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Two-methods gem to easy make methods inspection and simple performance measurements.

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README.md

Cutter

Two-methods-gem I use a lot for simple debugging & performance measuring purposes.

#inspect method shines when doing reverse engineering, it is especially useful, when it is needed to quickly hack on someone else's code. Also, it is very easy to become 'someone else' for self, when dealing with own code, if it was written very long time ago.

Besides that #stamper allows doing performance measuments in a handy manner, it can be used to create quick and neat demonstrations of how particular pieces of Ruby code perform.

The one interesting possible usage of #stamper is performance optimization of templates on Rails View Layer, because it often takes a large load impact (compared to M and C layers) because of Rails lazy-evaluation mechanisms.

Build Status

Prerequisites

It works on 1.8.7, 1.9.3, JRuby and Rubinius.

Installiation

Include it into Gemfile:

group :development, :test do
  gem 'cutter'
end

Cutter::Inspection

I) #inspect!

Insert #inspect! method into any of your methods:

  def your_method *your_args
    # ...

    inspect! {} # curly braces are important - they capture original environment!    

    # or 
    # iii {} as an alias

    # ...
  end

  # your_method(1,"foo",:bar) => 

  # method `your_method'
  #   variables: 
  #     your_args: [1, "foo", :bar]

It gives simple but nice trace for inspection: method's name and args that were passed to method.

With inspect!(:instance) {} we also see instance variables:

  def your_method a, b 
    @instance_var = "blip!"
    inspect!(:instance) {}
  end

  # your_method 1, 2
  # method: `your_method' 
  #   called from class: RSpec::Core::ExampleGroup::Nested_1::Nested_1
  #   local_variables: 
  #     a: 1
  #     b: 2
  #   instance_variables: 
  #     @instance_var: blip!

With inspect!(:self) {} we have self#inspect of class to which method belongs to:

  def your_method name, *args
    # ...
    inspect!(:self) {}
  end

  # your_method(1,2,3,4,5) =>

  # method: `your_method'
  #   called from class: SelfInspectDemo
  #   variables: 
  #     name: 1
  #     args: [2, 3, 4, 5]
  #     block: 
  #   self inspection:
  #     #<SelfInspectDemo:0x82be488 @variable="I'm variable">

Option :caller gives us caller methods chain:

  def your_method name, *args
    # ...
    inspect!(:caller) {}
  end

  # your_method(1,2,3,4,5) => 

  # method: `your_method'
  #   called from class: RSpec::Core::ExampleGroup::Nested_1::Nested_1
  #   variables: 
  #     name: 1
  #     args: [2, 3, 4, 5]
  #     block: 
  #   caller methods: 
  #     /home/stanislaw/_work_/gems/cutter/spec/inspection/demo_spec.rb:33:in `your_method'
  #     /home/stanislaw/_work_/gems/cutter/spec/inspection/demo_spec.rb:40:in `block (3 levels) in <top (required)>' 
  #     /home/stanislaw/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.2-p180@310/gems/rspec-core-2.6.4/lib/rspec/core/example.rb:48:in `instance_eval'

And finally inspect!(:max) {} produces maximum information: options :instance, :self, :caller are included and Ruby's ordinary #inspect method is called on every variable.

  def your_method *args
    inspect!(:max) {}
  end

  # maximal(1, :two, "three", :four => 5) =>
  #
  # method: `your_method' (maximal tracing)
  #   called from class: RSpec::Core::ExampleGroup::Nested_1::Nested_1
  #   local_variables: 
  #     args: [1, :two, "three", {:four=>5}]
  #   instance_variables: 
  #     @example: #<RSpec::Core::Example:0xa1d378 >
  #     ...
  #   self inspection:
  #   #<RSpec::Core::ExampleGroup::Nested_1::Nested_1:0x9e5f8f4
  #   ...
  #   caller methods: 
  #   /home/stanislaw/work/gems/cutter/spec/inspection/demo_spec.rb:28:in `maximal'
  #   /home/stanislaw/work/gems/cutter/spec/inspection/demo_spec.rb:54:in `block (3 levels) in <top (required)>'
  #   ...

If you want all #inspect! methods fall silent at once, use

Cutter::Inspection.quiet!

To make them sound again do

Cutter::Inspection.loud!

Three-letters methods

class Object
  def rrr object = nil
    raise object.inspect
  end

  def ppp object = nil
    puts object.inspect
  end

  def lll object = nil
    Rails.logger.info object.inspect
  end if defined? Rails
end

#iii

Instead of #inspect! you can use #iii - just an alias more convenient for typing.

Finally, you have a group of 4 three-letters methods in your every day debugging workflow.

II) Cutter::Stamper

Acts as benchmark {} in Rails or Benchmark.measure {} in common Ruby, but with stamps in any position in block executed.

It is much simpler to write Stamper with Stamps than all these Measure-dos.

Minimal stamper

stamp! method is just an alias for stamp, use whatever you like:

puts "Minimal stamper"
stamper do
  stamp
  sleep 0.2
  stamp! 
  sleep 0.2
  stamp!
end

Will produce:

Minimal stamper

no name
-------
  stamp:       0 ms   
  stamp:     200 ms   
  stamp:     400 ms   
-------
  400ms

Stamper with named stamps

puts "Now with named stamps"

Cutter::Stamper.scope :testing_method => "Demonstration of named stamping" do |tm|
  tm.msg _1: "first piece"
  tm.msg _2: "second piece"
end

Cutter::Stamper.scope :inner_scope => "Now internal things" do |i|
  i.msg first: "I'm the first inner stamp"
end

stamper :testing_method do |tm|
  sleep 0.3
  tm.stamp! :_1 # The old form of calling #stamp! on yielded scope
  variable
  sleep 0.3
  stamper :inner_scope do |i|
    sleep 0.2
    i.stamp! :first
    sleep 0.2
    i.stamp! "Stamp with custom text"
  end
  tm.stamp! :_2
end

will result in

Now with named stamps

Demonstration of named stamping
-------------------------------
  stamp:     300 ms   first piece

    Now internal things
    -------------------
    stamp:     201 ms   I'm the first inner stamp
    stamp:     401 ms   Stamp with custom text
    -------------------
                  401ms

  stamp:    1001 ms   second piece
-------------------------------
                         1001ms

Stamper with :capture => true option

Use it to hide the output of piece you are benchmarking.

require 'cutter'

N = 100000

result = []

EMB = "String to embed"

result << stamper(:capture => true) do
  N.times do
    puts "#{EMB}\n"
  end
end

result << stamper(:capture => true) do
  N.times do
    printf "#{EMB}\n"
  end
end

result << stamper(:capture => true) do
  N.times do
    print "#{EMB}\n"
  end
end

puts result.inspect

Notes

  • Both #inspect! {} and #stamper methods colorize their output. You can see lib/cutter/colored_output.rb file to understand how it is done. I will really appreciate any suggestions of how current color scheme can be improved.

Specs and demos

Clone it

$ git clone https://github.com/stanislaw/cutter
$ cd cutter

Specs are just

rake

See demos

rake demo

Contributors

  • Stanislaw Pankevich
  • Kristian Mandrup

Copyright

Copyright (c) 2011 Stanislaw Pankevich

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