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socrata-py

Python SDK for the Socrata Data Management API. Use this library to call into publishing and ETL functionality offered when writing to Socrata datasets.

with open('cool_dataset.csv', 'rb') as file:
    (revision, output) = Socrata(auth).create(
        name = "cool dataset",
        description = "a description"
    ).csv(file)

    revision.apply(output_schema = output)

Installation

This only supports python3.

Installation is available through pip. Using a virtualenv is advised. Install the package by running

pip3 install socrata-py

The only hard dependency is requests which will be installed via pip. Pandas is not required, but creating a dataset from a Pandas dataframe is supported. See below.

Example

Try the command line example with

python -m examples.create 'Police Reports' ~/Desktop/catalog.data.gov/Seattle_Real_Time_Fire_911_Calls.csv 'pete-test.test-socrata.com' --username $SOCRATA_USERNAME --password $SOCRATA_PASSWORD

Using

Boilerplate

# Import some stuff
from socrata.authorization import Authorization
from socrata import Socrata
import os

# Boilerplate...
# Make an auth object
auth = Authorization(
  "pete-test.test-socrata.com",
  os.environ['SOCRATA_USERNAME'],
  os.environ['SOCRATA_PASSWORD']
)

Simple usage

Create a new Dataset from a csv, tsv, xls or xlsx file

To create a dataset, you can do this:

with open('cool_dataset.csv', 'rb') as file:
    # Upload + Transform step

    # revision is the *change* to the view in the catalog, which has not yet been applied.
    # output is the OutputSchema, which is a change to data which can be applied via the revision
    (revision, output) = Socrata(auth).create(
        name = "cool dataset",
        description = "a description"
    ).csv(file)

    # Transformation step
    # We want to add some metadata to our column, drop another column, and add a new column which will
    # be filled with values from another column and then transformed
    output = output\
        .change_column_metadata('a_column', 'display_name').to('A Column!')\
        .change_column_metadata('a_column', 'description').to('Here is a description of my A Column')\
        .drop_column('b_column')\
        .add_column('a_column_squared', 'A Column, but times itself', 'to_number(`a_column`) * to_number(`a_column`)', 'this is a column squared')\
        .run()


    # Validation of the results step
    output = output.wait_for_finish()
    # The data has been validated now, and we can access errors that happened during validation. For example, if one of the cells in `a_column` couldn't be converted to a number in the call to `to_number`, that error would be reflected in this error_count
    assert output.attributes['error_count'] == 0

    # If you want, you can get a csv stream of all the errors
    errors = output.schema_errors_csv()
    for line in errors.iter_lines():
        print(line)

    # Update step

    # Apply the revision - this will make it public and available to make
    # visualizations from
    job = revision.apply(output_schema = output)

    # This opens a browser window to your revision, and you will see the progress
    # of the job
    revision.open_in_browser()

    # Application is async - this will block until all the data
    # is in place and readable
    job.wait_for_finish()

Similar to the csv method are the xls, xlsx, and tsv methods, which upload those files.

There is a blob method as well, which uploads blobby data to the source. This means the data will not be parsed, and will be displayed under "Files and Documents" in the catalog once the revision is applied.

Create a new Dataset from Pandas

Datasets can also be created from Pandas DataFrames

import pandas as pd
df = pd.read_csv('socrata-py/test/fixtures/simple.csv')
# Do various Pandas-y changes and modifications, then...
(revision, output) = Socrata(auth).create(
    name = "Pandas Dataset",
    description = "Dataset made from a Pandas Dataframe"
).df(df)

# Same code as above to apply the revision.

Updating a dataset

A Socrata update is actually an upsert. Rows are updated or created based on the row identifier. If the row-identifer doesn't exist, all updates are just appends to the dataset.

A replace truncates the whole dataset and then inserts the new data.

Generating a config and using it to update

# This is how we create our view initially
with open('cool_dataset.csv', 'rb') as file:
    (revision, output) = Socrata(auth).create(
        name = "cool dataset",
        description = "a description"
    ).csv(file)

    revision.apply(output_schema = output)

# This will build a configuration using the same settings (file parsing and
# data transformation rules) that we used to get our output. The action
# that we will take will be "update", though it could also be "replace"
config = output.build_config("cool-dataset-config", "update")

# Now we need to save our configuration name and view id somewhere so we
# can update the view using our config
configuration_name = "cool-dataset-config"
view_id = revision.view_id()

# Now later, if we want to use that config to update our view, we just need the view and the configuration_name
socrata = Socrata(auth)
view = socrata.views.lookup(view_id) # View will be the view we are updating with the new data

with open('updated-cool-dataset.csv', 'rb') as my_file:
    (revision, job) = socrata.using_config(
        configuration_name,
        view
    ).csv(my_file)
    print(job) # Our update job is now running

