TestProject Java SDK Examples
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README.md

README.md

TestProject Java SDK

This repository contains code examples based on TestProject Java SDK.

Briefing

This document describes the bare minimum steps to start developing tests using the Java SDK.
TestProject provides a unified test automation SDK with support for Android, iOS and Web applications by utilizing the open-source Selenium and Appium frameworks. TestProject is OS agnostic and can run on Windows, Linux or Mac. It is a full stack automation framework with capabilities that allow automation test management, remote and local test execution, job scheduling, reporting dashboards, collaboration and more.

JDK / JRE

Please use JDK 8, higher versions are not yet supported.

Preparations

To kick-off automation development with TestProject, it is necessary to have an active TestProject account and the TestProject Agent installed.
TestProject's Agent is a cross-platform desktop application, allowing you to create, debug and execute your test automation locally. TestProject Agent can be downloaded from Agents page.

Getting Java SDK

You can download TestProject SDK for Java from the Developers page and reference it in your project.

Installing SDK

To use TestProject SDK you have to add it as a reference to your project.
Here are some examples for how it should be done using Maven or Gradle.

Maven:

<dependency>
    <groupId>io.testproject</groupId>
    <artifactId>java-sdk</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
    <systemPath>/path/to/sdk/io.testproject.sdk.java.jar</systemPath>
    <scope>system</scope>
</dependency>

Gradle:

 compile files("/path/to/sdk/io.testproject.sdk.java.jar")

Refer to pom.xml and build.gradle files in the provided examples for more details.

Test Development

The best way to start developing automated tests with TestProject is by reviewing the source code of a basic test that performs a login and updates a profile form, expecting the save to succeed.

There is also a Generic test, representing a dummy scenario that can be automated.
It can be used as a reference for real scenarios that automate a non-UI sequences (those that do not require a Selenium or Appium driver).

Test Class

In order to build a Test that can be executed by TestProject, the class has to implement on of the interfaces that the SDK provides.
Interface implementation requires an implementation of the execute() method, that will be be invoked by the platform to run the Test.
The execute() method returns ExecutionResult enum which can be PASSED or FAILED.

Below are some examples for Test implementation on different platforms:

Web Test

BasicTest class implements the WebTest interface:

public class BasicTest implements WebTest

Test entry point is the execute method:

public ExecutionResult execute(WebTestHelper helper) throws FailureException

The following line of code retrieves a driver to automate the browser.

// Get driver initialized by TestProject Agent
// No need to specify browser type, it can be done later via UI
WebDriver driver = helper.getDriver();

Following code is used to navigate the browser to the relevant URL. After it is executed, TestProject Demo page is loaded.

// Navigate to TestProject Demo website
driver.navigate().to("https://example.testproject.io/web/");

The following code uses the Page Object Model pattern to login in and complete a profile form, saving it:

// Login using provided credentials
LoginPage loginPage = PageFactory.initElements(driver, LoginPage.class);
loginPage.login(name, password);

// Complete profile forms and save it
ProfilePage profilePage = PageFactory.initElements(driver, ProfilePage.class);
profilePage.updateProfile(country, address, email, phone);

The following return statement will assert test result:

return profilePage.isSaved() ? ExecutionResult.PASSED : ExecutionResult.FAILED;

Android Test

BasicTest class implements the AndroidTest interface:

public class BasicTest implements AndroidTest

Test entry point is the execute method:

public ExecutionResult execute(AndroidTestHelper helper) throws FailureException

The following line of code retrieves a driver to automate the App.

// Get driver initialized by TestProject Agent
AndroidDriver driver = helper.getDriver();

The following code resets the App and uses the Page Object Model pattern to login in and complete a profile form, saving it:

 driver.resetApp();

LoginPage loginPage = new LoginPage(driver);
loginPage.login(name, password);

ProfilePage profilePage = new ProfilePage(driver);
profilePage.updateProfile(country, address, email, phone);

The following return statement will assert test result:

return profilePage.isSaved() ? ExecutionResult.PASSED : ExecutionResult.FAILED;

iOS Test

BasicTest class implements the IOSTest interface:

public class BasicTest implements IOSTest

Test entry point is the execute method:

public ExecutionResult execute(IOSTestHelper helper) throws FailureException

The following line of code retrieves a driver to automate the App.

