No description, website, or topics provided.
Switch branches/tags
Nothing to show
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
A13415.xml
README.md

README.md

#All the vvorkes of Iohn Taylor the water-poet Beeing sixty and three in number. Collected into one volume by the author: vvith sundry new additions corrected, reuised, and newly imprinted, 1630. Works#

##Taylor, John, 1580-1653.## All the vvorkes of Iohn Taylor the water-poet Beeing sixty and three in number. Collected into one volume by the author: vvith sundry new additions corrected, reuised, and newly imprinted, 1630. Works Taylor, John, 1580-1653.

##General Summary##

Links

TCP catalogueHTMLEPUBPage images (Historical Texts)

Availability

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. This Phase I text is available for reuse, according to the terms of Creative Commons 0 1.0 Universal. The text can be copied, modified, distributed and performed, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.

Major revisions

  1. 2000-00 TCP Assigned for keying and markup
  2. 2001-00 Aptara Keyed and coded from ProQuest page images
  3. 2001-08 TCP Staff (Michigan) Sampled and proofread
  4. 2001-00 Aptara Rekeyed and resubmitted
  5. 2001-08 TCP Staff (Michigan) Sampled and proofread
  6. 2005-04 Andrew Kuster Text and markup reviewed and edited
  7. 2005-10 pfs Batch review (QC) and XML conversion

##Content Summary##

#####Front#####

  1. To the Right HonouraBLE THE LORD MARQVESSE HAMILTON, Master of the Horse to his MAIESTIE, IAMES HAMILLTON: ANAGRAMMA, I AMM ALL HONESTY. To the Author, Iohn Taylor.WAst euer keowne to any time before,That so much skill in Poesie could be _ To the Author, Iohn Taylor. IOhannes Tailerus〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉:Ira! an honesté lusi:Lusi et stigmata pessimis inussi,Pau _ Ars niuea hos lenit,〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉.

    _ Ad amicum meritò dilectum, Iohannem Tailor aliàs, aquinatem, vulgó Poëtam aquaticum hendecasyllabae.

    _ To my worthy and well-deseruing friend, our wel-known hydropoet, IOHN TAYLOR.

    _ To his friend the Author.

    _ To my honest friend, Iohn Taylor.

    _ To the deseruing author, Iohn Taylor.

    _ To my friend Iohn Taylor.

  2. A Catalogue of all the seuerall Bookes contained in this VOLVME.

  3. TO THE MOST HIGH, MOST MIGHTY, AND MOST ANCIENT PRODVCER, SEDVCER, AND ABVSER OF MANKIND, THE WORLD.

  4. Errata, or Faults to the Reader.

  5. In laudem Authoris.

#####Body#####

  1. TAYLORS VRANIA.

  2. TO THE TRVELY VVORTHY, AND RIGHT HONOVRABLE IOHN MORAY, L. VISCOVNT ANNAN, EARLE OF Annandale, one of the Gentlemen of his Maiesties Royall Bed-chamber; Earths Honours, and Heauens happinesse.

  3. THE SEVERALL SIEGES, ASSAVLTS, SACKINGS, AND FINALL DESTRVCTION OF the Famous, Ancient, and memorable Citty of IERVSALEM.

    _ THE LAST AND MOST LAMENTABLE Destruction of the Ancient, Famous, and Memorable Citty and Temple of IERVSALEM; being destroyed by VESPASIAN, and his Sonne TITVS. TO THE RIGHT HONOVRABLE AND TRVELY VER I VOVS LADY, and Noble Patronesse of good endeauours, MARY, C _ TO THE RIGHT HONOVRABLE AND TRVELY VER I VOVS LADY, and Noble Patronesse of good endeauours, MARY, Countesse of BVCKINGHAM.

    _ The Argument and cause of this Poem.

    _ THE LIFE AND DEATH OF THE MOST BLESSED AMONGST ALL VVOMEN, THE VIRGIN MARY, The Mother of our Lord IESVS CHRIST.

    _ ISKARRIOTT Anagramms. TRAITOR KIS.

    _ LENVOY. TO THE RIGHT HONOVRABLE, WORTHY, and Learned Gentleman, Sr. THOMAS Richardson Knight, Lord Chiefe Iu _ TO THE RIGHT HONOVRABLE, WORTHY, and Learned Gentleman, Sr. THOMAS Richardson Knight, Lord Chiefe Iustice of his Maiesties Court of Common Pleas, and Speaker in the High Court of PARLIAMENT, &c. RIGHT HONOVRABLE,BVt that I am assured that your Noble disposition, in all parts is sutable to the i _ TO NO MATTER VVHO, NO GREAT MATTER VVHERE, YET TO BE READ, THERE IS MATTER WHY, ALTHOVGH NOT MVCH MATTER WHEN.

    _ A FEW LINES, TO SMALL PVRPOSE, AGAINST THE SCANDALOVS ASPERSIONS, that are either maliciously, or ignorantly cast vpon the Poets and Poems of these Times.

    _ SVPERBIAE FLAGELLVM, OR THE VVHIP OF PRIDE. TO THE MOST HIGH AND ALMIGHTY God the Father, Creator of the World, and to the King of Kings, Lord o _ TO THE MOST HIGH AND ALMIGHTY God the Father, Creator of the World, and to the King of Kings, Lord of Lords, and onely Ruler of Princes, Iesus Christ, the Glorious Redeemer of the World, And to the most holy & Blessed Spirit, the Comfort of all true Beleeuers, and Sanctisier of the World, Three Persons, and one Eternall Omnipotent God.

    _ TO THE HIGH AND MIGHTY MONARCH, AND MY DREAD Soueraigne, CHARLES, by the Grace and Prouidence of God, King of Great Britaine, France and Ireland, Defender, &c.

    _ AGAINST CVRSING AND SVVEARING.

    • Of these foure in Order.

    • The second, Curses from Man to Man.

    • The third, when Man Curseth himselfe.

    • Fourthly, When Man Curseth or Blasphemeth God.

    • Against Swearing.

    _ Christian admonitions, against the two fearefull sinnes of Cursing & Swearing, that the grieuousnesse of those sinnes may be loth remembred, and auoyded, whereby the hatred of them may possesse the heart of euery Christian.

    • Against Cursing.

    • Against Swearing.

    • Against Swearing. TO THE TRVELY GENEROVS AND NOBLE KNIGHT, SIR IOHN MILLISSENT, SERIEANT PORTER TO the Kings most Exce _ TO THE TRVELY GENEROVS AND NOBLE KNIGHT, SIR IOHN MILLISSENT, SERIEANT PORTER TO the Kings most Excellent Maiestie.

    _ TO THE PRINTER.

    _ THE PRAEFACE.

    _ THE FEAREFVLL SVMMER: OR LONDONS CALAMITIE. NOw for a Conclusion in Prose, I must haue one touch more at the vncharitablenesse and ingratitude oTO ALL THOSE THAT HAVE BEENE, ARE, VVILL, OR WOVLD BE MASTERS OF A SHILLING OR TWELVE-PENCE.SIR Iohn _ TO ALL THOSE THAT HAVE BEENE, ARE, VVILL, OR WOVLD BE MASTERS OF A SHILLING OR TWELVE-PENCE.

    _ THE TRAVELS OF TVVELVE-PENCE.

    • Vpon the Kings Armes. TO THE RIGHT VVORSHIPFVLL AND TRVELY GENEROVS SIR IOHN FEARNE KNIGHT.Noble Sir,THe world suffi•ientl _ TO THE RIGHT VVORSHIPFVLL AND TRVELY GENEROVS SIR IOHN FEARNE KNIGHT.

