Use Ext JS components in React.
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README.md

Ext JS Reactor

The @extjs/reactor package makes it easy to use Ext JS components in your React app.

Join the chat at https://gitter.im/sencha/extjs-reactor

Requirements

  • React 15.4.0+ (peer dependency)
  • Ext JS 6.5+

Installation

# Be sure to install react>=15.4.0 before
npm install --save @extjs/reactor
npm install --save-dev @extjs/reactor-webpack-plugin @extjs/reactor-babel-plugin

Getting Started with ExtReact

To create a new ExtReact app, we recommend using the ExtReact Yeoman Generator:

npm install -g yo @extjs/generator-ext-react
yo @extjs/ext-react

The application it creates uses react, react-router, webpack, and babel (ES2015+) and is based off of the ExtReact Boilerplate.

Getting Started with Ext JS and React

If you're starting from scratch with Ext JS and React, we recommend cloning one of the boilerplates and following the instructions there:

Launching your Application

launch(React.Element/Function)

To launch your app, add the following to your index.js file (your webpack entry point):

import { launch } from '@extjs/reactor';
import App from './App';

launch(<App/>);

The launch function renders the specified component into the document body. It also accepts a callback function that returns the component to be rendered:

launch(() => {
  // do some initialization before initial render
  // ...
  
  // return the component to be rendered
  return <App/>;
})

The launch function serves two purposes:

  1. It delays your App's initial render until the ExtReact class system is fully initialized
  2. It creates a viewport, which is needed for creating components that take up the full height and width of the screen.

When using launch you do not need a separate target <div id="root"/> in your index.html file. If you have one you should remove it. The code above replaces the typical code for launching a React app, which generally looks something like:

import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';
import App from './App';

ReactDOM.render(<App/>, document.getElementById('root'));

renderWhenReady(Component)

If you do not need to create fullscreen components (for example if you're using ExtReact components with another layout system), you can apply the renderWhenReady higher-order component to topmost component containing an ExtReact element, omit the launch function, and render to a target element as is customary with React. This is especially useful if you're building a library of components based on ExtReact and you don't want to require the applications that use your library to call launch.

// App.js
import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { Panel } from '@extjs/ext-react';
import { renderWhenReady } from '@extjs/reactor';

class App extends Component {
    render() {
        return (
            <Panel title="ExtReact">Hello World!</Panel>
        )
    }
}

export default renderWhenReady(App);
// index.js
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';
import App from './App';

ReactDOM.render(<App/>, document.getElementById('root'));

React Hot Loader

Here is an example that uses the launch function's callback parameter to enable react-hot-loader. The callback is passed a DOM element that can be used as the target when calling ReactDOM.render.

import React from 'react'
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom'
import { AppContainer } from 'react-hot-loader'
import { launch } from '@extjs/reactor';
import App from './App'

let viewport;

const render = (Component, target) => {
    ReactDOM.render(
        <AppContainer>
            <Component/>
        </AppContainer>,
        target
    )
}

launch(target => render(App, viewport = target));

if (module.hot) {
    module.hot.accept('./App', () => render(App, viewport));
}

HTML Doctype

The HTML5 doctype declaration is required for ExtReact components to display properly. Please make sure that this begins your HTML document:

<!doctype html>

Viewport Meta Tag

ExtReact requires a viewport meta tag. This should be added to the head element in your index.html.

<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1, maximum-scale=1, user-scalable=no">

The fullscreen config

Most apps that use ExtReact are single-page applications that occupy the full height and width of the browser window. To acheive this, the root ExtReact component in your app should be configured with the fullscreen prop set to true. For example:

import { Container } from '@extjs/ext-react';

export default function App() {
  return (
    <Container fullscreen>
      ...
    </Container>
  )
}

Hello World

Here's a minimal React app that renders an Ext.Panel from the classic toolkit:

import React from 'react';
import { launch } from '@extjs/reactor';
import { Panel } from '@extjs/reactor/classic';

launch(
    <Panel title="ExtReact">
        Hello World!
    </Panel>
);

Importing Components

Any Ext JS component can be imported by the capitalized, camel-cased version of it's xtype. For example,

import { Grid } from '@extjs/reactor/classic';

Dashes in xtypes should be converted to underscores. For example:

import { D3_HeatMap } from '@extjs/reactor/classic';

Configuring Components

React props are converted to Ext JS configs. Here's a typical use of Ext.grid.Panel:

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { Grid } from '@extjs/reactor/classic';

export default class MyComponent extends Component {

    render() {        
        return (
            <Grid
                columns={[
                    { text: 'Name', dataIndex: 'name' },
                    { text: 'Email', dataIndex: 'email' }
                ]}
                store={{
                    fields: ['name', 'email'],
                    data: [
                        { name: 'Tim Smith', email: 'tim101@gmail.com' },
                        { name: 'Jill Lindsey', email: 'jlindsey890@gmail.com' }
                    ]
                }}
            />
        )
    }

}

Handling Events

Any prop starting with "on" followed by a capital letter is automatically converted to an Ext JS event listener. Since Ext JS events are all lower-case, case is not preserved. You're free to use camel-case, which is common in React.