// Get driver initialized by TestProject Agent
IOSDriver driver = helper.getDriver();

The following code resets the App and uses the Page Object Model pattern to login in and complete a profile form, saving it:

 driver.resetApp();

LoginPage loginPage = new LoginPage(driver);
loginPage.login(name, password);

ProfilePage profilePage = new ProfilePage(driver);
profilePage.updateProfile(country, address, email, phone);

The following return statement will assert test result:

return profilePage.isSaved() ? ExecutionResult.PASSED : ExecutionResult.FAILED;

Generic Test

BasicTest class implements the GenericTest interface:

public class BasicTest implements GenericTest

Test entry point is the execute method:

public ExecutionResult execute(TestHelper helper) throws FailureException

The following code adds the value stored in 'a' variable to the value in 'b' and if equals 2, asserts success:

int a = 1, b = 1;

if (a + b == 2) {
    return ExecutionResult.PASSED;
} else {
    return ExecutionResult.FAILED;
}

Debugging / Running Test

To debug or run the test locally, you will have to use the Runner class from TestProject SDK. All code examples, have JUnit tests that use Runner to debug the automation locally. Debugging or running a test locally with the Runner class, requires authentication before communication with the TestProject Agent (since it is the execution engine). Development token for authentication can be easily obtained from the Developers page. It should be used as a parameter in one of the Runner factory methods:

Web

Runner runner = Runner.createWeb("YOUR_DEV_TOKEN", ...

Android

Runner runner = Runner.createAndroid("YOUR_DEV_TOKEN", ...

Chrome on Android

Runner runner = Runner.createAndroidWeb("YOUR_DEV_TOKEN", ...

iOS

Runner runner = Runner.createIOS("YOUR_DEV_TOKEN", ...

Safari on iOS

Runner runner = Runner.createIOSWeb("YOUR_DEV_TOKEN", ...

Generic

Runner runner = Runner.create("YOUR_DEV_TOKEN"...

Using parameters and step reports in your tests

Let's make our example more advanced by adding parameters. To add parameters to your test, you simply need to add fields with relevant annotations.
In addition, we will create step reports to separate the different stages of the test (each report will appear as a separate step in the future execution reports).

See the relevant platform link for full source code:

Test Annotations

TestProject SDK provides annotations to describe the test and its parameters:

  1. The Test annotation is used to better describe the Test and define how it will appear later in TestProject UI:
    • name - The name of the test (if omitted, the name of the class will be used).
    • description - A description of the test which is shown in various places in TestProject platform (e.g. reporting dashboard). The description may contain placeholders {{propertyName}} that will be changed dynamically according to test parameters.
    • version - A version string which is used for future reference.
  2. The Parameter annotation is used to better describe your Test inputs and outputs, in the example above there are two inputs - url and expectedTitle.
    • description - The description of the parameter
    • direction - Defines the parameter as an input (default if omitted) or an output parameter. An input parameter will receive values when the test is executed while the output parameter value will be retrieved at the end of test execution (and can be used in following steps later on in the automation scenario).
    • defaultValue - Defines a default value that will be used for the parameter.

Reports

Implemented execute() method receives a Helper instance as a parameter.
Via this helper, you can obtain an instance of TestReporter class.

TestReporter report = helper.getReporter();

Notice the following line in the Extended Test example.
This line reports a step based on provided condition and takes a screenshot:

report.step("Profile information saved", profilePage.isSaved(), TakeScreenshotConditionType.Always);

Using the following code one can set test result message:

report.result("Test completed successfully");

Addon development

Much like Tests you can develop custom Addons to extend TestProject and shape your automated testing solution for your needs.
An Addon is a set of Actions (one or more) where each Action does a specific task, a common Addon scenario will be to extend basic set of Actions on complicated UI elements or make wrappers for user defined API.
Once created, Actions can be used to design steps of automated tests.