    _ AN ARMADO, OR NAVY OF SHIPS AND OTHER VESSELS, WHO HAVE THE ART TO SAYLE BY LAND, AS WELL AS BY SEA.

    _ THE DESCRIPTION HOW THE WHOLE NAVY IS VICTVALLED WITH THIRTY TWO SORTES OF LING, BESIDES OTHER NECESSARIES.

    _ Why these Ships are called SHIPS.

    _ The Lord-SHIP with her Regiment.

    _ The Scholler-SHIP with her Regiment.

    _ The Lady-SHIP with her Regiment.

    _ The Good fellow-SHIP with her Regiment.

    _ The Apprentice-SHIP.

    _ The Court-SHIP, with her Regiment.

    _ The Friend-SHIP

    _ The Fellow-SHIP with her Regiment.

    _ The Foot-man-SHIP with her Regiment.

    _ The Horseman-SIHP with her Squadron. I Niurious death, to make an Emperour mourneFleabitten Otho's timelesse Exequies,Who might haue liu'

    • Heere Nero Speakes.

    • Otho speaks to the two Asses.

    • Epitaph. To conclude, this Horsemanship after many stormes, tempests, gusts, and flawes came at last home to _ The Suretie-SHIP, with her Regiment.

    _ The Wor-SHIP with her Squadron or Regiment.

    _ The Huntsmans-SHIP; or Woodman-SHIP, with her Squadron or Regiment.

  4. THE PRAISE, ANTIQVITY, AND COMMODITIE OF BEGGERIE, BEGGERS, AND BEGGING. NOw it followes, that I shew some of their formes, carriage, manners, and behauiour, their seuerall INuention many thousand wayes could go,To shew their variations to and fro:For as vpon the some of mTO THE MIGHTIE MONARCH OF MONTZAGO, THE MODELL OF MAGNANIMITY, the map of man-darring Monster-quelle _ TO THE MIGHTIE MONARCH OF MONTZAGO, THE MODELL OF MAGNANIMITY, the map of man-darring Monster-quellers, the thrice three times trebble triple renowned Alphebo, ornamented honorable Knight of Standsalio, Treldedo, Maroua, Fregero, Andalowsia, and the skie-scaling mountaine of Muffetto: Illustrious Pheander, victorious and valorous Champion to Don Phoebus, great Duke of Delphos, and the Oracle of Apollo; Marquesse of Muzetta, and the lake Asse-phaltites: Earle of Vtopia; Lord and Dominator of the Promontory of Polipratemost: The vnconquer'd all conquering Mayden Knight, by reuelation, by creation, by procreation, and contentation: the vnmatched Phoenix, and fourefold Commander of the Inchanted Ilands, by nomination, by Banner, by warlike atchieuements, by natiuity, by descent and processe, matchlesse and vnparalleld Sir Thomas Parsons, Knight of the Sunne, great cousin Vermin to the seldome seene Queene of Fayries, and hopefull heire apparant to her inuisible Kingdome.

    _ TAYLORS GOOSE DESCRIBING THE VVILDE GOOSE, THE Tame Goose, the Taylors Goose, the VVinchester Goose, the Clack Goose, the Soleand Goose, the Huniburne Goose, Goose vpon Goose, the true nature and profit of all Geese, the honourable victories of the GrayGoose-wing, the worthinesse of the Pen, the Description of Goosetoft, and Goose Fayre, with the valour of the Gander.

    • The Winchester Goose.

    • The Taylors Goose.

    • The prayse of the Gray Goose wing.

    • The praise of the Gooses Quill.

    • The memorable honour of the Goose sauing the Capitoll at Rome.

    • Goostoft in Lincolnshire.

    • Goose Faire at Stratford Bow, the Thursday after Whitso•ide. TO THE FISHMONGERS, AND BVTCHERS, GREETING.FRiendly, frolicke, franke, free-hearted, famous flourish _ TO THE FISHMONGERS, AND BVTCHERS, GREETING.

    _ IACKE A LENT HIS BEGINNING AND ENTERTAINMENT: with the mad prankes of his Gentleman-Vsher ShroueTuesday that goes before him, and his Footman Hunger attending.

    _ CERTAINE BLANKE VERSES VVRITTEN of purpose to no purpose, yet so plainely contriu'd, that a Childe of two yeeres old may vnderstand them as well as a good Scholler of fifty. TO ALL MY LOVING ADVENTVRERS, BY VVHAT NAME OR TITLE SOEVER, MY GENERALL SALVTATION.REader, these Tr _ TO ALL MY LOVING ADVENTVRERS, BY VVHAT NAME OR TITLE SOEVER, MY GENERALL SALVTATION.

    _ THE PENNYLES PILGRIMAGE, OR THE MONEY-LESSE PERAMBVLATION, OF IOHN TAYLOR, ALIAS, THE KINGS MAIESTIES WATER-POET. HOVV HE TRAVAILED ON FOOT, FROM LONDON TO EDENBOROVGH IN Scotland, not carrying any Money to or fro, neither Begging, Borrowing, or Asking Meate, Drinke or Lodging. In this Towne of Newcastle, I oner-tooke •n Hostler, and I asked him what the next Towne was called,And now with sleep my Muse hath eas'd her braine,I'le turne my stile from prose, to verse againe.ThaTo the purpose then: my first nights lodging in Scotland was at a place called Mophot, which they saThat haue wasted, Mōths, weeks, dayes, & houresIn viewing Kingdomes, Countries, Townes, andWithout The Sea at certaines places doth leake, of soake into the Mine, which by the industry of Sir George VVHy should I waste Inuention to endite,Ouidian fictions, or Olympiam games ••My misty Muse enlightnBeing come to our lodgings, there was such Baking, Boyling, Roasting, and Stewing, a• if Cooke Russi _ THE EPILOGVE TO ALL MY ADVENTVRERS AND OTHERS.

  5. THE GREAT EATER OR PART OF THE ADMIRABLE TEETH AND STOMACKS EXPLOITS OF NICHOLAS WOOD, OF HARRISOM IN THE COVNTY OF KENT. HIS EXCESSIVE MANNER OF EATING WITHOVT MANNERS, IN STRANGE AND TRVE MANNER DESCRIBED, BY IOHN TAILOR. TO THE (SIR REVERENCE) RICH VVORSHIPPED Mr TRIM TRAM SENCELES, GREAT IMAGE OF AVTHORITY and Hedgboro _ TO THE (SIR REVERENCE) RICH VVORSHIPPED Mr TRIM TRAM SENCELES, GREAT IMAGE OF AVTHORITY and Hedgborough of the famous City of Goteham, and to the rest of that admired and vnmatchable Senate, with their Corruptions and Families.

    _ To Nobody.

    _ The names of such Authors Alphabetically recited, as are simply mentioned in this Worke.

    _ SIR GREGORY NONSENCE HIS NEWES FROM NO PLACE.

    • A most learned-Lye, and Illiterate Oration, in lame galloping Ri•• fustianly pronounced by Nimshag, a Gi•••sophicall Phoolosopher, in the presence of Ac••tophel Smel-smocke, Annani-Asse Aretine, Is••• Nabal, Fransiscus Ra-viliaco, Garnetto Iebusito, •• do Salpetro Fauexit Pouderio, and many other g••• Senators of Limbo. Translated out of the vulg•• Language, of Terraincognita, and is as materiall as any part of the Booke, the meaning whereof a blindman may see without Spectacles as well at midnight, as at noone day.

    • Some Sence at last to the Learned. AS MVCH HAPPINESSE AS MAY BE WISHED, ATTEND THE Two hopefull Impes, of Gentility and Learning, Mr RI _ AS MVCH HAPPINESSE AS MAY BE WISHED, ATTEND THE Two hopefull Impes, of Gentility and Learning, Mr RICHARD and GEORGE HATTON.

