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README.md

README.md

#The history of the world#

##Raleigh, Sir, Walter, 1552?-1618.## The history of the world Raleigh, Sir, Walter, 1552?-1618.

##General Summary##

Links

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This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. This Phase I text is available for reuse, according to the terms of Creative Commons 0 1.0 Universal. The text can be copied, modified, distributed and performed, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.

Major revisions

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  2. 2001-07 Apex CoVantage Keyed and coded from ProQuest page images
  3. 2005-03 Ben Griffin Sampled and proofread
  4. 2005-03 Ben Griffin Text and markup reviewed and edited
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##Content Summary##

#####Front#####

  1. THE MINDE OF THE FRONT.

  2. THE PREFACE. THE CONTENTS OF THE CHAPTERS, PARAGRAPHES, AND SECTIONS, OF THE FIRST BOOKE OF THE FIRST PART OF THE _ THE CONTENTS OF THE CHAPTERS, PARAGRAPHES, AND SECTIONS, OF THE FIRST BOOKE OF THE FIRST PART OF THE HISTORIE OF THE WORLD.

    _ The Contents of the Chapters, Paragraphes, and Sections, in the second Booke of the first Part of the Historie of the WORLD.

    _ The Contents of the Chapters, Paragraphes, and Sections, in the third Booke of the first Part of the Historie of the WORLD.

    _ The Contents of the Chapters, Paragraphes, and Sections, in the fourth Booke of the first Part of the Historie of the WORLD.

    _ The Contents of the Chapters, Paragraphes, and Sections, in the fift Booke of the first Part of the Historie of the WORLD.

#####Body#####

  1. THE FIRST PART OF THE HISTORIE OF THE WORLD: INTREATING OF THE Beginning, and first ages of the same, from the Creation, vnto ABRAHAM.

    _ THE FIRST BOOKE.

    • CHAP. I. Of the Creation, and Preseruation of the World.

§. I. That the inuisible God is seene in his Creatures.

§. II. That the wisest of the Heathen, whose authoritie is not to be despised, haue acknowledged the world to haue beene created by GOD.

§. III. Of the meaning of In Principio Genes. 1. 1.

§. IIII. Of the meaning of the words Heauen and Earth, Genesis 2. 1.

§. V. That the substance of the waters, as mixt in the body of the earth, is by MOSES vnderstood in the word Earth: and that the Earth, by the attributes of vnformed and voide, is described as the 〈◊〉 of the anctent Heathen.

§. VI. How it is to be vnderstood that the Spirit of God mooued vpon the waters, and that this is not to be searched curiously.

§. VII. Of the light created, as the materiall substance of the Sunne: and of the nature of it, and difficultie of knowledge of it: and of the excellencie and vse of it: and of motion, and heat annexed vnto it.

§. VIII. Of the Firmament, and of the waters aboue the Firmament: and whether there bee any cristalline Heauen, or any Primum mobile.

§. IX. A conclusion repeating the summe of the workes in the Creation, which are reduced to three heads: The creation of matter, The forming of it, The finishing of it.

§. X. That Nature is no Principium per se; nor forme the giuer of being: and of our ignorance, how second causes should haue any proportion with their effects.

§. XI. Of Fate; and that the Starres haue great influence: and that their operations may diuersly be preuented or furthered.

§. XII. Of Prescience.

§. XIII. Of Prouidence:

§. XIIII. Of Predestination.

§. XV. Of Fortune: and of the reason of some things that seeme to be by fortune, and against Reason andProuidence.

  * CHAP. II. Of mans estate in his first Creation, and of Gods rest.

§. I. Of the Image of God, according to which man was first created.

§. II. Of the intellectuall mind of man, in which there is much of the Image of God: and that this Image is much deformed by sinne.

§. III. Of our base and fraile bodies: and that the care thereof should yeeld to the immortall Soule.

§. IIII. Of the Spirit of life, which God breathed into man, in his Creation.

§. V. That man is (as it were) a little World: with a digression touching our mortalitie.

§. VI. Of the free power, which man had in his first creation, to dispose of himselfe.

§. VII. Of Gods ceasing to create any more: and of the cause thereof, because the Vniuersall created was exceeding good.

  * CHAP. III. Of the place of Paradise.

§. I. That the seate of Paradise is greatly mistaken: and that it is no maruaile that men should erre.

§. II. A recitall of strange opinions, touching Paradise.

§. III. That there was a true locall Paradise Eastward, in the Countrie of Eden.

§. IIII. Why it should bee needfull to intreate diligently of the place of Paradise.

§. V. That the Floud hath not vtterly' defaced the markes of Paradise, nor caused Hils in the Earth.

§. VI. That Paradise was not the whole Earth, as some haue thought: making the Ocean to bee the fountaine of those foure Riuers.

§. VII. Of their opinion, which make Paradise as high as the Moone: and of others, which make it higher than the middle Region of the ayre.

§. VIII. Of their opinion that seaete Paradise vnder the Aequinoctiall: and of the pleasant habitation vnder those Climates.

§. IX. Of the change of the names of places: and that besides that Eden in Coelesyria, there is a Countrey in Babylon, once of this name, as is proued out of ESA. 37. and EZECH. 27.

§. X. Of diuers other testimonies of the land of Eden; and that this is the Eden of Paradise.

§. XI. Of the difficultie in the Text, which seemeth to make the foureRiuers to rise from one streame.

§. XII. Of the strange fertilitie and happinesse of the Babylonian soile, as it is certayne that Eden was such.

§. XIII. Of the Riuer Pison, and the land of Hauilah.

§. XIIII. Of the Riuer Gehon and the Land of Cush: and of the ill translating of the Aethiopia for Cush, 2. CHRON. 21. 16.

§. XV. A conclusion by way of repetition of something spoken of before.

  * CHAP. IIII. Of the two chiefe Trees in the Garden of Paradise.

§. I. That the Tree of Life was a materiall Tree: and in what sense it is to be taken, that man by his eating the forbidden fruit, is made subiect to death.

§. II. Of BECANVS his opinion, that the Tree of Knowledge was Ficus Indica.

§ III. Of BECANVS his not vnwittie allegorizing of the Storie of his Ficus Indica.

§. IIII. Of the name of the tree of Knowledge of good and euill: with some other notes touching the storie of ADAMS sinne.

  * CHAP. V.  Of diuers memorable things betweene the fall of ADAM, and the floud of NOAH.

§. I. Of the cause and the reuenge of CAINS sinne: and of his going out from God.

§. II. Of CAINS dwelling in the Land of NOD: and of his Citie Enoch.

§. III. Of MOSES his omitting sundry things concerning CAINS Generation.

§. IIII. Of the diuersities in the Ages of the Patriarchs when they begat their children.

§. V. Of the long liues of the Patriarchs: and some of late memorie.

§. VI. Of the Patriarchs deliuering their knowledge by Tradition: and that ENOCH writ before the Floud.

§. VII. Of the men of renownie before the floud.

§. VIII. That the Giants by MOSES so called, were indeede men of huge bodies: as also diuers in later times.

  * CHAP. VI. Of idolatrous corruptions, quickly rising, and hardly at length vanishing in the world: and of the Reliques of Truth touching these ancient times, obscurely appearing in Fables and old Legends.

§. I. That in old corruptions we may finde some signes of more ancient truth.

§. II. That the corruptions themselues were very ancient: as in the family of NOAH, and in the old Aegyptians.

§. III. That in processe of time these lesser errours drew on greater: as appeareth in the grosse Superstitions of the Aegyptians.

§. IIII. That from the reliques of ancient Records among the Ae gyptians and others the first Idols and Fables were inuented: and that the first IVPITER was CAIN, VVLCAN, TVBALCAIN, &c.

§. V. Of the three chiefest IVPITERS; and the strange Storie of the third.

§. VI. Of CHAM, and other wicked ones, whereof some gat, some affected the name of Gods.

§. VII. That the wiser of the ancient Heathen had farre better opinions of God.

§. VIII. That Heathenisme and Iudaisme, after many wounds, were at length about the same time vnder IVLIAN miraculously confounded.

§. IX. Of the last refuges of the Deuill to maintaine his Kingdome.

  * CHAP. VII. Of NOAHS Floud.

§. I. Of Gods fore-warning: and some humane testimonies: and some doubting touching the truth of NOAHS Floud.

§. II. Of the Floud in the time of 〈◊〉: and that this was not NOAHS Floud.

§. III. Of DEVCALIONS Floud: and that this was not NOAHS Floud: nor the Vmbri in Italie a remnant of any vniuersall Floud.

§ IIII. Of some other records testifying the vniuersall floud: and of two ancient deluges in Aegypt: and of some elsewhere.

§. V. That the floud of NOAH was supernaturall, though some say it might haue beene foreseene by the Starres.

§. VI. That there was no neede of any new Creation of matter to make the vniuersall floud: and what are Catarractae Coeli, GEN. 7. VERS. 11.

§. VII. Of some remaynder of the memorie of NOAH among the Heathen.

§. VIII. Of sundrie particulars touching the Arke: as the place where it was made, the matter, fashion and name.

§. IX. That the Arke was of sufficient capacitie.

§. X. That the Arke rested vpon part of the hill Taurus (or Caucasus) betweene the East Indies, and Scythia.

  * CHAP. VIII. Of the first planting of Nations after the floud; and of the Sonnes of NOAH, SEM, HAM, and IAPHET, by whom the earth was repeopled. 

§. I. Whether SHEM and HAM were elder then IAPHET.

§. II. Of diuers things that in all reason are to be presumed, touching the first planting of the World, as that all Histories must yeeld to MOSES: that the world was not planted all at once, nor without great direction: and that the knowne great Lords of the first ages were of the issue of HAM.

§. III. Of the Iles of the Gentiles in IAPHETS portion: of BEROSVS his too speedie seating GOMER the sonne of IAPHET in Italie; and another of IAPHETS sonnes TVBAL in Spaine: and of the antiquitie of Longinque Nauigation.

§. IIII. Of GOG and MAGOG, TVBAL, and MESECH, seated first about 〈◊〉, out of EZECHIEL CAP. 38. 39.

§. V. Against the fabulous BEROSVS his fiction, That the Italian IANVS was NOAH.

§. VI. That GOMER also and his sonne TOGORMA of the posteritie of IAPHETH were first seated about Asia the lesse: and that from thence they spred Westward into Europe: and Northward into Sarmatia.

§. VII. Of IAVAN the fourth sonne of IAPHETH: and of MESCH, of ARAM, and MESHECH of IAPHETH.

§. VIII. Of ASCANEZ and RIPHATH, the two elder Sonnes of GOMER.

§. IX. Of the foure Sonnes of IAVAN: and of the double signification of Tharsis, either for a proper name or for the Sea.

§. X. That the seate of CHVSH the eldest sonne of HAM, was in Arabia, not in Aethiopia: and of strange Fables, and 〈◊〉 Translations of Scripture, grounded vpon the mistaking of this point.

§. XI. Of the plantation and antiquities of Egypt.

§. XII. Of the eleuen sonnes of CANAAN, the fourth sonne of HAM.

§. XIII. Of the sonnes of CHVSH (excepting NIMROD) of whom hereafter.

§. XIIII. Of the issue of MIZRAIM: and of the place of HIEREMIE, Chap. 9. Vers. 7.

§. XV. Of the issue of SEM.

  * CHAP. IX. Of the beginning and establishing ofGouernement.

§. I. Of the proceeding from the first Gouernement vnder the eldest of Families to Regall, and from Regall absolute, to Regall tempered with Lawes.

§. II. Of the three commendable sorts of Gouernement with their opposites: and of the degrees of humane societie.

§. III. Of the good Gouernment of the first Kings.

§. IIII. Of the beginning of Nobilitie: and of the vaine vaunt thereof without vertue.

  * CHAP. X. Of NIMROD, BELVS, and NINVS: and of memorable things about those times.

§. I. That NIMROD was the first after the Floud that raigned like Soueraigne Lord: and that his beginning seemeth to haue beene of iust authoritie.

§. II. That NIMROD, BELVS, and NINVS were three distinct persons.

§. III. That NIMROD, not ASSVR, built Niniue: and that it is probable out of ESAY 23. 13. that ASSVR built Vr of the Chaldees.

§. IIII. Of the acts of NIMROD and BELVS, as farre as now they are knowne.

§. V. That we are not to maruaile how so many Kingdomes could be erected about these times: and of VEXORIS of Aegypt, and TANAIS of Scythia.

§. VI. Of the name of BELVS, and other names affine vnto it.

§. VII. Of the worshipping of Images begunne from BELVS in Babel.

§. VIII. Of the Warres of NINVS: and lastly of his Warre against ZOROASTER.

  * CHAP. XI. Of ZOROASTER, supposed to haue beene the chiefe Author of Magick arts: and of the diuers kindes of Magicke. 

§. I. That ZOROASTER was not CHAM, nor the first Inuenter of Astrologie, or of Magicke: and that there were diuers great Magicians of this name.

§. II. Of the name of Magia: and that it was anciently farre diuers from Coniuring, and Witchcraft.

§. III. That the good knowledge in the ancient 〈◊〉 is not to bee condemned: though the Deuill here as in other kinds hath sought to obtrude euill things, vnder the name and colour of good things.

§. IIII. That DANIELS mistiking NABVCHODONOSORS condemning of the Magicians doth not iustifie all their practices.

§. V. The abuse of things which may bee found in all kinds, is not to condemne the right vse of them.

§ VI. Of the diuers kindes of vnlawfull Magicke.

§. VII. Of diuerswayes by which the Deuill seemeth to worke his wonders.