Addon Manifest

To start developing an Addon a manifest file is required. The manifest is a descriptor of your Addon, it contains a unique GUID for the addon and a list of required permissions.
Create an Addon in the Addons screen and download the generated manifest, placing it in your project resources folder.

Implement the Addon

Lets review a simple Addon with a ClearFields action that clears a form. It can be used on the login form in TestProject Demo website or mobile App:

There is also a Generic action, representing a dummy scenario that can be automated.
It can be used as a reference for real scenarios that automate a non-UI (those hat do not require a Selenium or Appium driver) actions.

Action Class

In order to build an Action that can be executed by TestProject, the class has to implement one of the interfaces that the SDK provides.
Action class can also be decorated with the @Action annotation to provide extra information about the action.

Interface implementation requires an implementation of the execute() method, that will be be invoked by the platform to run the Action.
The execute() method returns ExecutionResult enum which can be PASSED or FAILED.

Web Action

ClearFields class implements the WebAction interface:

@Action(name = "Clear Fields")
public class ClearFields implements WebAction

Action entry point is the execute method:

public ExecutionResult execute(WebAddonHelper helper) throws FailureException

Action code searches for visible Forms and then for contained inputs elements, clearing them one by one:

// Get Driver
WebDriver driver = helper.getDriver();

// Search for Form elements
for (WebElement form : driver.findElements(By.tagName("form"))) {

    // Ignore invisible forms
    if (!form.isDisplayed()) {
        continue;
    }

    // Clear all inputs
    for (WebElement element : form.findElements(By.tagName("input"))) {
        element.clear();
    }
}

Android Action

ClearFields class implements the AndroidAction interface:

@Action(name = "Clear Fields")
public class ClearFields implements AndroidAction

Action entry point is the execute method:

public ExecutionResult execute(AndroidAddonHelper helper) throws FailureException

Action code searches for EditText elements, clearing them one by one:

for (AndroidElement element : helper.getDriver().findElements(By.className("android.widget.EditText"))) {
    element.clear();
}

iOS Action

ClearFields class implements the IOSAction interface:

@Action(name = "Clear Fields")
public class ClearFields implements IOSAction

Action entry point is the execute method:

public ExecutionResult execute(IOSAddonHelper helper) throws FailureException

Action code searches for XCUIElementTypeTextField and XCUIElementTypeSecureTextField elements, clearing them one by one:

for (IOSElement element : helper.getDriver().findElements(By.className("XCUIElementTypeTextField"))) {
    element.clear();
}

for (IOSElement element : helper.getDriver().findElements(By.className("XCUIElementTypeSecureTextField"))) {
    element.clear();
}

Generic Action

Addition class implements the GenericAction interface:

@Action(name = "Addition", description = "Add {{a}} to {{b}}")
public class Addition implements GenericAction

Action entry point is the execute method:

public ExecutionResult execute(AddonHelper helper) throws FailureException

Action code performs an addition of values in two variables, assigning result to third:

this.result = a + b;

Actions run in context of a test and assume that required UI state is already in place.
When the action will be used in a test it will be represented as a single step, usually preceded by other steps.
However, when debugging it locally, preparations should be done using the Runner class to start from expected UI state:

Web - State Preparation

// Create Action
ClearFields action = new ClearFields();

// Prepare state
WebDriver driver = runner.getDriver();
driver.navigate().to("https://example.testproject.io/web/");
driver.findElement(By.id("name")).sendKeys("John Smith");
driver.findElement(By.id("password")).sendKeys("12345");

// Run action
runner.run(action);

Android - State Preparation

// Create Action
ClearFields action = new ClearFields();

// Prepare state
AndroidDriver driver = runner.getDriver();
driver.findElement(By.id("name")).sendKeys("John Smith");
driver.findElement(By.id("password")).sendKeys("12345");

