The as-simple-as-possible-but-not-simpler stubbing library.
Ruby
Switch branches/tags
Nothing to show
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
lib
test
.gitignore
LICENSE
README.markdown
Rakefile
override.gemspec
override.gemspec.erb

README.markdown

Override

The as-simple-as-possible-but-not-simpler stubbing library.

Description

Override is the essence of the stubbing concept: it takes an object, a hash of methods/results, and proceeds to rewrite each method in the object. It can be used as a stubbing strategy in most cases, and I'd say that cases that don't fit this pattern have a very bad code smell, because are either dealing with internals or with side effects.

Usage

require 'override'

include Override

user = User.spawn
override(user, :name => "Foobar", :email => "foobar@example.org")
override(User, :find => user)

Or alternatively:

override(User, :find => override(User.spawn, :name => "Foobar, :email => "foobar@example.org"))

You can also send lambdas that will become the body of the redefined method:

user = User.spawn :name => "Foobar"
override(User, :find => lambda { |id| raise ArgumentError unless id == 1; user })

And then, in your tests:

assert_raise ArgumentError do
  User.find(2)
end

assert_nothing_raised do
  User.find(1)
end

assert_equal "Foobar", User.find(1).name

In case you don't know what spawn means, check my library Spawn.

It is a common pattern to set expectations for method calls. You can do it with the expect function:

user = User.spawn :name => "Foobar"
expect(User, :find, :with => [:first, { :include => :friendships }], :return => user)

And then:

assert_equal "Foobar", User.find(:first, :include => :friendships).name

This kind of tests encourage a very fine grained development style. Testing side effects is possible with this and with many other libraries, but it's something that should be avoided as much as possible. Always keep in mind that a deterministic function is the easiest to test, so the less coupling there is in the system, the more reliable it becomes.

Note that this way of setting expectations doesn't count the number of calls received by the redefined method. The RSpec equivalent of User.should_receive(:find).with(:first, :include => :friendships) triggers an exception if the method is not called. While it is a handy feature, it encourages coupling and testing internals, so my advice would be to use it scarcely and to try to refactor your code so it doesn't follow this testing anti-pattern. Check the tests for more examples.

Installation

$ sudo gem install override

Thanks

Thanks to Tim Goh for his advice of using a hash for rewriting multiple methods at once.

License

Copyright (c) 2009 Michel Martens

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.