Advanced usage

Create a revision

# This is our socrata object, using the auth variable from above
socrata = Socrata(auth)

# This will make our initial revision, on a view that doesn't yet exist
revision = socrata.new({'name': 'cool dataset'})

# revision is a Revision object, we can print it
print(revision)
Revision({'created_by': {'display_name': 'rozap',
                'email': 'chris.duranti@socrata.com',
                'user_id': 'tugg-ikce'},
 'fourfour': 'ij46-xpxe',
 'id': 346,
 'inserted_at': '2017-02-27T23:05:08.522796',
 'metadata': None,
 'update_seq': 285,
 'upsert_jobs': []})

# We can also access the attributes of the revision
print(revision.attributes['metadata']['name'])
'cool dataset'

Create an upload

# Using that revision, we can create an upload
upload = revision.create_upload('foo.csv')

# And print it
print(upload)
Source({'content_type': None,
 'created_by': {'display_name': 'rozap',
                'email': 'chris.duranti@socrata.com',
                'user_id': 'tugg-ikce'},
 'source_type': {
    'filename': 'foo.csv',
    'type': 'upload'
 },
 'finished_at': None,
 'id': 290,
 'inserted_at': '2017-02-27T23:07:18.309676',
 'schemas': []})

Upload a file

# And using that upload we just created, we can put bytes into it
with open('test/fixtures/simple.csv', 'rb') as f:
    source = upload.csv(f)

Transforming your data

Transforming data consists of going from input data (data exactly as it appeared in the source) to output data (data as you want it to appear).

Transformation from input data to output data often has problems. You might, for example, have a column full of numbers, but one row in that column is actually the value hehe! which cannot be transformed into a number. Rather than failing at each datum which is dirty or wrong, transforming your data allows you to reconcile these issues.

We might have a dataset called temps.csv that looks like

date, celsius
8-24-2017, 22
8-25-2017, 20
8-26-2017, 23
8-27-2017, hehe!
8-28-2017,
8-29-2017, 21

Suppose we uploaded it in our previous step, like this:

with open('temps.csv', 'rb') as f:
    source = upload.csv(f)
    input_schema = source.get_latest_input_schema()

Our input_schema is the input data exactly as it appeared in the CSV, with all values of type string.

Our output_schema is the output data as it was guessed by Socrata. Guessing may not always be correct, which is why we have import configs to "lock in" a schema for automation. We can get the output_schema like so:

output_schema = input_schema.get_latest_output_schema()

We can now make changes to the schema, like so

new_output_schema = output
    # Change the field_name of date to the_date
    .change_column_metadata('date', 'field_name').to('the_date')\
    # Change the description of the celsius column
    .change_column_metadata('celsius', 'description').to('the temperature in celsius')\
    # Change the display name of the celsius column
    .change_column_metadata('celsius', 'display_name').to('Degrees (Celsius)')\
    # Change the transform of the_date column to to_fixed_timestamp(`date`)
    .change_column_transform('the_date').to('to_fixed_timestamp(`date`)')\
    # Make the celsius column all numbers
    .change_column_transform('celsius').to('to_number(`celsius`)')\
    # Add a new column, which is computed from the `celsius` column
    .add_column('fahrenheit', 'Degrees (Fahrenheit)', '(to_number(`celsius`) * (9 / 5)) + 32', 'the temperature in celsius')\
    .run()

change_column_metadata(column_name, column_attribute) takes the field name used to identify the column and the column attribute to change (field_name, display_name, description, position)

add_column(field_name, display_name, transform_expression, description) will create a new column

We can also call drop_column(celsius) which will drop the column.

.run() will then make a request and return the new output_schema, or an error if something is invalid.

Transforms can be complex SoQL expressions. Available functions are listed here. You can do lots of stuff with them;

For example, you could change all null values into errors (which won't be imported) by doing something like

new_output_schema = output
    .change_column_transform('celsius').to('coalesce(to_number(`celsius`), error("Celsius was null!"))')
    .run()

Or you could add a new column that says if the day was hot or not

new_output_schema = output
    .add_column('is_hot', 'Was the day hot?', 'to_number(`celsius`) >= 23')
    .run()

Or you could geocode a column, given the following CSV

address,city,zip,state
10028 Ravenna Ave NE, Seattle, 98128, WA
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington DC, 20500, DC
6511 32nd Ave NW, Seattle, 98155, WA

We could transform our first output_schema into a single column dataset, where that single column is a Point of the address

output = output\
    .add_column('location', 'Incident Location', 'geocode(`address`, `city`, `state`, `zip`)')\
    .drop_column('address')\
    .drop_column('city')\
    .drop_column('state')\
    .drop_column('zip')\
    .run()

Composing these SoQL functions into expressions will allow you to validate, shape, clean and extend your data to make it more useful to the consumer.

