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minor #4608 Removing some installation instructions (weaverryan)

This PR was merged into the 2.3 branch.

Discussion
----------

Removing some installation instructions

| Q             | A
| ------------- | ---
| Doc fix?      | no
| New docs?     | no
| Applies to    | all
| Fixed tickets | n/a

Hi guys!

This removes some duplicate installation instructions. I want less docs, without explaining less :). Duplicate like this is an opportunity to give users more paths for no reason. I'm sure we have more things like this - like details on handling parameters.yml or other things.

Thanks!

Commits
-------

3395b50 Re-wording parameters.yml section and removing note about vendor #4608
9d925ff [#4608] Using #. for numbered bullets
78e08f4 Removing some installation instructions
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weaverryan committed Dec 20, 2014
2 parents 90ef4ec + 3395b50 commit 95fc4874aa19666f026aee771b685c31775d51b1
Showing with 18 additions and 51 deletions.
  1. +3 −27 cookbook/workflow/new_project_git.rst
  2. +15 −24 cookbook/workflow/new_project_svn.rst
@@ -19,24 +19,10 @@ that's stored using the `Git`_ source control management system.
Initial Project Setup
---------------------
To get started, you'll need to download Symfony and initialize your local
git repository:
To get started, you'll need to download Symfony and get things running. See
the :doc:`/book/installation` chapter for details.
#. Download the `Symfony Standard Edition`_ using Composer:
.. code-block:: bash
$ php composer.phar create-project symfony/framework-standard-edition path/ '~2.5'
.. tip::
Add the ``-vvv`` flag to see everything that Composer is doing - this is
especially useful on a slow connection where it may seem that nothing is
happening.
Composer will now download the Standard Distribution along with all of the
required vendor libraries. For more information about downloading Symfony using
Composer, see `Installing Symfony using Composer`_.
Once your project is running, just follow these simple steps:
#. Initialize your Git repository:
@@ -90,16 +76,6 @@ to learn more about how to configure and develop inside your application.
.. include:: _vendor_deps.rst.inc
Vendors and Submodules
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Instead of using the ``composer.json`` system for managing your vendor
libraries, you may instead choose to use native `git submodules`_. There
is nothing wrong with this approach, though the ``composer.json`` system
is the official way to solve this problem and probably much easier to
deal with. Unlike Git submodules, Composer is smart enough to calculate
which libraries depend on which other libraries.
Storing your Project on a remote Server
---------------------------------------
@@ -46,28 +46,27 @@ widespread standard structure:
Initial Project Setup
---------------------
To get started, you'll need to download Symfony and get the basic Subversion setup:
To get started, you'll need to download Symfony and get the basic Subversion setup.
First, download and get your Symfony project running by following the
:doc:`Installation </book/installation>` chapter.
1. Download the `Symfony Standard Edition`_ with or without vendors.
Once you have your new project directory and things are working, follow along
with these steps:
2. Unzip/untar the distribution. It will create a folder called Symfony with
your new project structure, config files, etc. Rename it to whatever you
like.
3. Checkout the Subversion repository that will host this project. Suppose
#. Checkout the Subversion repository that will host this project. Suppose
it is hosted on `Google code`_ and called ``myproject``:
.. code-block:: bash
$ svn checkout http://myproject.googlecode.com/svn/trunk myproject
4. Copy the Symfony project files in the Subversion folder:
#. Copy the Symfony project files in the Subversion folder:
.. code-block:: bash
$ mv Symfony/* myproject/
5. Now, set the ignore rules. Not everything *should* be stored in your Subversion
#. Now, set the ignore rules. Not everything *should* be stored in your Subversion
repository. Some files (like the cache) are generated and others (like
the database configuration) are meant to be customized on each machine.
This makes use of the ``svn:ignore`` property, so that specific files can
@@ -88,27 +87,19 @@ To get started, you'll need to download Symfony and get the basic Subversion set
$ svn ci -m "commit basic Symfony ignore list (vendor, app/bootstrap*, app/config/parameters.yml, app/cache/*, app/logs/*, web/bundles)"
6. The rest of the files can now be added and committed to the project:
#. The rest of the files can now be added and committed to the project:
.. code-block:: bash
$ svn add --force .
$ svn ci -m "add basic Symfony Standard 2.X.Y"
7. Copy ``app/config/parameters.yml`` to ``app/config/parameters.yml.dist``.
The ``parameters.yml`` file is ignored by svn (see above) so that
machine-specific settings like database passwords aren't committed. By
creating the ``parameters.yml.dist`` file, new developers can quickly clone
the project, copy this file to ``parameters.yml``, customize it, and start
developing.
8. Finally, download all of the third-party vendor libraries by
executing Composer. For details, see :ref:`installation-updating-vendors`.
.. tip::
If you rely on any "dev" versions, then Git may be used to install
those libraries, since there is no archive available for download.
That's it! Since the ``app/config/parameters.yml`` file is ignored, you can
store machine-specific settings like database passwords here without committing
them. The ``parameters.yml.dist`` file *is* committed, but is not read by
Symfony. And by adding any new keys you need to both files, new developers
can quickly clone the project, copy this file to ``parameters.yml``, customize
it, and start developing.
At this point, you have a fully-functional Symfony project stored in your
Subversion repository. The development can start with commits in the Subversion

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