    _ PROLOGVE.

    _ A Very Merrie VVherrie-FerryVOYAGE. OR, YORKE for my Money.

    • An Epilogue.
  6. THE GREAT O TOOLE.

    _ AN ENCOMIVM OR ENCO-MI-ASS. TRICK, DEDICATED TO THE VNLIMITED memory of Arthur O Toole, or O Toole the Great: Being the Sonne and Heire of Brian O Toole, Lord of Poores Court and farre Collen, in the County of Dublin, in the Kingdome of Ireland. The Mar• and Mercury, the Agamemnon and Vlisses both for Wisdome and Valour, in the Kingdomes of Great Britaine and Ireland.

    _ THE ARGVMENT AND MEANING of this following History.

    _ To the Honour of the Noble CAPTAINE O TOOLE.

    • Vpon his Wisedome, and Policie.

    • A Complaint and a Petition to him.

    • Lenuoy. TO THE NOBILITY, GENTRY, AND COMMVNALTY, WHO ARE INHABITANTS, OR WEL-WILLERS TO THE WELFARE OF THE C _ TO THE NOBILITY, GENTRY, AND COMMVNALTY, WHO ARE INHABITANTS, OR WEL-WILLERS TO THE WELFARE OF THE CITIE OF SALISBVRY, AND COVNTY OF WILTSHIRE.

    _ A DISCOVERY BY SEA, FROM LONDON TO SALISBVRY. GOD, who of his infinite wisdome made Man, of his vnmeasured mercy redeemed him, of his boundlesse b

  7. The Scourge of Basenesse: OR, The old Lerry, with a new Kicksey, and a new-cum twang, with the old Winsey:

    _ DEDICATED TO THE MIRROR OF GOOD FELLOWSHIP, THE PATTERNE OF TRVE FRIENDSHIP, AND the onely nonparallell of iouiall Entertainement; Mr Andrew Hilton, at the signe of the Horse-shoo, at Daintree; I. Taylor wisheth daily increase of good Guests, true payment, hearts content in this life, and afterward as much happinesse as his soule can desire.

    _ To the Reader.

    _ THE VVHY AND THE VVHEREFORE.

    _ A Table of the generall heads, containing seuen parts.

    _ A KICKSEY VVINSEY, OR, A LERRY COME-TWANG: Wherein Iohn Taylor hath Satyrically suted seuen hundred and fifty of his bad debtors, that will not pay him for his returne of his iourney from Scotland.

    _ In defence of Aduentures vpon Returnes.

  8. Taylors Motto.

    _ DEDICATED TO EVERY BODY.

    _ TAYLORS MOTTO. ET HABEO, ET CAREO, ET CVRO. I HAVE, I VVANT, I CARE.

    • Et Habeo, I haue.

    • Et Careo, I want.

    • Et Curo, I Care.

    • My serious Cares and Considerations.

  9. ODCOMBS COMPLAINT OR, CORIATS FVNERALL EPICEDIVM: OR DEATH-SONG, VPON HIS late-reported drowning. With his Epitaph in the Barmuda, and Vtopian tongues: And translated into English by IOHN TAYLOR.

    _ The Authour in his owne defence.

    _ TO THE MIRROR OF TIME, THE MOST REFVLGENT, SPLENDIDIO VS REFLECTING COVRT Animal, Don Archibald Armstrong: Great M. Comptroller, Commander, and Countermander of mirth, alacrity, sport, and ridiculous confabulations, in this Septentrionall, ••• Westerne Monarchie of Magna Britania: Your poore and daily Orator, IOHN TAYLOR, wisheth increase of your wisdome, in your owne person, and that your eminence and spirit may be infused into the bosoms of most mens heires, that esteeme more of Wealth, then of Wisdome.

    _ TO THE GENTLEMEN READERS, THAT vnderstand A.B. from a Battledore.

    _ A SAD, IOYFVLL, LAMENTABLE, DELIGHTFVLL, MERRY-GOSORRY ELEGY OR FVNERALL POEM VPON the supposed death of the famous Cosmographicall Surueior, and Historiographicall Relator, Mr THOMAS CORIAT of Odcomb.

    _ EPITAPH in the Barmooda tongue, which must be pronounced with the accent of the grunting of a hogge.

    • Epitaph in the Vtopian tongue.

    • The same in English, translated by Caleb Quishquash, an Vtopian borne, and principall Secretary to the great Adelentado of Barmoodoes.

    _ CERTAINE SONNETS, IN PRAISE OF Mr. THOMAS THE DECEASED; FASHIONED OF diuers stuffs, as mockado, fustian, stand-further off, and Motly, all which the Author dedicates to the immortall memory of the famous Odcombian traueller.

  10. THE EIGHTH VVONDER OF THE VVORLD: OR, CORIATS ESCAPE FROM HIS SVPPOSED DROWNING.

    _ DEDICATED

    _ To the knowing Reader.

    _ The cause of the contention betwixt sir Thomas the Scholer, and Iohn the Sculler.

    _ The VVorlds eighth VVonder: OR, CORIATS REVIVING.

    • Epilogue to Sir Thomas Coriat vpon his name.

    • Vpon his bookes name, called his Crudities.

    • A Simile for his Learning.

    • My Fare-well to him.

  11. Laugh, and be Fat: OR, A COMMENTARY VPON THE ODCOMBYAN BANKET.

    _ To the Reader.

    _ LAVGH, AND BE FAT.

    • M'Coriats entertainement at Bossoms Inne.

      1. Oration.
      1. Oration.
    • Epilogue to Mr Coriat.

  12. MASTER THOMAS CORIAT TO HIS FRIENDS IN ENGLAND SENDS GREETING, From Agra, the Capitall City of the Dominion of the Great MOGOLL in the Easterne India.

    _ Certaine Verses in commendations of this mirrour of footmanship, this Catholique or vniuersall Traueller, this European, Asian, African Pilgrime, this well letterd, well litterd discouerer and Cosmographicall describer Master Thomas Coriat of Odcombe.

    _ IN PRAISE OF THE AVTHOR MASTER THOMAS CORIAT.

    _ A SHORT DESCRIPTION OF THE LONGING desire that AMERICA hath to entertaine this vnmatchable Perambulator.

    _ A LITTLE REMEMBRANCE OF HIS VARIETY OF TONGVES, AND Politicke forme of Trauell.

    _ The superscription, Sent from Azmere, the Court of the great and mightiest Monarch of the East, called the great MOGVLL in the Easterne India: To be conuaid To my deare and louing Mother, Mrs Garthered Coriat, at her house in the Towne of Euill in Somersetshire. I pray you deliuer this letter at Gerards Hall, to Christopher Guppie, a Carrier, (if he be yet liuing) or else to some other honest trusty Messenger, to be conuaid with all conuenient speed to the place aforesaid.

    • MASTER THOMAS CORIATS COMMENDATIONS TO HIS friends in England. From Agra, the Capitall City of the Dominion of the Great MOGOLL in the Easterne India, the last of October, 1616.

    • The Copie of an Oration that I made in the Persian tongue, to the Great Mogoll, before diuers of his Nobles.

    • The English of it is this.

    _ The Copy of a speech that I made to a Mahometan in the Italian tongue.

    _ The Author of the Verse, takes leaue of the Author of the Prose, desiring rather to see him, then to beare from him.

  13. A Bawd. A vertuous Bawd, a modest Bawd: As Shee Deserues, reproue, or else applaud.

    _ DEDICATED TO THE NEITHER NOBLE OR JGNOBLE, LORD OR LADY, KIND, OR CRVELL, learned or ignorant, curteous or currish, Christian or Barbarian, Man or Woman, rich or poore: but to all and euery one in generall and particular.