Wait for the transformation to finish

Transformations are async, so if you want to wait for it to finish, you can do so

Errors in a transformation

Transformations may have had errors, like in the previous example, we can't convert hehe! to a number. We can see the count of them like this:

print(output_schema.attributes['error_count'])

We can view the detailed errors like this:

errors = output_schema.schema_errors()

We can get a CSV of the errors like this:

csv_stream = output_schema.schema_errors_csv()

Validating rows

We can look at the rows of our schema as well

rows = output_schema.rows(offset = 0, limit = 20)

self.assertEqual(rows, [
    {'b': {'ok': ' bfoo'}},
    {'b': {'ok': ' bfoo'}},
    {'b': {'ok': ' bfoo'}},
    {'b': {'ok': ' bfoo'}}
])

Do the upsert!

# Now we have transformed our data into the shape we want, let's do an upsert
job = revision.apply(output_schema = output_schema)

# This will complete the upsert behind the scenes. If we want to
# re-fetch the current state of the upsert job, we can do so
job = job.show()

# To get the progress
print(job.attributes['log'])
[
    {'details': {'Errors': 0, 'Rows Created': 0, 'Rows Updated': 0, 'By RowIdentifier': 0, 'By SID': 0, 'Rows Deleted': 0}, 'time': '2017-02-28T20:20:59', 'stage': 'upsert_complete'},
    {'details': {'created': 1}, 'time': '2017-02-28T20:20:59', 'stage': 'columns_created'},
    {'details': {'created': 1}, 'time': '2017-02-28T20:20:59', 'stage': 'columns_created'},
    {'details': None, 'time': '2017-02-28T20:20:59', 'stage': 'started'}
]


# So maybe we just want to wait here, printing the progress, until the job is done
job.wait_for_finish(progress = lambda job: print(job.attributes['log']))

# So now if we go look at our original four-four, our data will be there

Metadata only revisions

When there is an existing Socrata view that you'd like to update the metadata of, you can do so by creating a Source which is the Socrata view.

view = socrata.views.lookup('abba-cafe')

revision = view.revisions.create_replace_revision()
source = revision.source_from_dataset()
output_schema = source.get_latest_input_schema().get_latest_output_schema()
new_output_schema = output_schema\
    .change_column_metadata('a', 'description').to('meh')\
    .change_column_metadata('b', 'display_name').to('bbbb')\
    .change_column_metadata('c', 'field_name').to('ccc')\
    .run()


revision.apply(output_schema = new_output_schema)

Development

Testing

Install test deps by running pip install -r requirements.txt. This will install pdoc and pandas which are required to run the tests.

Configuration is set in test/auth.py for tests. It reads the domain, username, and password from environment variables. If you want to run the tests, set those environment variables to something that will work.

If I wanted to run the tests against my local instance, I would run:

SOCRATA_DOMAIN=localhost SOCRATA_USERNAME=$SOCRATA_LOCAL_USER SOCRATA_PASSWORD=$SOCRATA_LOCAL_PASS bin/test

Generating docs

make the docs by running

make docs

Releasing

You will need to have twine installed (pip3 install twine), and a .pypirc file in your home directory. For help, read this

An example of a pypirc file looks like:

[distutils]
index-servers =
  local
  pypi

[local]
repository=https://repo.socrata.com/artifactory/api/pypi/pypi
username=shared-engr
password=<REDACTED>

[pypi]
repository=https://upload.pypi.org/legacy/
username=socrata
password=<REDACTED>

Make sure the version in setup.py is new and makes sense for the change you're releasing. Then run:

python3 setup.py sdist
twine upload dist/<your distribution file>

Library Docs

Socrata

ArgSpec
    Args: auth

Top level publishing object.

All functions making HTTP calls return a result tuple, where the first element in the tuple is whether or not the call succeeded, and the second element is the returned object if it was a success, or a dictionary containing the error response if the call failed. 2xx responses are considered successes. 4xx and 5xx responses are considered failures. In the event of a socket hangup, an exception is raised.

create

Shortcut to create a dataset. Returns a Create object, which contains functions which will create a view, upload your file, and validate data quality in one step.

