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\input texinfo @c -*-texinfo-*-
@c %**start of header
@setfilename stumpwm.info
@settitle StumpWM Manual
@setchapternewpage odd
@c %**end of header
@dircategory X11
@direntry
* StumpWM: (stumpwm). A Common Lisp window manager
@end direntry
@ifinfo
This is the Stump Window Manager user manual.
Copyright @copyright{} 2000-2008 Shawn Betts
Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim
copies of this manual provided the copyright notice and
this permission notice are preserved on all copies.
@ignore
Permission is granted to process this file through TeX
and print the results, provided the printed document
carries a copying permission notice identical to this
one except for the removal of this paragraph (this
paragraph not being relevant to the printed manual).
@end ignore
Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified
versions of this manual under the conditions for
verbatim copying, provided also that the sections
entitled ``Copying'' and ``GNU General Public License''
are included exactly as in the original, and provided
that the entire resulting derived work is distributed
under the terms of a permission notice identical to this
one.
Permission is granted to copy and distribute
translations of this manual into another language,
under the above conditions for modified versions,
except that this permission notice may be stated in a
translation approved by the Free Software Foundation.
@end ifinfo
@iftex
@kbdinputstyle code
@end iftex
@titlepage
@sp 10
@titlefont{The Stump Window Manager}
@author Shawn Betts
@page
@vskip 0pt plus 1filll
Copyright @copyright{} 2000-2008 Shawn Betts
Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim
copies of this manual provided the copyright notice and
this permission notice are preserved on all copies.
Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified
versions of this manual under the conditions for
verbatim copying, provided also that the sections
entitled ``Copying'' and ``GNU General Public License''
are included exactly as in the original, and provided
that the entire resulting derived work is distributed
under the terms of a permission notice identical to this
one.
Permission is granted to copy and distribute
translations of this manual into another language,
under the above conditions for modified versions,
except that this permission notice may be stated in a
translation approved by the Free Software Foundation.
@end titlepage
@node Top, Introduction, (dir), (dir)
@ifinfo
This document explains how to use The Stump Window Manager.
@end ifinfo
@menu
* Introduction::
* Key Bindings::
* Commands::
* Message and Input Bar::
* Windows::
* Frames::
* Mode-line::
* Groups::
* Screens::
* Interacting With Unix::
* Interacting With X11::
* Miscellaneous Commands::
* Colors::
* Hooks::
* Modules::
* Hacking::
* Command and Function Index::
* Variable Index::
@detailmenu
--- The Detailed Node Listing ---
Introduction
* Starting StumpWM::
* Basic Usage::
* Interacting with the Lisp process::
* Contact the StumpWM developers::
Key Bindings
* List of Default Keybindings::
* Binding Keys::
* Modifiers::
Message and Input Bar
* Customizing The Bar::
* Using The Input Bar::
* Programming The Message Bar::
* Programming the Input Bar::
Windows
* Window Marks::
* Customizing Window Appearance::
* Controlling Raise And Map Requests::
* Programming With Windows::
* Rule Based Window Placement::
Frames
* Interactively Resizing Frames::
* Frame Dumping::
Groups
* Customizing Groups::
Screens
* Xinerama::
* Programming With Screens::
Miscellaneous Commands
* Menus::
* StumpWM's Data Directory::
* Debugging StumpWM::
* Timers::
* Getting Help::
Colors
* Behind The Scenes Look At Colors::
Hacking
* General Advice::
* Using git with StumpWM::
* Sending Patches::
@end detailmenu
@end menu
@node Introduction, Key Bindings, Top, Top
@chapter Introduction
StumpWM is an X11 window manager written entirely in Common Lisp. Its
user interface goals are similar to ratpoison's but with an emphasis on
customizability, completeness, and cushiness.
@menu
* Starting StumpWM::
* Basic Usage::
* Interacting with the Lisp process::
* Contact the StumpWM developers::
@end menu
@node Starting StumpWM, Basic Usage, Introduction, Introduction
@section Starting StumpWM
There are a number of ways to start StumpWM but the most straight
forward method is as follows. This assumes you have a copy of the
StumpWM source code and are using the @samp{SBCL} Common Lisp
environment.
@enumerate
@item
Install the prerequisites and build StumpWM as described in
@file{README}. This should give you a @file{stumpwm} executable.
@item
In your @file{~/.xinitrc} file include the line
@command{/path/to/stumpwm}. Remember to replace @samp{/path/to/}
with the actual path.
@item
Finally, start X windows with @command{startx}. Cross your
fingers. You should see a @samp{Welcome To the Stump Window Manager}
message pop up in the upper, right corner. At this point, you have
successfully started StumpWM.
@end enumerate
@node Basic Usage, Interacting with the Lisp process, Starting StumpWM, Introduction
@section Basic Usage
Once you have StumpWM up and running, the first thing you might want
to do is start @command{emacs}. Type @kbd{C-t e}, or in other words
@kbd{Control + t} followed by @kbd{e}. Now perhaps you want an
@command{xterm}. Type @kbd{C-t c}. Now you have some programs running.
To see a list of windows StumpWM is managing, type @kbd{C-t w}. The
highlighted window is the one you're looking at right now. It's the
focused window.
All of StumpWM's keys are bound to named commands, which can be
executed not only by keys but also from the input bar. Type @kbd{C-t
;} to open a command prompt. Now type @command{time} and press
return. Note, @command{time} can also be called by typing @kbd{C-t a}.
Throughout this manual you'll find definitions for commands,
functions, and variables. Any command you see in this manual can be
executed from the input bar or bound to a key.
At this point you probably want to switch back from your new
@command{xterm} to @command{emacs}. Type @kbd{C-t C-t}. This runs the
@command{other} command. Type it again and you're back to xterm.
