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Non-planar FDM #3442

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lordofhyphens opened this Issue Jul 27, 2016 · 10 comments

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lordofhyphens commented Jul 27, 2016

Is this something we should look into bringing into upstream?

Tagging @makertum to bring into conversation

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Patola Jul 28, 2016

That... would... be... AMAZING!!!!! AWESOME! PLEASE DO IT (but first, custom supports to counter simplify3d)

Check out this project, it has non-planar slicing in java: https://github.com/nick-parker/Bread

Patola commented Jul 28, 2016

That... would... be... AMAZING!!!!! AWESOME! PLEASE DO IT (but first, custom supports to counter simplify3d)

Check out this project, it has non-planar slicing in java: https://github.com/nick-parker/Bread

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makertum Jul 28, 2016

Great stuff, would love to see that feature!

I guess this can be achieved without massive changes in the slicing process itself. For static displacement maps, like the wavy cube (image below), I currently externally tesselate the STL geometry, pre-warp it, send it through the planar Slicer, then displace the G-code in the post-processor.

Surface-geometry based displacement maps, like the wing (image below), could be generated from the STL file itself. It would be just a depth map of the top surface. The process of pre-warping, slicing and post-displacing stays the same.

All the best,
Moritz

Cube:
cube

Wing:
wing

makertum commented Jul 28, 2016

Great stuff, would love to see that feature!

I guess this can be achieved without massive changes in the slicing process itself. For static displacement maps, like the wavy cube (image below), I currently externally tesselate the STL geometry, pre-warp it, send it through the planar Slicer, then displace the G-code in the post-processor.

Surface-geometry based displacement maps, like the wing (image below), could be generated from the STL file itself. It would be just a depth map of the top surface. The process of pre-warping, slicing and post-displacing stays the same.

All the best,
Moritz

Cube:
cube

Wing:
wing

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FlameRunner Jul 30, 2016

That method obviously gives us ways to get some great prints. It would be nice to have it implemented in Slic3r, not even for some useful applications but just for the joy of experimenting itself.

On the other hand, I can't really imagine using it for regular everyday printing.

FlameRunner commented Jul 30, 2016

That method obviously gives us ways to get some great prints. It would be nice to have it implemented in Slic3r, not even for some useful applications but just for the joy of experimenting itself.

On the other hand, I can't really imagine using it for regular everyday printing.

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kefir- Jul 30, 2016

I imagine this would be a very useful feature. For angles within some limit, the typical 3d printed steps could be avoided, and printed parts could more accurately represent the original model. If it works well I don't see why it shouldn't be enabled by default with some conservative parameters?

kefir- commented Jul 30, 2016

I imagine this would be a very useful feature. For angles within some limit, the typical 3d printed steps could be avoided, and printed parts could more accurately represent the original model. If it works well I don't see why it shouldn't be enabled by default with some conservative parameters?

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burbilog Aug 2, 2016

Simply amazing. Please, do it!

burbilog commented Aug 2, 2016

Simply amazing. Please, do it!

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rPman Aug 7, 2016

wow! this feature must be

rPman commented Aug 7, 2016

wow! this feature must be

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mrvn Aug 8, 2016

The pictures show non-flat layers throughout the object. That's probably not even necessary. Instead print the inside normal with fixed thickness and stairs and all. But then the top fill layers you make non-flat, filling out the stairs in the process. Or a mixed mode. Allow non-flat layers throughout but when they get to thin allow stairs (on the inside).

mrvn commented Aug 8, 2016

The pictures show non-flat layers throughout the object. That's probably not even necessary. Instead print the inside normal with fixed thickness and stairs and all. But then the top fill layers you make non-flat, filling out the stairs in the process. Or a mixed mode. Allow non-flat layers throughout but when they get to thin allow stairs (on the inside).

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mrjohnc Oct 4, 2016

Non-planar layers all the way through the print could offer other functions including offering increased layer bonding by making all layers 'wiggly' which would make the layers stronger in the x-y plane.

Non-planar layers may also allow other possibilities when printing with multiple materials including coating one material with another.

mrjohnc commented Oct 4, 2016

Non-planar layers all the way through the print could offer other functions including offering increased layer bonding by making all layers 'wiggly' which would make the layers stronger in the x-y plane.

Non-planar layers may also allow other possibilities when printing with multiple materials including coating one material with another.

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alexrj Nov 24, 2016

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Hey @makertum!
Sorry for jumping into the conversation so late. Your script is very nice, and it would be cool to include it in Slic3r so that more people can benefit and experiment. The hardest part is making a visual preview of the deformed output...

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alexrj commented Nov 24, 2016

Hey @makertum!
Sorry for jumping into the conversation so late. Your script is very nice, and it would be cool to include it in Slic3r so that more people can benefit and experiment. The hardest part is making a visual preview of the deformed output...

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dmitryprokopchuk May 27, 2017

Incredible! It must be in the Slic3r !!!

dmitryprokopchuk commented May 27, 2017

Incredible! It must be in the Slic3r !!!

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