To actually place the validated data into a view, you can call .apply() on the revision

(revision, output_schema) Socrata(auth).create(
    name = "cool dataset",
    description = "a description"
).csv(file)

job = revision.apply(output_schema = output_schema)

Args:

   **kwargs: Arbitrary revision metadata values

Returns:

    result (Revision, OutputSchema): Returns the revision that was created and the
        OutputSchema created from your uploaded file

Examples:

Socrata(auth).create(
    name = "cool dataset",
    description = "a description"
).csv(open('my-file.csv'))

new

ArgSpec
    Args: metadata, deleted_at

Create an empty revision, on a view that doesn't exist yet. The view will be created for you, and the initial revision will be returned.

Args:

    metadata (dict): Metadata to apply to the revision

Returns:

    Revision

Examples:

    rev = Socrata(auth).new({
        'name': 'hi',
        'description': 'foo!',
        'metadata': {
            'view': 'metadata',
            'anything': 'is allowed here'

        }
    })

using_config

ArgSpec
    Args: config_name, view

Update a dataset, using the configuration that you previously created, and saved the name of. Takes the config_name parameter which uniquely identifies the config, and the View object, which can be obtained from socrata.views.lookup('view-id42')

Args:

    config_name (str): The config name
    view (View): The view to update

Returns:

    result (ConfiguredJob): Returns the ConfiguredJob

Note: Typical usage would be in a context manager block (as demonstrated in the example below). In this case, the ConfiguredJob is created and immediately launched by way of the call to the ConfiguredJob.csv method.

Examples:

    with open('my-file.csv', 'rb') as my_file:
        (rev, job) = p.using_config(name, view).csv(my_file)

Authorization

ArgSpec
    Args: domain, username, password, request_id_prefix
    Defaults: domain=

Manages basic authorization for accessing the socrata API. This is passed into the Socrata object once, which is the entry point for all operations.

auth = Authorization(
    "data.seattle.gov",
    os.environ['SOCRATA_USERNAME'],
    os.environ['SOCRATA_PASSWORD']
)
publishing = Socrata(auth)

live_dangerously

Disable SSL checking. Note that this should only be used while developing against a local Socrata instance.

Revisions

ArgSpec
    Args: fourfour, auth

create_delete_revision

ArgSpec
    Args: metadata, permission
    Defaults: metadata={}, permission=public

Create a revision on the view, which when applied, will delete rows of data.

This is an upsert; a row id must be set.

Args:

    metadata (dict): The metadata to change; these changes will be applied when the revision is applied
    permission (string): 'public' or 'private'

Returns:

    Revision The new revision, or an error

Examples:

    view.revisions.create_delete_revision(metadata = {
        'name': 'new dataset name',
        'description': 'description'
    })

create_replace_revision

ArgSpec
    Args: metadata, permission
    Defaults: metadata={}, permission=public

Create a revision on the view, which when applied, will replace the data.

Args:

    metadata (dict): The metadata to change; these changes will be applied when the revision
        is applied
    permission (string): 'public' or 'private'

Returns:

    Revision The new revision, or an error

Examples:

    >>> view.revisions.create_replace_revision(metadata = {'name': 'new dataset name', 'description': 'updated description'})

create_update_revision

ArgSpec
    Args: metadata, permission
    Defaults: metadata={}, permission=public

Create a revision on the view, which when applied, will update the data rather than replacing it.

This is an upsert; if there is a rowId defined and you have duplicate ID values, those rows will be updated. Otherwise they will be appended.

Args:

    metadata (dict): The metadata to change; these changes will be applied when the revision is applied
    permission (string): 'public' or 'private'

Returns:

    Revision The new revision, or an error

Examples:

    view.revisions.create_update_revision(metadata = {
        'name': 'new dataset name',
        'description': 'updated description'
    })

create_using_config

ArgSpec
    Args: config

Create a revision for the given dataset.

list

List all the revisions on the view

Returns:

    list[Revision]

lookup

ArgSpec
    Args: revision_seq

Lookup a revision within the view based on the sequence number

Args:

    revision_seq (int): The sequence number of the revision to lookup

Returns:

    Revision The Revision resulting from this API call, or an error

Revision

ArgSpec
    Args: auth, response, parent

A revision is a change to a dataset

apply

ArgSpec
    Args: output_schema

Apply the Revision to the view that it was opened on

Args:

    output_schema (OutputSchema): Optional output schema. If your revision includes
        data changes, this should be included. If it is a metadata only revision,
        then you will not have an output schema, and you do not need to pass anything
        here

Returns:

    Job

Examples:

job = revision.apply(output_schema = my_output_schema)

create_upload

ArgSpec
    Args: filename, parse_options
    Defaults: filename={}

Create an upload within this revision

Args:

    filename (str): The name of the file to upload

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source The Source created by this API call, or an error

discard

Discard this open revision.