Perhaps you'd like to see @command{emacs} and @command{xterm}
side-by-side. Type @kbd{C-t s}. You have now split the screen into 2
@command{frames}. For more information see @ref{Frames}. To switch to the
empty frame type @kbd{C-t TAB}. Now let's pull the xterm window into
this empty frame. Type @kbd{C-t w} for a window listing. Find the
@command{xterm} window. See the number beside it? Type @kbd{C-t} followed
by @command{xterm}'s window number.
Another common activity is browsing the interwebs. Type @kbd{C-t !}.
The input bar pops up again. You can now run a shell command. Let's
start a web browser: type @command{firefox} into the input bar and press
return.
Unfortunately, @command{firefox} probably isn't wide enough because it's
in one of the frames. Type @kbd{C-t Q} to remove all frames but the
current one and resize it to fit the screen.
For a full list of key bindings, see @ref{List of Default Keybindings}.
@node Interacting with the Lisp process, Contact the StumpWM developers, Basic Usage, Introduction
@section Interacting with the Lisp process
Since StumpWM is a Lisp program, there is a way for you to evaluate
Lisp code directly, on the same Lisp process that StumpWM is running on.
Type @kbd{C-t :} and an input box will appear. Then type some Lisp
expression.
When you call @command{eval} this way, you will be in the STUMPWM-USER
package, which imports all the exported symbols from the main STUMPWM
package.
@table @code
@item *mode-line-border-width*
Reads the value of @var{*mode-line-border-width*}.
@item (setf *mode-line-border-width* 3)
Sets the variable @var{*mode-line-border-width*} to 3.
@item (set-prefix-key (kbd "C-M-H-s-z"))
Calls the @code{set-prefix-key} function (and sets a new keyboard prefix)
@end table
@node Contact the StumpWM developers, , Interacting with the Lisp process, Introduction
@section Contact the StumpWM developers
The StumpWM home page is @url{http://stumpwm.nongnu.org/}.
You can reach Shawn Betts at @email{sabetts at vcn.bc.ca}.
The StumpWM mailing list is @email{stumpwm-devel@@nongnu.org} which
you can subscribe to at
@url{http://mail.nongnu.org/mailman/listinfo/stumpwm-devel}. Posting
is restricted to subscribers to keep spam out of the archives.
The StumpWM IRC channel can be found on Freenode at
@uref{irc://irc.freenode.net/#stumpwm, @code{#stumpwm}}.
@node Key Bindings, Commands, Introduction, Top
@chapter Key Bindings
StumpWM is controlled entirely by keystrokes and Lisp commands. It
mimics GNU Screen's keyboard handling. StumpWM's default prefix key is
@kbd{C-t}.
@menu
* List of Default Keybindings::
* Binding Keys::
* Modifiers::
@end menu
@node List of Default Keybindings, Binding Keys, Key Bindings, Key Bindings
@section List of Default Keybindings
The following is a list of keybindings.
@table @kbd
@item C-t @var{d}
Select the window with the corresponding digit@tie{}@var{d}
@item C-t C-@var{d}
Pull the window with the corresponding digit@tie{}@var{d} into the current frame
@item C-t n
@itemx C-t C-n
@itemx C-t Space
Go to the next window in the window list
@item C-t p
@itemx C-t C-p
Go to the previous window in the window list
@item C-t '
Go to a window by name
@item C-t "
Select a window from a list and focus the window.
@itemx C-t C-g
Abort the current command. This is useful if you accidentally hit @kbd{C-t}
@item C-t w
List all the windows
@item C-t i
Display information about the current window.
@item C-t f
Select a frame by number
@item C-t s
Split current frame vertically
@item C-t S
Split current frame horizontally
@item C-t k
@itemx C-t C-k
Sends a kill message to the current frame and the running program.
@item C-t K
Kills the current frame and running program; like a @command{kill -9}.
@item C-t c
@itemx C-t C-c
Run an X terminal; by default @command{xterm}
@item C-t e
@itemx C-t C-e
Run Emacs or raise it if it is already running.
@item C-t t
Sends a @kbd{C-t} to the frame; this is useful for applications like Firefox
which make heavy use of @kbd{C-t} (in Firefox's case, for opening a new
tab). This is similar to how GNU screen uses @kbd{C-a a}.
@item C-t w
@itemx C-t C-w
Prints out a list of the windows, their number, and their name.
@item C-t b
@itemx C-t C-b
Banish the mouse point to the lower right corner of the screen.
@item C-t a
@itemx C-t C-a
Display the current time and date, much like the Unix command @command{date}.
@item C-t C-t
Switch to the last window to have focus in the current frame.
@item C-t !
Prompt for a shell command to run via @file{/bin/sh}. All output is discarded.
@item C-t R
If the screen is split into multiple frames, one split will be
undone. If there is only one split, the effect will be the same as @kbd{C-t Q}.
@item C-t o
@itemx C-t TAB
If the screen is split into multiple frames, focus shifts to the
@command{next} frame, where it cycles to the right and then down; analogous
to @kbd{C-x o} in Emacs.
@item C-t F
Display ``Current Frame'' in the frame which has focus.
@item C-t ;
Opens the input box. StumpWM commands can be run from here, and the
input history moved through.
@item C-t :
Opens the input box, but all things typed in here will be sent to the
Common Lisp interpreter where they will be ran as Lisp programs; thus,
input should be valid Common Lisp.
@item C-t C-h
@itemx C-t ?
The help.
@item C-t -
Hide all frames and show the root window.
@item C-t Q
Removes all splits and maximizes the frame with focus.