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { Slider } from '@extjs/@extjs/reactor/classic';

export default function MyComponent() {
    return (
        <Slider
            minValue={0}
            maxValue={100}
            onChange={(slider, value) => console.log(`Value set to ${value}`)}
        />
    )
}

Event handler props can also take an object with additional options:

<Button 
    onAfterRender={{
        single: true, // handler will only be called once
        fn: () => {...}
    }}
/>

You can also use a listeners object as is common in traditional Ext JS:

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { Slider } from '@extjs/reactor/classic';

export default function MyComponent() {
    return (
        <Slider
            minValue={0}
            maxValue={100}
            listeners={{
                change: (slider, value) => console.log(`Value set to ${value}`)
            }}
        />
    )
}

Special Props

defaults

Use the defaults prop to apply a set of props to all children. For example, to use flex: 1 for all items in a container:

<Container layout="vbox" defaults={{ flex: 1 }}>
    <Container>Item</Container>
</Container>

Refs

Refs point to Ext JS component instances:

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { Slider } from '@extjs/reactor/classic';

export default class MyComponent {
    render() {
        return (
            <Slider
                ref={ slider => this.slider = slider }
                minValue={0}
                maxValue={100}
                onChange={() => this.onChange()}
            />         
        )
    }

    onChange() {
        console.log('Slider value', this.slider.getValue()); // this.slider is an Ext.slider.Single
    }
}

Docked Items (Classic Toolkit)

When using the Ext JS classic toolkit, any component with a dock prop is automatically added to (dockedItems)[http://docs.sencha.com/extjs/6.2.0/classic/Ext.panel.Panel.html#cfg-dockedItems].

Here is an example which docks a toolbar above a grid:

import { Grid, Panel, Toolbar, TextField } from '@extjs/reactor/classic';

function MyComponent(props) {
    return (
        <Panel layout="fit">
            <Toolbar dock="top">
                <TextField emptyText="Search..." flex={1}/>
            </Toolbar>
            <Grid>...</Grid>
        </Panel>
    )
}

Using HTML Elements and Non-Ext JS Components Inside of Ext JS Components

HTML elements and other non-Ext JS React components are wrapped in an Ext.Component instance when they appear within an Ext JS Component. This is allows Ext JS layouts to work with non-Ext JS components. For example...

<Panel layout="hbox">
    <div>left</div>
    <div>right</div>
</Panel>

... will result in two divs side-by-side. The component structure created is equivalent to:

Ext.create({
    xtype: 'panel',
    layout: 'hbox'
    items: [{
        xtype: 'component',
        html: '<div>left</div>'
    }, {
        xtype: 'component',
        html: '<div>right</div>'
    }]
});

When an Ext JS component contains only text, that text will be set as the html config of the component. For example...

<Panel>Hello World!</Panel>

... results in ...

Ext.create({
    xtype: 'panel',
    html: 'Hello World!'
});

Using Custom Ext JS Components

You can import custom Ext JS components in much the same way you would those from Ext JS itself. Just reference the camel-case version of the component's xtype.

For example, given the following component:

Ext.define('MyPackage.view.MyGrid', {
    extend: 'Ext.grid.Grid',
    xtype: 'mygrid'
})

You could import and use that component using:

import { MyGrid } from '@extjs/reactor/classic';

If your component doesn't have an xtype, you can using the reactify function to convert any Ext JS component into a react component:

import { reactify } from '@extjs/reactor';

const MyGrid = reactify(MyPackage.view.MyGrid);

function MyComponent() {
    return (
        <MyGrid/>
    )
}

Building

Select your toolkit, theme, and packages using @extjs/reactor-webpack-plugin. The plugin scans your code and only includes the classes you need in the final bundle. Here's an example:

const ExtJSReactWebpackPlugin = require('@extjs/reactor-webpack-plugin');

module.exports = {
    ...
    plugins: [
        new ExtJSReactWebpackPlugin({
            sdk: 'ext', // location of Ext JS SDK.  You can either copy the sdk into your project or create a symbolic link to it.
            theme: 'theme-material', // the name of an Ext JS theme or a relative path to a custom theme
            toolkit: 'classic',
            packages: ['charts']
        })
    ]
    ...
}

We recommend creating a symbolic link called "ext" in the root of your project that points to your local copy of the Ext JS SDK. You can do this on Mac OS and linux with the following command:

ln -s /path/to/ext-6.x.x ext

Or on windows:

mklink ext c:\path\to\ext-6.5.x

If you're using Babel, we recommend adding @extjs/reactor-babel-plugin to your .babelrc. The reactor-babel-plugin require module compilation to be turned off. For example:

{
  "presets": [
    [ "es2015", { "modules": false } ],
    "stage-2",
    "react"
  ],
  "plugins": [
    "@extjs/reactor-babel-plugin",
    "transform-runtime"
  ]
}

Development

You must be authenticated to Sencha's npm registry to set up a development environment. To do this, run:

npm login --registry=https://npm.sencha.com --scope=@extjs

Use your support portal credentials. If your username is your email address, replace "@" with "..". For example, "developer..sencha.com".

This is a monorepo that uses lerna. After cloning, run npm install at the root of the project tree to install and link dependencies in all packages.

Running Against ExtReact Pre-Releases

You can upgrade all packages to use the latest ext-react and sencha-cmd by using the test.npm.sencha.com registry and running

npm run install:clean

Running Tests

Tests are implemented using Sencha Test. See packages/reactor-tests for instructions on how to set up a test environment.

Packages

Contributing

Contributor License Agreement

We'd love to accept patches and new boilerplates. Before we can take them, we need you to sign this CLA.

Once we receive it, we'll be able to accept your pull requests.

Contributing a Patch

  1. Submit an issue describing your proposed change.
  2. The repo owner will respond to your issue promptly.
  3. If your proposed change is accepted, fork the repo, develop and test your code changes.
  4. Submit a pull request.