Returns:

    Revision The closed Revision or an error

list_operations

Get a list of the operations that you can perform on this object. These map directly onto what's returned from the API in the links section of each resource

open_in_browser

Open this revision in your browser, this will open a window

plan

Return the list of operations this revision will make when it is applied

Returns:

    dict

set_notes

ArgSpec
    Args: notes

Set any notes on the revision. The notes is displayed in the dataset changelog if the dataset is enrolled in archiving. If it is not enrolled in archiving, this has no effect.

Args:

    notes (string): The change notes

Returns:

    Revision The updated Revision as a result of this API call, or an error

Examples:

    revision = revision.set_notes("Just updating my dataset")

set_output_schema

ArgSpec
    Args: output_schema_id

Set the output schema id on the revision. This is what will get applied when the revision is applied if no ouput schema is explicitly supplied

Args:

    output_schema_id (int): The output schema id

Returns:

    Revision The updated Revision as a result of this API call, or an error

Examples:

    revision = revision.set_output_schema(42)

source_as_blob

ArgSpec
    Args: filename, parse_options
    Defaults: filename={}

Create a source from a file that should remain unparsed

source_from_agent

ArgSpec
    Args: agent_uid, namespace, path, parse_options, parameters
    Defaults: agent_uid={}, namespace={}

Create a source from a connection agent in this revision

source_from_dataset

ArgSpec
    Args: parse_options
    Defaults: parse_options={}

Create a dataset source within this revision

source_from_url

ArgSpec
    Args: url, parse_options
    Defaults: url={}

Create a URL source

Args:

    url (str): The URL to create the dataset from

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source The Source created by this API call, or an error

ui_url

This is the URL to the landing page in the UI for this revision

Returns:

    url (str): URL you can paste into a browser to view the revision UI

update

ArgSpec
    Args: body

Set the metadata to be applied to the view when this revision is applied

Args:

    body (dict): The changes to make to this revision

Returns:

    Revision The updated Revision as a result of this API call, or an error

Examples:

    revision = revision.update({
        'metadata': {
            'name': 'new name',
            'description': 'new description'
        }
    })

Sources

ArgSpec
    Args: auth

create_upload

ArgSpec
    Args: filename

Create a new source. Takes a body param, which must contain a filename of the file.

Args:

    filename (str): The name of the file you are uploading

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source

Examples:

    upload = revision.create_upload('foo.csv')

lookup

ArgSpec
    Args: source_id

Lookup a source

Args:

    source_id (int): The id

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source The Source resulting from this API call, or an error

Source

ArgSpec
    Args: auth, response, parent

add_to_revision

ArgSpec
    Args: revision

Associate this Source with the given revision.

blob

ArgSpec
    Args: file_handle

Uploads a Blob dataset. A blob is a file that will not be parsed as a data file, ie: an image, video, etc.

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source

Examples:

    with open('my-blob.jpg', 'rb') as f:
        upload = upload.blob(f)

change_parse_option

ArgSpec
    Args: name

Change a parse option on the source.

If there are not yet bytes uploaded, these parse options will be used in order to parse the file.

If there are already bytes uploaded, this will trigger a re-parsing of the file, and consequently a new InputSchema will be created. You can call source.latest_input() to get the newest one.

Parse options are: header_count (int): the number of rows considered a header column_header (int): the one based index of row to use to generate the header encoding (string): defaults to guessing the encoding, but it can be explicitly set column_separator (string): For CSVs, this defaults to ",", and for TSVs " ", but you can use a custom separator quote_char (string): Character used to quote values that should be escaped. Defaults to """

Args:

    name (string): One of the options above, ie: "column_separator" or "header_count"

Returns:

    change (ParseOptionChange): implements a `.to(value)` function which you call to set the value

For our example, assume we have this dataset

This is my cool dataset
A, B, C
1, 2, 3
4, 5, 6

We want to say that the first 2 rows are headers, and the second of those 2 rows should be used to make the column header. We would do that like so:

Examples:

    source = source            .change_parse_option('header_count').to(2)            .change_parse_option('column_header').to(2)            .run()

csv

ArgSpec
    Args: file_handle

Upload a CSV, returns the new input schema.

Args:

    file_handle: The file handle, as returned by the python function `open()`

    max_retries (integer): Optional retry limit per chunk in the upload. Defaults to 5.
    backoff_seconds (integer): Optional amount of time to backoff upon a chunk upload failure. Defaults to 2.

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source

Examples:

    with open('my-file.csv', 'rb') as f:
        upload = upload.csv(f)

df

ArgSpec
    Args: dataframe

Upload a pandas DataFrame, returns the new source.