@item C-t Up
@itemx C-t Down
@itemx C-t Left
@itemx C-t Right
Shift focus to an adjacent frame in the specified direction. @kbd{C-t Up} will
shift focus up, if possible, @kbd{C-t Down} will shift downwards, etc.
@item C-t v
Prints out the version of the running StumpWM.
@item C-t #
Toggle the mark on the current window
@item C-t m
@itemx C-t C-m
Display the last message. Hitting this keybinding again displays the
message before that, and so on.
@item C-t l
@itemx C-t C-l
redisplay the current window and force it to take up the entire frame.
@item C-t G
Display all groups and windows in each group. For more information see @ref{Groups}.
@item C-t F@var{n}
Jump to the corresponding group @var{n}. @kbd{C-t F1} jumps to group 1 and so on.
@item C-t g g
Show the list of groups.
@item C-t g c
Create a new group.
@item C-t g n
@itemx C-t g C-n
@itemx C-t g SPC
@itemx C-t g C-SPC
Go to the next group in the list.
@item C-t g N
Go to the next group in the list and bring the current window along.
@item C-t g p
@itemx C-t g C-p
Go to the previous group in the list.
@item C-t g P
Go to the previous group in the list and bring the current window along.
@item C-t g '
Select a group by name or by number.
@item C-t g "
Select a group from a list and switch to it.
@item C-t g m
Move the current window to the specified group.
@item C-t g k
Kill the current group. All windows are merged into the next group.
@item C-t g A
@itemx C-t g r
Change the current group's name.
@item C-t g @var{d}
Go to the group with digit @var{d}. @kbd{C-t g 1} jumps to group 1 and so on.
@item C-t +
Make frames the same height or width in the current frame's subtree.
@item C-t h k
Describe the specified key binding.
@item C-t h f
Describe the specified function.
@item C-t h v
Describe the specified variable.
@item C-t h w
List all key sequences that are bound to the specified command
@item C-t h c
Describe the specified command.
@end table
@node Binding Keys, Modifiers, List of Default Keybindings, Key Bindings
@section Binding Keys
@@@ define-key
@@@ undefine-key
@@@ kbd
!!! set-prefix-key
@@@ make-sparse-keymap
### *root-map*
### *top-map*
### *groups-map*
!!! bind
@node Modifiers, , Binding Keys, Key Bindings
@section Modifiers
Many users have had some difficulty with setting up modifiers for
StumpWM keybindings. This is caused by a combination of how StumpWM
handles modifiers and the default modifiers list for many users' X
servers.
@itemize
@item
My ``Super'' key doesn't work!
This is most likely caused by having the Hyper and Super keys listed
as the same modifier in the modifier list.
@example
$ xmodmap
xmodmap: up to 3 keys per modifier, (keycodes in parentheses):
shift Shift_L (0x32), Shift_R (0x3e)
lock Caps_Lock (0x42)
control Control_L (0x25), Control_R (0x6d)
mod1 Alt_L (0x40), Alt_R (0x71), Meta_L (0x9c)
mod2 Num_Lock (0x4d)
mod3
mod4 Super_L (0x7f), Hyper_L (0x80)
mod5 Mode_switch (0x5d), ISO_Level3_Shift (0x7c)
@end example
The problem is in the line beginning with ``mod4''. The way to set up
the modifier list correctly is to have just the Super key as the mod4
modifier. The following @command{xmodmap} commands will do just that.
@example
# clear out the mod4 modifier
$ xmodmap -e 'clear mod4'
$ xmodmap
xmodmap: up to 3 keys per modifier, (keycodes in parentheses):
shift Shift_L (0x32), Shift_R (0x3e)
lock Caps_Lock (0x42)
control Control_L (0x25), Control_R (0x6d)
mod1 Alt_L (0x40), Alt_R (0x71), Meta_L (0x9c)
mod2 Num_Lock (0x4d)
mod3
mod4
mod5 Mode_switch (0x5d), ISO_Level3_Shift (0x7c)
# add Super as a mod4 modifier
$ xmodmap -e 'add mod4 = Super_L'
$ xmodmap
xmodmap: up to 3 keys per modifier, (keycodes in parentheses):
shift Shift_L (0x32), Shift_R (0x3e)
lock Caps_Lock (0x42)
control Control_L (0x25), Control_R (0x6d)
mod1 Alt_L (0x40), Alt_R (0x71), Meta_L (0x9c)
mod2 Num_Lock (0x4d)
mod3
mod4 Super_L (0x73), Super_L (0x7f)
mod5 Mode_switch (0x5d), ISO_Level3_Shift (0x7c)
@end example
You can automate this by storing the commands in a file and calling
xmodmap when you start your X session.
@example
$ cat ~/.Xmodmap
clear mod4
add mod4 = Super_L
@end example
If you use @command{startx}, modify your @file{~/.xsession} or @file{~/.xinitrc} file.
@example
$ cat ~/.xsession
#!/bin/sh
xmodmap ~/.Xmodmap
exec /usr/bin/stumpwm
@end example
If you use a graphical login manager (GDM, KDM, etc.), your @file{~/.Xmodmap}
file should be fed to @command{xmodmap} when you log in. FIXME: verify this.
@item
Handling Meta and Alt: when do I use @kbd{M-} and @kbd{A-}?
If you have no Meta keys defined (see the output of the @command{xmodmap}
command), then StumpWM will treat the @kbd{M-} prefix in keybindings to
mean Alt. However, if there are Meta keys defined, then the @kbd{M-}
prefix refers to them, and the @kbd{A-} prefix refers to Alt.
Most users will simply use @kbd{M-} to refer to their Alt keys. However,
users that define separate Meta and Alt keys will use @kbd{M-} to refer
to the former, and @kbd{A-} to refer to the latter.
