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was actually not running the correct benchmarks but they are actually…

… quite similar with simple objects. need more complex objects to see differences.
latest commit 8a362b29b3
@spullara authored

README.md

Mustache.java Build Status

As of release 0.9.0 mustache.java is now Java 8 only. For Java 6/7 support use 0.8.x.

There are no external dependencies and the compiler library is 95k.

Mustache.java is a derivative of mustache.js.

There is a Google Group for support and questions: http://groups.google.com/group/mustachejava

Travis CI: https://travis-ci.org/spullara/mustache.java

Largest production deployment of Mustache.java:

  • Twitter (the web site, email, syndicated widgets, etc)

Thanks to YourKit for many performance improvements:

YourKit is kindly supporting the mustache.java open source project with its full-featured Java Profiler. YourKit, LLC is the creator of innovative and intelligent tools for profiling Java and .NET applications. Take a look at YourKit's leading software products:

Request for contributions:

  • Real world benchmarks that matter - currently benchmarking based on Twitter templates
  • Documentation
  • Bug reports / fixes
  • API feedback
  • Optimizations

Documentation:

  • Javadocs
  • Mustache.js manual
  • Passes all of the mustache specification tests modulo whitespace differences
  • Biggest difference between mustache.js and mustache.java is optional concurrent evaluation
  • Data is provided by objects in an array of scopes and are accessed via non-private fields, methods or maps
  • Any Iterable can be used for list-like behaviors
  • Returning a Callable allows for concurrent evaluation if an ExecutorService is configured
  • Template inheritance is supported by this implementation, see https://github.com/mustache/spec/issues/38 (eg. {{<super}}{{$content}}...{{/content}}{{/super}})
  • Additional functions/lambdas (eg. {{#func1}}...{{/func1}}) are implemented using Function from Java 8 (post-substitution)
  • Use TemplateFunction if you want mustache.java to reparse the results of your function/lambda (pre-substitution)
  • Both default and manually configured classpath based and file system based template roots are supported
  • A compiled and invokedynamic version is available. Performance improvements are often application specific.
  • The handlebar server will render templates + json data for quick mockups of templates by designers
  • Completely pluggable system for overriding almost all the behavior in the compilation and rendering process
  • You can pull out sample data from live systems using the CapturingMustacheVisitor for mocks and tests
  • The DecoratedCollection can provide first / last / index for elements in a collection
  • The invert call can take text and a template and solve for the data

Performance:

  • See the com.github.mustachejavabenchmarks package in the compiler module
  • Compiles 4000+ timeline.html templates per second per core
  • Renders 3000+ of 50 tweet timelines per second per core on 2011 Macbook Pro / MacPro hardware
  • New codegen module generates code for guards and mustaches
  • The indy module uses the codegen module and invokedynamic to compile templates down to bytecode

Build suggestions:

  • Don't build, use Maven dependencies
  • If you must build but not test:
  • If you must build and test but not benchmark:
    • CI=1 mvn clean install
  • If you must build, test and benchmark:
    • mvn clean install

Maven dependency information (ie. for most common cases you will just need the compiler module):

Java 8+:

<dependency>
  <groupId>com.github.spullara.mustache.java</groupId>
  <artifactId>compiler</artifactId>
  <version>0.9.0</version>
</dependency>

Java 6/7:

<dependency>
  <groupId>com.github.spullara.mustache.java</groupId>
  <artifactId>compiler</artifactId>
  <version>0.8.17</version>
</dependency>

Example template file:

{{#items}}
Name: {{name}}
Price: {{price}}
  {{#features}}
  Feature: {{description}}
  {{/features}}
{{/items}}

Might be powered by some backing code:

public class Context {
  List<Item> items() {
    return Arrays.asList(
      new Item("Item 1", "$19.99", Arrays.asList(new Feature("New!"), new Feature("Awesome!"))),
      new Item("Item 2", "$29.99", Arrays.asList(new Feature("Old."), new Feature("Ugly.")))
    );
  }

  static class Item {
    Item(String name, String price, List<Feature> features) {
      this.name = name;
      this.price = price;
      this.features = features;
    }
    String name, price;
    List<Feature> features;
  }

  static class Feature {
    Feature(String description) {
       this.description = description;
    }
    String description;
  }
}

And would result in:

Name: Item 1
Price: $19.99
  Feature: New!
  Feature: Awesome!
Name: Item 2
Price: $29.99
  Feature: Old.
  Feature: Ugly.

Evaluation of the template proceeds serially. For instance, if you have blocking code within one of your callbacks you the system will pause while executing them:

static class Feature {
  Feature(String description) {
    this.description = description;
  }

  String description() throws InterruptedException {
    Thread.sleep(1000);
    return description;
  }
}

If you change description to return a Callable instead it will automatically be executed in a separate thread if you have provided an ExecutorService when you created your MustacheFactory.

Callable<String> description() throws InterruptedException {
  return new Callable<String>() {

    @Override
    public String call() throws Exception {
      Thread.sleep(1000);
      return description;
    }
  };
}

This enables scheduled tasks, streaming behavior and asynchronous i/o. Check out the example module in order to see a complete end-to-end example:

package mustachejava;

import com.github.mustachejava.DefaultMustacheFactory;
import com.github.mustachejava.Mustache;
import com.github.mustachejava.MustacheFactory;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.PrintWriter;
import java.io.Writer;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

public class Example {

  List<Item> items() {
    return Arrays.asList(
      new Item("Item 1", "$19.99", Arrays.asList(new Feature("New!"), new Feature("Awesome!"))),
      new Item("Item 2", "$29.99", Arrays.asList(new Feature("Old."), new Feature("Ugly.")))
    );
  }

  static class Item {
    Item(String name, String price, List<Feature> features) {
      this.name = name;
      this.price = price;
      this.features = features;
    }

    String name, price;
    List<Feature> features;
  }

  static class Feature {
    Feature(String description) {
      this.description = description;
    }

    String description;
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    MustacheFactory mf = new DefaultMustacheFactory();
    Mustache mustache = mf.compile("template.mustache");
    mustache.execute(new PrintWriter(System.out), new Example()).flush();
  }
}

An alternative approach for providing variables would be to use a Map object, like:

  public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    HashMap<String, Object> scopes = new HashMap<String, Object>();
    scopes.put("name", "Mustache");
    scopes.put("feature", new Feature("Perfect!"));

    Writer writer = new OutputStreamWriter(System.out);
    MustacheFactory mf = new DefaultMustacheFactory();
    Mustache mustache = mf.compile(new StringReader("{{name}}, {{feature.description}}!"), "example");
    mustache.execute(writer, scopes);
    writer.flush();
  }
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