// Run action
runner.run(action);

iOS - State Preparation

// Create Action
ClearFields action = new ClearFields();

// Prepare state
IOSDriver driver = runner.getDriver();
driver.findElement(By.id("name")).sendKeys("John Smith");
driver.findElement(By.id("password")).sendKeys("12345");

// Run action
runner.run(action);

Action Annotations

TestProject SDK provides annotations to describe the action:

  1. The Action annotation is used to better describe your action and define how it will appear later in TestProject UI:
    • name - The name of the action (if omitted, the name of the class will be used).
    • description - A description of the test which is shown in various places in TestProject platform (reports for example). The description can use placeholders {{propertyName}} do dynamically change the text according to test properties.
    • version - A version string which is used for future reference.
  2. The Parameter annotation is used to better describe your action's inputs and outputs, in the example above there are two parameters - question and answer.
    • description - The description of the parameter
    • direction - Defines the parameter as an input (default if omitted) or an output parameter. An input parameter will able to receive values when it is being executed while the output parameter value will be retrieved at the end of test execution (and can be used in other places later on in the automation scenario).
    • defaultValue - Defines a default value that will be used for the parameter.

NOTE: Unlike tests, actions cannot use assertions because an action is a single generic reusable unit.

Debugging / Running Actions

To debug or run the action locally, you will have to use the Runner class from TestProject SDK. All code examples, have JUnit tests that use Runner to debug the automation locally.

Element Actions

Actions can be element based, when their scope is limited to operations on a specific element and not the whole DOM.
This allows creating smart crowd based addons for industry common elements and libraries.

TypeRandomPhone is an example of an Element Action:

This action generates a random phone number based on provided country code and max digits amount, typing it in a text field:

long number = (long) (Math.random() * Math.pow(10, maxDigits));
phone = String.format("+%s%s", countryCode, number);
element.sendKeys(phone);
return ExecutionResult.PASSED;

It also stores the result in an output field (see the annotation and ParameterDirection.OUTPUT configuration) for further use later in test.
When the action is debugged using a Runner, via JUnit test, it's important to pass the element search criteria into the action:

runner.run(action, By.id("phone"));

After the Addon is uploaded to TestProject platform this will be done via UI.

Element Type

Element Actions are made to be used on a specific Element Types. Element Types are defined in TestProject using XPath to describe target elements similarities:

Web - Element Type

It can be a simple definitions such as:

//div

Or a more complex one, such as:

//div[contains(@class, 'progressbar') and contains(@class, 'widget') and @role = 'progressbar']

Android - Element Type

It can be a simple definitions such as:

//android.widget.Button

Or a more complex one, such as:

//android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView[contains(@resource-id, 'my_view') and .//android.widget.TextView[not(contains(@resource-id, 'average_value'))]]

iOS - Element Type

It can be a simple definitions such as:

//XCUIElementTypeButton

Or a more complex one, such as:

//XCUIElementTypeSearchField[contains(@label = 'Categories')]

It is up to the Action developer how to narrow and limit the list of element types that the action developed will be applicable to.

Crowd Code / Addon Proxy

One of the greatest features of the TestProject environment is the ability to execute a code written by someone else.
It can be your account colleagues writing actions that you can reuse, or TestProject community users.
Developer must download a binary file with the proxy class for the Action he wants to execute.

Assuming your account member uploaded the example Addon, named it Example and you want to reuse it's code your Test.
To do so, you can download it's proxy JAR and use it like this:

ClearFields clearFieldsAction = ExampleAddon.clearFields();

Implemented execute() method receives a Helper instance as a parameter.
Via this helper, you can execute the proxy by invoking the executeProxy method:

StepExecutionResult result = helper.executeProxy(clearFieldsAction);

See examples:

Packaging

In order to upload your Addons or Tests to TestProject, you have to package it as JAR file.
Export your code as an uber JAR file with dependencies, excluding TestProject SDK.

See build.gradle or pom.xml files in code examples for details.

Support

For any further inquiries, please use TestProject support channels: