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Flow Package to add graphql APIs to Neos and Flow that also supports some advanced features
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t3n.GraphQL

Flow Package to add graphql APIs to Neos and Flow that also supports advanced features like schema stitching, validation rules, schema directives and more. This package doesn't provide a GraphQL client to test your API. We suggest to use the GraphlQL Playground

Simply install the package via composer:

composer require "t3n/graphql"

Configuration

In order to use your GraphQL API endpoint some configuration is necessary.

Endpoints

Let's assume that the API should be accessible under the URL http://localhost/api/my-endpoint.

To make this possible, you first have to add the route to your Routes.yaml:

- name: 'GraphQL API'
  uriPattern: 'api/<GraphQLSubroutes>'
  subRoutes:
    'GraphQLSubroutes':
      package: 't3n.GraphQL'
      variables:
        'endpoint': 'my-endpoint'

Don't forget to load your routes at all:

Neos:
  Flow:
    mvc:
      routes:
        'Your.Package':
          position: 'start'

Now the route is activated and available.

Schema

The next step is to define a schema that can be queried.

Create a schema.graphql file:

/Your.Package/Resources/Private/GraphQL/schema.root.graphql

type Query {
  ping: String!
}

type Mutation {
  pong: String!
}

schema {
  query: Query
  mutation: Mutation
}

Under the hood we use t3n/graphql-tools. This package is a php port from Apollos graphql-tools. This enables you to use some advanced features like schema stitching. So it's possible to configure multiple schemas per endpoint. All schemas will be merged internally together to a single schema.

Add a schema to your endpoint like this:

t3n:
  GraphQL:
    endpoints:
      'my-endpoint': # use your endpoint variable here
        schemas:
          root: # use any key you like here
            typeDefs: 'resource://Your.Package/Private/GraphQL/schema.root.graphql'

To add another schema just add a new entry below the schemas index for your endpoint.

You can also use the extend feature:

/Your.Package/Resources/Private/GraphQL/schema.yeah.graphql

extend type Query {
  yippie: String!
}
t3n:
  GraphQL:
    endpoints:
      'my-endpoint': #
        schemas:
          yeah:
            typeDefs: 'resource://Your.Package/Private/GraphQL/schema.yeah.graphql'

Resolver

Now you need to add some Resolver. You can add a Resolver for each of your types. Given this schema:

type Query {
  product(id: ID!): Product
  products: [Product]
}

type Product {
  id: ID!
  name: String!
  price: Float!
}

You might want to configure Resolver for both types:

t3n:
  GraphQL:
    endpoints:
      'my-endpoint':
        schemas:
          mySchema:
            resolvers:
              Query: 'Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver\QueryResolver'
              Product: 'Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver\ProductResolver'

Each resolver must implement t3n\GraphQL\ResolverInterface !

You can also add resolvers dynamically so you don't have to configure each resolver separately:

t3n:
  GraphQL:
    endpoints:
      'my-endpoint':
        schemas:
          mySchema:
            resolverPathPattern: 'Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver\Type\{Type}Resolver'
            resolvers:
              Query: 'Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver\QueryResolver'

With this configuration the class Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver\Type\ProductResolver would be responsible for queries on a Product type. The {Type} will evaluate to your type name.

Resolver Implementation

A implementation for our example could look like this (pseudocode):

<?php

namespace Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver;

use Neos\Flow\Annotations as Flow;
use t3n\GraphQL\ResolverInterface;

class QueryResolver implements ResolverInterface
{
    protected $someServiceToFetchProducts;

    public function products($_, $variables): array
    {
        // return an array with products
        return $this->someServiceToFetchProducts->findAll();
    }

    public function product($_, $variables): ?Product
    {
        $id = $variables['id'];
        return $this->someServiceToFetchProducts->getProductById($id);
    }
}
<?php

namespace Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver\Type;

use Neos\Flow\Annotations as Flow;
use t3n\GraphQL\ResolverInterface;

class ProductResolver implements ResolverInterface
{
    public function name(Product $product): array
    {
        // this is just an overload example
        return $product->getName();
    }
}

An example query like:

query {
  products {
    id
    name
    price
  }
}

would invoke the QueryResolver in first place and call the products() method. This method returns an array with Product objects. For each of the objects the ProductResolver is used. To fetch the actual value there is a DefaultFieldResolver. If you do not configure a method named as the requests property it will be used to fetch the value. The DefaultFieldResolver will try to fetch the data itself via ObjectAccess::getProperty($source, $fieldName). So if your Product Object has a getName() it will be used. You can still overload the implementation just like in the example.

All resolver methods share the same signature:

method($source, $args, $context, $info)

Context

The third argument in your Resolver method signature is the Context. By Default it's set to t3n\GraphQContext which exposes the current request.