    _ A Bawd.

  14. A Common Whore with all these graces grac'd; Shee's very honest, beautifull and chaste. With a comparison betweene a Whore and a Booke.

    _ DEDICATED To no matter who: Lord, Master, Goodman, Gaffer, or Knaue; Lady, Mistresse, Good-Readers. wife, Gammer, or Whore,

    _ A WHORE.

    _ A comparison betwixt a Whore and a Booke.

  15. An arrant Thiefe, whom euery Man may trust: In Word and Deed exceeding true and iust. With a Comparison betweene a Thiefe and a Booke. THis WaterThe Anigram of Rat is Art.Rat, (or Art) I would commend,But that I know not to begin or enWHen a fresh Waterman doth turn Saltpict,His Muse must prattle all the world ••• know it:Of Whores a _ TO THE HOPEFVLL PAIRE OF BRETHREN, AND MY WORTHY PATRONES, Master RICHARD, and GEORGE HATTON, Loue, Learning, and true Happinesse.

    _ To any Reader Hee or Shee, It makes no matter what they bee.

    _ A THIEFE.

    _ A Comparison betweene a Thiefe and a Booke.

  16. THE PRAISE AND VERTVE OF a IAYLE and IAYLERS: WITH THE MOST EXCELLENT MYSTERIE, and necessary vse of all sorts of Hanging. ALSO A TOVCH AT TYBVRNE FOR A PERIOD, AND THE AVTHORS FREE LEAVE TO LET THEM be hangd, who are offended at the Booke without cause.

    _ DEDICATED To theReader, you must note, that this Gentleman did send me from the Fairne Iland, a barrell of Gulls and Cormotant egges, by ••••••ing of which, I haue attained to the vnderstanding of many words which our Gulls and Cormotants doe speaks here abou•••, Sensible, Reasonable, Affable, Amiable, Acceptable, minded, Honourable, in VVit, Iudgement, and Vnderstanding Able, Robert Rugge Gentleman, Reare Adelantado of the Holy Iland, the Fairne, and the Staples, on the Coast of Northumbria.

    _ THE VERTVE OF AIAYLE, AND NECESSITIE OF HANGING.

      1. PRISONE. Anagramma. NIP SORE.
      1. PRISONE. Anagramma. IN ROPES.
      1. PRISONE. Anagramma. IN PROSE.
      1. PRISONE. Anagramma. NO PRISE.
    • 5 IAYLES. Anagramma. I SLAYE.

      1. BONDAGE. Anagramma. BANDOGE.
      1. IAYLER. Anagramma. I RAYLE.
      1. ARESTING. Anagramma. A STINGER.
    • OR,

  17. ARESTING. Anagramma. IN GRATES.

      1. SERIEANT. Anagramma. IN ARESTE.
    • OR,

  18. SERIEANT. Anagramma. IN TEARES.

      1. WARDES. Anagramma. DRAWES.

    _ THE NECESSITIE OF HANGING.

    _ THE DESCRIPTION OF TYBVRNE.

  19. The Vnnaturall Father: OR, The cruell Murther committed by one IOHN ROVVSE of the Towne of Ewell, ten miles from London, in the County of Surry, vpon two of his owne Children.

    _ IOHN ROVVSE his Prayer for pardon of his lewd life, which bee vsed to pray in the time of his imprisonment.

    _ JOHN ROVVSE of Ewell his owne Arraignment, Confession, Condemnation, and Iudgement of himselfe, whilst hee lay Prisoner in the White Lyon, for drowning of his two Children.

    • His Inditement for murder of his Children.

    • His Iudgement.

    • His speech what hee could say for himselfe.

  20. TAYLORS REVENGE: OR, The Rimer VVILLIAM FENNOR, firkt, ferrited, and finely fetcht ouer the Coales.

    _ To any that can read.

    _ WILLIAM FENNOR. Anagramma. NV VILLANY For me; OR, Forme NV VILLANY.

    • TO WILLIAM FENNOR.

    • To the Reader

    • To my Friends.

    • To my despightfull Foes.

  21. FENNORS DEFENCE: OR, I AM YOVR FIRST MAN. Wherein the Water-man, IOHN TAYLOR, is dasht, sowst, and finally fallen into the Thames: With his slanderous Taxations, base Imputations, scandalous Accusations, and foule Abominations, against his Maiesties Ryming Poet: who hath answered him without Vexations or trembling Recantations.

    _ DEDICATED To all that can iudge, of what degree soeuer. Although I cannot Rogue it, as he can,Yet will I shew my selfe on honest man. _ An Apologie to the Anagram of my Name, made by no Scholler, but a Sculler.

    • An Anagram vpon the Scullers Name. IOHN TAYLOR, Anagramma. O Hate, rayle on.

    • To his approued Foe Iohn Taylor.

    • Defence.

    • Epitaph.

    • To my kinde Friends in generall.

    • FENNORS finall Fare•ill to TAYLOR, with his blue Bitch and Cods bellie.

  22. A CAST OVER THE VVATER, BY IOHN TAYLOR. Giuen Gratis to WILLIAM FENNOR, the Rimer, From London to the Kings Bench.

    _ DEDICATED To all that vnderstand English. By your leaue a little in Prose, and to the purpose. He giues himselfe an honest good report,And to himselfe he is beholden for't:Tet 'twixt the greatest _ Master PENNORS taking Boate.

    • In defence of the true Annagram I made of William Fennor. Nv Villany for mee.

    • Vpon his false Annagram on my name.

    • To him I hold too vnworthy to be my foe: William Fenner.

    • My Defence against thy Offence.

    • Epitaph.

    • An Epilogue.

    • Taylors defence of the honesty of his Blew-Bitch.

    • His Landing.

  23. The praise of cleane Linnen. VVITH THE COMMENDABLE VSE OF THE LAVNDRES.

    _ DEDICATED TO THE MOST MONDIFYING, CLARIFYING, PVRIFYING, AND REPVRIFYING, CLEANSER, Clearer, and Reformer of deformed and polluted Linnen, Martha Legge Esquiresse, transparent, vnspotted, Snow Lilly-white Laundresse to the Right worshipfull and generous the Innes of Court, of the middle Temple, with diuers others in the ranke of Nobility, Gentility, and tranquility: your poore and vnknowne Poeticall Oratour IOHN TAYLOR, in humility and •••, cranes your Patronages ability, in defence of his imbecility.

    _ The praise of Cleane Linnen.

    _ The principall occasions why this merry Poeme was written.

  24. THE TRVE CAVSE OF THE WATERMENS Suit concerning Players, and the reasons that their Playing on London side is their extreame hindrances. With a Relation how farre that suit was proceeded in, and the occasions that it was not effected.

  25. Wit and Mirth: CHARGEABLY COLLECTED OVT OF TAVERNS, ORDINARIES, Innes, Bowling Greenes and Allyes, Alehouses, Tobacco Shops, Highwayes, and Water passages. Made vp• and ••••• Clinohes, •ulls, Quirkes, Yerkes •…garbled at the requ•• of old •••n GA•••• Gh••

    _ DEDICATED To the truely Loyall harted, learned, well-accomplished Gentleman, M••ter •••

    _ IOHN GARRETS GHOST.

    _ VVIT AND MIRTH.

    • (1)

    • (2)

    • (3)

    • (4)

    • (5)

    • (6)

    • (7)

    • (8)

    • (9)

    • (10)

    • (11)

    • (12)

    • (13)

    • (14)

    • (15)

    • (16)

    • (17)

    • (18)

    • (19)

    • (20) A Quiblet.