Args:

    file_handle: The file handle, as returned by the python function `open()`

    max_retries (integer): Optional retry limit per chunk in the upload. Defaults to 5.
    backoff_seconds (integer): Optional amount of time to backoff upon a chunk upload failure. Defaults to 2.

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source

Examples:

    import pandas
    df = pandas.read_csv('test/fixtures/simple.csv')
    upload = upload.df(df)

geojson

ArgSpec
    Args: file_handle

Upload a geojson file, returns the new input schema.

Args:

    file_handle: The file handle, as returned by the python function `open()`

    max_retries (integer): Optional retry limit per chunk in the upload. Defaults to 5.
    backoff_seconds (integer): Optional amount of time to backoff upon a chunk upload failure. Defaults to 2.

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source

Examples:

    with open('my-geojson-file.geojson', 'rb') as f:
        upload = upload.geojson(f)

kml

ArgSpec
    Args: file_handle

Upload a KML file, returns the new input schema.

Args:

    file_handle: The file handle, as returned by the python function `open()`

    max_retries (integer): Optional retry limit per chunk in the upload. Defaults to 5.
    backoff_seconds (integer): Optional amount of time to backoff upon a chunk upload failure. Defaults to 2.

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source

Examples:

    with open('my-kml-file.kml', 'rb') as f:
        upload = upload.kml(f)

list_operations

Get a list of the operations that you can perform on this object. These map directly onto what's returned from the API in the links section of each resource

load

Forces the source to load, if it's a view source.

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source

open_in_browser

Open this source in your browser, this will open a window

shapefile

ArgSpec
    Args: file_handle

Upload a Shapefile, returns the new input schema.

Args:

    file_handle: The file handle, as returned by the python function `open()`

    max_retries (integer): Optional retry limit per chunk in the upload. Defaults to 5.
    backoff_seconds (integer): Optional amount of time to backoff upon a chunk upload failure. Defaults to 2.

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source

Examples:

    with open('my-shapefile-archive.zip', 'rb') as f:
        upload = upload.shapefile(f)

tsv

ArgSpec
    Args: file_handle

Upload a TSV, returns the new input schema.

Args:

    file_handle: The file handle, as returned by the python function `open()`

    max_retries (integer): Optional retry limit per chunk in the upload. Defaults to 5.
    backoff_seconds (integer): Optional amount of time to backoff upon a chunk upload failure. Defaults to 2.

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source

Examples:

    with open('my-file.tsv', 'rb') as f:
        upload = upload.tsv(f)

ui_url

This is the URL to the landing page in the UI for the sources

Returns:

    url (str): URL you can paste into a browser to view the source UI

wait_for_finish

ArgSpec
    Args: progress, timeout, sleeptime
    Defaults: progress=<function noop at 0x7fa34fb57040>, timeout=43200, sleeptime=1

Wait for this data source to finish transforming and validating. Accepts a progress function and a timeout.

Default timeout is 12 hours

wait_for_schema

ArgSpec
    Args: progress, timeout, sleeptime
    Defaults: progress=<function noop at 0x7fa34fb57040>, timeout=43200, sleeptime=1

Wait for this data source to have at least one schema present. Accepts a progress function and a timeout.

Default timeout is 12 hours

xls

ArgSpec
    Args: file_handle

Upload an XLS, returns the new input schema

Args:

    file_handle: The file handle, as returned by the python function `open()`

    max_retries (integer): Optional retry limit per chunk in the upload. Defaults to 5.
    backoff_seconds (integer): Optional amount of time to backoff upon a chunk upload failure. Defaults to 2.

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source

Examples:

    with open('my-file.xls', 'rb') as f:
        upload = upload.xls(f)

xlsx

ArgSpec
    Args: file_handle

Upload an XLSX, returns the new input schema.

Args:

    file_handle: The file handle, as returned by the python function `open()`

    max_retries (integer): Optional retry limit per chunk in the upload. Defaults to 5.
    backoff_seconds (integer): Optional amount of time to backoff upon a chunk upload failure. Defaults to 2.

Returns:

    Source: Returns the new Source

Examples:

    with open('my-file.xlsx', 'rb') as f:
        upload = upload.xlsx(f)

Configs

ArgSpec
    Args: auth

create

ArgSpec
    Args: name, data_action, parse_options, columns

Create a new ImportConfig. See http://docs.socratapublishing.apiary.io/ ImportConfig section for what is supported in data_action, parse_options, and columns.

list

List all the ImportConfigs on this domain

lookup

ArgSpec
    Args: name

Obtain a single ImportConfig by name

Config

ArgSpec
    Args: auth, response, parent

change_parse_option

ArgSpec
    Args: name

Change a parse option on the source.