@item
How can I set up a Hyper key and use it with StumpWM?
To set up a Hyper key, you need to do two things: bind a physical key
to be a Hyper key, and add that key to the modifiers list.
The following example shows how to bind the control key at the
bottom-left of most keyboards to be Hyper. This is useful if you've
made Caps Lock into a control key, and have no use for the bottom-left
key.
@example
$ xmodmap -e 'keycode 37 = Hyper_L'
$ xmodmap -e 'clear mod5'
$ xmodmap -e 'add mod5 = Hyper_L'
@end example
To use a different key for Hyper, replace the keycode ``37'' above.
Use the @command{xev} program to see the keycode that any physical key has.
Refer to the section above on setting up the Super key to see how to
automate setting the Hyper key when you start X.
Now you can use @kbd{H-} as a prefix in StumpWM bindings.
@example
(define-key *top-map* (kbd "H-RET") "fullscreen")
(define-key *top-map* (kbd "H-Left") "gprev")
(define-key *top-map* (kbd "H-Right") "gnext")
(define-key *top-map* (kbd "H-TAB") "other")
@end example
Since essentially no programs have Hyper bindings, you can safely bind
commands to the @var{*top-map*}.
@end itemize
@node Commands, Message and Input Bar, Key Bindings, Top
@chapter Commands
If you've used emacs before you'll find commands and functions
familiar. Commands are functions that can be bound to keys and
executed interactively from StumpWM's input bar. A command expects a
certain number of arguments and any that are not supplied will be
prompted for.
FIXME: actually write some docs here
@node Message and Input Bar, Windows, Commands, Top
@chapter Message and Input Bar
!!! echo
!!! colon
@menu
* Customizing The Bar::
* Using The Input Bar::
* Programming The Message Bar::
* Programming the Input Bar::
@end menu
@node Customizing The Bar, Using The Input Bar, Message and Input Bar, Message and Input Bar
@section Customizing The Bar
The bar's appearance and behavior can be modified with the following
functions and variables.
@@@ set-fg-color
@@@ set-bg-color
@@@ set-border-color
@@@ set-msg-border-width
@@@ set-font
### *message-window-padding*
### *message-window-gravity*
### *timeout-wait*
### *input-window-gravity*
@node Using The Input Bar, Programming The Message Bar, Customizing The Bar, Message and Input Bar
@section Using The Input Bar
The following is a list of keybindings for the Input Bar. Users of Emacs
will recognize them.
@table @kbd
@item DEL
Delete the character before point (@code{delete-backward-char}).
@item M-DEL
Kill back to the beginning of the previous word (@code{backward-kill-word}).
@item C-d
@itemx Delete
Delete the character after point (@code{delete-forward-char}).
@item M-d
Kill forward to the end of the next word (@code{forward-kill-word}).
@item C-f
@itemx Right
Move forward one character (@code{forward-char}).
@item M-f
Move forward one word (@code{forward-word}).
@item C-b
@itemx Left
Move backward one character (@code{backward-char}).
@item M-b
Move backward one word (@code{backward-word}).
@item C-a
@itemx Home
Move to the beginning of the current line (@code{move-beginning-of-line}).
@item C-e
@itemx End
Move to the end of the current line (@code{move-end-of-line}).
@item C-k
Kill to the end of the line (@code{kill-line}).
@item C-u
Kill to the beginning of the line (@code{kill-to-beginning}),
the same as @kbd{C-a C-k}.
@item C-p
@itemx Up
Move to the next earlier entry saved in the command history (@command{history-back}).
@item C-n
@itemx Down
Move to the next later entry saved in the command history (@command{history-forward}).
@item RET
Submit the entered command (@command{submit}).
@item C-g
Abort the current action by closing the Input Bar (@command{abort}).
@item C-y
Paste text from clipboard into the Input Bar (@command{yank-selection}).
@item TAB
Clockwise tab complete the current string, if possible. Press @kbd{TAB} again to
cycle through completions.
@item S-TAB
Counter-clockwise tab complete the current string, if possible. Press @kbd{S-TAB} again to
cycle through completions.
@end table
@node Programming The Message Bar, Programming the Input Bar, Using The Input Bar, Message and Input Bar
@section Programming The Message Bar
@@@ echo-string
@@@ message
### *input-history-ignore-duplicates*
!!! copy-last-message
@node Programming the Input Bar, , Programming The Message Bar, Message and Input Bar
@section Programming the Input Bar
New input behavior can be added to the input bar by creating editing
functions and binding them to keys in the @var{*input-map*} using
@command{define-key}, just like other key bindings.
An input function takes 2 arguments: the input structure and the key pressed.
@@@ read-one-line
@@@ read-one-char
@@@ completing-read
@@@ input-insert-string
@@@ input-insert-char
### *input-map*
@node Windows, Frames, Message and Input Bar, Top
@chapter Windows
!!! next
!!! pull-hidden-next
!!! prev
!!! pull-hidden-previous
!!! delete-window
!!! kill-window
!!! echo-windows
!!! other-window
!!! pull-hidden-other
!!! renumber
!!! meta
!!! select-window
!!! select-window-by-number
!!! title
!!! windowlist
!!! fullscreen
!!! info
!!! refresh
!!! redisplay
### *window-format*
### *window-name-source*
### *new-window-prefered-frame*
@menu
* Window Marks::
* Customizing Window Appearance::
* Controlling Raise And Map Requests::
* Programming With Windows::
* Rule Based Window Placement::
@end menu
@node Window Marks, Customizing Window Appearance, Windows, Windows
@section Window Marks
Windows can be marked. A marked window has a # beside it in the window
list. Some commands operate only on marked windows.