    • (21)

    • (22)

    • (23)

    • (24)

    • (25)

    • (26)

    • (27)

    • (28)

    • (29)

    • (30) c. A Quiblet.

    • (31)

    • (32)

    • (33)

    • (34)

    • (35)

    • (36)

    • (37)

    • (38)

    • (39)

    • (40)

    • (41)

    • (42)

    • (43)

    • (44) The figure Conuersion.

    • (45)

    • (46)

    • (47)

    • (48)

    • (49)

    • (50)

    • (51)

    • (52)

    • (53)

    • (54)

    • (55)

    • (56)

    • (57)

    • (58)

    • (59)

    • (60)

    • (61)

    • (62)

    • (63)

    • (64)

    • (65)

    • (66)

    • (67)

    • (68)

    • (69)

    • (70)

    • (71)

    • (72)

    • (73)

    • (74)

    • (75)

    • (76)

    • (77)

    • (78)

    • (79)

    • (80)

    • (81)

    • (82)

    • (83)

    • (84)

    • (85)

    • (86)

    • (87)

    • (88)

    • (90)

    • (91)

    • (92)

    • (93)

    • (94)

    • (95)

    • (96)

    • (97)

    • (98)

    • (99) A Clinch.

    • (100)

    • (101) Atoy to mocke an Ape.

    • (102)

    • (103)

    • (104)

    • (105)

    • (106)

    • (107)

    • (108)

    • (109)

    • (110)

    • (111)

    • (112)

    • (113)

    • (114)

    • (115)

    • (116)

    • (117)

    • (118)

    • (119)

    • (120)

    • (121)

    • (122)

    • (123)

    • (124)

    • (125)

    • (126)

    • (127)

    • (128)

    • (129)

    • (130)

    • (131)

    • (132)

    • (133)

    • (134)

    • (135)

    • (136)

    • (137)

    • (138)

    _ TO THE KINGS MOST Excellent Maiestie.

    • A Ribble ••bble of Gossips.
  26. ADOGGE OF VVARRE, OR, The Trauels of Drunkard, the famous Curre of the Round Woollstaple in Westminster. His seruices in the Netherlands, and lately in FRANCE, with his home returne.

    _ The Argument.

    _ To the Reader.

    _ A Dogge of VVarre: THus the old Prouerbe is fulfilled, A Dogge shall haue his day: And this Dogge hath not out liu'd hi

  27. The VVorld runnes on wheeles: OR, Oddes betwixt Carts and Coaches.

    _ TO The Noble Company of Cordwainers, the worshipfull Company of Sadlers and Woodmongers: To the worthy, honest and laudable Company of Watermen; And to the Sacred Societie of Hackney-men; And finally, to as many as are grieued and vniustly impouerished, and molested with the Worlds running on Wheeles.

    _ The VVorld runnes on VVheeles.

  28. The Nipping or Snipping of ABVSES: OR, The Wooll-gathēring ôf VVit.

    _ A Skeltonicall salutation to those that know how to reade, and not merre the sense with hacking or mis-construction.

    _ To the Castalian Water-writer, Splende & dignoscar.

    _ To my friend by land and by water, Iohn Taylor.

    _ To his deare friend Master Iohn Taylor.

    _ To the Water-Poet, Iohn Taylor.

    _ To my friend Iohn Taylor.

    _ To my honest friend Iohn Taylor.

    _ In Laudem Authoris.

    _ To my friend IOHN TAYLOR.

    _ The Authours description of a Poet and Poesie, with an Apology in defence of Naturall English Poetry.

    _ To the Kings most excellent Maiesty.

    _ To the high and mighty Prince, CHARLES STVART.

    • Anagramma, Calls true hearts.

    • To Anna Queene of Great Brittaine.

    _ Loues Iabyrinth, with the description of the seuen Planets.

    • 1 To Saturne.

    • 2 To Ioue.

    • 3 To Mars.

    • 4 To Sol.

    • 5 To Venus.

    • 6 To Mercury.

    • 7 To Luna.

    • Sonnet.

    _ Plutoes Proclamation concerning his Infernall pleasure for the Propagation of Tobacco.

    _ A Proclamation or approbation from the King of execration, to euery Nation, for Tobaccoes propagation.

    _ To the Right Honourable, Lord, William Earle of Pembroke, WILLIAM HERBERT.

    _ To the Right honourable Iohn Lord Viscount Haddington, Earle of Holdernes, Iohn Ramsey.

    _ To the Honourable Knight Sir Thomas Bludder.

    _ Vpon the Powder Treason the fifth of Nouember 1605.

    _ To the Right Honourable Iob• Moray, Lord Viscount Annan, Earle of Annandale, Gentleman of his Maiesties Honourable Bedchamber.

    _ Twelue Sonnets vpon the Sonnes entring into the twelue Caelestiall Signes.

    • March 10. Aries.

    • To the Right Honourable Christopher Villers, Earle of Anglesey.

    • Taurus.

    • To the Right Honorable the Earle of Manchester, Lord priuy Seale to the Kings Matestie, HENRY MONTAGVE.

    • Gemini, May.

    • To my approued good friend, Mr Robert Branthwayte.

    • Cancer. Iune.

    • Leo. Iuly.

    • Virgo. August.

    • Libra. September.

    • Scorpio. October.

    • Sagitarius. Nouember.

    • Capricornus. December.

    • Aquarius, Ianuary.

    • Pisces. February.

    _ To the Right Honourable Thomas Lord Ridgewaye, Treasurer.

    _ Certaine Sonnets made in the forme of AEquiuoques; on the destruction of Troy.

    _ To the Right Honourable, the Lord Viscount Grandison.

    _ Certaine Sonnets: variously composed vpon diuers subiects.

    • Sonnet. 1

    • Sonnet. 2.

    • Sonnet. 3.

    • Sonnet. 4.

    • Sonnet. 5.

    • Sonnet. 6.

    • Sonnet. 7.

    • Sonnet. 8.

    _ A Cataplasmicall Satyre, composed and compacted of sundry simples, as salt, vineger, wormewood, and a little gall, very profitable to cure the impostumes of vice.

    _ To Mistresse Rose.

    _ To my approued good friend Mr. ROBARTE CVDDNER.

    _ A nest of Epigrams.

    • Fortune. 1.

    • Epigram 2.

    • Epigram 3.

    • Epigram 4.

    • Epigram 5.

    • Epigram 6.

    • Epigram 7.

    • Epigram 8.

    • Epigram 9.

    • Epigram 10.

    • Epigram 11.

    • Epigram 12.

    • Epigram 13.

    • Epigram 14.

    • Epigram 15.

    • Epigram 16.

    • Epigram 17.

    • Epigram 18.

    • Epigram 19.

    • Epigram 20.

    • Epigram 21.

    • Epigram 22.

    • Epigram 23.

    • Epigram 34.

    • Epigram 25.

    • Epigram 26.

    • Epigram 27.

    • Epigram 28.

    • Epigram 29.

    • Epigram 30.

    • Epigram 31.

    • Epigram 32.

    • Epigram 33.

    • Epigram 34.

    • Epigram 35.

    • Epigram 36.

    • Epigram 37.

    • Epigram 38.

    • Epigram 39.

    • Epigram 40.

    • Epigram 41.

    _ An Apologie for Water-men •• Dedicated to Nowell, and Robert Clarke Esquires, Masters of his Maiesties Barges; and to the rest of the Masters, the Assistants of the Company of Watermen.

    _ Epilogue to those that know what they haue read, and how to censure.

  29. A MEMORIALL OF ALL THE ENGLISH MONARCHS, being in number 151. from Brute to King CHARLES.

    _ TO THE RIGHT HONOVRABLE, LIONEL Lord Viscount Cranefield, Earle of Middlesex, &c. BRVTE, THE FIRST KING OF BRITTAINE, began his Reigne,1. BRVTE.••••••munds, 2858.Before Christ, 1108.