It's easy to set your very own Context per endpoint. This might be handy to share some Code or Objects between all your Resolver implementations. Make sure to extend t3n\GraphQContext

Let's say we have an graphql endpoint for a shopping basket (simplified):

type Query {
  basket: Basket
}

type Mutation {
  addItem(item: BasketItem): Basket
}

type Basket {
  items: [BasketItems]
  amount: Float!
}

type BasketItem {
  id: ID!
  name: String!
  price: Float!
}

input BasketItemInput {
  name: String!
  price: Float!
}

First of all configure your context for your shopping endpoint:

t3n:
  GraphQL:
    endpoints:
      'shop':
        context: 'Your\Package\GraphQL\ShoppingBasketContext'
        schemas:
          basket:
            typeDefs: 'resource://Your.Package/Private/GraphQL/schema.graphql'
            resolverPathPattern: 'Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver\Type\{Type}Resolver'
            resolvers:
              Query: 'Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver\QueryResolver'
              Mutation: 'Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver\MutationResolver'

A context for this scenario would inject the current basket (probably flow session scoped);

<?php

declare(strict_types=1);

namespace Your\Package\GraphQL;

use Neos\Flow\Annotations as Flow;
use Your\Package\Shop\Basket;
use t3n\GraphQL\Context as BaseContext;

class ShoppingBasketContext extends BaseContext
{
    /**
     * @Flow\Inject
     *
     * @var Basket
     */
    protected $basket;

    public function getBasket()
    {
        return $this->basket;
    }
}

And the corresponding resolver classes:

<?php

namespace Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver;

use Neos\Flow\Annotations as Flow;
use t3n\GraphQL\ResolverInterface;

class QueryResolver implements ResolverInterface
{
    protected $someServiceToFetchProducts;

    // Note the resolver method signature. The context is available as third param
    public function basket($_, $variables, ShoppingBasketContext $context): array
    {
        return $context->getBasket();
    }
}
<?php

namespace Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver;

use Neos\Flow\Annotations as Flow;
use t3n\GraphQL\ResolverInterface;

class MutationResolver implements ResolverInterface
{
    protected $someServiceToFetchProducts;

    public function addItem($_, $variables, ShoppingBasketContext $context): Basket
    {
        // construct your item with the input (simplified, don't forget validation etc.)
        $item = new BasketItem();
        $item->setName($variables['name']);
        $item->setPrice($variables['price']);

        $basket = $context->getBasket();
        $basket->addItem($item);

        return $basket;
    }
}

Log incoming requests

You can enable logging of incoming requests per endpoint:

t3n:
  GraphQL:
    endpoints:
      'your-endpoint':
        logRequests: true

Once activated all incoming requests will be logged to Data/Logs/GraphQLRequests.log. Each log entry will contain the endpoint, query and variables.

Secure your endpoint

To secure your api endpoints you have several options. The easiest way is to just configure some privilege for your Resolver:

privilegeTargets:
  'Neos\Flow\Security\Authorization\Privilege\Method\MethodPrivilege':
    'Your.Package:Queries':
      matcher: 'method(public Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver\QueryResolver->.*())'
    'Your.Package:Mutations':
      matcher: 'method(public Your\Package\GraphQL\Resolver\MutationResolver->.*())'

roles:
  'Your.Package:SomeRole':
    privileges:
      - privilegeTarget: 'Your.Package:Queries'
        permission: GRANT
      - privilegeTarget: 'Your.Package:Mutations'
        permission: GRANT

You could also use a custom Context to access the current logged in user.

Schema directives

By default this package provides three directives:

  • AuthDirective
  • CachedDirective
  • CostDirective

To enable those Directives add this configuration to your endpoint:

t3n:
  GraphQL:
    endpoints:
      'your-endpoint':
        schemas:
          root: # use any key you like here
            typeDefs: 'resource://t3n.GraphQL/Private/GraphQL/schema.root.graphql'
        schemaDirectives:
          auth: 't3n\GraphQL\Directive\AuthDirective'
          cached: 't3n\GraphQL\Directive\CachedDirective'
          cost: 't3n\GraphQL\Directive\CostDirective'

AuthDirective

The AuthDirective will check the security context for current authenticated roles. This enables you to protect objects or fields to user with given roles.

Use it like this to allow Editors to update a product but restrict the removal to Admins only:

type Mutation {
    updateProduct(): Product @auth(required: "Neos.Neos:Editor")
    removeProduct(): Boolean @auth(required: "Neos.Neos:Administrator")
}

CachedDirective

Caching is always a thing. Some queries might be expensive to resolve and it's worthy to cache the result. Therefore you should use the CachedDirective:

type Query {
  getProduct(id: ID!): Product @cached(maxAge: 100, tags: ["some-tag", "another-tag"])
}

The CachedDirective will use a flow cache t3n_GraphQL_Resolve as a backend. The directive accepts a maxAge argument as well as tags. Check the flow documentation about caching to learn about them! The cache entry identifier will respect all arguments (id in this example) as well as the query path.

CostDirective

The CostDirective will add a complexity function to your fields and objects which is used by some validation rules. Each type and children has a default complexity of 1. It allows you to annotate cost values and multipliers just like this:

type Product @cost(complexity: 5) {
  name: String! @cost(complexity: 3)
  price: Float!
}

type Query {
  products(limit: Int!): [Product!]! @cost(multipliers: ["limit"])
}

If you query produts(limit: 3) { name, price } the query would have a cost of:

9 per product (5 for the product itself and 3 for fetching the name and 1 for the price (default complexity)) multiplied with 3 cause we defined the limit value as an multiplier. So the query would have a total complexity of 27.

Validation rules

There are several Validation rules you can enable per endpoint. The most common are the QueryDepth as well as the QueryComplexity rule. Configure your endpoint to enable those rules:

t3n:
  GraphQL:
    endpoints:
      'some-endpoint':
        validationRules:
          depth:
            className: 'GraphQL\Validator\Rules\QueryDepth'
            arguments:
              maxDepth: 11
          complexity:
            className: 'GraphQL\Validator\Rules\QueryComplexity'
            arguments:
              maxQueryComplexity: 1000

The maxQueryComplexitiy is calculated via the CostDirective.

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