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Checklist (and a short version for the impatient):
Commits:
- make commits of logical units
- check for unnecessary whitespace/identation/documentation
with "git diff --check" and maintainer tests for each commit
- do not check in commented out code or unneeded files
- provide a meaningful commit message
- the first line of the commit message should be a short
description and should skip the full stop
- if you want your work included, add a
"Signed-off-by: Your Name <you@example.com>" line to the
commit message (or just use the option "-s" when
committing) to confirm that you agree to the Developer's
Certificate of Origin (below)
- make sure that you have tests for the bug you are fixing
- make sure that the test suite passes after your commit
Patches:
- use "git format-patch -M" to create the patch
- send the patch to (srsadmins@catalyst.net.nz) If you use
git-send-email(1), please test it first by sending email to
yourself.
- patches may also be sent to the RT queue for the module on
rt.cpan.org; please only create one ticket for each
independent change or closely related series of independent
changes.
Pull requests:
- if you use github, use the 'pull request' option and select
'Catalyst' as the recipient. Please do remember to sign-off
your changes!
----
Developer's Certificate of Origin 1.2-gnu
By making a contribution to this project, I certify that:
(a) The contribution was created in whole or in part by me and I
have the right to submit it under the license indicated in the
file; or
(b) The contribution is based upon previous work that, to the best
of my knowledge, is covered under an compatible license and I
have the right under that license to submit that work with
modifications, whether created in whole or in part by me, under
the same license (unless I am permitted to submit under a
different license), as indicated in the file; or
(c) The contribution was provided directly to me by some other
person who certified (a), (b) or (c) and I have not modified it.
(d) I understand and agree that this project and the contribution
are public and that a record of the contribution (including all
personal information I submit with it, including my sign-off) is
maintained indefinitely and may be redistributed consistent with
this project or the license(s) involved.
----
These patch guidelines are intended to help you help us maintain the
software. We are interested in all submissions, however we may not
have time to make the changes you submit meet the code base standard.
Detailed information:
(1) Make separate commits for logically separate changes.
Unless your patch is really trivial, you should not be sending
out a patch that was generated between your working tree and
your commit head. Instead, always make a commit with complete
commit message and generate a series of patches from your
repository. It is a good discipline.
Describe the technical detail of the change(s).
The guiding principle for change messages is that they should only
describe the change that they are making. There should be a little
story:
1. why the change must happen (the motivation)
2. what the code used to do, if appropriate (old behaviour)
3. an outline of the new approach, sparing excessive details (new
behaviour)
They should always be written from the perspective that someone has
just run 'git annotate' and landed on this commit; that person has no
idea whatsoever about related commits in time. The description should
be written in the present tense; with no reference to terms like "this
patch".
If your description starts to get too long, that's a sign that you
probably need to split up your commit to finer grained pieces.
(1a) Test your changes
Your changes should include tests which demonstrate and hopefully test
corner cases of your new additions. If you have difficulty writing
these, please submit anyway but tests will help us be sure that your
code works and is suitable for inclusion.
Ideally, the new tests should fail on the old code, pass on the new
code, and test the documented functionality.
(1b) Whitespace, indentation, documentation and copyright boilerplate
There are tests which check that the indentation matches that which
'perltidy' will produce for the file. Please use them to check that
you are conforming to the indentation style of the project. This will
involve installing 'perltidy', and setting an environment variable.
The style is specifically chosen to allow readers to choose their own
tab width setting without breaking the appearance of the code, and to
make merging changes easier.
In terms of documentation, we also have a rule that all object methods
must be documented, or at least mentioned in the SYNOPSIS section of
the man page/perldoc for that module. The exception to this is
internal functions, which are marked by starting with an underscore.
Again, there is a test script for this which only runs with a
particular environment variable set. Running the test suite using
'make test' will tell you what you need to set.
It is also required that every Perl program contains a brief copyright
statement, and there is a test for that too.
(1c) Be nice to Perl 5.8.x
This codebase is currently designed to run on older perls, ie 5.8.x;
though we are likely to soon be making 5.10.0 a minimum requirement.
So currently, do not use 5.10+ features such as //-defined-or,
smartmatch or newer regex-engine features. We will also endeavour to
test the code base on the latest blead and Perl maint branches.
(2) Generate your patch using git tools out of your commits.
git based diff tools (git, StGIT, etc) generate unidiff which is the
preferred format.
You do not have to be afraid to use -M option to "git diff" or
"git format-patch", if your patch involves file renames. The
receiving end can handle them just fine.
Please make sure your patch does not include any extra files
which do not belong in a patch submission. Make sure to review
your patch after generating it, to ensure accuracy. Before
sending out, please make sure it cleanly applies to the "master"
branch head. If you are preparing a work based on "next" branch,
that is fine, but please mark it as such.
(3) Agreeing to the DCO
The "Sign-off" procedure from git.git and linux-2.6.git is used for
this project. This Sign-off indicates _copyright_ conformance only,
and is the only strict requirement for submissions.
If you are submitting many changes and are worried about potential
patent infringement lawsuits, please contact us for a copyright
assignment agreement so that we can take formal ownership of your
contributions. However this is not necessary for casual submissions,
or for those who do not worry about such things.
If you want to indicate your change has been reviewed by someone, you
can use 'Acked-by:'
(4) Sending it in.
As there is not currently a mailing list for this program, please
submit via one of the following means:
* fork the project on github
(http://github.com/st3vil/crypt-password) and send a pull
request.
* Log a ticket at rt.cpan.org under the queue for 'Crypt::Password'
(if you must)