    • BRVTE, THE FIRST KING OF BRITTAINE, began his Reigne, Locrine 20. yeeres, 1034.LOcrinus, Eldest of old Brutus Sonnes,By Valour vanquisht the inuading HunnQ. Guendoline, 1064.About this time Saul was King of Israel.VVHen 15. yeeres this Queen'had wisely rMadan, 1009.VVHen forty yeers this King had rul'd this Ile,(As Stories say) he died a death most vilMempricius raigned 20. yeeres, 991.MEmpricius base, his brother Manlius slew,And got the Crowne, by Ebranke, 989.King D••uid ••••••At Edinburgh the Castle he did found,Alcluid & Tork, he built new froBrute the second, 929.IF any noble act Brute Greeneeshield did,Hee's wrong'd, because from HistoriesLeil. 917.LEil Carleile built, and raign'd yeeres twenty fiueAnd as Fame still keepes dead mens actsRudbudibrasse, 892.His King built Canterbury, Winchester,And Shastbury he from the ground did reare:Bladud reign'd 20. 863.BLathe was by Bladud to perfection brought,By Necromanticke Arts, to flye heeLeire, 844.LEire (as the Story saies) three daughters had,The youngest good, the other two too bad:•Qu. Cordeilla, 805.MAd Morgan, an vnmanner'd Cunedagus,Their Aūt Cordeilla with fierce war did plagMorgan Cunedagus, 800.THen Morgan did 'gainst Cunedagus contend,And at Glamorgan, Morgan had his endRiuallo, before Christ, 766.THree daies it rain'd blood, when Riuallo reign'd,And great mortalitie tGurgustus, 721.Scicillius, 684.A Common Drunkard was this wicked King,Which vice did many other viceIago, 636.Kimma•m, 612.OF these two Kings, small mention I doe finde,They left bare Names (for memorGorbodug, 559.GOrbodug next did in the Throne succeed,Was sixty three yeeres King, and last dec•••••Ferex, and Porex, 496.POrex, in Fight his brother Ferex kil'd,For which their mother, Porex heart blMulmutius Donwallo, 441.THe Land vnguided, Kinglesse did remaine,Till great Mulmutius did the WreathBellinus and Brennus reigned 26. yeeres. 401.THese brethren did diuide the Realme in twaine,But KingG•rguintus, 373.GVrguintus was Belinus first-borne sonne,Victoriously he Denmark• ouer-runne:••e theGuinthelinus, 456.HE married Merci• a renowned Dame,From whom the iust, • wise, Mer•••an Statutes caCecilius, 330.Kimarus, 223.SEuen yeeres Cecilius kept the Regall Cha•re,Three yeeres Kimarus rul'd aElanius, 321.ELanius (as most Histories agree)Was King of Brittaine yeeres iust three times three:WhMorindus reigned 8 yeeres, 311.THis King Morindus, valiant more then wise,A rau'ning Monster from thGorbomanus 303.THis King eleuen yeers wore the Brittain crown,He founded Cambridge, & built GranthamArchigalo, and Elidurus. 392.THese brothers were not Kings both at one time,But for extortion (an vnElidurus, 272. Vigenius, Peredurus, 270.THen A•chigale beeing dead and gone,Good Elidure two yeers kElidurus, 261.And reigned foure yeeres more, belou'd renown'dOnce subiect, twice a slaue, and thrice258. Gerbonian reigned ten yeeres.248. Morgan foureteene yeeres.224. Emeria••s seuen yeeres.This King was deposed from al••• gall gouernment for his tyranny.227. Iuall twenty yeeres.This King was a iust and ••• Prince.Yeeres before Christ.207. Rimo sixteen yeeres.His reigne was blest with abundance of Peace and Plenty.191. Geruncius twenty yeeres.171. Catillus ten yeeres.Catillus caused all the oppressors of the poore to be hanged vp: but since