§. VIII. That none was euer raysed from the dead by the power of the Deuill: and that it was not the true SAMVEL which appeared to SAVL.

  * CHAP. XII.  Of the memorable buildings of NINVS, and of his wife SEMIRAMIS: and of other of her acts.

§. I. Of the 〈◊〉 building of Niniue by NINVS: and of Babylon by SEMIRAMIS.

§. II. Of the end of NINVS: and beginning of SEMIRAMIS reigne.

§. III. Of SEMIRAMIS parentage and education, and 〈◊〉 of her Mother.

§. IIII. Of her Expedition into India, and death after discomfiture: with a note of theimprobabilitie of her vices.

§. V. Of the Temple of BELVS built by SEMIRAMIS: and of the Pyramides of Aegypt.

  1. THE FIRST PART OF THE HISTORIE OF THE WORLD: INTREATING OF THE TIMES FROM The birth of ABRAHAM to the destruction of the Temple of Salomon.

    _ THE SECOND BOOKE.

    • CHAP. I. Of the time of the birth of ABRAHAM: and of the vse of this question, for the ordering of the Storie of the Assyrian Empire.

§. I. Of some of the successours of SEMIRAMIS: with a briefe transition to the question, about the time of the birth of ABRAHAM.

§. II. A proposall of reasons or arguments, that are brought to proue ABRAHAM was borne in the yeere 292. after the Floud, and not in the yeere 352.

§. III. The answere to one of the obiections proposed, shewing that ABRAHAM made but one iourney out of Mesopotamia into Canaan: and it, after his Fathers death.

§. IIII. The answere to another of the obiections proposed, shewing that it was not vnlikely, that TERAH should beget ABRAHAM in his hundred and thirty yeere.

§. V. The answere to two more of the obiections: shewing that wee may haue certaintie of ABRAHAMS age from the Scripture, though we make not ABRAHAM the eldest Sonne: and that there was great cause, why in the story of ABRAHAM his two brethren should be respected.

§. VI. That the naming of ABRAHAM first of the three brethren, Gen. 11. v. 26. doth not proue that hee was the eldest: together with diuers reasons proouing that ABRAHAM was not the eldest sonne of TERAH.

§. VII. A conclusion of this dispute, noting the Authors on both sides: with an admonition that they which shorten the times, make all ancient stories the more vnprobable.

§. VIII. A computation of the times of the Assyrians and others, grounded vpon the times noted in the storie of ABRAHAM.

§. IX. That AMRAPHEL, one of the foure Kings whom ABRAHAM ouertbrew, Gen. 14. may probably be thought to haue beene NINIAS the sonne of NINVS.

§. X. of ARIOCH another of the 〈◊〉 Kings, and that ELLAS, whereof he is said to haue beene King, lies betwene Coelesyria and Arabia Petraea.

§. XI. Of TIDAL another of the soure Kings.

§. XII. That CHEDORLAOMER the chiefe of the 4. Kings was not of Assyria, but of Persia: and that the Assyrian Empire at this time was much impaired.

§. XIII. That it is not vnprobable that the foure Kings had no dominion in the Countries named, but that they had else-where with their colonies planted themselues: and so retained the names of the Countries whence they came: which if it be so, we neede not say that AMRAPHEL was NINIAS, nor trouble our selues with many other difficulties.

  * CHAP. II. Of the Kings of Aegypt from the first peopling of it after the Floud, to the time of the deliuerie of the Israelites from thence.

§. I. A briefe of the names and times of the first Kings of Aegypt: with a note of the causes of difficulty in resoluing of the trueth in these points.

§. II. That by the account of the Aegyptian Dynasties, and otherwise, it appeares that CHAMS reigne in Aegypt began in the yeere after the Floud, 191.

§. III. That these Dynasties were not diuers families of Kings, but rather successions of Regents, oft times many vnder one King.

§ IIII. Of CHAM, and his sonne MIZRAIM, or OSIRIS.

§. V. Of the time when OSIRIS reigne ended: and that IACOB came into Aegypt in the time of ORVS the sonne of OSIRIS.

§. VI. Of TYPHON, HERCVLES AEGYPTVS, ORVS, and the two SESOSTRES, successiuely reigning after MIZRAIM: and of diuers errors about the former SESOSTRES.

§. VII. Of BVSIRIS the first oppressor of the Israelites: and of his successor Queene THERMVTIS that tooke vp MOSES out of the water.

§. VIII. Of the two brethren of Queene THERMVTIS: and what king it was, vnder whom MOSES was borne: and who it was that perished in the red Sea.

  * CHAP. III. Of the deliuery of Israel out of Aegypt.

§. I. Of the time of MOSES birth, and how long the Israelites were oppressed in Aegypt.

§. II. Of diuers Cities and places in Aegypt, mentioned in this Story, or elsewhere in the Scripture.

§. III. Of the cruelty against the Israelites yong children in Aegypt: and of MOSES his preseruation, and education.

§. IIII. Of MOSES his flying out of Aegypt; and the opinions of certaine ancient Historians of his warre in AEthiopia; and of his marriage there: PHILO his iudgement of his Pastorall life: and that of PERERIVS of the Bookes of GENESIS and 〈◊〉.

§. V. Of PHARAOHS pursuit of the Israelites: and of their possage towards the Red Sea, so farre as Succoth.

†. VI. Of the Solarie and Lunarie yeeres: and how they are reconciled: with the forme of the Hebrew yeere, and their manner of intarcalation.

§. VII. Of the passage of Israel from Succoth towards the Red Sea: and of the diuers wayes leading out of Aegypt.

§. VIII. Of their passage ouer the Red Sea: and of the Red Sea it selfe.

§. IX. That the passage through the Red Sea was miraculous, and not at a low Ebbe.

  * CHAP. IIII. Of the iournying of the Israelites from the Red Sea, to the place where the Law was giuen them: with a discourse of Lawes.

§. I. A transition, by way of recapitulation of some things touching Chronologie: with a continuance of the storie, vntill the Amalekites met with the Israelites.

§. II. Of the Amalekites, Madianites, and Kenites, vpon occasion of the battell with the Amalekites, and IETHROES comming: who being a Kenite, was Priest of Madian.

§. III. Of the time when the Law was giuen: with diuers commendations of the inuention of Lawes.

§. IIII. Of the name and meaning of the words, Law, and Right.

§. V. Of the definition of Lawes, and of the law eternall.

§. VI. Of the Law of Nature.

§. VII. Of the written Law of God.

§. VIII. Of the vnwritten law of God, giuen to the Patriarks by Tradition.

§. IX. Of the Morall, Iudiciall, and Ceremoniall Law, with a note prefixed, How the Scripture speaketh not alway in one sense, when it nameth the Law of MOSES.

§. X. A proposall of nine other points to be considered, with a touch of the fiue first.

§. XI. Of the sixth poynt, to wit, of the difference and agreement of the Old and New Testament.

§. XII. Of the rest of the points proposed.

§. XIII. Of the seuerall Commandements of the Decalogue: and that the difficultie is not in respect of the Commandements, but by our default.

§. XIIII. If there were not any Religion nor Iudgement to come, yet the Decalogue were most necessarie to be obserued.

§. XV. Of humane Law, written and vnwritten.

§. XVI. That onely the Prince is exempt from humane lawes, and in what sort.

  * CHAP. V. The Storie of the 〈◊〉 from the receiuing of the Law to the death of MOSES.

§. I. Of the numbring and disposing of the Host of Israel, for their marches through the Wildernesse; with a note of the 〈◊〉 giuen to the worship of God, in this ordering of their troupes.

§. II. The offerings of the twelue Princes: the Passeouer of the second yeere: The departing of IETHRO.

§. III. The voiage from Horeb to Kades: the mutinies by the way: and the cause of their turning backe to the red Sea.

§. IIII. Of their vnwillingnesse to returne: with the punishment thereof, and of diuers accidents in the returne.

§. V. Of MOSES arriuall at Zin Kades: and the accidents while they abode there.

§. VI. Of their compassing Idumaea, and trauailing to Arnon, the border of Moab.

§. VII. Of the Booke of the battailes of the Lord, mentioned in this Storie, and of other Bookes mentioned in Scripture which are lost.

§. VIII. Of MOSES his sparing the issue of LOT; and of the Giants in those parts; and of SEHON and OG.

§. IX. Of the troubles about the Madianites, and of MOSES his death.

§. X. Obseruations out of the Storie of MOSES, how God disposeth both the smallest occasions, and the greatest resistances, to the effecting of his purpose.

  * CHAP. VI. Of the Nations with whom the Israelites had dealing after their comming out of Aegypt; and of the men of renowne in other Nations, about the times of MOSES and IOSVA, with the summe  of the Historie of IOSVA.

§. I. How the Nations with whom the Israelites were to haue Warre, were diuers wayes, as it were, prepared to be their enemies.

§. II. Of the Kings of the Canaanites and Madianites, mentioned in the ancient Warres of the Israelites.

§. III. Of the Amalekites and Ismaelites.

§. IIII. Of the instauration of ciuilitie in Europe about these times, and of PROMETHEVS and ATLAS.

§. V. Of DEVCALION and PHAETON.

§. VI. Of HERMES TRISMEGISTVS.

§. VII. Of IANNES and IAMBRES, and some other that liued about those times.

§. VIII. A Briese of the Historie of IOSVA; and of the space betweene him and OTHONIEL: and of the remainders of the Canaanites; with a note of some Contemporaries to IOSVA: and of the breach of Faith.

  * CHAP. VII. Of the Tribes of 〈◊〉, that were planted in the borders of Phoenicia, with sundrie Stories dependingvpon those places.

§. I. The Proaeme to the description of the whole Land of Canaan, with an exposition of the name of Syria.

§. II. Of the bounds of the Land of Canaan, and of the promises touching this Land.

§. III. THE TRIBE OF ASHER.

§. IIII. THE TRIBE OF NEPHTALIM.

§. V. THE TRIBE OF ZABVLON.

§. VI. THE TRIBE OF JSACHAR.

§. VII. THE HALFE OF THE TRIBE OF MANASSE.

  * CHAP. VIII. Of the Kingdome of Phoenicia.

§. I. The bounds and chiefe Cities, and Founders, and Name, of this Kingdome: and of the inuention of Letters ascribed to them.

§. II. Of the Kings of Tyre.

§. III. Of BOZIVS his conceit that the Edumaeins inhabiting along the Red Sea, were the Progenitors of the Tyrians, and that the Tyrtans from them receiued and brought into Phoenicia the knowledge of the true GOD.

  * CHAP. IX. Of the Tribe of EPHRAIM, and of the Kings of the tenne Tribes, whose head was EPHRAIM.

§. I. Of the memorable places in the Tribe of EPHRAIM.

§. II. Of the Kings of the ten Tribes from IEROBOAM to ACHAB.

§. III. Of ACHAB and his Successors, with the captinitie of the ten Tribes.

  * CHAP. X. Of the memorable places of DAN, SIMEON, IVDA, RVBEN, GAD, and the other halfe of MANASSE.

§ I. Of DAN, where of Ioppe, Gath, Accaron, Azotus, and other Townes.

§. II. THE TRIBE OF SIMEON.

§. III. THE TRIBE OF JVDA.

§. IIII. THE TRIBE OF REVBEN and his Borderers.

§. V. Of the memorable places of the Gadites, and the bordering places of Ammon.

§. VI. Of the Ammonites, part of whose Territories the 〈◊〉 e s wanne from OG the King of Basan.

§. VII. Of the other halse of MANASSE.

  * CHAP. XI. The Historie of the Syrians the chiefe borderers of the Jsraelites that dwelt on the East of Jordan.

§. I. Of the Citie of Damascus and the diuers fortunes thereof.

§. II. Of the first Kings of Damascus, and of the growing vp of their power:

§. III. Of the later Kings, and decay and ouerthrow of their power.

§. IIII. Of other lesser Kingdomes of the Syrians, which being brought vnder the Assyrians, neuer recouered themselues againe.

  * CHAP. XII. Of the Tribe of BENIAMIN, and of Hierusalem.

§. I. Of diuers memorable places in the Tribe of Beniamin, whereof 〈◊〉, Gilgal, Mitspa, Bethel, Rama, Gobah and Gibha.

§. II. Of diuers memorable things concerning Hierusalem.

§. III. Of the destruction of Ierusalem by the Romans.

§. IIII. Of the vaine and malicious reports of Heathen writers, touching the ancient Iewes.

  * CHAP. XIII. Of the memorable things that happened in the world, from the death of IOSVA to the Warre of Troy: which was about the time of IEPHTHA.

§. I. Of the inter-regnum after IOSVA'S death: and of OTHONIEL.

§. II. Of the memorable things of this Age in other Nations: and of the difficultie in the computation of times.

§. III. Of EHVDS time, and of〈◊〉, ORITHYA, TEREVS, TANTALVS, TITYVS, ADMETVS, and others that liued about those times.

§. IIII. Of DEBORA and her Contemporaries.

§. V. Of GIDEON, and of DAEDALVS, SPHINX, MINOS, and others that liued in this Age.

§. VI. Of the expedition of the Argonauts.

§. VII. Of ABIMELECH, THOLAH, and IAIR, and of the Lapythae, and of THESEVS, HYPPOLYTVS, &c.

§. VII. Of the warre of Thebes which was in this age.

§. VIII. Of IEPHTA, and how the three hundred yeeres which hee speaketh of, IVD. 11. v. 28. are to bee reconciled with the places, ACT. 13. 20. 1. REG. 6. 1. together with some other things touching Chronologie about these times.

  * CHAP. XIIII. Of the Warre of Troy.

