Converts CommonJS style code to AMD-compliant bundles.
JavaScript
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Failed to load latest commit information.
fragments
lib
src
.gitignore
LICENSE
README.md
package.json

README.md

buildit

Converts CommonJS (e.g. node) style code to AMD-compliant (e.g. requirejs) bundles.

Usage

Programmatic usage of buildit is straightforward. The buildit function accepts a string pattern (or array of string patterns) and configuration options. The pattern format conforms to the standard seen in GruntJS and is supported by the glob dependency.

var buildit = require('buildit');

var out = buildit({
  baseUrl: '.',
  name: 'mybundle',
  define: {
    mymod1: 'src/mymod1',
    mymod2: 'src/mymod2',
  }
  exports: {
    mymod1: 'src/mymod1',
    mymod2: 'src/mymod2'
  },
  extensions: [
    'src/myextension'
  ]
});

console.log(out);

By default, the buildit function will automatically run with the supplied arguments. However, running can be delayed and patterns can be built up manually as follows:

var Buildit = require('buildit').Buildit;

var buildit = new Buildit({
  baseUrl: '.',
  name: 'mybundle',
  define: {
    mymod1: 'src/mymod1',
    mymod2: 'src/mymod2',
  }
  exports: {
    mymod1: 'src/mymod1',
    mymod2: 'src/mymod2'
  },
  extensions: [
    'src/myextension'
  ]
});

var out = buildit.run();

console.log(out);

The Buildit constructor accepts the same arguments as the buildit function (but just exposes the additional .run() method).

Options

baseUrl – The folder to use as the current working directory. The specified path is relative to the directory initiating the NodeJS script. Defaults to ..

name – An optional name for the code bundle. This follows the AMD standard and manifests as:

define(name, [ ... ], function( ... ) {
  ...
});

If no name is supplied the bundle definition will instead be:

define([ ... ], function( ... ) {
  ...
});

define – Internal modules can be defined in the AMD scope. The define option is a plain object with key/value pairs corresponding to the name that should be used for the defined AMD module and the path to the dependency. Similar to the RequireJS optimizer, the ".js" extension should be excluded from the module path as it is added automatically. Only definitions corresponding to files found by the supplied pattern(s) will be successfully defined. Defined modules can be found after requiring the bundle itself with an AMD loader. From the primary usage example above:

require(['mybundle'], function(mybundle) {
  // Individual modules in `mybundle` are now available.

  require(['mymod1', 'mymod2'], function(mymod1, mymod2) {
    // This should work!
  });
});

OR

require(['mybundle'], function(mybundle) {
  // Individual modules in `mybundle` are now available.
});

require(['mymod1', 'mymod2'], function(mymod1, mymod2) {
  // This should work!
});

exports – Internal modules can be directly exported in the defined bundle. The exports option is a plain object with key/value pairs corresponding to the name that should be used for exportation and the path to the dependency. Similar to the RequireJS optimizer, the ".js" extension should be excluded from the module path as it is added automatically. Only exports corresponding to files found by the supplied pattern(s) will be sucessfully exported. Exported modules can be accessed after requiring the bundle itself with an AMD loader. From the primary usage example above, the exports option would manifest in the bundle as:

define(name, [ ... ], function( ... ) {
  // Internal bundling code

  return {
    mod1: require('src/mymod1'),
    mod2: require('src/mymod2')
  };
});

Individual modules can then be accessed as follows:

require(['mybundle'], function(mybundle) {
  mybundle.mod1; // Should be defined.
  mybundle.mod2; // Should be defined.
});

The exports option can also be a string to enable a singular module export. For example, the following configuration:

var buildit = require('buildit');

var out = buildit({
  baseUrl: '.',
  name: 'mybundle',
  exports: 'src/mymod1'
});

console.log(out);

Would result in the bundle:

define('mybundle', [ ... ], function( ... ) {
   // Internal bundling code

   return require('src/mymod1');
});

The module would then be accessed as follows:

require(['mybundle'], function(mybundle) {
  mybundle; // Should be defined and equivalent to the exports of "src/mymod1".
});

extensions – Internal modules can be used to extend their dependencies. The extensions option is an array containing paths to the files that will be executed internally as part of the bundle definition. Similar to the RequireJS optimizer, the ".js" extension should be excluded from the module path as it is added automatically. Only extensions corresponding to files found by the supplied pattern(s) will be sucessfully executed. From the primary usage example above, the extensions option would manifest in the bundle as:

define(name, [ ... ], function( ... ) {
  // Internal bundling code

  require('src/myextension');
});

Note that the define, exports, and extensions options are not mutually exlusive. While this can be redundant and doesn't necessarily make sense, the flexibility is available.

Command-line Support

buildit cannot currently be run from the command line. Command-line execution will be added in future versions.

Limitations

buildit is NOT a 1:1 replacement for browserify or webpack. NodeJS dependencies are not traced completely. That is to say, only local dependencies (e.g. ./src/test.js) will be included in compiled bundles.

It is assumed that external dependencies (e.g. jQuery or lodash) would be AMD required through CDN or compiled with something like the RequireJS optimizer.

buildit does not patch or wrap Node-only libraries (e.g. NodeJS builtins) to make them usable in the browser, nor does it include them in the build. For example, code like:

var jquery = require('jquery');
var fs = require('fs');

module.exports = {};

Would translate to a bundle like:

define(['fs', 'jquery'], function(fs, jquery) {
  // Internal bundling code
});

There are no warning messages issued for code depending on NodeJS builtins.

To reiterate, buildit is only intended to package locally defined-CommonJS modules into AMD compliant blocks that can THEN be used in an AMD build-optimization process or be deployed directly in a script tag (provided all dependencies are otherwise met).

Testing

buildit has admittedly poor test coverage. Everything seems to work when I use this library for my own projects, but please feel free to report any issues you come across. I'm working to improve test coverage in future versions.

Notes

Circular Module Dependencies

Circular dependencies are not currently supported. I am aware that NodeJS currently supports module cycles. I haven't found a good reason to support circular module definition in my own projects. If this changes, or if circular dependency support becomes a requested feature, buildit may support circular dependencies in the future.

Path Obfuscation

Internal path definitions make use of relative pathing from the specified baseUrl to the included modules. This is to protect the privacy of your filesystem as much as possible and to improve minification potential.

Dependency Idiosyncrasies

buildit depends on detective to trace module dependencies. As such any weaknesses in detective manifest in buildit, so please report dependency discovery issues accordingly. Specific deficiencies I've noticed are:

  • Non-literal require statements
var test = 'test';
var mymodule = require(__dirname + '/lib/' + test);
  • Offsetting require
var t = require;
var mymodule = t('mymodule');