Coylus twenty yeeres.A peaceable King, and a quiet reigne.141. Porrex fiue yeeres.A good Prince.136. Chirimus one yeere.Chirimus through excessiue drinking got his death.135. Tulgon two yeeres.133. EL•red one yeere.Yeeres before Christ.132. Androgius one yeere.131. Varianus one yeere.Varianus giuen all to lust, purchsed himselfe a short reigne: and it may bee12•. Eliud fiue yeeres.120. Dedamius fiue yeeres.118. Gurginius three yeeres.115. Merianus two yeeres.113. Blodunus two yeeres.110. Capenus three yeeres.Yeeres after Christ.108. Quinus two yeeres.106. Silius two yeeres.94. Bledgabredus ten yeeres.A great louer of Musicke, and a good Patron to Musicians.92. Archemalus two yeeres.90. Eldolus two yeeres.88. Rodianus two yeeres.86. Redargius three yeeres.Yeeres after Christ.84. Samullius two yeeres.81. Penisellus three yeeres.78. Pirrhus two yeeres.76. Caporus two yeeres.74. Diuellus foure yeeres.A Noble and ver•nous Prince.70. Hellius one yeere.The Ile of Ely tooke the n•m•••tion from this Prince. There hee •••• a Palace,Lud reigned 11. yeeres, 66.A Long time after Troynouant was fram'd,It was by Lud, Kair-Lud, or Lud-sCassibelan, 17. yeeres. 58.V• dead the nobles crown'd Cassibelan,••• whose reign here the Romanes coTheomantius, 37.THen Theomantius (of the royall blood)The sole Sonne liuing of his Father Lud;••ign'Cimbilinus.IN this Kings reigne, (the glorious King of KingsIn person came, and mans saluation bringGuiderius, anno Christi, 21.THis King and Subiects, brauely, nobly ioyne,To hold from Rome the tribuAruiragus, 44STout Aruiragus being in the fight,The Kings death added fury to his might:Perceiu'd thMarius, 73.IN this Kings reigne the lawlesse proling Pict,(A Nation strange) did the North part afflCoylus, 124.IN Rome, this King was fostred all his youth,He lou'd Peace, Iustice, Fortiude and TruthLucius, 179.THe first of Kings that was a Christian nam'd,Was Lucius (with the spirit of God inflam'Seuerus, 194.THis was a Romane Emperour, and was slaineAt York the eighteenth yeere of his proud reiBassianus, 212.SE••rus here did wed a British Dame,By whom this King (their Son) the Crowne did claiCarausius, 290.Alectus, 291.••• Carausi•••••, Dio••••was •••••THis king (of meane birth) did the CroAsclepiodatus, 299.ASclepiodatus, (in a mortall Fight)Sabdude the Romane Generall Gallus might;Kil'dCoil raigned 14. yeeres. 301.COlchesters Duke Coil in the Throne inuested,Was by Constantius Caesar Constantius, 305.SPaine, Italy, France, Britaines Emperor,Foure yeeres he raign'd heere, with MaiestConstantine, 306.GReat Emp'ror Constantine, surnam'd the Great:In all respects a worthy Prince compl84. Constantinus, 337.85. Constans, 340.THese two were Brothers of the Royall line,And Sonnes vnto t86. Octauius, 345.87. Traherus, 349.OCtauius Duke of Windsore tooke the Crowne,Traherus came from Ro88. Constantius the third. 353.The Romane Empire he did closely sway,And as a King this Land did him89 Maximinianus. 375.NExt Iulian, raigned Valenti•ia•,And after him, succeeded Grasi••;Maximianus wa90. Gratian. 376.THen Gratian claim'd this Kingdome as his right:But hauing gain'd it, he was slaine91 Vortiger. 447.THis King through murder did the Throne ascend,And had a troublous Raigne, and murd92. Vortimer. 454.THenOn the Plaine of Salisbury at Stonching (where the Stones are to be seene as t93. Aurelius Ambrose. 466.IN honour of the Nobles basely slaine,This King set vp the Stones on Sarum94. Vter Pendragon raigned 18 yeeres. 498.THis King (by Merlins meanes, a skilfull man)Igrene, the D95. Arthur. 516.OF the nine Worthies was this Worthy one,Denmarke, and Norway, did obey his Throne:I96 Constantine, the fourth. 542.97 Aurelius Conanus. 545.COnstantine was by King Aurelius kil'd:Aure98 Vortiporus. 578.99 Malgo 581.THis Vortipore from good Kings did decline,Kept his wiues Daughter a100. Careticus. 586.GVrmundus hither out of Ireland came,And with the Saxons ioyn'd with sword and fCadwane. 613.THis Cadwane did the Saxon•orce withstand,Of Ethelfridus of Northumberland:And made him102. Cadwallin. 635.CAdwallin slew King Edwin, Egfrids Sonne,He Penda Merciaes King did ouer-runne:H103. Cadwallader. 685.THis King renowned was both neere and farre,The last of Brittaines Kings, Cadw687. Cadwallader left his Crowne, went to Rome, and dyed there. _ These Kings following were of the West Saxons. 726 Ethelard was King of the West Saxons.Yeeres before Christ.740. Cuthred succeeded him.757. Sigebert next him, was slain• by a Swineheard.758. Kenulphus was slaine by Kinsman of Sigebert.786. Brithricus. In his time i• rained blood.IN the 800. yeere of Christ, the Danes landed at Po••laEgbri•us, King of West-Saxons. 839. •••839. Adelnulphus ouercame •• Danes, that came to inua•e the Kingdome with 350. ships.857. Athelbald.Yeeres after Christ.860. Athelbrict.866. Etheldrid.872. AElfred.900. Edward surnamed Se•ior. Heere end the Kings of the West-Saxons: now follow the Kings of Britain104. Athelstane reigned 15. yeeres. 905.THis King did tame the Welsh, the Danes subdu'd,He conquered105. Edmund. 940.106. Eldred. 640.EDmund, reign'd next his brother Athelstane,And after fiue yeeres 107. Edwin. 955.108 Edgar. 959.THen Edwin (as his right) obtain'd the Crowne,For Rape, and brutish L109 Edward. 975.110 Etheldred. 978.EDward was slain by his accurst Stepmother,Ayded by Etheldred his111 Edmond Irònside. 1016.THe Danes came to reuenge with sword and fire,Both Kings to Combat single 112 Canutus 1018.THis mighty Danish King foure Kingdomes held,Danes, Norway, England, Scotland he co113 Harold. 1038.114 Hardianutus. 1041.HArold from England did exile his Mother,And kild Allured his115. Saint Edward, 1043.116. Harold the second. 1066.SAint Edward from the Danes this Kingdom freed• _ The second part. William Conquerour. An. Dom. 1066.VVHen Britains, Romanes, Saxons, Danes had done,The Normans (fiftlWilliam Rufus, An. Dom. 1087.WIlliam the cruell Conquerours second Sonne,With ease, got what his FatHenry the first. An. Dom. 1100.THis Henry (for his wisedome Beuclarke nam'd)Th'vnlawfull Lawes and mKing Stephen. An. Dom. 1135.STephen Earle of B•loig•, (th' Earle of Bloy• his son)From th'Empresse MHenry the second. An Dom. 1154.THis King vnto the Empresse Maud was Heyre,And lawfully obtain'd the Richard Cordelion. An. Dom. 1189.THis braue victorious Lyon-hearted Prince,The foes of Christ, in ••King Iohn. An. Dom. 1199.IOhn Earle of Morton tooke the regall Seate,His state, his toyle, his pompeHenry the third. An. Dom. 1216.Wars, bloody wars, the French in England made,Strong holds, Towns, ToEdward Long-•hanks. An. Dom. 1271.THis was a hardy, wise, Victorious King,The Welshmen he did to subEdward the third, An. Dom. 1326.IN Peace, and warre, this King was right, & good,He did reuenge his Richard the second. An. Dom. 1377.YOng King, rash co•sell, lawes & right neglected,The good put downHenry the fourth. An. Dom. 1399.THe Crown wrong got frō the wrong'doing king,More griefe then ioy dHenry the fift. An. Dom. 1412.THis was a King Renowned neere and farre,A Mars of men, a Thunderbolt Henry the sixt. An. Dom. 1422.THis Infant Prince scarce being nine moneths old,The Realmes of FranceEdward the fourth. An. Dom. 1460.EDward, the 4. the house of Yorks great heire,By bloudy wars attainEdward the fifth. An. Dom. 1483.HIgh birth, blood, state, and innocent in yeeres,Eclips'd, and murdrRichard the third. An. Dom. 1483.BY Treason, mischiefe, murder and debate.Vsurping Richard wonne theHenry the seuenth. An. Dom. 1485.VVHen Ciuill wars, full fourescore yeers & more,Had made this kingdHenry the eight. An. Dom. 1509.FRom both the Lines, and both the Ioynes did springOf York & LancasteEdward the sixt. An. Dom. 1546.HAd this Kings reigne bin long, as it was good,Religion in a peaceablQueene Mary. An. Dom. 1553.AFter a while this Queene had worne the Crown,Idolatry was rais'd, and TrQueene Elizabeth. An. Dom. 1558.A Debora, a Iudith, a Susanna,A Virgin, a Virago, a Diana:CouragiousKing Iames. An. Dom. 1601.VVHen as Elizaes wofull death was acted:When this lamenting land was halfeKing CHARLES.TWo Williams, Henries 8. I. Steuen, I. Iohn,Sixe Edwards, Richards 3. and I. Queene Mar

  1. A BRIEFE REMEMBRANCE OF ALL THE ENGLISH MOnarchs, from the Normans Conquest, vntill this present.

    _ TO THE HONOVRABLE AND TRVLY Noble, Sir ROBERT CARR, Knight, one of the Gentlemen of his Maiesties Royall Bed-chamber, &c.

    _ WILLIAM THE FIRST, Surnamed the CONQVEROVR; KING OF ENGLAND, And DVKE OF NORMANDY.

    • Anno 1066, October 14, Saturday.

    _ WILLIAM THE IJ, Surnamed RVFVS, KING OF ENGLAND And DVKE OF NORMANDY.

    • Anno 1087. September 26. being Sunday.

    _ HENRY THE FIRST, Surnamed BEAVCLARKE, KING OF ENGLAND, And DVKE OF NORMANDY.

    • Anno 1100. August I, Wednesday.

    _ STEPHEN, KING OF ENGLAND, AND DVKE OF NORMANDY,

    • Anno 1135. December 26. Munday.

    _ HENRY THE SECOND, KING OF ENGLAND, DVKE OF NORMANDY, Guyen and Aquitaine, &c.

    • Anno ••••••••••••

    _ RICHARD THE FIRST, Surnamed CVER DE LYON, KING OF ENGLAND, DVKE OF NORMANDY, Guyen and Aquitaine, &c.

    • Anoo 1189 Iuly, 6, Thursday.

    _ IOHN, KING OF ENGLAND, DVKE OF NORMANDY, Guyen and Aquitaine, LORD OF IRELAND, &c.

    • Anno 1199, Aprill 6, Tuesday.

    _ HENRY THE THIRD, KING OF ENGLAND, LORD OF JRELAND, DVKE OF NORMANDY, G••en and Aquitaine, &c.

    • Anno 1216, October 19, Wednesday.