!!! mark
!!! clear-window-marks
!!! pull-marked
@node Customizing Window Appearance, Controlling Raise And Map Requests, Window Marks, Windows
@section Customizing Window Appearance
### *maxsize-border-width*
### *transient-border-width*
### *normal-border-width*
### *window-border-style*
@@@ set-win-bg-color
@@@ set-focus-color
@@@ set-unfocus-color
@@@ set-float-focus-color
@@@ set-float-unfocus-color
@@@ set-normal-gravity
@@@ set-maxsize-gravity
@@@ set-transient-gravity
!!! gravity
@node Controlling Raise And Map Requests, Programming With Windows, Customizing Window Appearance, Windows
@section Controlling Raise And Map Requests
It is sometimes handy to deny a window's request to be focused. The
following variables determine such behavior.
A map request occurs when a new or withdrawn window requests to be
mapped for the first time.
A raise request occurs when a client asks the window manager to give
an existing window focus.
### *deny-map-request*
### *deny-raise-request*
### *suppress-deny-messages*
Some examples follow.
@example
;; Deny the firefox window from taking focus when clicked upon.
(push '(:class "gecko") stumpwm:*deny-raise-request*)
;; Deny all map requests
(setf stumpwm:*deny-map-request* t)
;; Deny transient raise requests
(push '(:transient) stumpwm:*deny-map-request*)
;; Deny the all windows in the xterm class from taking focus.
(push '(:class "Xterm") stumpwm:*deny-raise-request*)
@end example
@node Programming With Windows, Rule Based Window Placement, Controlling Raise And Map Requests, Windows
@section Programming With Windows
%%% define-window-slot
@@@ window-send-string
### *default-window-name*
@node Rule Based Window Placement, , Programming With Windows, Windows
@section Rule Based Window Placement
%%% define-frame-preference
@@@ clear-window-placement-rules
!!! remember
!!! forget
!!! dump-window-placement-rules
!!! restore-window-placement-rules
@node Frames, Mode-line, Windows, Top
@chapter Frames
Frames contain windows. All windows exist within a frame.
Those used to ratpoison will notice that this differs from ratpoison's
window pool, where windows and frames are not so tightly connected.
!!! pull-window-by-number
!!! hsplit
!!! vsplit
!!! remove-split
!!! only
!!! curframe
!!! fnext
!!! sibling
!!! fother
!!! fselect
!!! resize
!!! balance-frames
!!! fclear
!!! move-focus
!!! move-window
!!! next-in-frame
!!! prev-in-frame
!!! other-in-frame
!!! echo-frame-windows
!!! exchange-direction
### *min-frame-width*
### *min-frame-height*
### *new-frame-action*
@menu
* Interactively Resizing Frames::
* Frame Dumping::
@end menu
@node Interactively Resizing Frames, Frame Dumping, Frames, Frames
@section Interactively Resizing Frames
There is a mode called @code{iresize} that lets you interactively
resize the current frame. To enter the mode use the @code{iresize}
command or type @key{C-t r}.
The following keybindings apply to the mode:
@table @kbd
@item C-p
@itemx Up
@itemx k
Shrink the frame vertically.
@item C-n
@itemx Down
@itemx j
Expand the frame vertically.
@item C-f
@itemx Right
@itemx l
Expand the frame horizontally.
@item C-b
@itemx Left
@itemx h
Shrink the frame horizontally.
@item C-g
@itemx ESC
Abort the interactive resize. NOTE: This currently doesn't work.
@item RET
Select the highlighted option.
@end table
!!! iresize
!!! abort-iresize
!!! exit-iresize
### *resize-increment*
@node Frame Dumping, , Interactively Resizing Frames, Frames
@section Frame Dumping
The configuration of frames and groups can be saved and restored using
the following commands.
!!! dump-desktop-to-file
!!! dump-group-to-file
!!! dump-screen-to-file
!!! restore-from-file
!!! place-existing-windows
@node Mode-line, Groups, Frames, Top
@chapter The Mode Line
The mode line is a bar that runs across either the top or bottom of
a head and is used to display information. By default the mode line
displays the list of windows, similar to the output @kbd{C-t w} produces.
Alternatively, external panel applications such as the GNOME panel and
KDE's kicker may be used. Simply starting one of these programs is enough
to set it as the mode line of the head it would like to be on (if the
panel is Xinerama aware) or whichever head is available. In order to
avoid problems displaying menus, configure your panel application for
positioning at the top or bottom of the head rather than relying on
@var{*mode-line-position*}
The mode line can be turned on and off with the @command{mode-line}
command or the lisp function @code{stumpwm:toggle-mode-line}. Each
head has its own mode line. For example:
@example
;; turn on/off the mode line for the current head only.
(stumpwm:toggle-mode-line (stumpwm:current-screen)
(stumpwm:current-head))
@end example
The mode line is updated after every StumpWM command.
To display the window list and the current date on the modeline, one
might do the following:
@example
(setf stumpwm:*screen-mode-line-format*
(list "%w | "
'(:eval (stumpwm:run-shell-command "date" t))))
@end example
@code{(stumpwm:run-shell-command "date" t)} runs the command
@command{date} and returns its output as a string.
!!! mode-line
@@@ toggle-mode-line
### *screen-mode-line-format*
The following variables control the color, position, and size of the
mode line.
### *mode-line-position*
### *mode-line-border-width* 1
### *mode-line-pad-x*
### *mode-line-pad-y*
### *mode-line-background-color*
### *mode-line-foreground-color*
### *mode-line-border-color*
### *mode-line-timeout*
@node Groups, Screens, Mode-line, Top
@chapter Groups
Groups in StumpWM are more commonly known as @dfn{virtual desktops} or
@dfn{workspaces}. Why not create a new term for it?