§. I. Of the Genealogie of the Kings of Troy, with a note touching the ancient Poets how they haue obserued Historicall truth.

§. II. Of the Rape of HELEN: and strength of both sides for the warre.

§. III. Of the Graecians iourney, and Embassage to Troy, and of Helenaes being detained in Aegypt; and of the Sacrificing of Iphigenia.

§. IIII. Of the Actes of the 〈◊〉 at the siege.

§. V. Of the taking of Troy, the woodden Horse, the Booke of DARES and DYCTIS, the Colonies of the reliques of Troy.

§. VI. Of the distresses and dispersions of the Greekes returning from Troy.

  * CHAP. XV. Of SAMSON, ELI, and SAMVEL.

§. I. Of SAMSON.

§. II. Of ELI and of the Arke taken, and of DAGONS fall, and the sending backe of the Arke.

§. III. Of SAMVEL, and of his Gouernment.

  * CHAP. XVI. Of SAVL.

§. I. Of the deliberation to change the gouernment into a Kingdome.

§. II. Of the election of SAVL.

§. III. Of the establishing of SAVL by his first victories.

§. IIII. Of SAVLS disobedience in his proceedings in the Warres with the Philistims and Amalekites, which caused his finall reiection.

§. V. Of the 〈◊〉 betweene the reiection of SAVL and his death.

§. VI. Of such as liued with SAMVEL and SAVL; of HELLEN and HERCVLES, and of their issues: vpon occasion of the DORES, with the HERACLIDAE, entring PELOPONESVS about this time.

§. VII. Of HOMER and HESIOD, and many changes in the world, that happened about this age:

  * CHAP. XVII. Of DAVID.

§. I. Of DAVIDS estate in the time of SAVL.

§. II. Of the beginning of DAVIDS reigne, and the warre made by ABNER for ISBOSETH.

§. III. Of the death of ABNER slaine by IOAB, and of ISBOSETH by RECHAB and BAANAH.

§. IIII. Of the flourishing time of DAVIDS Kingdome, the taking of Ierusalem, with two ouerthrowes giuen to the Philistims, and the conduction of the Arke to the Citie of DAVID.

§. V. The 〈◊〉 of the Philistims and Moabites.

§. VI. The warre which DAVID made vpon the Syrians.

§. VII. Of DAVIDS troubles in his reigne, and of his forces.

§. VIII. Of the last acts of DAVID; ADONIAHS faction; the 〈◊〉 vpon IOAB and SHIMEI.

§. IX. Of the treasures of DAVID and SALOMON.

§. X. Of the Philistims, whom DAVID absolutely mastered: and of sundry other contemporaries with DAVID.

  * CHAP. XVIII. Of SALOMON.

§ I. Of the establishing of SALOMON: of birthright, and of the cause of ADONIAHS death, and of SALOMONS Wisedome.

§. II. Of SALOMONs buildings and glorie.

§. III. Of SALOMONs sending to Ophir, and of some seeming contradictions about SALOMONs riches, and of PINEDAES conceipt of two strange passages about Africke.

§. IIII. Of the fall of SALOMON, and how long he liued.

§. V. Of SALOMONS〈◊〉.

§. VI. Of the Contemporaries of SALOMON.

  * CHAP. XIX.  Of SALOMONS Successors vntill the end of IEHOSAPHAT.

§. I. Of REHOBOAM his beginnings: the defection of the ten Tribes, and 〈◊〉〈◊〉.

§. II. Of REHOBOAM his impietie; for which hee was punished by SESAC: of his end and Contemporaries.

§. III. Of the great battaile betweene IEROBOAM and ABIA, with a Corolarie of the examples of Gods iudgements.

§. IIII. Of ASA and his Contemporaries.

§. V. Of the great alteration falling out in the ten Tribes during the raigne of ASA.

§. VI. A coniecture of the causes hindering the reunion of Israel with Iuda, which might haue been effected by these troubles.

§. VII. Of IEHOSAPHAT and his contemporaries.

  * CHAP. XX. Of IEHORAM the sonne of IEHOSAPHAT, and AHAZIA.

§. I. That IEHORAM was made King sundry times.

§. II. Probable coniectures of the motiues inducing the old King IEHOSAPHAT to change his purpose often, in making his sonne IEHORAM King.

§. III. The doings of IEHORAM when he reigned alone; and the rebellion of Edom and Libna.

§. IIII. Of the miseries falling vpon IEHORAM, and of his death.

§. V. Of the raigne of AHAZIA, and his businesse with the King of Israel.

§. VI. How AHAZIA perished with the house of AHAB: and how that Familie was destroyed by IEHV.

  * CHAP. XXI. Of ATHALIA, and whose Sonne he was that succeeded vnto her.

§. I. Of ATHALIA her vsurping the Kingdome, and what pretences shee might forge.

§. II. How IEHV spent his time in Israel, so that he could not molest ATHALIA.

§. III. Of ATHALIAHS Gouernement.

§. IIII. Of the preseruation of IOAS.

§. V. Whose Sonne IOAS was.

§. VI. 〈◊〉, wherein is maintained the liberty of vsing coniecture in Histories.

§. VII. The conspiracie against ATHALIA.

§. VIII. The death of ATHALIA, with a comparison of her and IEZABEL.

  * CHAP. XXII. Of IOAS and AMASIA, with their Contemporaries; where somewhat of the building of Carthage. 

§. I. Of IOAS his doings, whilest IEHOIADA the Priest liued.

§. II. The death of IEHOIADA, and Apostasie of IOAS.

§. III. The 〈◊〉 and time of the Syrians inuading Iuda in the dayes of IOAS.

§. IIII. How ZACHARIA was murdered by IOAS.

§. V. How IOAS was shamefully beaten by the Aramites, and of his death.

§. VI. Of the Princes liuing in the time of IOAS: Of the time when Carthage was built; and of DIDO.

§. VII. The beginning of AMAZIA his reigne. Of IOAS King of Israel, and ELISHA the Prophet.

§. VIII. Of AMAZIA his warre against EDOM; His Apostasie; and ouerthrow by IOAS.

§. IX. A discourse of the reasons hindering IOAS from vniting IVDA to the Crowne of Israel, when he had wonne Ierusalem, and held AMAZIA prisoner. The end of IOAS his Raigne.

§. X. The end of AMAZIA his 〈◊〉 and Life.

§. XI. Of the Interregnum, or vacancie, that was in the Kingdome of IVDA, after the death of AMAZIA.

§. XII. Of Princes Contemporarie with 〈◊〉, and more particularly of SARDANAPALVS.

  * CHAP. XXIII. Of VZZIA.

§. I. The prosperitie of VZZIA, and of IEROBOAM the second, who raigned with him in Israel. Of the Anarchie that was in the tenne Tribes after the death of IEROBOAM. Of ZACHARIA, SALLVM, MENAHEM and PEKAHIA.

§. II. The end of VZZIA his Raigne and life.

§. III. Of the Prophets which liued in the time of VZZIA; and of Princes then ruling in Aegypt, and in some other Countries.

§. IIII. Of the Assyrian Kings, descending from PHVL: and whether PHVL and BELOSVS were one person; or heads of sundrie Families, that raigned a-part in Niniue and Babylon.

§. V. Of the Olympiads, and the time when they began.

§. VI. Of IOTHAM and his Contemporaries.

§. VII. Of ACHAZ and his Contemporaries.

  * CHAP. XXIIII. Of the Antiquities of 〈◊〉, and 〈◊〉 of Rome in the time of AHAS.

§. I. Of the old Inhabitants, and of the name of Italie.

§. II. Of the Aborigines, and other Inhabitants of Latium, and of the reason of the names of Latini and Latium.

§. III. Of the ancient Kings of the Latines vntill AENEAS his comming.

§. IIII. Of AENEAS, and of the Kings and Gouernours of Alba.

§. V. Of the beginning of Rome, and of ROMVLVS birth and death.

  * CHAP. XXV. Of EZEKIA, and his Contemporaries:

§. I. Of the beginning of EZECHIAS, and of the agreeing of PTOLOMIES, NABONASSAR, NABOPOLASSAR and MARDOCEMPADVS, with the historie of the Bible.

§. II. Of the danger and 〈◊〉 of Iudaea from SENNACHERIB.

§. III. Of 〈◊〉 his sicknesse and recouerie; and of the Babylonian King that congratulated him.

§. IIII. The Kings that were in Media during the raigne of EZEKIA: Of the difference found betweene sundrie Authors, in rehearsing the Median Kings. Other contemporaries of EZEKIA: of CANDAVLES, GYGES, and the Kings descended from HERCVLES.

  * CHAP. XXVI. Of the Kings that raigned in Aegypt, betweene the deliuerance of ISRAEL from thence, and the raigne of EZEKIA in Juda, when Aegypt and Iuda made a league against the Assyrians. 

§. I. That many names of Aegyptian Kings, found in Historie, are like to 〈◊〉 belonged only to Viceroyes. An example prouing this out of WILLIAM of Tyre his Historie of the holy Warre.

§. II. Of ACHERRES; whether he were VCHOREVS that was the eighth from OSYMANDYAS. Of OSYMANDYAS and his Tombe.

§. III. Of CHERRES, ARMEVS, RAMESSES, and AMENOPHIS. Of MYRIS, and the Lake that beares his name.

§. IIII. Of the Kings that raigned in the Dynastie of the Larthes.

§. V. Of Aegyptian Kings whose names are found scattering in sundrie Authors, their times being not recorded. The Kings of Aegypt, according to CEDRENVS. Of VAPHRES and SESAC.

§. VI. Of CHEMMIS, CHEOPS, 〈◊〉, and other Kings recited by HERODOTVS and DIODORVS SICVLVS, which raigned betweene the times of REHOBOAM and EZEKIA.

§. VII. Of SETHON who raigned with EZEKIA, and sided with him against 〈◊〉.

  * CHAP. XXVII. Of MANASSE and his Contemporaries.

§. I. The wickednesse of MANASSES. His imprisonment, Repentance, and Death.

§. II. Of troubles in Aegypt following the death of SETHON. The raigne of PSAMMITICVS.

§. III. What reference these Aegyptian matters might haue to the imprisonment and enlargement of MANASSES. In what part of his raigne MANASSES was taken prisoner.

†. IIII. Of the first and second Messenian Warres, which were in the raignes of EZEKIA, and MANASSES Kings of Iuda.

§. V. Of the Kings that were in Lydia and Media, 〈◊〉MANASSES raigned. Whether DEIOCES the Mede were that ARPHAXAD which is mentioned in the Booke of IVDITH. Of the historie of IVDITH.

§. VI. Of other Princes and actions that were in these times.

  * CHAP. XXVIII. Of the times from the death of MANASSES to the destruction of Jerusalem.

§. I. Of AMMON and IOSIAS.

§. II. Of PHARAO NECO that fought with IOSIAS: Of IEHOAHAZ and IEHOIAKIM Kings of Iuda.

§. III. Of the Kings of Babylon and Media. How it came to passe that the Kings of Babel could not giue attendance on their businesse in Syria; which caused them to loose that Prouince.

§ IIII. The great expedition of the Scythians, who ruled in Asia eight and twentie yeeres.

§. V. Of Princes liuing in diuers Countries, in these ages.

§. VI. The 〈◊〉 of Iudaea, and destruction of Ierusalem by the Chaldaeans.

  1. THE FISRT PART OF THE HISTORIE OF THE WORLD: INTREATING OF THE TIMES FROM the destruction of Ierusalem, to the time of PHILIP of Macedon.

    _ THE THIRD BOOKE.

    • CHAP. I. Of the time passing betweene the destruction of〈◊〉, and the fall of the Assyrian Empire.

§. I. Of the connexion of Sacred and 〈◊〉 Historie.

§. II. A briefe rehearsall of two opinions, touching the beginning of the captiuitie: with an answere to the cauills of PORPHYRIE, inueighing against S. MATTHEW, and DANIEL, vpon whom the later of these opinions is founded.

§. III. That the 70. yeeres of captiuitie are to be numbred from the 〈◊〉 of Ierusalem; not from the migration of IECHONIA.

§. IIII. Sundrie opinions of the Kings which raigned in Babylon during the 70. yeeres.

§. V. A more particular examination of one opinion touching the number, persons, and raignes of the Babylonian Kings.

§. VI. What may be held as probable of the Persons and Times of NABVCHODONOSOR his successors.

§. VII. Of the victories which NABVCHODONOSOR obtained betweene the destruction of Ierusalem and conquest of Aegypt.

§. VIII. That Aegypt was conquered, and the King therein raigning slaine by NABVCHODONOSOR, contrarie to the opinion of most Authors: who following HERODOTVS and DIODORVS, relate it otherwise.

§. IX. How Aegypt was subdued and held by NABVCHADNEZZAR.

§. X. Of the sundry accompts drawne from sundry acts of NEBVCHADNEZZAR, and of the destruction of Niniuie, by him; the time of which action is vncertaine.

§. XI. Of the later time of NEBVCHADNEZZAR; his buildings, madnesse, and death.

§. XII. Of EVILMERODACH.

§. XIII. Apriuate coniecture of the Author; seruing to make good those things, which are cited out of BEROSVS, concerning the Successors of EVILMERODACH, without wrong to the truth, the qualitie, and death of BALTHASAR.

  * CHAP. II. Of the originall and first greatnesse of the Persians.

§. I. That the Medes were chiefe actors in the subuersion of theBabylonian Empire.

§. II. By what meanes the Empire was translated from the Medes to the Persians.

§. III. XENOPHONS relation of the Warre with the 〈◊〉 and Persians, made with ioynt forces vpon the Assyrians, and others.

