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ActiveOperation is a micro-framework for modelling business processes
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README.md

ActiveOperation

Gem Version Downloads

ActiveOperation is a micro-framework for modelling business processes. It is the perfect companion for any Rails application. The core idea behind an operation is to move code that usually would either live in a controller or a model into a dedicated object.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'active_operation'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it manually as:

$ gem install active_operation

Rails

Run the the install generator to initialize a base operation:

rails g active_operation:install

Then generate the desired operation:

rails g active_operation:operation signup/create_user

Usage

To define an operation, create a new class and inherit from ActiveOperation::Base. The input arguments of an operation are defined using the input statement. These statements describe the arguments the initializer takes. All arguments are accessible through reader and writer methods. ActiveOperation uses SmartProperties to provide this feature. More information on the available configuration options can be found in the project README.

Every operation must implement the #execute method, which describes its core functionality. Additionally, operations support the following callbacks: before, around, after, succeeded, halted, error. The callback mechanism utilizes ActiveSupport::Callbacks. Thus, everything known from Rails is applicable for operation callbacks, too.

# app/operations/user/signup.rb
class User::Signup < ActiveOperation::Base
  input :email, accepts: String, type: :keyword, required: true
  input :password, accepts: String, type: :keyword, required: true

  before do
    user = User.find_by(email: email)
    halt user unless user.nil?
  end

  def execute
    User.create!(email: email, password: password)
  end

  succeeded do
    Email::SendWelcomeMail.perform(output)
  end
end

To execute an operation, instantiate it and invoke the #call method. As a result, this method will return the operation's output, which is also available through the #output method. For convenience, operations also expose a .call class method, which instantiates the operation, runs it and returns the its output.

Operations go through different states during their lifecycle. After executing an operation, the state can be used for branching purposes. In the example below, the operation's state is used to decide wether to redirect to the user_path or to re-render the new page.

# app/controllers/users_controller.rb
class UsersController < ApplicationController
  def create
    signup = User::Signup.new(**signup_params)
    @user = signup.call

    if signup.succeeded?
      redirect_to user_path(@user)
    else
      flash[:error] = "Could not create user"
      render :new
    end
  end

  private

  def signup_params
    params.permit(:email, :password)
  end
end

Development

After checking out the repo, run bin/setup to install dependencies. Then, run rake spec to run the tests. You can also run bin/console for an interactive prompt that will allow you to experiment.

To install this gem onto your local machine, run bundle exec rake install. To release a new version, update the version number in version.rb, and then run bundle exec rake release, which will create a git tag for the version, push git commits and tags, and push the .gem file to rubygems.org.

Contributing

Bug reports and pull requests are welcome on GitHub at https://github.com/t6d/active_operation.

License

The gem is available as open source under the terms of the MIT License.

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