!!! gnew
!!! gnew-float
!!! gnewbg
!!! gnewbg-float
!!! gnext
!!! gprev
!!! gnext-with-window
!!! gprev-with-window
!!! gother
!!! gmerge
!!! groups
!!! vgroups
!!! gselect
!!! gmove
!!! gkill
!!! grename
!!! grouplist
@menu
* Customizing Groups::
@end menu
@node Customizing Groups, , Groups, Groups
@section Customizing Groups
### *group-formatters*
### *group-format*
@@@ current-group
@node Screens, Interacting With Unix, Groups, Top
@chapter Screens
StumpWM handles multiple screens.
!!! snext
!!! sprev
!!! sother
@menu
* Xinerama::
* Programming With Screens::
@end menu
@node Xinerama, Programming With Screens, Screens, Screens
@section Xinerama
StumpWM will attempt to detect Xinerama heads at startup (and at no other
time.) Heads are logically contained by screens. In a dual-monitor Xinerama
configuration, there will be one screen with two heads. Non-rectangular layouts
are supported (frames will not be created in the 'dead zone'.) And message
windows will be displayed on the current head--that is, the head to which the
currently focused frame belongs.
@node Programming With Screens, , Xinerama, Screens
@section Programming With Screens
@@@ current-screen
@@@ screen-current-window
@@@ current-window
### *screen-list*
@node Interacting With Unix, Interacting With X11, Screens, Top
@chapter Interacting With Unix
!!! run-shell-command
@@@ programs-in-path
@@@ pathname-is-executable-p
### *shell-program*
@@@ getenv
@@@ (setf getenv)
@node Interacting With X11, Miscellaneous Commands, Interacting With Unix, Top
@chapter Interacting With X11
@@@ set-x-selection
@@@ get-x-selection
@node Miscellaneous Commands, Colors, Interacting With X11, Top
@chapter Miscellaneous Commands
The following is a list of commands that don't really fit in any other
section.
!!! emacs
!!! banish
!!! ratwarp
!!! ratrelwarp
!!! ratclick
!!! echo-date
!!! eval-line
!!! window-send-string
!!! reload
!!! loadrc
!!! keyboard-quit
!!! quit
!!! restart-hard
!!! restart-soft
!!! getsel
!!! putsel
!!! command-mode
!!! copy-unhandled-error
!!! commands
!!! lastmsg
!!! list-window-properties
@@@ run-commands
%%% defcommand
%%% define-stumpwm-type
@@@ run-or-raise
@@@ run-or-pull
### *run-or-raise-all-groups*
### *run-or-raise-all-screens*
@@@ restarts-menu
%%% with-restarts-menu
### *startup-message*
### *suppress-abort-messages*
### *default-package*
%%% defprogram-shortcut
### *initializing*
@menu
* Menus::
* StumpWM's Data Directory::
* Debugging StumpWM::
* Timers::
* Getting Help::
@end menu
@node Menus, StumpWM's Data Directory, Miscellaneous Commands, Miscellaneous Commands
@section Menus
Some commands present the options in a menu. The following are the menu key bindings:
@table @kbd
@item C-p
@itemx Up
@itemx k
Highlight the previous menu option.
@item C-n
@itemx Down
@itemx j
Highlight the next menu option.
@item C-g
@itemx ESC
Abort the menu.
@item RET
Select the highlighted option.
@end table
@node StumpWM's Data Directory, Debugging StumpWM, Menus, Miscellaneous Commands
@section StumpWM's Data Directory
If you want to store StumpWM data between sessions, the recommended
method is to store them in @file{~/.stumpwm.d/}. StumpWM supplies
some functions to make doing this easier.
### *data-dir*
@@@ data-dir-file
%%% with-data-file
@node Debugging StumpWM, Timers, StumpWM's Data Directory, Miscellaneous Commands
@section Debugging StumpWM
### *debug-level*
### *debug-stream*
@@@ redirect-all-output
@node Timers, Getting Help, Debugging StumpWM, Miscellaneous Commands
@section Timers
StumpWM has a timer system similar to that of @dfn{Emacs}.
@@@ run-with-timer
@@@ cancel-timer
@defun timer-p @var{timer}
Return T if TIMER is a timer structure.
@end defun
@node Getting Help, , Timers, Miscellaneous Commands
@section Getting Help
!!! describe-key
!!! describe-variable
!!! describe-function
!!! where-is
!!! modifiers
@node Colors, Hooks, Miscellaneous Commands, Top
@chapter Colors
All text printed by stumpwm is run through a coloring engine before
being displayed. All color commands start with a @samp{^} (caret)
character and apply to all text after it.
@table @code
@item ^0-9
A caret followed by a single digit number changes the foreground color
to the specified color. A @samp{*} can be used to specify the normal
color. See the color listing below.
@item ^0-90-9
A caret followed by two digits sets the foreground and background
color. The first digit refers to the foreground color and the second
digit to the background color. A @samp{*} can be used in place of
either digit to specify the normal color. See the color listing below.
@item ^B
Turn on bright colors.
@item ^b
Turn off bright colors.
@item ^n
Use the normal background and foreground color.
@item ^R
Reverse the foreground and background colors.
@item ^r
Turn off reverse colors.
@item ^[
Push the current colors onto the color stack. The current colors remain unchanged.
@item ^]
Pop the colors off the color stack.
@item ^^
Print a regular caret.