§. IIII. The estate of the Medes and Persians in times fore-going this great Warre.

  * CHAP. III. Of CYRVS.

§. I. Of CYRVS his name and first actions.

§ II. Of CROESVS the King of Lydia, who made warre vpon CYRVS.

§ III. CROESVS his Expedition against CYRVS.

§. IIII. The Conquest of Lydia by CYRVS.

§. V. How CYRVS wonne Babylon.

§. VI. The end of CYRVS.

§. VII. Of CYRVS his decree for building the Temple of God in Ierusalem.

§. VIII. Of CYRVS his issue: and whether ATOSSA were his daughter, or (as some thinke) were the same with Queene HESTER.

  * CHAP. I III. The estate of things from the death of CYRVS to the Raigne of DARIVS.

§. I. Of the number and names of the Persian Kings.

§. II. Of CAMBYSES, and the conquering of Aegypt by him.

§. III. The rest of CAMBYSE s his acts.

§. IIII. Of the inter-regnum betweene CAMBYSES and DARIVS.

  * CHAP. V.  Of DARIVS the sonne of HYSTASPES.

§. I. Of DARIVS his Linage.

§. II. Of DARIVS his Gouernment, and suppressing the rebellion of Babylon.

§. III. Of DARIVS his fauour to the Iewes in building the Temple.

§. IIII. Of DARIVS his Scythian Warre.

§. V. Some actions of the Persians in Europe, after the Scythian Warre.

§. VI. The first occasion of the Warre which DARIVS made vpon Greece, with arehear sall of the gouernment in Athens, whence the the quarrell grew.

§. VII. Of the Ionian Rebellion, which was the principall cause of the warres 〈◊〉 betweene Greece and Persia.

§. VIII. The Warre which DARIVS made vpon Greece, with the battaile of MARATHON, and DARIVS his death.

  * CHAP. VI. Of XERXES.

§. I. The preparation of XERXES against Greece.

§. II. XERXES Armie entertained by PYTHIVS: His cutting off Mount Athos from the Continent: his bridge of Boates ouer the Hellespont: and the discourse betweene him and ARTABANVS vp. on the view of his Armie.

§. III. Of the fights at Thermopylae and Artemisium.

§. IIII. The attempt of XERXES vpon APOLLOE'S temple: and his taking of Athens.

§. V. How THEMISTOCLES the Athenian drew the Greekes to fight at Salamis.

§. VI. How the Persians consulted about giuing battaile: and how THEMISTOCLES by policie held the Greekes to their resolution; with the victorie at Salamis thereupon ensuing.

§. VII. Of things following after the battaile of Salamis: and of the flight of XERXES.

§. VIII. The negotiations betweene MARDONIVS and the Athenians, as also betweene the Athenians and Lacedaemonians; after the slight of XERXES.

§. IX. The great battaile of 〈◊〉.

§. X. The battaile of Mycale, with a strange accident that fell out in the beginning of it: and examples of the like.

§. XI. Of the barbarous qualitie of XERXES: with a transition from the Persian affaires to matters of Greece, which from this time grew more worthie of regard.

  * CHAP. VII. Of things that passed in Greece from the end of the Persian Warre, to the beginning of the Peloponnesian.

§. I. How Athens was rebuilt and fortified.

§. II. The beginning of the Athenian greatnesse, and prosperous warres madeby that State vpon the Persian.

§. III. The death of XERXES by the treason of ARTABANVS.

§. IIII. The banishment of THEMISTOCLES: His flight to ARTAXERXES newly 〈◊〉 in Persia; and his death.

§. V. How the Athenians, breaking the peace, which to their great honour they had made with the Persian, were shamefully beaten in Aegypt.

§. VI. Of other Warres made by the Athenians for the most part with good successe, about the same time.

§. VII. Of ARTAXERXES LONGIMANVS, that he was AHASHVEROSH the husband of Queene HESTER.

§. VIII. Of the troubles in Greece, foregoing the Peloponnesian Warre.

  * CHAP. VIII. Of the Peloponnesian Warre.

§. I. Vpon what termes the two principall Cities of Greece, Athens and Sparta, stood, at the beginning of the Peloponnesian Warre.

§. II. How Sparta and Athens entred into Warre.

§. III. The beginning of the Peloponnesian Warre.

§. IIII. Of the great losse which the Spartans receiued at Pylus.

§. V. How the Lacedaemonians hardly, and to their great disaduantage, obtained a peace, that was not well kept.

§. VI. Of the negotiations, and practices, held betweene many States of Greece, by occasion of the peace that was concluded.

§. VII. How the peace betweene Athens and Sparta was ill kept, though not openly broken.

§. VIII. The Athenians sending two fleets to sacke Siracuse, are put to flight and vtterly discomfited.

§. IX. Of the troubles where-into the State of Athens fell, after the great losse of the Fleet, and Armie, in Sicilia.

§. X. How ALCIBIADES wanne many important victories for the Athenians; was recalled from exile; made their Generall, and againe deposed.

§. XI. The battaile at Arginusa, and condemnation of the victorious Athenian Captaines by the people.

§. XII. The battaile at Aegos-Potamos, wherein the whole State of Athens was ruined; with the end of the Peloponnesian Warre.

  * CHAP. IX. Of matters concurring with the Peloponnesian Warre, or shortly following it.

§. I. How the affaires of Persia 〈◊〉 in these times.

§. II. How the thirtie Tyrants got their Dominion in Athens.

§. III. The conspiracie against the thirtie Tyrants, and their depositior.

  * CHAP. X. Of the expedition of CYRVS the younger.

§. I. The grounds of CYRVS his attempt against his brother.

§. II. The preparations of CYRVS, and his first entrie into the Warre.

§. III. How CYRVS tooke his iourney into the higher Asia, and came vp close to his Brother.

§. IIII. The battaile betweene CYRVS and ARTAXERXES.

§. V. The hard estate of the Greekes after the fight; and how ARTAXERXES in vaine sought to haue made them yeeld vnto him.

§. VI. How the Greekes beganne to returne home-wards.

§. VII. How TISSAPHERNES, vnder colour of peace, betraied all the Captaines of the Greekes.

§. VIII. How XENOPHON heartened the Greekes, and in despight of TISSAPHERNES went off safely.

§. IX. The difficulties which the Greeke Armie found in passing through the Land of the Carduchi.

§. X. How 〈◊〉 Gouernour of Armenia, seeking to entrap the Greekes with termes of fained peace, was disappointed and shamefully beaten.

§. XI. The passage of the Armie to Trabizonde, through the Countries bordering vpon the Riuer of Phasis, and other obscure Nations.

§. XII. How the Armie beganne at Trabizond to prouide a Fleet, wherewith to returne home by Sea: how it came into the Territorie of Sinope, and there prosequuted the same purpose.

§. XIII. Of dissension which arose in the Armie; and how it was embarked.

§. XIIII. Another great dissension and distraction of the Armie. How the mutiners were beaten by the Barbarians, and rescued by XENOPHON.

§. XV. Of diuers pieces of seruice done by XENOPHON; and how the Armie returnedinto Greece. The occasions of the 〈◊〉 betweene the Lacedaemonians and the Persian.

  * CHAP. XI. Of the affaires of Greece, whilest they were managed by the Lacedaemonians.

§. I. How the Lacedaemonians tooke courage by example of XENOPHONS Armie, to make Warre vpon ARTAXERXES.

§. II. The prosperous beginnings of the warre in Asia.

§. III. How the Lacedaemonians tooke reuenge vpon the Eleans for old displeasure. The discontents of the Corinthians and Thebans, conceiued against the State of Sparta.

§. IIII. The passage of AGESILAVS〈◊〉 Asia. His warre with TISSAPHERNES. How TISSAPHERNES was put to death, and the warre diuerted into another Prouince, through perswasion and gifts of TITHRAVSTES his successor. How carlesse the Persian Lieutenants were of the Kings good.

§. V. The Warre and Treatie betweene AGESILAVS and PHARNABAZVS.

§. VI. The great commotions raised in Greece by the Thebans and others, that were 〈◊〉 with gold from the Persian.

§. VII. How AGESILAVS was called out of Asia to helpe his Countrie. A victorie of the Spartans. CONON the Athenian, assisted by PHARNABAZVS, ouercomes the Lacedaemonian fleet; recouers the 〈◊〉 of the Seas; and rebuilds the walls of Athens.

§. VIII. Of sundrie small victories gotten on each part. The Lacedaemonians lose all in Asia; The Athenians recouer some part of their old Dominion.

§. IX. The base conditions offered vnto the Persian by the Lacedaemonians. Of sundrie fights and other passages in the warre. The peace of ANTALCIDAS.

§. X. The wrare which the Lacedaemonians made vpon Olynthus. They take Thebes by treason; and Olynthus by famine.

§. XI. How the Thebans recouered their libertie, driuing out the Lacedaemonian Garrison.

  * CHAP. XII. Of the flourishing estate of Thebes, from the battaile of Leuctra to the battaile of 〈◊〉.

§. I. How Thebes and Athenr ioyned together against Sparta. How the Athenians made peace for themselues, and others, out of which the Thebans were excluded. The battaile of Leuctra, and beginning of the Theban greatnesse.

§. II. How the Athenians tooke vpon them to maintaine the peace of Greece. New troubles hence arising. EPAMINONDAS inuadeth and wasteth the Territorie of Lacedaemon.

§. III. The composition betweene Athens and Sparta for command in warre against the Thebans; who againe inuade and 〈◊〉 Pelopennesus. The vnfortunate presumption of the Arcadians.

§. IIII. The great growth of the Theban Estate. Embassages of the Greekes to the Persian; with the reasons why he most fauoured the Thebans. Troubles in the Persian Empire, The fruitlesse issue of the Embassages.

§. V. How all Greece was diuided, betweene the Athenians and Lacedaemonians, on the one side, and Thebans on the other. Of the great tumults rising in Arcadia.

§. VI. A terrible inuasion of Peloponnesus by EPAMINONDAS.

§. VII. The great battaile of Mantinaea. The honourable death of EPAMINONDAS, with his commendation.

§. VIII. Of the peace concluded in 〈◊〉 after the 〈◊〉 of 〈◊〉. The voiage of AGESILAVS into Aegypt. His death, and qualities; with an examination of the comparison made betweene him and POMPEY the Roman.

  1. THE FIRST PART OF THE HISTORIE OF THE WORLD: INTREATING OF THE TIMES FROM the raigne of PHILIP of MACEDON, to the establishing of that Kingdome, in the race of ANTIGONVS.

    _ THE FOVRTH BOOKE.

    • CHAP. I. Of PHILIP, the Father of ALEXANDER the Great, King of Macedon.

§. I. What Kings raigned in Macedon before PHILIP.

§. II. The beginning of PHILIPS raigne; and how he deliuered Macedon from the troubles wherein he found it entangled.

§. III. The good successe which PHILIP had in many enterprises.

§. IIII. Of the Phocian Warre which first drew PHILIP into Greece.

§. V. Of the Olynthian Warre. The ambitious practices of PHILIP.

§. VI. How PHILIP ended the Phocian Warre.

§. VII. How PHILIP with ill successe attempted vpon Perinthus, Byzantium, and the Scythians.

§. VIII. How PHILIP ouerthrowing the Greekes in the battaile of Chaeronaea, was chosen Captaine-Generall of Greece. The death of PHILIP.

§. IX. What good foundations of ALEXANDERS greatnesse were laied by PHILIP. Of his 〈◊〉 qualities, and 〈◊〉.

  * CHAP. II. Of ALEXANDER the Great.

§. I. A briefe rehearsall of ALEXANDERS doings, before 〈◊〉 inuaded Asia.

§. II. How ALEXANDER passing into Asia, fought with the Persians vpon the Riuer of Granicus.

§. III. A digression concerning the defence of hard passages. Of things following the battaile of Granick.

§. IIII. Of the vnwarlike Armie leuied by DARIVS against ALEXANDER. The 〈◊〉 courses which DARIVS tooke in this expedition. He is vanquished at Issus; where his Mother, Wife, and Children are made prisoners. Of some things following the battaile of Issus.

§. V. How ALEXANDER〈◊〉 and wanne the Citie of Tyre.

§. VI. How DARIVS offered conditions of peace to ALEXANDER. ALEXANDER winnes Gaza; and deales graciously with the Iewes.

§. VII. ALEXANDER winnes Aegypt: and makes a iournie to the Temple of HAMMON.

§. VIII. How ALEXANDER marching 〈◊〉DARIVS, was opposed very 〈◊〉 by the Enemie.

§. IX. The new prouisions of DARIVS. Accidents foregoing the battaile of Arbela.

§. X. The battaile of Arbela: and that it could not be so strongly fought as report hath made it.

§. XI. Of things following the battaile of Arbela. The yeelding of Babylon and 〈◊〉.

§. XII. How ALEXANDER came to Persepolis, and burnt it.

§. XIII. The Treason of BESSVS against DARIVS. DARIVS his death.

§. XIIII. How ALEXANDER pursued BESSVS, and tooke into his grace DARIVS his Captaines.

§. XV. Of THALESTRIS Queene of the Amazons; where, by way of digression it is shewed, that such Amazons haue beene, and are.

§. XVI. How ALEXANDER fell into the Persians Luxurie: and how hee further pursued BESSVS.

§. XVII. A Conspiracie against ALEXANDER. The death of PHILOTAS and PARMENIO.

§. XVIII. How ALEXANDER subdued the Bactrians, Sogdians, and other people. How BESSVS was deliuered into his hands. How hee fought with the Scythians.

§. XIX. How ALEXANDER slew his owne friends.