If there are not yet bytes uploaded, these parse options will be used in order to parse the file.

If there are already bytes uploaded, this will trigger a re-parsing of the file, and consequently a new InputSchema will be created. You can call source.latest_input() to get the newest one.

Parse options are: header_count (int): the number of rows considered a header column_header (int): the one based index of row to use to generate the header encoding (string): defaults to guessing the encoding, but it can be explicitly set column_separator (string): For CSVs, this defaults to ",", and for TSVs " ", but you can use a custom separator quote_char (string): Character used to quote values that should be escaped. Defaults to """

Args:

    name (string): One of the options above, ie: "column_separator" or "header_count"

Returns:

    change (ParseOptionChange): implements a `.to(value)` function which you call to set the value

For our example, assume we have this dataset

This is my cool dataset
A, B, C
1, 2, 3
4, 5, 6

We want to say that the first 2 rows are headers, and the second of those 2 rows should be used to make the column header. We would do that like so:

Examples:

    source = source            .change_parse_option('header_count').to(2)            .change_parse_option('column_header').to(2)            .run()

create_revision

ArgSpec
    Args: fourfour

Create a new Revision in the context of this ImportConfig. Sources that happen in this Revision will take on the values in this Config.

delete

Delete this ImportConfig. Note that this cannot be undone.

list_operations

Get a list of the operations that you can perform on this object. These map directly onto what's returned from the API in the links section of each resource

update

ArgSpec
    Args: body

Mutate this ImportConfig in place. Subsequent revisions opened against this ImportConfig will take on its new value.

InputSchema

ArgSpec
    Args: auth, response, parent

This represents a schema exactly as it appeared in the source

get_latest_output_schema

Note that this does not make an API request

Returns: output_schema (OutputSchema): Returns the latest output schema

latest_output

Get the latest (most recently created) OutputSchema which descends from this InputSchema

Returns: OutputSchema

list_operations

Get a list of the operations that you can perform on this object. These map directly onto what's returned from the API in the links section of each resource

transform

ArgSpec
    Args: body

Transform this InputSchema into an Output. Returns the new OutputSchema. Note that this call is async - the data may still be transforming even though the OutputSchema is returned. See OutputSchema.wait_for_finish to block until the

wait_for_schema

ArgSpec
    Args: progress, timeout, sleeptime
    Defaults: progress=<function noop at 0x7fa34fb57040>, timeout=43200, sleeptime=1

Wait for this data source to have at least one schema present. Accepts a progress function and a timeout.

Default timeout is 12 hours

OutputSchema

This is data as transformed from an InputSchema

add_column

ArgSpec
    Args: field_name, display_name, transform_expr, description

Add a column

Args:

    field_name (str): The column's field_name, must be unique
    display_name (str): The columns display name
    transform_expr (str): SoQL expression to evaluate and fill the column with data from
    description (str): Optional column description

Returns:

    output_schema (OutputSchema): Returns self for easy chaining

Examples:

new_output_schema = output
    # Add a new column, which is computed from the `celsius` column
    .add_column('fahrenheit', 'Degrees (Fahrenheit)', '(to_number(`celsius`) * (9 / 5)) + 32', 'the temperature in celsius')
    # Add a new column, which is computed from the `celsius` column
    .add_column('kelvin', 'Degrees (Kelvin)', '(to_number(`celsius`) + 273.15')
    .run()

any_failed

This is probably not the function you are looking for.

This returns whether or not any transform in this output schema has failed. "Failed" in this case means an internal error (which is unexpected), not a data error (which is expected). This function will wait for processing to complete if it hasn't yet.

For data errors:

Tell whether or not there are data errors
    output_schema.any_errors()
Get the count of data errors
    output_schema.attributes['error_count']
Get the errors themselves
    output_schema.schema_errors(offset = 0, limit = 20)

build_config

ArgSpec
    Args: name, data_action

Create a new ImportConfig from this OutputSchema. See the API docs for what an ImportConfig is and why they're useful

change_column_metadata

ArgSpec
    Args: field_name, attribute

Change the column metadata. This returns a ColumnChange, which implements a .to function, which takes the new value to change to

Args:

    field_name (str): The column to change
    attribute (str): The attribute of the column to change

Returns:

    change (TransformChange): The transform change, which implements the `.to` function

Examples:

    new_output_schema = output
        # Change the field_name of date to the_date
        .change_column_metadata('date', 'field_name').to('the_date')
        # Change the description of the celsius column
        .change_column_metadata('celsius', 'description').to('the temperature in celsius')
        # Change the display name of the celsius column
        .change_column_metadata('celsius', 'display_name').to('Degrees (Celsius)')
        .run()

change_column_transform

ArgSpec
    Args: field_name

Change the column transform. This returns a TransformChange, which implements a .to function, which takes a transform expression.