@end table
The default colors are made to resemble the 16 VGA colors and are:
@table @asis
@item 0 black
@item 1 red
@item 2 green
@item 3 yellow
@item 4 blue
@item 5 magenta
@item 6 cyan
@item 7 white
@end table
There are only 8 colors by default but 10 available digits. The last
two digits are left up to the user. @ref{Behind The Scenes Look At
Colors} for information on customizing colors.
@menu
* Behind The Scenes Look At Colors::
@end menu
@node Behind The Scenes Look At Colors, , Colors, Colors
@section Behind The Scenes Look At Colors
Color indexes are stored in @var{*colors*} as a list. The default list
of colors leave 2 slots for the user to choose. If you'd like to use
@samp{Papaya Whip} and @samp{Dark Golden Rod 3} you might eval the
following:
@example
(setf *colors* (append *colors*
(list "PapayaWhip"
"DarkGoldenRod3")))
(update-color-map (current-screen))
@end example
Of course, you can change all the colors if you like.
@@@ parse-color-string
@@@ uncolorify
### *colors*
@@@ update-color-map
@node Hooks, Modules, Colors, Top
@chapter Hooks
StumpWM exports a number of hooks you can use to add customizations;
like hooks in Emacs, you add to a hook with the @code{add-hook}
function. for example:
@example
(stumpwm:add-hook 'stumpwm:*new-window-hook* 'my-new-window-custos)
@end example
adds your @code{my-new-window-custos} function to the list of
functions called when a new window appears.
%%% add-hook
%%% remove-hook
The following hooks are available:
$$$ *new-window-hook*
$$$ *destroy-window-hook*
$$$ *focus-window-hook*
$$$ *place-window-hook*
$$$ *start-hook*
$$$ *internal-loop-hook*
$$$ *focus-frame-hook*
$$$ *new-frame-hook*
$$$ *message-hook*
$$$ *top-level-error-hook*
$$$ *focus-group-hook*
$$$ *key-press-hook*
$$$ *root-click-hook*
$$$ *mode-line-click-hook*
$$$ *urgent-window-hook*
@node Modules, Hacking, Hooks, Top
@chapter Modules
StumpWM has a growing number of modules not loaded by default. All
modules exist in the @file{contrib/} directory of StumpWM's archive.
!!! load-module
@node Hacking, Command and Function Index, Modules, Top
@chapter Hacking
For those of you who have worked on Free Software projects before,
this part should probably be fairly intuitive.
@menu
* General Advice::
* Using git with StumpWM::
* Sending Patches::
@end menu
@node General Advice, Using git with StumpWM, Hacking, Hacking
@section Hacking: General Advice
@enumerate
@item
Pay attention to file names and contents. If you're making changes to
mode-line related code, don't put it in @file{core.lisp}. If you're
introducing some completely new featureset, consider putting all of
the new code in a new file.
@item
Does a command need to be user-visible (``interactive'') or is it just
called by other commands?
@itemize
@item
If it's not going to be user-visible, you can just use the familiar
@code{(defun foo () ...)} syntax.
@item
If you want the command to be used interactively, you use StumpWM's
@code{defcommand} syntax, as in the examples below.
@example
(defcommand test (foo bar)
((:string "How you're going to prompt for variable foo: ")
(:number "How you want to prompt for variable bar: "))
"This command is a test"
(body...))
(defcommand test2 () ()
"This is also a test"
(body...))
(defcommand title (args) (interactive-args)
"Doc string"
(body...))
@end example
So basically, inside the first set of parentheses after the
function name, you specify what (if any) arguments will be passed to
the command. The second set of parentheses tells StumpWM how to get
those arguments if they're not explicitly passed to the command. For
example,
@example
((:string "What do you want to do: "))
@end example
will read a string from the input the user provides. The quoted
text is the prompt the user will see. Of course, if you were to, say,
call the command test, as defined above, from another piece of code,
it wouldn't give the prompt as long as you fed it arguments.
@end itemize
@item
Note that all commands defined using the @code{defcommand} syntax are
available both to be called with @kbd{C-t ;} and from within other lisp
programs, as though they had been defun-ned (which, in fact, they
have).
@item
Any code that depends on external libraries or programs that some
users might not have installed should be placed in the @file{contrib/}
directory.
@item
Don't be afraid to submit your patches to the StumpWM mailing list!
It may not immediately make it into the official git repository, but
individual users might find it useful and apply it to their own setup,
or might be willing to offer suggestions on how to improve the code.
@item
Remember: StumpWM is designed to run on both clisp and on SBCL. If
you must use code specific to one or the other, at the very least warn
people that it only works with one lisp implementation. Better yet,
figure out how to do it in the other distribution and write a
statement like this:
@example
#+clisp
(your-clisp-code)
#+sbcl
(your-sbcl-code)
@end example
#to wrap the code for each lisp. Of course, the best option is to
find a way to use the same code for clisp and SBCL.
@end enumerate
@node Using git with StumpWM, Sending Patches, General Advice, Hacking
@section Hacking: Using git with StumpWM
For quite a while now, StumpWM has been using the git version control
system for development. If you're one using one of the official
releases or still using the now-obsolete CVS version, you can get the
bleeding-edge source code from the official git repository with
a single command:
@example
$ git clone git://git.savannah.nongnu.org/stumpwm.git
@end example
After this, you'll have a complete git repository, along with the
complete revision history since the switch. Feel free to play around;
git has some important features that actually make this safe!
Before we get to that stuff, though, you're going to want to tell git
about yourself so that your information is included in your commits
and patches. The very minimum you're going to want to do is:
@example
$ git config --global user.name "Anne N. O'Nymous"
$ git config --global user.email "anonymous@@foo.org"
@end example
Be sure to check out the manual for @command{git-config}--there are several
options you might want to set, such as enabling colorized output or
changing the editor and pager you use when making commits and viewing
logs.