§. XX. Of ALEXANDERS iourney into India. The battaile betweene him and PORVS.

§. XXI. How ALEXANDER finished his expedition, and returned out of India.

§. XXII. Of ALEXANDERS Riot, Crueltie, and death.

§. XXIII. Of ALEXANDERS Person and qualities.

  * CHAP. III. The raigne of ARIDAEVS. 

§. I. Of the question about succession to ALEXANDER.

§. II. The election of ARIDAEVS, with the troubles there-about arising; the first diuision of the Empire.

§. III. The beginning of the Lamian Warre.

§. IIII. How PERDICCAS emploied his Armie.

§. V. The processe of the Lamian Warre.

§. VI. Of the peace granted to Athens by ANTIPATER. Of DEMOSTHENES his death.

§. VII. How CRAYERVS and ANTIPATER were drawne from their Aetolian Warres into Asia. The grounds of the first 〈◊〉 betweene the 〈◊〉 Lords.

§. VIII. PERDICCAS his voyage into Aegypt, and his death.

§. IX. Victories of EVMENES in the lower Asia.

§. VI. That the naming of ABRAHAM first of the three brethren, Gen. 11. v. 26. doth 〈◊〉 proue that hee was the eldest: together with diuers reasons 〈◊〉 that ABRAHAM was not the eldest sonne of TERAH.

§. X. Quarrels betweene 〈◊〉 the Queene, and PYTHON the Protector. PYTHON resignes his office, into which ANTIPATER is chosen.

§. XI. ANTIGONVS Lieutenant of Asia, winnes a battaile of EVMENES,〈◊〉 and besiegeth him in Nora: He vanquisheth other followers of PERDICCAS.

§. XII. PTOLOMIE winnes Syria and Phoenicia. The death of ANTIPATER.

§. XIII. Of POLYSPERCHON who succeeded vnto ANTIPATER in the Protectorship. The insurrection of CASSANDER against him.

§. XIIII. The vnworthie courses held by POLYSPERCHON, for the keeping downe of CASSANDER.

§. XV. Of the great commotions raised in Athens by POLYSPERCHONS decree. The death of PHOCION.

§. XVI. Of POLYSPERCHON his vaine expedition against CASSANDER.

§. XVII. ANTIGONVS seekes to make himselfe an absolute Lord: and thereupon treates with EVMENES, aho disappointeth him. Phrygia and Lydia wonne by ANTIGONVS.

§. XVIII. ANTIGONVS pursues EVMENES. EVMENES hauing authoritie from the Court, raiseth great Warre against ANTIGONVS in defence of the Royall house.

§. XIX. How the Princes of Macedon stood affected mutually. OLYMPIAS takes ARIDEVS and EVRYDICE, whom shee cruelly puts to death.

§. XX. How CASSANDER was reuenged vpon OLYMPIAS.

  * CHAP. IIII. Of the great Lordship which ANTIGONVS got in Asia.

§. I. The iourney of EVMENES into Persia. His wise dealing with those that ioyned with him.

§. II. How ANTIGONVS, comming to set vpon EVMENES, was driuen off with losse.

§. III. Of EVMENES his cunning. A battaile betweene him and ANTIGONVS.

§. IIII. Of diuers stratagems practised by ANTIGONVS, and EVMENES, one against the other.

§. V. The conspiracie of PEVCESTES and others, against EVMENES his life.

§. VI. The last battaile betweene ANTIGONVS and EVMENES.

§. VII. How EVMENES was betrayed to ANTIGONVS, and slaine.

§. VIII. How 〈◊〉 slew PITHON, and occupied MEDIA. How he remoued Gouernours of Prouinces, and made himselfe Lord of Persia, carrying away PEVCESTES.

§. IX. How SELEVCVS was chased out of Babylon, by ANTIGONVS. The great riches of ANTIGONVS.

  * CHAP. V. Of the great ciuill Warre betweene ALEXANDERS Captaines: and how they assumed the name and state of Kings.

§. I. The combination of PTOLOMIE, CASSANDER, and others, against ANTIGONVS. Their demands, and his 〈◊〉.

§. II. The preparations and beginnings of the Warres.

§. III. How each partie sought to winne the assistance of Greece. ANTIGONVS his declaration against CASSANDER. ALEXANDER the sonne of POLISPERCHON reuolteth from ANTIGONVS, who had set him vp.

§. IIII. The Aetolians rise against CASSANDER in fauour of ANTIGONVS, and are beaten. A fleet and land-armie of ANTIGONVS, vtterly defeated by PTOLOMIES Lieutenant. In what termes the warre stood at this time. ANTIGONVS drawes neerer to 〈◊〉.

§. V. How LYSIMACHVS and CASSANDER vanquished some enemies, raised against them by ANTIGONVS. The good successe of ANTIGONVS in Asia and Greece: with the rebellion of many Cities against CASSANDER.

§. VI. Victories of PTOLOMIE by Sea. A great battaile at Gaza, which PTOLOMIE and SELEVCVS wanne, against DEMETRIVS the Sonne of ANTICONVS.

§. VII. How SELEVCVS recouered Babylon, and made himselfe Lord of many Countries in the highest Asia. The AERA of the Kingdome of the Greekes, which beganne with the Dominion of SELEVCVS.

§. VIII. How PTOLOMIE lost all that he had wonne in Syria. What the causes were of the quiet obedience, performed vnto the Macedonians, by those that had beene subiect vnto the Persian Empire. Of diuers pettie enterprizes, taken in hand by ANTIGONVS and DEMETRIVS, with ill successe.

§. IX. A generall peace made and broken. How all the house of ALEXANDER was destroyed.

§. X. How DEMETRIVS, the sonne of ANTIGONVS, gaue libertie to Athens, 〈◊〉 the Garrisons of CASSANDER out of those parts. The immoderate honors decrced by the 〈◊〉 to 〈◊〉 and DEMETRIVS.

§. XI. The great victorie of DEMETRIVS against PTOLOMIE in Cyprus. How ANTIGONVS and DEMETRIVS tooke vpon them the stile of Kings; wherein others followed their example.

  * CHAP. VI. Of the warres betweene the Kings of Aegypt, Asia, Macedon, I 〈◊〉, and others: vntill all ALEXANDERS Princes were consumed.

§. I. The Expedition of ANTIGONVS against Aegypt, with ill successe.

§. II. How the Citie of Rhodes was besieged by DEMETRIVS.

§. III. How DEMETRIVS preuailed in Greece. CASSANDER desires peace of ANTIGONVS, and cannot obtaine it. Great preparations of warre against 〈◊〉.

§. IIII. How ANTIGONVS was slaine in a great battaile at Ipsus, neere vnto Ephesus; wherein his whole estate was lost.

§. V. How DEMETRIVS forsaken by the Athenians after his ouerthrow, was reconciled to SELEVCVS and PTOLOMIE, beginning a new fortune, and shortly entring into new quarrells.

§. VI. How DEMETRIVS wanne the Citie of Athens, and preuailed in Greece, but lost in Asia. Of troubles in Macedon following the death of CASSANDER.

§. VII. 〈◊〉PYRRHVS and his doings in Macedon. The death of CASSANDERS children. DEMETRIVS gets the Kingdome of Macedon; preuailes in 〈◊〉 against the Greeks; Looseth reputation in his warre against PYRRHVS, and in his 〈◊〉 Gouernement, and prepares to win Asia. How all conspire against DEMETRIVS. PYRRHVS and LYSIMACHVS inuade him, his Armie yeelds to PYRRHVS, who shares the Kingdome of Macedon with LYSIMACHVS.

§. VIII. How DEMETRIVS gathering 〈◊〉, enterprised many things with ill successe, in Greece and Asia. How he was driuen vpon SELEVCVS, and compelled to yeeld himselfe. His imprisonment and death.

§. IX. The death of PTOLOMIE, of LYSIMACHVS, and of SELEVCVS, that was last of ALEXANDERS Captaines: with other occurrences.

  * CHAP. VII. The growth of Rome: and setling of the Easterne Kingdomes.

§. I. How the Romans enlarged their Dominion in Italie, from the death of TVLLVS HOSTILIVS, vnto such time as they were 〈◊〉 by PYRRHVS.

§. II. How PYRRHVS warred vpon the Romans, and vanquished them in two battailes.

§. III. The great troubles in Macedon and Sicill. How PYRRHVS, being inuited into Sicill, for sooke Italie; wanne the most of the Isle; and lost it in short space. PYRRHVS returnes into Italy; where he is beaten by the Romans, and so goes backe to his owne Kingdome.

§. IIII. How ANTIGONVS, the sonne of DEMETRIVS, deliuered Macedon from the Gaules. How PYRRHVS wonne the Kingdome of Macedon from ANTIGONVS.

§. V. How PYRRHVS assailed Sparta without successe. His enterprise vpon Argos, and his death.

  1. THE FIRST PART OF THE HISTORIE OF THE WORLD: INTREATING OF THE TIMES FROM the setled rule of ALEXANDERS Successors in the East, vntill the ROMANS, preuailingouer all, made Conquest of ASIA and MACEDON.

    _ THE FIFT BOOKE.

    • CHAP. I. Of the first Punicke Warre.

§. I. A discussion of that probleme of LIVIE; Whether the Romans could haue resisted the great ALEXANDER. That neither the Macedonian nor the Roman Souldier, was of equall valour to the English.

§. II. The estate of Carthage, before it entred into warre with Rome.

§. III. The beginning of the fist Punick warre. That it was 〈◊〉 vndertaken by the Romans.

§. IIII. Of the Iland of Sicil.

§. V. Arecontinuation of the Roman warre in Sicil. How HIERON, King of Syracuse, for sooke the Carthaginians; and made his peace with Rome.

§. VI. How the Romans besiege and winne Agrigentum. Their beginning to maintaine a fleet. Their first losse, and first victorie by Sea. Of Seafight in generall.

§. VII. Diuers enterfeats of warre, betweene the Romans and Carthaginians, with variable successe. The Romans prepare to inuade Africk: and obtaine a great victorie at Sea.

§. VIII. The Romans preuaile in Africk. ATILIVS the Consullpropoundeth intolerable conditions of peace to the Carthaginians. He is vtterly beaten, and made prisoner.

§. IX. How the affaires of Carthage prospered after the victorie against ATILIVS: How the Romans hauing lost their fleet by tempest, resolue to forsake the Seas: The great aduantages of a good fleet in warre, betweene Nations diuided by the Sea.

§. X. How the Romans attempt againe to get the mastrie of the Seas. The victorie of CEACILIVS the Roman Consull at Panormus: The siege of Lilybaeum. How a Rhodian Gallie entred Lilybaeum at pleasure, in despight of the Roman fleet. That it is a matter of great difficultie to stop the passage of good ships. The Romans, by reason of grieuous losses receiued, vnder CLAVDIVS and IVNIVS their Consulls, abandon the Seas againe.

§. XI. The Citie of Eryx is surprized by the Romans, and recouered by AMILCAR; Who stoutly holds warre with them fiue yeeres. The Romans hauing emptied their common treasurie, build a new fleet, at the charges of priuate men. The great victorie at Sea of LVCTATIVS the Consull; whereby the Carthaginians are forced to craue peace. The conditions of the peace betweene Rome and Carthage.

  * CHAP. II. Of diuers actions passing betweene the first and second Punick Warres.

§. I. Of the cruell warre begunne betweene the Carthaginians and their owne 〈◊〉.

§. II. Diuers obseruations vpon this warre with the mercinaries.

§. III. How the warre against the Mercinarie was diuerslie mannaged by HANNO and AMILCAR, with variable successe. The bloudy counsailes of the Mercinaries; and their finall destruction.

§. IIII. How the Mercenaries of the Carthaginians, that were in Sardinia, rebelled: and were afterwards driuen 〈◊〉 by the Ilanders. The faithlesse dealing of the Romans with the Carthaginians, in taking from them Sardinia, contrarie to the peace.

§. V. How the affaires of Carthage went betweene the African Rebellion, and the second Punicke Warre.

§. VI. The estate of Greece from the death of 〈◊〉, to the raigne of PHILIP the sonne of 〈◊〉 in Macedon.

§. VII. How the Illyrians infested the coast of Grecce; and how they were subdued by the Romans.

§. VIII. Of the warre betweene the Romans and Gaules, somewhat before the comming of HANNIBAL into Italie.

  * CHAP. III. Of the second Punick Warre.

§ I. The warres of HANNIBAL in Spaine. Quarrels between the Romans and Carthaginians. HANNIBAL besiegeth and taketh Saguntum, whilest the Romans are busied with the Illyrians. Warre proclaimed betweene Rome and Carthage.

§. II. HANNIBAL takes order for the defence of Spaine and Africke. His iournie into Italie.

§. III. How the Romans in vaine sollicited the Spaniards and Gaules to take their part. The rebellion of the Cisalpine Gaules against the Romans.

§. IIII. SCIPIO the Roman Consul ouer-come by HANNIBAL at Ticinum. Both of the Roman Consuls beaten by HANNIBAL, in a great battaile at Trebia.

§. V. The departure of HANNIBAL from the Cisalpine Gaules into Hetruria. FLAMINIVS the Roman Consul slaine; and his Armie destroyed by the Carthaginians, at the Lake of Thrasymen.

§ VI. How QFABIVS the Roman Dictator, sought to consume the force of HANNIBAL, by lingring warre. MINVTIVS, the Master of the Horse, honoured and aduanced by the People, for bold and successefull attempting, aduentures rashly vpon HANNIBAL; and is like to perish with his Armie, but rescued by FABIVS.

