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Fixed several typos, lessons 2-2, 2-3, 2-4

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1 parent 15d992c commit 6c191aa20eeac8595442cfc1a9a95a7d629727c8 @spookylukey committed Feb 19, 2011
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2 contents/lesson-2-2-primitive-data-types-1.rst
@@ -160,7 +160,7 @@ This is in a window called \*backtrace\*. It is worth looking at the output in s
eval-print-last-sexp()
call-interactively(eval-print-last-sexp nil nil)
-The first line of this give us some details of the problem, it is a Lisp error - the predicate function ``number-or-marker-p`` on the parameter ``two`` threw an ``wrong-type-argument`` error. We will look at the debugger later on in the book. If you go back to the list of Emacs specific types you will see that there is one called marker. The operator ``+`` can operate on numbers or markers and so it uses this special predicate function to test the arguments before running the function.
+The first line of this give us some details of the problem, it is a Lisp error - the predicate function ``number-or-marker-p`` on the parameter ``two`` threw a ``wrong-type-argument`` error. We will look at the debugger later on in the book. If you go back to the list of Emacs specific types you will see that there is one called marker. The operator ``+`` can operate on numbers or markers and so it uses this special predicate function to test the arguments before running the function.
-----------------------------
Converting Between Data Types
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4 contents/lesson-2-3-lists-at-last.rst
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ Introduction
eLisp is a dialect of Lisp - the LISt Processing language.
-You will have noticed that all the expressions we have used so far has been of the form ``(something somethingelse anotherthing)``. That basic form is a list - defined by the opening and closing brackets. All the expressions we have looked at so far have been the simplest sort of programmes - lists where the first element is an operator and the remaining elements are data. But a list can also be simple data.
+You will have noticed that all the expressions we have used so far have been of the form ``(something somethingelse anotherthing)``. That basic form is a list - defined by the opening and closing brackets. All the expressions we have looked at so far have been the simplest sort of programmes - lists where the first element is an operator and the remaining elements are data. But a list can also be simple data.
----------
Data Lists
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ The eLisp interpreter has to be told that it is a data list. This is done by **q
:You Type: ``'(1 2 3)``
:Result: ``(1 2 3)``
-The apostrophe ``'`` is syntactic sugare for the quote operator which can be invoked like a normal operator:
+The apostrophe ``'`` is syntactic sugar for the quote operator which can be invoked like a normal operator:
:You Type: ``(quote (1 2 3))``
:Result: ``(1 2 3)``
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4 contents/lesson-2-4-symbols-and-variables.rst
@@ -92,7 +92,7 @@ We can now see what ``defvar`` has done to the variable ``farmer_dell`` by evalu
But if we ``defvar`` on ``do_tell`` it won't take:
:You Type: ``(defvar do_tell 123)``
-:Return: ``do_tel``
+:Return: ``do_tell``
and now evaluate ``do_tell``:
@@ -158,7 +158,7 @@ Property lists can be the *value* of a symbol and are associated with it by ``se
But the symbol can also have its own *plist* which is created by the special function ``setplist``. (the symbol must already have been created.)
-:You Type: ``(setplist hotdog '(:rhubarb "custard" :status "borked"))``
+:You Type: ``(setplist 'hotdog '(:rhubarb "custard" :status "borked"))``
:Return: ``(:rhubarb "custard" :status "borked")``
However if we now evaluate the value of ``hotdog`` you will see that it is ``(:quality "great" :achievement "impressive")`` as that is the *value* we set previously:

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