For the sake of argument, let's say you want to make some major
changes to both @file{user.lisp} and @file{core.lisp}, add a file called
@file{DANGEROUS_EXPERIMENT_DO_NOT_USE_OR_@-ELSE.lisp}, and remove the manual
because you're too 1337 for such things. However, you don't want to
break your entire StumpWM setup and start over. Thankfully, you don't
have to. Before you get started, issue this command from the stumpwm
directory:
@example
$ git checkout -b experimental
@end example
You should now find yourself in a new branch, called experimental. To
confirm this, type @command{git branch}; there should be
an asterisk next to the branch you're currently viewing. At any time,
you can type @command{git checkout master} to return to your master branch,
and at any time you can have as many branches of the project as you
like. If you want to create a new branch based not on the master
branch but on your experimental branch, for example, you'd type:
@example
$ git checkout -b new-experiment experimental
@end example
This will place you in a newly-created branch called ``new-experiment''
which should be identical to your experimental branch as of the last
commit (more on that soon). If you're actually typing out the
directions, switch back to your old experimental branch like so:
@example
$ git checkout experimental
@end example
Anyway, now that you have a new branch, create that new file with the
long name, which I'll just call @file{danger.lisp} for brevity. Make whatever
changes you want to it, and when you're done, tell git about your new
file.
@example
$ git add dangerous.lisp
@end example
Now, let's pretend you're done making changes. Tell git you're done
for now:
@example
$ git commit -a
@end example
This will open up a prompt in your editor of choice for you to
describe your changes. Try to keep the first line short, and then add
more explanation underneath (for an example, run the command @command{git log}
and take a look at some of the longer commit explanations). Save that
file and then do this:
@example
$ git checkout master
$ ls
@end example
Then look for your new file. It's not there! That's because you've
done all of your work in another branch, which git is currently hiding
from you so that you can ``check out'' the branch called ``master.'' All
is as it should be--your master repository is still safe.
@example
$ git checkout experimental
@end example
Now, delete @file{manual.lisp} and @file{stumpwm.texi}. That's right. Wipe them off
the face of the Earth, or at least off the hard drive of your
computer. When you're done, you don't have to tell git you've deleted
them; it'll figure it out on its own (though things may not compile
properly unless you edit @file{Makefile.in} and @file{stumpwm.asd}. Anyway, go ahead
and edit @file{core.lisp} and @file{user.lisp}. Really break 'em. Run free! When
you're done, do another commit, as above, and give it a stupid title
like ``lolz i b0rked stUmpwm guys wTF!?!?!!111!'' Now try to compile.
Just try. It won't work. If it does, you're some kind of savant or
something. Keep up the good work. If you've actually managed to break
StumpWM like you were supposed to, never fear! You have two options at
this point.
One is to go back to the master branch (with another git checkout) and
just delete your experimental branch, like so:
@example
$ git branch -D
@end example
The ``@code{-D}'' means to force a delete, even if the changes you've made
aren't available elsewhere. A ``@code{-d}'' means to delete the branch if and
only if you've merged the changes in elsewhere.
The other option is to create patches for each of your commits so far,
delete the branch, and then apply any working/wanted patches in a new
branch. Create your patches (after committing) like so:
@example
$ git format-patch -o patches origin
@end example
(Before doing that you can review your changes with @command{git log origin..})
You can also use the @command{format-patch} command to create a patch of working
code to send in to the mailing list.
A developer might ask you to try out something they're working on. To
fetch their master branch, you'd do this:
@example
$ git remote add -f -m master -t master foo git://bar.org/~foo/stumpwm
@end example
Here, ``foo'' is the shorthand name you'll use to refer to that
repository in the future. To checkout a local copy of that repository,
you'd then do
@example
$ git checkout --track -b foo-master foo/master
@end example
Later you could use @command{git pull foo} to update while looking at that
branch (and note that @command{git pull} with no arguments, in the master
branch, will update your StumpWM from the official repository).
Finally, if you want to move your experimental changes into your
master branch, you'd checkout your master branch and run:
@example
$ git merge experimental
@end example
If there are file conflicts, @command{git diff} will show you where they are;
you have to fix them by hand. When you're done, do another
@example
$ git commit -a
@end example
to finalize the changes to your master branch. You can then delete
your experimental branch. Alternately, you can wait until your changes
(assuming you sent them in) make it into the official repository
before deleting your experimental branch.
@node Sending Patches, , Using git with StumpWM, Hacking
@section Sending Patches
When sending patches to the mailing list for inclusion in StumpWM,
there are a few guidelines that will make everything go smoother.
@itemize
@item
Make sure it applies clean to the main git repository
@item
Ensure that you aren't introducing tabs, extra blank lines, or whitespace at the end of lines.
@item
Ensure your patch doesn't contain irrelevant indenting or reformatting changes.
@item
Try to make your patch address a single issue. If your patch changes
two unrelated issues, break them into two seperate patches that can
stand on their own.
@item
Don't send intermediate patches. When you're working on a feature you
might make several commits to your local repository as you refine it
and work out the bugs. When it's polished and ready to ship, send it
as one patch! Sometimes it makes sense to send it as multiple patches
if each patch contains a discrete feature or bug fix that can stand on
its own. If one of your patches changes code that was added or
modified in an earlier patch, consider merging them together and
sending them as one.
@end itemize
@node Command and Function Index, Variable Index, Hacking, Top
@unnumbered Command and Function Index
@printindex fn
@node Variable Index, , Command and Function Index, Top
@unnumbered Variable Index
@printindex vr
@bye
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