§. VII. The Roman people, desirous to finish the warre quickly, choose a rash and vnworthie Consul. Great forces leuied against HANNIBAL. HANNIBAL taketh the Romans prouisions in the Castle of Cannae. The new Consuls set forth against HANNIBAL.

§. VIII. Dissension betweene the two Roman Consuls. Whether it be likely, that HANNIBAL was vpon point of flying out of Italie, when the Romans pressed him to fight. The great battaile of Cannae.

§ IX. Of things following the battaile at Cannae.

§. X. Of the great supply that was decreed at Carthage to be sent to HANNIBAL in Italie. How by the malice of HANNO, and sloth or parsimonie of the Carthaginians, the supply was too long deferred. That the riches of the Carthaginians grew faster, than of the Romans. Of FABIVS and other old Roman Historians, how partiall they were in their writings.

§ XI. Strange reports of the Roman victories in Spaine, before ASDRVBAL the sonne of AMILCAR followed thence his brother HANNIBAL into Italie.

§. XII. The great troubles that HANNIBAL raised in all quarters, to the Cittie of Rome. POSTHVMIVS the Roman Generall, with his whole Armie, is slaine by the Gaules. PHILIP King of Macedon, enters into a League with HANNIBAL, against the Romans. The Romans ioyning with the Aetolians, make warre vpon PHILIP in Greece: and afterwards conclude a peace with him; the better to intend their businesse against the Carthaginians.

§. XIII. How the Romans beganne to recouer their strength by degrees. The noble affection of the Romans, in relecuing the publike necessities of their Common-weale.

§. XIIII. The Romans win some Townes back from HANNIBAL. HANNIBAL winnes Tarentum. The siege of Capua. Two victories of HANNIBAL. The tournie of HANNIBAL to the gates of Rome. Capua taken by the Romans.

§ XV. How the Carthaginians, making a partie in Sardinia and Sicil, held 〈◊〉 against the Romans in those Ilands; and were ouer-〈◊〉.

§. XVI. How the warre passed betweene the Romans and HANNIBAL in Italie, from the taking of Capua to the great victorie at Metaur us.

§. XVII. How P. CORNELIVS SCIPIO the Roman, made entire conquest of Spaine.

§. XVIII. SCIPIO obtaines leaue to make warre in Africk. His preparations. Of MASANISSA who ioyned with SCIPIO. The victories against ASDRVBAL and SYPHAX.

§. XIX. The Carthaginians desire Truce: and breake it.

§. XX. In what sort HANNIBAL spent the time after the battaile of Metaurus. The doings of MAGO in Italie. HANNIBAL and MAGO called out of Italie. How the Romans were diuersly affected by HANNIBALS departure.

§. XXI. HANNIBAL in Africk prepares to fight with SCIPIO; treates with him about peace in vaine; looseth a battaile at Nadagara, and perswades the Carthaginians to sue for peace. Of the peace granted from Rome to Carthage.

  * CHAP. IIII. Of PHILIP the father of PERSEVS, King of Macedon; His first Acts and warre with the Romans, by whom he was subdued. 

§. I. How the Romans grew acquainted in the East Countries, and desirous of warre there. The beginning of many Princes, with great warres, at one time. The Aetolians ouerrun Peloponnesus. PHILIP and his Associates make war against the Aetolians. Alteration of the State in Sparta. The Aetolians inuade Greece and Macedon, and are inuaded at home by PHILIP.

§. II. How PHILIP was misseaduised by ill Counsailors: Who afterwards wrought treason against him, and were iustly punished. Hee inuadeth the Aetolians a second time: And forceth them to sue for peace: Which is granted vnto them.

§. III. PHILIP, at the perswasion of DEMETRIVS PHARIVS, enters into League with HANNIBAL, against the Romans. The Tenour of the League betweene HANNIBAL and PHILIP.

§. IIII. How PHILIP yeelded to his naturall vices being therein soothed by DEMETRIVS PHARIVS. His desire to tyr annize vpon the free States his Associates: With the troubles, into which hee thereby fell, 〈◊〉 he bore a part in the second 〈◊〉 warre. He poisoneth ARATVS: and growes hatefull to the 〈◊〉.

§. V. Of PHILOPOEMEN Generall of the Achaeans: and MACHANIDAS, Tyrant of Lacedaemon. A battaile betweene them, wherein MACHANIDAS is slaine.

§. VI. PHILIP hauing peace with Rome, and with all Greece, prepares against Asia. Of the Kings of Pergamus, Cappadocia, Pontus, Paphlagona, Bithynia; and their Linages. Of the Galatians.

§. VII. The Towne of Cios taken by PHILIP, at the instance of PRVSIAS King of Bithynia, and cruelly destroyed. By this and like actions, PHILIP growes hatefull to many of the Greekes: and is warred vpon by ATTALVS King of Pergamus, and by the Rhodians.

§. VIII. The Romans, after their Carthaginian warre, seeke matter of quarrell against PHILIP. The Athenians, vpon slight cause, proclaime warre against PHILIP; mouedthereto by ATTALVS; whom they flatter. PHILIP winnes diuers Townes: and makes peremptorie answere to the Roman Embassadour. The 〈◊〉 resolution of the Abydeni.

§. IX. The Romans decree warre against PHILIP, and send one of their Consuls into 〈◊〉, as it were in defence of the Athenians their Confederats. How poore the Athenians were at this time, both in qualitie and estate.

§. X. The Towne of Chalcis in Euboea, taken and sackt by the Romans and their Associates, that lay in Garison at Athens. PHILIP attempteth to take Athens by Surprise: wasteth the Countrey about: and makes a iourney into Peloponnesus. Of NABIS the Tyrant of Lacedaemon, and his wife. PHILIP offers to make Warre against 〈◊〉 for the Achaeans. He returneth home through Attica, which he spoyleth againe: and prouides against his Enemies. Some exploits of the Romans. Diuers Princes ioyne with them. Great labouring to draw the Aetolians into the warre.

§. XI. The meeting of PHILIP with the Romans, and skirmishing with them on his borders. The Aetolians inuade 〈◊〉 dominions, and are beaten home. Some doings of ATTALVS and the Roman Fleet.

§. XII. VILLIVS the Roman Consul wastes a yeere to no effect. Warre of the Gaules in Italie. An Embassie of the Romans to Carthage, MASANISSA, and VERMINA. The Macedonian prepares for defence of his 〈◊〉: and T. QVINTIVS FLAMINIVS is sent against him.

§. XIII. The Romans beginne to make warre by negotiation. T. QVINTIVS winnes a passage against PHILIP. Thessalie wasted by PHILIP, the Romans, and Aetolians. The Achaeans forsaking the Macedonian, take part with the Romans. A treatie of peace, that was vaine. PHILIP deliuers Argos to 〈◊〉 the Tyrant, who presently enters into League with the Romans.

§. XIIII. The battcile at Cynoscephalae, wherein PHILIP was vanquished by T. QVINTIVS.

§. XV. T. QVINTIVS falleth out with the Aetolians; and grantes 〈◊〉 vnto PHILIP, with conditions, vpon which the peace is ratified. Libertie proclaimed vnto the Greeks. The 〈◊〉 quarrell with ANTIOCHVS.

  * CHAP. V. The Warres of the Romans with ANTIOCHVS the great, and his adherents.

§. I. What Kings, of the races of SELEVCVS and PTOLEMIE, raigned in Asia and Aegypt before Antiochus the great.

§. II. The beginning of the Great ANTIOCHVS his reigne. Of PTOLEMIE EVERGETES, and PHILOPATOR, Kings of Aegypt. Warre betweene ANTIOCHVS and PHILOPATOR. The rebellion of MOLO: an Expedition of ANTIOCHVS against him. The recontinuance of ANTIOCHVS his Aegyptian warre: with the passages betweene the two Kings: the victory of PTOLEMIE, and Peace concluded. Of ACHAEVS, and his rebellion; his greatnesse, and his fall. ANTIOCHVS his Expedition against the Parthians, Bactrians, and Indians. Somewhat of the Kings reigning in India, after the death of the Great ALEXANDER.

§. III. The lewd Reigne of PTOLEMIE PHILOPATOR in Aegypt: with the tragicall ende of his fauourites, when hee was dead. ANTIOCHVS prepares to warre on the young child PTOLEMIE EPIPHANES, the sonne of PHILOPATOR. His irresolution in preparing for diuers warres at once. His Voyage toward the Hellespont. Hee seekes to hold amitie with the Romans, who make friendly shew to him; intending neuerthelesse to haue warre with him. His doings about the Hellespont; which the Romans make the first ground of their quarrell to him.

§. IIII. The Romans hold friendly correspondence with ANTIOCHVS, during their warre with PHILIP: after which they quarrell with him. The doings of HANNIBAL at Carthage: whence hee is chased by his enemies, and by the Romans: His flight vnto the King ANTIOCHVS. The Aetolians murmure against the Romans in Greece. The warre of the Romans and Achaeans, with NABIS the Tyrant of Lacedaemon. The departure of the Romans out of Greece. T. QVINTIVS his Triumph. Peace denied to ANTIOCHVS by the Romans.

§. V. Of the long Warres which the Romans had with the Gaules, Ligurians, and Spaniards. Of M. PORCIVS CATO. Iniuries done by MASANISSA to the Carthaginians, that sue to the Romans for iustice in vaine.

§. VI. The Aetolians labour to prouoke ANTIOCHVS, PHILIP, and NABIS, to warre vpon the Romans; by whom they hold themselues wronged and disgraced. NABIS besiegeth Gyttheum, and wasteth some part of Achaea. The exact skill of PHILOPOEMEN, in aduantage of ground: whereby he vtterly vanquisheth NABIS. ANTIOCHVS being denied Peace by the Romans, ioynes with the Aetolians. The Aetolians surprize DEMETRIAS; and by killing NABIS, their Confederate seize vpon Sparta. But they are driuen out by the Citizens: who at PHILOPOEMEN his perswasions annex themselues to the Achaeans.

§. VII. ANTIOCHVS, perswaded by THOAS the Aetolian, comes ouer into Greece, ill attended. Sundrie passages betweene him, the Aetolians, Chalcidians and others. Hee winnes Chalcis, and thereby the whole Ile of Euboea. The vanitie of the Kings Embassadors and the Aetolians, with the Ciuil answere of TITVS to their discourse, before the Achaeans. That it concerned the Greekes to haue desired peace, betweene the Romans and ANTIOCHVS; as the best assurance of their owne libertie. Of many pettie Estates that fell to the King. Of AMINANDER; and an idle vanitie, by which King PHILIP was lost. HANNIBAL giues good counsaile in vaine. Some Townes wonne in Thessalie. The King retires to Chalcis; Where hee marrieth a young Wife, and reuels away the rest of Winter. Vpon the comming of the Roman Consul all forsake ANTIOCHVS. Hee with two thousand Aetolians keepes the Streights of Thermopylae. Hee is beaten, and flies into Asia: leauing all in Greece vnto the Victors.

§. VIII. LVCIVS SCIPIO, hauing with him PVBLIVS the African his elder Brother, for his Lieutenant, is sent into Greece, He grants long Truce to the Aetolians, that so he might at leisure passe into Asia. Much trouble some businesse by Sea; and diuers fights. An inuasion vpon EVMENES his Kingdome; with the siege of Pergamus, raysed by an handfull of the Achaeans. L. SCIPIO the Consul comes into Asia: where ANTIOCHVS most earnestly desireth peace, and is denied it. The battaile of MAGNESIA: wherein ANTIOCHVS being vanquished, yeeldeth to the Romans good pleasure. The Conditions of the peace. In what sort the Romans vsed their Victorie. L. CORNELIVS SCIPIO, after a most sumptuous triumph ouer ANTIOCHVS, is surnamed The Asiatique, as his brother was stiled The African.

§. IX. The Aetolians, and the Gallogreekes, vanquished by the Roman Consuls FVLVIVS and MANLIVS. MANLIVS hardly obtaines a Triumph: being charged (among other obiections) with attempting to haue passed the bounds appointed as fatall to the Romans by SIBYL. Of SIBYLS Prophectes; the Bookes of HERMES; and that Inscription, SIMONI DEO SANCTO. The ingratitude of Rome to the two SCIPIOES: and that beginning and faction among the Roman Nobilitie.

  * CHAP. VI. The second Macedonian Warre.

§. I. The Condition wherein those Princes and Estates remained, which were associates of the Romans, when the warre with ANTIOCHVS was finished. The Romans quarrell with PHILIP. They deale insolently with the Achaeans. The Macedonian, being vnreadie for warre, obtaines peace at Rome, by his sonne DEMETRIVS; of whom thencefoorth hee becomes iealous.

§. II. The death of PHILOPOEMEN, HANNIBAL, and SCIPIO. That the militarie profession is of all other the most vnhappie: notwithstanding some examples, which may seeme to prooue the contrarie.

§. III. PHILIP making prouision for warre against the Romans, deales hardly with many of his owne subiects. His negotiation with the Bastarnae. His crueltie. He suspecteth his sonne DEMETRIVS. DEMETRIVS accused by his brother PERSEVS; and shortly after slaine, by his fathers appointment. PHILIP repenteth him of his sonnes death; whom he findeth to haue beene innocent: and intending to reuenge it on PERSEVS, he dieth.

§. IIII. How the Bastarnae fell vpon Dardania. The behauiour of PERSEVS in the beginning of his Reigne. Some warres of the Romans: and how they suffered MASANISSA, cruelly to oppresse the Carthaginians. They quarrell with PERSEVS. They allow not their Confederates to make warre without their leaue obtained. The Treason of CALLICRATES; whereby all Greece became more obnoxious to Rome, than in former times. Further quarrels to PERSEVS. Hee seekes friendship of the Achaeans, and is withstood by CALLICRATES. The Romans 〈◊〉 their intent of warring vpon him.