Args:

    field_name (str): The column to change

Returns:

    change (TransformChange): The transform change, which implements the `.to` function

Examples:

    new_output_schema = output
        .change_column_transform('the_date').to('to_fixed_timestamp(`date`)')
        # Make the celsius column all numbers
        .change_column_transform('celsius').to('to_number(`celsius`)')
        # Add a new column, which is computed from the `celsius` column
        .add_column('fahrenheit', 'Degrees (Fahrenheit)', '(to_number(`celsius`) * (9 / 5)) + 32', 'the temperature in celsius')
        .run()

drop_column

ArgSpec
    Args: field_name

Drop the column

Args:

    field_name (str): The column to drop

Returns:

    output_schema (OutputSchema): Returns self for easy chaining

Examples:

    new_output_schema = output
        .drop_column('foo')
        .run()

list_operations

Get a list of the operations that you can perform on this object. These map directly onto what's returned from the API in the links section of each resource

rows

ArgSpec
    Args: offset, limit
    Defaults: offset=0, limit=500

Get the rows for this OutputSchema. Acceps offset and limit params for paging through the data.

run

Run all adds, drops, and column changes.

Returns:

    OutputSchema

Examples:

    new_output_schema = output
        # Change the field_name of date to the_date
        .change_column_metadata('date', 'field_name').to('the_date')
        # Change the description of the celsius column
        .change_column_metadata('celsius', 'description').to('the temperature in celsius')
        # Change the display name of the celsius column
        .change_column_metadata('celsius', 'display_name').to('Degrees (Celsius)')
        # Change the transform of the_date column to to_fixed_timestamp(`date`)
        .change_column_transform('the_date').to('to_fixed_timestamp(`date`)')
        # Make the celsius column all numbers
        .change_column_transform('celsius').to('to_number(`celsius`)')
        # Add a new column, which is computed from the `celsius` column
        .add_column('fahrenheit', 'Degrees (Fahrenheit)', '(to_number(`celsius`) * (9 / 5)) + 32', 'the temperature in celsius')
        .run()

schema_errors

ArgSpec
    Args: offset, limit
    Defaults: offset=0, limit=500

Get the errors that resulted in transforming into this output schema. Accepts offset and limit params

schema_errors_csv

Get the errors that results in transforming into this output schema as a CSV stream.

Note that this returns a Reponse, where Reponse is a python requests Reponse object

set_row_id

ArgSpec
    Args: field_name

Set the row id. Note you must call validate_row_id before doing this.

Args:

    field_name (str): The column to set as the row id

Returns:

    OutputSchema

Examples:

new_output_schema = output.set_row_id('the_id_column')

set_sort_by

Replace the columns used to sort the dataset. This returns a SortChange, which implements a .on function to add a sort and a .end_sort function to finish.

If you do not call this, the OutputSchema will try to preserve any existing sorts, which means it will remove sorts on deleted columns or on columns whose transforms are changed.

Returns:

    change (SortChange): The sort change, which implements the `.on` and `.end_sort` functions

Examples:

    new_output_schema = output
        .set_sort_by()
        .on('column_one', ascending = True)
        .on('column_two', ascending = False)
        .on('column_three') # ascending = True is the default
        .end_sort()
        .run()

validate_row_id

ArgSpec
    Args: field_name

Set the row id. Note you must call validate_row_id before doing this.

Args:

    field_name (str): The column to validate as the row id

Returns:

    boolean

wait_for_finish

ArgSpec
    Args: progress, timeout, sleeptime
    Defaults: progress=<function noop at 0x7fa34fb57040>, timeout=10800, sleeptime=1

Wait for this dataset to finish transforming and validating. Accepts a progress function and a timeout.

Default timeout is 3 hours

Job

ArgSpec
    Args: auth, response, parent

is_complete

Has this job finished or failed (or been submitted for approval)

list_operations

Get a list of the operations that you can perform on this object. These map directly onto what's returned from the API in the links section of each resource

submitted_for_approval

Has this job entered the approval queue (rather than finishing or failing)

wait_for_finish

ArgSpec
    Args: progress, timeout, sleeptime
    Defaults: progress=<function noop at 0x7fa34fb57040>, sleeptime=1

Wait for this dataset to finish transforming and validating. Accepts a progress function and a timeout.