Yet another South American rodent...a Capybara like web app testing tool for Elixir.
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
lib
test Fixes for OTP18 and Elixir 1.1.1 Dec 21, 2015
.gitignore
.travis.yml
README.md
mix.exs
mix.lock

README.md

TucoTuco

Build Status

Testing for Elixir web applications.

TucoTuco helps you test your web application by running a web browser and simulating user interaction with your application.

With a DSL approximating that of Capybara's, it should be easy for developers to write tests for a web application.

Setup

In your mix.exs add the following to the test environment deps:

{:tuco_tuco, "~>0.8.1", only: test}

Either specify tuco_tuco in your application block in mix.exs or do:

:application.start TucoTuco

Requirements

Testing requires that you have Phantomjs, Firefox or ChromeDriver installed. The WebDriver library will also prompt you to install the Firefox plugin with mix webdriver.firefox.plugin if it is not present. You can also test against a remote WebDriver server such as a Selenium instance.

Documentation

Here is a rough guide to using TucoTuco.

Starting A Session

Import the DSL functionality with:

use TucoTuco.DSL

Start a session with:

TucoTuco.start_session :browser_name, :session_name, :browser_type

Where browser_name and session_name are atoms to reference the running browser and session with later and browser_type is one of

* :phantomjs
* :firefox
* :chromedriver
* :remote

Navigation

Visit sends the browser to other pages.

  visit "http://elixir-lang.org"
  visit "/login"

Relative urls will be appended with the TucoTuco.app_root value.

You can go back and forward in the browser history:

  go_forward
  go_back

And query the current url:

current_url
current_path
current_query
current_port

Clicking

You can click on a link or button with the click_link and click_button commands.

  click_link "Home"
  click_link "i3"
  click_button "Back"
  click_button "Submit"

Yet to come: mouse movements.

Forms

Interacting with forms is easy with TucoTuco's functions for that:

  fill_in "Login", "Stuart"
  fill_in "Password", "secret_password"
  click_button "Submit"
  choose "A radio button"
  select "Carrot"
  select "Tomato", from: "Vegetables"
  check "A Checkbox"

You can even attach files:

  attach_file "Upload Picture", "path/to/my_photo.png"

Querying

Getting information about the page to use in assertions:

  Page.has_css? "table thead tr.header"
  Page.has_xpath? "//foo/bar[@name='baz']"
  Page.has_text? "Some text from the page"
  Page.has_link? "Back"

With 'has_css?andhas_xpath?` you can specify a count of how many should be found.

  # Check that there are 5 rows in the table.
  Page.has_css? "table tbody tr", count: 5

There are many more. Check the documentation for them.

Assertions

TucoTuco supplies two assertions that you can use directly in tests:

  assert_selector :xpath, "//foo/bar"
  refute_selector :xpath, "//baz[@class='bob']"

Finder

Finder return elements from the DOM.

  Finder.find :id, "foo"
  Finder.find :css, ".bar"
  Finder.find :xpath, "//foo/bar"

Find returns an Element record.

Elements

The following functions for manipulating elements are imported from WebDriver, they all take a WebDriver.Element struct as the first argument. Luckily that is exactly what all the finders return:

  Element.attribute reference, :a_html_attribute
  Element.clear reference
  Element.click reference
  Element.css reference, "some-css-property-name"
  Element.displayed? reference
  Element.enabled? reference
  Element.equals? reference, other_reference
  Element.location? reference
  Element.location_in_view? reference
  Element.name reference
  Element.selected? reference
  Element.size reference
  Element.submit reference
  Element.text reference
  Element.value reference, "value to set"

For more detailed docs on the Element functions see WebDriver.Element.

Javascript

Javascript can be run using the execute_javascript and execute_async_javascript commands.

  iex> execute_javascript "return argument[0] * 10", [3]
  iex> 30

Retrying

When you are testing applications that have Javascript modifying the page it is possible that elements will not be available when you want them because the browser script takes some time to run.

To alleviate this TucoTuco has retry settings. When retry is turned on all the Page.has_foo? and action functions will retry for a set number of times before failing.

You can also use the retry function yourself like this:

  # Find elements
  TucoTuco.Finder.find using, selector

  # Any function
  TucoTuco.Retry.retry fn -> my_function(args) end

Changing retry settings:

  # Set retries on
  TucoTuco.use_retries true
  # Set the maximum retry time in milliseconds.
  TucoTuco.max_retry_time 1000
  # Set the delay between retries in milliseconds.
  TucoTuco.retry_delay 20

Multiple Sessions

You can run multiple sessions on different browser or on the same browser. To start a session use:

TucoTuco.start_session :browser_name, :session_name, browser_type

Where the browser type is one of :phantomjs, :firefox or :chrome. If the process :browser_name is already running the session will be started on that, otherwise a new browser will start running.