§. V. How EVMENES King of Pergamus was busied with PHARNACES, the Rhodians and others. His hatred to the Macedonian: whom hee accuseth to the Roman 〈◊〉. The Senate honours him greatly, and contemnes his enemies the Rhodians; with the causes thereof. The vnusuall stoutnesse of the 〈◊〉 Embassadours. PERSEVS his attempt vpon EVMENES. The brotherly 〈◊〉 betweene EVMENES and ATTALVS. PERSEVS his deuice to poyson some of the Roman Senators: wherevpon they decree warre against him, and send him defiance. Other things, concerning the iustice of this warre.

§. VI. The Romans sollicit the Greekes, to ioyne with them in the Warre against PERSEVS. How the Greekes stood affected in that Warre. The timorousnesse of PERSEVS. MARTIVS a Roman Embassadour deludes him with hope of Peace. His forces. Hee takes the field, and winnes part of Thessalie. The forces of LICINIVS the Roman Consul: and what assistants the Romanes had in this Warre. Of Tempe in Thessalie; and what aduantages the Macedonian had, or might haue had; but lost by his feare. PERSEVS braues the Romanes; fights with them; knowes not how to vse his victorie; sues for Peace; and is 〈◊〉 it by the vanquished. PERSEVS hauing the worse in a skirmish, for sakes all the Countrey lying without Tempe. The Boeotians rebell against the Romans, and are rigorously punished. The Roman Commanders vnfortunate in the warre against PERSEVS. They vexe the Greekes their friends; for whose ease the Senate makes prouision, hauing heard their complaints. The flattering Alabanders.

§. VII. Q. MARTIVS the Roman Consul, with extreame difficultie and danger, enters into Tempe. The cowardize of PERSEVS in abandoning Tempe. The towne of 〈◊〉 quitted by MARTIVS; repaired and fortified by the King. The Romans attempt many places, with ill successe. Their affaires in 〈◊〉 estate. MARTIVS a cunning and a bad man. POLYBIVS sent Embassador to MARTIVS from the Achaeans. POLYBIVS his honest wisdome beneficiall to the Achaeans. King EVMENES growes 〈◊〉 from the Romans. PERSEVS negotiates with ANTIOCHVS and EVMENES, His false dealing with GENTIVS King of Illyria; 〈◊〉 hee drawes into the Roman warre. He sends Embassadors to the Rhodians; who vainely take vpon them to be arbitrators betweene him and the Romans. PERSEVS loseth a mightie succour of the Bastarnae, by his wretched parsimonie.

§. VIII. Of L. AEMYLIVS PAVLVS the Consul. His iourney. He forceth PERSEVS to discampe. He will not hazard battaile with anie disaduantage. Of an Eclypse of the Moone. AEMYLIVS his superstition. The 〈◊〉 of Pydna. PERSEVS his flight. He for sakes his Kingdome: which hastily yeelds to AEMYLIVS. PERSEVS at Samothrace. He yeelds himselfe to the Roman Admirall; and is sent prisoner to AEMYLIVS.

§. IX. GENTIVS, King of the Illyrians, taken by the Romans.

§. X. How the Romans behaued themselues in Greece and Macedon after their victory ouer PERSEVS.

§. XI. The Warre of ANTIOCHVS vpon Aegypt, brought to end by the Roman Embassadours.

§. XII. How the Romans were dreadfull to all Kings. Their demeanour towards EVMENES, PRVSIAS, MASANISSA, and COTYS. The end of PERSEVS and his children. The instabilitie of Kingly Estates. The Triumphs of PAVLVS, ANICIVS, and OCTAVIVS. With the Conclusion of the Worke.

#####Back#####

  1. ¶ To the Reader.

  2. A CHRONOLOGICALL TABLE. AN ALPHABETICALL TABLE OF THE PRINCIPALL CONTENTS OF THE FIRST AND SECOND BOOKES OF THE FIRST Part o _ AN ALPHABETICALL TABLE OF THE PRINCIPALL CONTENTS OF THE FIRST AND SECOND BOOKES OF THE FIRST Part of the Historie of the WORLD.

    _ AN ALPHABETICALL LIST OF THE PRINCIPALL CONTENTS OF THE THIRD, FOVRTH, AND FIFT BOOKES OF THE FIRST Part of the Historie of the WORLD. FOR THOV SHALT LABORPEACE PLENTIEprinter's device of William StansbyLONDON Printed by William Stansb Types of content

  • There are 533 verse lines!
  • Oh, Mr. Jourdain, there is prose in there!

