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An implementation of the Cake composition language (or something resembling one)
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README

README

Non-release notes

If you are reading this, you have probably read the Cake paper from OOPSLA
2010. The Cake implementation is not currently in a usable state for third
parties,  except for the very brave. This is because:

- the language is not well enough documented for learning its considerable
quirks (particularly certain recurring "shoehorning" idioms, subtleties
concerning opaque pointers and co-object replacement, etc..)

- error messages, and error conditions generally, will not be comprehensible
to anyone who doesn't understand how the compiler and runtime work
---typically they are from the C++ compiler itself, or even stranger runtime
errors

- code generation is unimplemented for several language features (lambdas,
algorithms, event context patterns, associations, caller_free)---none of this
will be tons of work to add, but it is currently missing;

- the language semantics are still not terribly well-defined---this is good,
because there is still some wiggle room which can be used to accommodate
minor variations on the requirements currently catered for, but it does mean
that one shouldn't  expect a new use-case to work without semantic tweaks,
and in some cases, new variants on the language features;

- as a consequence, existing Cake code will inevitably need to be tweaked to
stay in sync with the compiler as semantic wiggles are added.  I don't expect
these changes would ever require significant increase in complexity of
existing Cake code, but they would be a pain for authors to keep up with.

However, I am making the code available for anyone who wants to have a go. 
If you do: please, please, send me e-mail. I'd love to know what you want to
do with it, and I'd also be very happy to support your efforts (possibly as a
collaboration).

Stephen Kell <srkell@acm.org>
September 2012


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