE_DB_PACKAGES=gs://scratch.scylladb.com/`whoami`/rpms

# downloading a specific rpms built on master in job 888
export SCT_UPDATE_DB_PACKAGES=s3://downloads.scylladb.com/rpm/unstable/centos/master/888/scylla/7/x86_64/

Q: How to use SCT_SCYLLA_MGMT_PKG and what does it do?

A: SCT has the ability to run a job (manager jobs) using your own scylla-manager package files. It will allow you to run one of the manager jobs using your self build package files, for example

# uploading to s3
aws s3 cp --recursive rpms s3://scylla-qa-public/`whoami`/

# download from s3 path
export SCT_SCYLLA_MGMT_PKG=s3://scylla-qa-public/`whoami`/rpms

# uploading to google storage
gsutil cp rpms/* gs://scratch.scylladb.com/`whoami`/rpms/

# download for google storage
export SCT_SCYLLA_MGMT_PKG=gs://scratch.scylladb.com/`whoami`/rpms

# downloading specific rpms built on master in job 762
export SCT_SCYLLA_MGMT_PKG=s3://downloads.scylladb.com/manager/rpm/unstable/centos/master/762/scylla-manager/7/x86_64/

# using a local path, place your rpms into a local folder inside the builder
export SCT_SCYLLA_MGMT_PKG=<path_to_my_rpms>/

Q: How do I update the configuration docs ?

A: Like that

SCT_CLUSTER_BACKEND=aws hydra conf-docs -o markdown > docs/configuration_options.md

TODO

  • Set up buildable HTML documentation, and a hosted version of it.
  • Write more tests, improve test API (always in progress, I guess).

Known issues

  • No test API guide. Bear with us while we set up hosted test API documentation, and take a look at the current tests and the sdcm library for more information.

Footnotes

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