Once you have multiple sessions running you can swap sessions with:

TucoTuco.session :new_session

And to get a list of sessions that are running:

TucoTuco.sessions

Screenshot

When the driver supports it, you can take a screenshot and save it as a PNG file.

save_screenshot "path/to/file.png"

Example Session from console:

    iex(1)> use TucoTuco.DSL
    :ok
    iex(2)> TucoTuco.start_session :test_browser, :tuco_test, :phantomjs
    {:ok,
     %TucoTuco.SessionPool.SessionPoolState{app_root: nil,
      current_session: :tuco_test, max_retry_time: 2000, retry_delay: 50,
      use_retry: false}}
    iex(3)> visit "http://elixir-lang.org"
    {:ok,
     %WebDriver.Protocol.Response{request: %WebDriver.Protocol.Request{body: "{\"url\":\"http://elixir-lang.org\"}",
       headers: ["Content-Type": "application/json;charset=UTF-8",
        "Content-Length": 32], method: :POST,
       url: "http://localhost:57491/wd/hub/session/4dc0b3b0-26b8-11e4-85b9-7b8e9f3c77e7/url"},
      session_id: "4dc0b3b0-26b8-11e4-85b9-7b8e9f3c77e7", status: 0, value: %{}}}
    iex(4)> click_link "getting started guide"
    {:ok,
     %WebDriver.Protocol.Response{request: %WebDriver.Protocol.Request{body: "{}",
       headers: ["Content-Type": "application/json;charset=UTF-8",
        "Content-Length": 2], method: :POST,
       url: "http://localhost:57491/wd/hub/session/4dc0b3b0-26b8-11e4-85b9-7b8e9f3c77e7/element/:wdc:1408353394161/click"},
      session_id: "4dc0b3b0-26b8-11e4-85b9-7b8e9f3c77e7", status: 0, value: %{}}}
    iex(5)> current_url
    "http://elixir-lang.org/getting_started/1.html"
    iex(6)> Page.has_css? "article h1#toc_0"
    false
    iex(7)> Page.has_text? "Elixir also supports UTF-8 encoded strings:"
    false
    iex(8)> click_link "Next →"
    {:ok,
     %WebDriver.Protocol.Response{request: %WebDriver.Protocol.Request{body: "{}",
       headers: ["Content-Type": "application/json;charset=UTF-8",
        "Content-Length": 2], method: :POST,
       url: "http://localhost:57491/wd/hub/session/4dc0b3b0-26b8-11e4-85b9-7b8e9f3c77e7/element/:wdc:1408353427808/click"},
      session_id: "4dc0b3b0-26b8-11e4-85b9-7b8e9f3c77e7", status: 0, value: %{}}}
    iex(9)> current_url
    "http://elixir-lang.org/getting_started/2.html"
    iex(10)>  Page.has_xpath? "//h1[.='2 Diving in']"
    false
    iex(11)> go_back
    {:ok,
     %WebDriver.Protocol.Response{request: %WebDriver.Protocol.Request{body: "{}",
       headers: ["Content-Type": "application/json;charset=UTF-8",
        "Content-Length": 2], method: :POST,
       url: "http://localhost:57491/wd/hub/session/4dc0b3b0-26b8-11e4-85b9-7b8e9f3c77e7/back"},
      session_id: "4dc0b3b0-26b8-11e4-85b9-7b8e9f3c77e7", status: 0, value: %{}}}
    iex(12)> current_path
    "/getting_started/1.html"

Using with Phoenix

Here are some preliminary instructions for using TucoTuco for testing Phoenix applications.

Dependencies

Edit mix.exs to include the tuco_tuco dependency and to start TucoTuco in test mode.

  def application do
    [
      mod: { Photuco, [] },
      applications: applications(Mix.env)
    ]
  end

  defp applications do
    [:phoenix, :cowboy]
  end

  defp applications :test do
    applications ++ [:tuco_tuco]
  end

  defp applications _ do
    applications
  end

  defp deps do
    [
      {:phoenix, github: "phoenixframework/phoenix"},
      {:cowboy, "~> 1.0.0"},
      {:tuco_tuco, "~>0.8.1"}
    ]
  end

Test Setup

Add the setup block for the tests in the foo_test.exs file

  setup_all do
    router = Phoenix.Project.module_root.Router
    port = Phoenix.Config.get([router,:port])
    router.start

    {:ok, _} = TucoTuco.start_session :test_browser, :test_session, :firefox
    TucoTuco.app_root "http://localhost:#{port}"

    on_exit fn -> TucoTuco.stop end
    :ok
  end

Changelog

2014-12-20

  • 0.8.1
  • Elixir 1.1.1 compatability

2014-10-30

  • 0.7.1
  • Made password inputs fillable

2014-10-23

  • 0.7.0
  • Add alert handling code

2014-10-21

  • 0.6.1
  • Bump Webdriver version to 0.6.1

2014-08-20

  • 0.6.0
  • Webdriver 0.6.0

2014-08-17

  • 0.5.1
  • Webdriver 0.5.2
  • Use hex.pm for deps

2014-08-12

  • 0.5.0
  • Elixir-0.15.0
  • Webdriver 0.5.0

2014-03-06

  • 0.4.0
  • Added save_screenshot

2014-03-04

  • 0.3.0
  • Added execute_javascript and execute_async_javascript

2014-03-02

  • 0.2.1
  • Element functions from WebDriver
  • Retries