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tcp:13280:428 (2), tcp:13280:429 (2), tcp:13280:430 (2), tcp:13280:431 (2), tcp:13280:432 (2), tcp:13280:433 (2), tcp:13280:434 (2), tcp:13280:435 (2), tcp:13280:436 (2), tcp:13280:437 (2), tcp:13280:438 (2), tcp:13280:439 (2), tcp:13280:440 (2), tcp:13280:441 (2), tcp:13280:442 (2), tcp:13280:443 (2), tcp:13280:444 (2), tcp:13280:445 (2), tcp:13280:446 (2), tcp:13280:447 (2), tcp:13280:448 (2), tcp:13280:449 (2), tcp:13280:450 (2), tcp:13280:451 (2), tcp:13280:452 (2), tcp:13280:453 (2), tcp:13280:454 (2), tcp:13280:455 (2), tcp:13280:456 (2), tcp:13280:457 (2), tcp:13280:458 (2), tcp:13280:459 (2), tcp:13280:460 (2), tcp:13280:461 (2), tcp:13280:462 (2), tcp:13280:463 (2), tcp:13280:464 (2), tcp:13280:465 (2), tcp:13280:466 (2), tcp:13280:467 (2), tcp:13280:468 (2), tcp:13280:469 (2), tcp:13280:470 (2), tcp:13280:471 (2), tcp:13280:472 (2), tcp:13280:473 (2), tcp:13280:474 (2), tcp:13280:475 (2), tcp:13280:476 (2), tcp:13280:477 (2), tcp:13280:478 (2), tcp:13280:479 (2), tcp:13280:480 (2), tcp:13280:481 (2), tcp:13280:482 (2), tcp:13280:483 (2), tcp:13280:484 (2), tcp:13280:485 (2), tcp:13280:486 (2), tcp:13280:487 (2), tcp:13280:488 (2), tcp:13280:489 (2), tcp:13280:490 (2), tcp:13280:491 (2), tcp:13280:492 (2), tcp:13280:493 (2), tcp:13280:494 (2), tcp:13280:495 (2), tcp:13280:496 (2), tcp:13280:497 (2), tcp:13280:498 (2), tcp:13280:499 (2), tcp:13280:500 (2), tcp:13280:501 (2), tcp:13280:502 (2), tcp:13280:503 (2), tcp:13280:504 (2), tcp:13280:505 (2), tcp:13280:506 (2), tcp:13280:507 (2), tcp:13280:508 (2), tcp:13280:509 (2), tcp:13280:510 (2), tcp:13280:511 (2), tcp:13280:512 (2), tcp:13280:513 (2), tcp:13280:514 (2), tcp:13280:515 (2), tcp:13280:516 (2), tcp:13280:517 (2), tcp:13280:518 (2), tcp:13280:519 (2), tcp:13280:520 (2), tcp:13280:521 (2), tcp:13280:522 (2), tcp:13280:523 (2), tcp:13280:524 (2), tcp:13280:525 (2), tcp:13280:526 (2), tcp:13280:527 (2), tcp:13280:528 (2), tcp:13280:529 (2), tcp:13280:530 (2), tcp:13280:531 (2), tcp:13280:532 (2), tcp:13280:533 (2), tcp:13280:534 (2), tcp:13280:535 (2), tcp:13280:536 (2), tcp:13280:537 (2), tcp:13280:538 (2), tcp:13280:539 (2), tcp:13280:540 (2), tcp:13280:541 (2), tcp:13280:542 (2), tcp:13280:543 (1), tcp:13280:546 (2), tcp:13280:547 (2), tcp:13280:548 (2), tcp:13280:549 (2), tcp:13280:550 (2), tcp:13280:551 (2), tcp:13280:552 (2), tcp:13280:553 (2), tcp:13280:554 (2), tcp:13280:555 (2), tcp:13280:556 (2), tcp:13280:557 (2), tcp:13280:558 (2), tcp:13280:559 (2), tcp:13280:560 (2), tcp:13280:561 (2), tcp:13280:562 (2), tcp:13280:563 (2), tcp:13280:564 (2), tcp:13280:565 (2), tcp:13280:566 (2), tcp:13280:567 (2), tcp:13280:568 (2), tcp:13280:569 (2), tcp:13280:570 (2), tcp:13280:571 (2), tcp:13280:572 (2), tcp:13280:573 (2), tcp:13280:574 (2), tcp:13280:575 (2), tcp:13280:576 (2), tcp:13280:577 (2), tcp:13280:578 (2), tcp:13280:579 (2), tcp:13280:580 (2), tcp:13280:581 (2), tcp:13280:582 (2), tcp:13280:583 (2), tcp:13280:584 (2), tcp:13280:585 (2), tcp:13280:586 (2), tcp:13280:587 (2), tcp:13280:588 (2), tcp:13280:589 (2), tcp:13280:590 (2), tcp:13280:591 (2), tcp:13280:592 (2), tcp:13280:593 (2), tcp:13280:594 (2), tcp:13280:595 (2), tcp:13280:596 (2), tcp:13280:597 (2), tcp:13280:598 (2), tcp:13280:599 (2), tcp:13280:600 (2), tcp:13280:601 (2), tcp:13280:602 (2), tcp:13280:603 (2), tcp:13280:604 (2), tcp:13280:605 (2), tcp:13280:606 (2), tcp:13280:607 (2), tcp:13280:608 (2), tcp:13280:609 (2), tcp:13280:610 (2), tcp:13280:611 (1), tcp:13280:617 (1), tcp:13280:618 (2), tcp:13280:619 (2), tcp:13280:620 (2), tcp:13280:621 (2), tcp:13280:622 (2), tcp:13280:623 (2), tcp:13280:624 (2), tcp:13280:625 (2), tcp:13280:626 (2), tcp:13280:627 (2), tcp:13280:628 (2), tcp:13280:629 (2), tcp:13280:630 (2), tcp:13280:631 (2), tcp:13280:632 (2), tcp:13280:633 (2), tcp:13280:634 (2), tcp:13280:635 (2), tcp:13280:636 (2), tcp:13280:637 (2), tcp:13280:638 (2), tcp:13280:639 (2), tcp:13280:640 (2), tcp:13280:641 (2), tcp:13280:642 (2), tcp:13280:643 (2), tcp:13280:644 (2), tcp:13280:645 (2), tcp:13280:646 (2), tcp:13280:647 (2), tcp:13280:648 (2), tcp:13280:649 (2), tcp:13280:650 (2), tcp:13280:651 (2), tcp:13280:652 (2), tcp:13280:653 (2), tcp:13280:654 (2), tcp:13280:655 (2), tcp:13280:656 (2), tcp:13280:657 (2), tcp:13280:658 (2), tcp:13280:659 (2), tcp:13280:660 (2), tcp:13280:661 (2), tcp:13280:662 (2), tcp:13280:663 (2), tcp:13280:664 (2), tcp:13280:665 (2), tcp:13280:666 (2), tcp:13280:667 (2), tcp:13280:668 (2), tcp:13280:669 (2), tcp:13280:670 (2), tcp:13280:671 (2), tcp:13280:672 (2), tcp:13280:673 (2), tcp:13280:674 (2), tcp:13280:675 (2), tcp:13280:676 (2), tcp:13280:677 (2), tcp:13280:678 (2), tcp:13280:679 (2), tcp:13280:680 (2), tcp:13280:681 (2), tcp:13280:682 (2), tcp:13280:683 (2), tcp:13280:684 (2), tcp:13280:685 (2), tcp:13280:686 (2), tcp:13280:687 (2), tcp:13280:688 (2), tcp:13280:689 (2), tcp:13280:690 (2), tcp:13280:691 (2), tcp:13280:692 (2), tcp:13280:693 (2), tcp:13280:694 (2), tcp:13280:695 (2), tcp:13280:696 (2), tcp:13280:697 (2), tcp:13280:698 (2), tcp:13280:699 (2), tcp:13280:700 (2), tcp:13280:701 (2), tcp:13280:702 (2), tcp:13280:703 (2), tcp:13280:704 (2), tcp:13280:705 (2), tcp:13280:706 (2), tcp:13280:707 (2), tcp:13280:708 (2), tcp:13280:709 (2), tcp:13280:710 (2), tcp:13280:711 (2), tcp:13280:712 (2), tcp:13280:713 (2), tcp:13280:714 (2), tcp:13280:715 (2), tcp:13280:716 (2), tcp:13280:717 (2), tcp:13280:718 (2), tcp:13280:719 (2), tcp:13280:720 (2), tcp:13280:721 (2), tcp:13280:722 (2), tcp:13280:723 (2), tcp:13280:724 (2), tcp:13280:725 (2), tcp:13280:726 (2), tcp:13280:727 (2), tcp:13280:728 (2), tcp:13280:729 (2), tcp:13280:730 (2), tcp:13280:731 (2), tcp:13280:732 (2), tcp:13280:733 (2), tcp:13280:734 (2), tcp:13280:735 (2), tcp:13280:736 (2), tcp:13280:737 (2), tcp:13280:738 (2), tcp:13280:739 (2), tcp:13280:740 (2), tcp:13280:741 (2), tcp:13280:742 (2), tcp:13280:743 (2), tcp:13280:744 (2), tcp:13280:745 (2), tcp:13280:746 (2), tcp:13280:747 (2), tcp:13280:748 (2), tcp:13280:749 (2), tcp:13280:750 (2), tcp:13280:751 (2), tcp:13280:752 (2), tcp:13280:753 (2), tcp:13280:754 (2), tcp:13280:755 (2), tcp:13280:756 (2), tcp:13280:757 (2), tcp:13280:758 (2), tcp:13280:759 (2), tcp:13280:760 (2), tcp:13280:761 (2), tcp:13280:762 (2), tcp:13280:763 (2), tcp:13280:764 (2), tcp:13280:765 (2), tcp:13280:766 (2), tcp:13280:767 (2), tcp:13280:768 (2), tcp:13280:769 (2), tcp:13280:770 (2), tcp:13280:771 (2), tcp:13280:772 (2), tcp:13280:773 (2), tcp:13280:774 (2), tcp:13280:775 (2), tcp:13280:776 (2), tcp:13280:777 (2), tcp:13280:778 (2), tcp:13280:779 (2), tcp:13280:780 (2), tcp:13280:781 (2), tcp:13280:782 (2), tcp:13280:783 (2), tcp:13280:784 (2), tcp:13280:785 (2), tcp:13280:786 (2), tcp:13280:787 (2), tcp:13280:788 (2), tcp:13280:789 (2), tcp:13280:790 (2), tcp:13280:791 (2), tcp:13280:792 (2), tcp:13280:793 (2), tcp:13280:794 (2), tcp:13280:795 (2), tcp:13280:796 (2), tcp:13280:797 (2), tcp:13280:798 (2), tcp:13280:799 (2), tcp:13280:800 (2), tcp:13280:801 (2), tcp:13280:802 (2), tcp:13280:803 (2), tcp:13280:804 (2), tcp:13280:805 (2), tcp:13280:806 (2), tcp:13280:807 (2), tcp:13280:808 (2), tcp:13280:809 (2), tcp:13280:810 (2) • @n (1430) : 1 (2), 2 (2), 3 (2), 4 (2), 5 (2), 6 (2), 7 (2), 8 (2), 9 (2), 10 (2), 11 (2), 12 (2), 13 (2), 14 (2), 15 (2), 16 (2), 17 (2), 18 (2), 19 (2), 20 (2), 21 (2), 22 (2), 23 (2), 24 (2), 25 (2), 26 (3), 27 (2), 28 (1), 29 (2), 30 (2), 31 (2), 32 (2), 33 (2), 34 (2), 35 (2), 36 (2), 37 (2), 38 (2), 39 (2), 40 (2), 41 (2), 42 (2), 43 (2), 44 (2), 45 (2), 46 (2), 47 (2), 48 (2), 49 (2), 50 (2), 51 (2), 52 (2), 53 (2), 54 (2), 55 (2), 56 (2), 57 (2), 58 (2), 59 (2), 60 (2), 61 (2), 62 (2), 63 (2), 64 (2), 66 (2), 67 (2), 68 (2), 69 (2), 70 (2), 71 (2), 72 (2), 73 (2), 74 (2), 75 (2), 76 (2), 77 (2), 78 (2), 79 (2), 80 (2), 81 (2), 82 (2), 83 (2), 84 (2), 85 (2), 86 (2), 87 (2), 88 (2), 89 (2), 90 (2), 91 (2), 92 (2), 93 (2), 94 (2), 95 (2), 96 (2), 97 (2), 98 (2), 99 (2), 100 (2), 101 (2), 102 (2), 103 (2), 104 (2), 105 (2), 106 (2), 107 (2), 108 (2), 109 (2), 110 (2), 111 (2), 112 (2), 113 (2), 114 (2), 115 (2), 116 (2), 117 (2), 118 (2), 119 (2), 120 (2), 121 (2), 122 (2), 123 (2), 124 (2), 125 (2), 126 (2), 127 (2), 128 (2), 129 (2), 130 (2), 131 (2), 132 (2), 133 (2), 134 (2), 135 (2), 136 (2), 137 (2), 138 (2), 139 (2), 140 (2), 141 (2), 142 (2), 143 (2), 144 (2), 145 (2), 146 (2), 147 (2), 148 (2), 149 (2), 150 (2), 151 (2), 152 (2), 153 (3), 154 (2), 155 (2), 156 (1), 157 (1), 158 (2), 159 (2), 160 (2), 161 (2), 162 (2), 164 (2), 165 (3), 166 (2), 167 (2), 168 (2), 169 (2), 170 (2), 171 (2), 172 (2), 173 (2), 174 (2), 175 (2), 176 (2), 177 (2), 178 (2), 180 (3), 181 (3), 182 (2), 183 (2), 184 (2), 185 (2), 186 (2), 187 (2), 188 (2), 189 (2), 190 (2), 191 (2), 192 (2), 193 (2), 194 (2), 195 (2), 196 (2), 197 (2), 198 (2), 199 (2), 200 (2), 201 (2), 202 (2), 203 (2), 204 (2), 205 (2), 206 (2), 207 (2), 208 (2), 209 (2), 210 (2), 211 (2), 212 (2), 213 (3), 214 (2), 215 (2), 216 (2), 217 (2), 218 (2), 219 (2), 220 (2), 221 (2), 222 (2), 223 (2), 224 (3), 225 (4), 226 (2), 227 (2), 228 (3), 229 (1), 230 (2), 231 (2), 232 (2), 233 (2), 234 (2), 235 (2), 236 (2), 237 (2), 238 (2), 239 (2), 240 (2), 241 (2), 242 (2), 243 (2), 244 (2), 245 (2), 246 (2), 247 (2), 248 (2), 249 (2), 250 (2), 251 (2), 252 (2), 253 (2), 254 (2), 255 (2), 256 (2), 257 (2), 258 (2), 259 (2), 260 (2), 262 (2), 263 (2), 264 (2), 265 (2), 266 (2), 267 (3), 268 (2), 269 (2), 270 (2), 271 (2), 272 (2), 273 (2), 274 (2), 275 (2), 276 (1), 277 (2), 278 (2), 279 (2), 280 (2), 281 (2), 282 (2), 283 (2), 284 (2), 285 (2), 286 (2), 287 (2), 288 (2), 289 (2), 290 (2), 291 (2), 292 (2), 293 (2), 294 (2), 295 (2), 296 (2), 297 (2), 298 (2), 299 (2), 300 (2), 301 (2), 302 (2), 303 (2), 304 (2), 305 (2), 306 (2), 307 (2), 308 (1), 309 (2), 310 (2), 311 (2), 312 (2), 313 (2), 314 (2), 315 (2), 316 (2), 317 (2), 318 (2), 319 (2), 320 (2), 321 (1), 322 (2), 323 (2), 324 (2), 325 (2), 326 (2), 327 (2), 328 (2), 329 (2), 330 (2), 331 (2), 332 (2), 333 (2), 334 (2), 335 (2), 336 (2), 337 (2), 338 (2), 339 (2), 340 (2), 341 (2), 342 (2), 343 (2), 344 (2), 345 (2), 346 (2), 347 (2), 348 (2), 349 (2), 350 (2), 351 (2), 352 (2), 353 (2), 354 (2), 355 (2), 356 (2), 357 (2), 358 (2), 359 (2), 360 (2), 361 (2), 362 (2), 363 (2), 364 (2), 365 (2), 366 (2), 367 (2), 368 (2), 369 (2), 370 (2), 371 (2), 372 (2), 373 (2), 374 (2), 375 (2), 376 (2), 377 (2), 378 (2), 379 (2), 380 (2), 381 (2), 382 (2), 383 (2), 384 (2), 385 (2), 386 (2), 389 (3), 388 (2), 390 (2), 391 (2), 392 (2), 393 (2), 394 (2), 395 (2), 396 (2), 397 (2), 398 (2), 399 (2), 400 (2), 401 (2), 402 (2), 403 (2), 404 (2), 405 (2), 406 (2), 407 (2), 408 (2), 409 (2), 410 (2), 411 (2), 412 (2), 413 (2), 414 (2), 415 (2), 416 (2), 417 (2), 418 (2), 419 (2), 420 (2), 421 (2), 422 (2), 423 (2), 424 (2), 425 (2), 426 (2), 427 (2), 428 (2), 429 (2), 430 (2), 431 (2), 432 (2), 433 (2), 434 (2), 435 (2), 436 (2), 437 (2), 438 (3), 439 (1), 440 (2), 441 (2), 442 (1), 443 (2), 444 (2), 445 (2), 446 (2), 447 (2), 448 (2), 449 (2), 450 (2), 451 (2), 452 (2), 453 (1), 454 (1), 455 (1), 456 (1), 457 (2), 458 (2), 459 (2), 460 (2), 461 (2), 462 (2), 463 (2), 464 (2), 465 (2), 466 (2), 467 (2), 468 (2), 469 (2), 470 (2), 471 (2), 472 (2), 473 (2), 474 (2), 475 (2), 476 (2), 477 (2), 478 (2), 479 (2), 480 (2), 481 (2), 482 (2), 483 (2), 484 (2), 485 (2), 486 (2), 487 (2), 488 (2), 489 (2), 490 (2), 491 (3), 492 (3), 493 (2), 494 (2), 495 (2), 496 (2), 497 (2), 498 (2), 499 (2), 500 (2), 501 (2), 502 (2), 503 (2), 504 (2), 505 (2), 506 (2), 507 (2), 508 (2), 509 (2), 510 (2), 511 (2), 512 (2), 513 (2), 514 (2), 515 (2), 516 (2), 517 (2), 518 (2), 519 (2), 520 (2), 521 (2), 522 (2), 523 (2), 524 (2), 525 (3), 526 (2), 527 (2), 528 (2), 529 (2), 530 (2), 531 (2), 532 (2), 533 (2), 534 (2), 536 (2), 537 (2), 538 (2), 539 (2), 540 (2), 541 (2), 542 (2), 543 (2), 544 (2), 545 (2), 546 (2), 547 (2), 548 (2), 549 (2), 550 (2), 551 (2), 552 (2), 553 (2), 554 (2), 555 (2), 556 (2), 557 (2), 558 (2), 559 (2), 560 (2), 561 (2), 562 (2), 563 (2), 564 (2), 565 (2), 566 (2), 567 (2), 568 (2), 569 (2), 570 (2), 571 (2), 572 (2), 573 (2), 574 (2), 575 (2), 576 (2), 577 (2), 578 (2), 579 (2), 580 (2), 581 (2), 582 (2), 583 (2), 584 (2), 585 (2), 586 (3), 587 (3), 588 (2), 589 (2), 590 (2), 591 (2), 592 (2), 593 (2), 594 (2), 595 (2), 596 (2), 597 (2), 598 (2), 599 (2), 600 (2), 601 (2), 602 (2), 603 (2), 604 (2), 605 (2), 606 (2), 607 (2), 608 (3), 609 (3), 610 (2), 611 (2), 612 (2), 613 (2), 614 (2), 615 (2), 616 (2), 617 (2), 618 (2), 619 (2), 620 (2), 621 (2), 622 (2), 623 (2), 624 (3), 625 (3), 626 (2), 627 (2), 628 (2), 629 (2), 630 (2), 631 (2), 632 (2), 633 (2), 634 (2), 635 (2), 636 (2), 637 (2), 638 (2), 639 (2), 640 (2), 641 (2), 642 (2), 643 (2), 644 (2), 645 (2), 646 (2), 647 (2), 648 (2), 649 (2), 650 (2), 651 (2), 65 (1), 163 (1), 179 (1), 261 (1), 387 (1), 535 (1), 652 (1), 653 (1), 654 (1), 655 (1), 656 (1), 657 (1), 658 (1), 659 (1), 660 (1), 661 (1), 662 (1), 663 (1), 664 (1), 665 (1), 666 (1), 667 (1), 668 (1), 669 (1), 670 (1), 671 (1), 672 (1), 673 (1), 674 (1), 675 (1), 676 (1), 677 (1), 678 (1), 679 (1), 680 (1), 681 (1), 682 (1), 683 (1), 684 (1), 685 (1), 686 (1), 687 (1), 688 (1), 689 (1), 690 (1), 691 (1), 692 (1), 693 (1), 694 (1), 695 (1), 696 (1), 697 (1), 698 (1), 699 (1), 700 (1), 701 (1), 702 (1), 703 (1), 704 (1), 705 (1), 706 (1), 707 (1), 708 (1), 709 (1), 710 (1), 711 (1), 712 (1), 713 (1), 714 (1), 715 (1), 716 (1), 717 (1), 718 (1), 719 (1), 720 (1), 721 (1), 722 (1), 723 (1), 724 (1), 725 (1), 726 (1), 727 (1), 728 (1), 729 (1), 730 (1), 731 (1), 732 (1), 733 (1), 734 (1), 735 (1), 736 (1), 737 (1), 738 (1), 739 (1), 740 (1), 741 (1), 742 (1), 743 (1), 744 (1), 745 (1), 746 (1), 747 (1), 748 (1), 749 (1), 750 (1), 751 (1), 752 (1), 753 (1), 754 (1), 755 (1), 756 (1), 757 (1), 758 (1), 759 (1), 760 (1), 761 (1), 762 (1), 763 (1), 764 (1), 765 (1), 766 (1), 767 (1), 768 (1), 769 (1), 770 (1), 771 (1), 772 (1), 773 (1), 774 (1), 775 (1), 776 (1) • @rendition (1) : simple:additions (1)
22. q 18
23. row 594
24. table 50
25. trailer 7