    _ EDWARD THE FIRST, KING OF ENGLAND, LORD OF IRELAND, DVKE OF AQVITAINE, &c.

    • An. Dom. 1272. Nouember, Wednesday.

    _ EDWARD, THE II, KING OF ENGLAND, LORD OF IRELAND, DVKE OF AQVITAINE, &c.

    • Anno Dom. 1307, Iuly 8.

    _ EDWARD THE IIJ, KING OF ENGLAND, And FRANCE, LORD OF IRELAND,

    • Anno 1327, Ianuary 25, Saturday.

    _ RICHARD THE IJ, KING OF ENGLAND, And FRANCE, LORD OF IRELAND, &c.

    • Anno Dom. 1377 June 21 Sunday.

    _ HENRY THE IV, KING OF ENGLAND, And FRANCE, LORD OF IRELAND, &c.

    • Anno Dom. 1399, September 19, Munday.

    _ HENRY THE FIFTH, KING OF ENGLAND, And FRANCE, LORD OF IRELAND.

    • Anno Dom. 1413. March 20, Sunday.

    _ HENRY THE VI, KING OF ENGLAND, And FRANCE, LORD OF JRELAND.

    • Anno Dom. 1422, August 31, Munday.

    _ EDWARD THE IIIJ, KING OF ENGLAND, And FRANCE, LORD OF IRELAND, &c. Edward the fourth was Earle of March, some and heire to Richard, Duke of Yorke, sonne to Richard Ear _ EDWARD THE V, KING OF ENGLAND AND FRANCE, LORD OF IRELAND Edward the fifth, borne in the Sanctuary at Westminster, Sonne of King Edward the fourth, beganne hi _ RICHARD THE IIJ, KING OF ENGLAND, And FRANCE, LORD OF IRELAND, &c.

    • Anno 1483, June 22.

    _ HENRY THE VIJ, KING OF ENGLAND And FRANCE, LORD OF IRELAND.

    • Anno Dom. 1485, August 22, Monday.

    _ HENRY THE VIIJ, KING OF ENGLAND, And FRANCE, LORD OF IRELAND

    • Anno Dom. 1509, Aprill 22, Sunday.

    _ EDWARD THE VI KING OF ENGLAND, FRANCE and IRELAND, Desender of the Faith, &c.

    • Anno Dom. 1546, Ianuary 28, Thursday:

    _ MARY, QVEENE OF ENGLAND, FRANCE and IRELAND, Desender of the Faith, &c.

    • Anno. Dom. 1553, Iuly 6, Thursday.

    _ ELIZABETH, QVEENE OF ENGLAND, FRANCE and IRELAND, Defender of the Faith, &c.

    • Anno Dom. 1558, Nouember 17, Thursday.

    _ IAMES, Of that Name THE FIRST, And I. Monarch of the whole Iland of GREAT BRITAINE &c.

    • Anno Dom. 1602, March 24, Thursday,

    _ CHARLES Of that Name THE FIRST, And II. Monarch of the whole Iland of GREAT BRITAINE. KING OF ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, FRANCE and IRELAND, Gods immediate VICEGERENT., Supreame HEAD, &c.

    • STEWART• CHARLES MARIE Anagramma. Christ Arme vs E•• AT AL,

    • Anno. Dom. 1625-March 27. Sunday.

  2. ALIVING SADNES INDVTY CONSECRATED TO THE IMMORtall memory of our late Deceased all-beloued Soueraigne LORD the Peerelesse Paragon of Princes, IAMES, King of great Britaine, France and Ireland; who departed this Life at his Manour of Theobalds, on Sunday the 27. of March 1625.

    _ TO THE MOST HIGH AND PVISSENT Prince CHARLES by the Grace of GOD, the first of that name, and second Monarch of the whole Iland of Great BRITAINE. HIS VNDOVBTED ROYALTIES BEING VNITED VNDER one and the same his most glorious Crowne, the Kingdomes of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland; Gods Immediate Vice-Gerent; Supreme head of all Persons, and Defender of the true, ancient Christian Faith, in these his Empires and Dominions.

    _ A Funerall Elegie vpon King IAMES.

    • To all that haue Read this Poeme.
  3. FOR The sacred memoriall of the great, Noble, and ancient Example of Vertue and Honor, the Illustrious and welbeloued Lord, CHARLES HOWARD, Earle of Nottingham, Iustice in Eyre of all his Maiesties Forrests, Parks, and Chases on this side Trent; Knight of the Honourable Order of the Garter, and one of the Lords of his Maiesties most Honourable P•iuie Councell; Who departed this Life at his Mannour of Hal•ing in Surrey, on Thurseday the 14. of December, 1624. and was buried at Rigate, amongst his Honourable Ancestors, the 20. of December last, 1624.

    _ TO THE RIGHT HONORABLE, Right Worshipfull, of both Sexes, who had either alliance by Marriage, Consanguinity by Birth, or bore loue to the Right Noble and truly vertuous deceased.

SOme few yeeres since, I rode to my Lords Mannour of Halcing in Surrey, where I presented his Lords _ For the sacred Memoriall of the Great, Noble and Ancient example of Vertue and Honour, the Illustrious and welbeloued Lord, Charles Howard, Earle of Nottingham, Iustice in Eyre of all his Maiesties Forrests, Parks and Chases on this side Trent; Knight of the Honorable Order of the Garter, and one of the Lords of his Maiesties most Honorable priuy Councell.

  1. A FVNERALL ELEGIE, IN THE SACRED MEMORY OF THE Right Reuerend, Right Honourable and Learned Father in GOD, LANCELOT, Lord Bishop of VVinchester, Deane of his Maiesties Chappell, Prelate of the Right Honourable Order of the Garter, and one of the Lords of his Maiestices most Honourable Priuie COVNCELL: Who departed this life at his house in Southwarke, on Munday the 25th. of September last, 1626, and was Honourably Interred in Saint Sauiours Church in Southwarke, the XI. of Nouember.

    _ TO THE WORSHIPFVLL AND RELIGIOVS GENTLE. man, Mr. Iohn Parker, Citizen of London, and of the worshipfull Societie of Marchant-Taylors. A Silly Taper, or a Candles light,Are vaine additious to make Sol more bright:••• can one little wat

  2. True louing Sorrovv, ••TTIRED IN A ROBE OF VNFAINED •efe, presented vpon occasion of the much bewailed Funerall that Gracious and Illustrious. Prince, LEVVIS STEVVARD, ••e of Richmond and Linox, Earle of Newcastle and Darnely, Lord of Torbolt•n and ••uen, Baron of Settrington, Knight of the Noble Order of the Garter, Lord High ••••irall, & great Chamberlain of Scotland, Lord high Steward to the Kings most ••lent Maiesties most Honourable Houshold, Gentleman of his Maiesties Bed-chamber, ••• one of his Maiesties most Honourable Priuie Councell for England and Scotland: who ••••departed this life at White-hall, on Thursday the 12 of February 1624. whose obsequies were solemnly and Princely celebrated on Munday the 19 of Aprill following, described in forme as followeth. Dedicated generally to all his worthy Friends, and louing Seruants; and particularly to that trusty and welbeloued Seruant of his, Arthur Neassmith.

    _ ANd first my Muse findes, that his Graces name Significantly makes an Anagram. LEWIS STEWARDE. Anagram. VERTV IS WEL EAS'D. His Vertues such continuall paines did take For King and Countrie, Church and peoples sake; That for Earths courtly toyle, to him 'twas giuen, His VERTV IS WEL EAS'D t'the Court of Heauen.

    _ The manner of the Funerall. And then our fraileties truely will confesse,God tooke him hence for our vnworthinesse:Death was in ble furnished as the other.Seruants to his Grace in Cloakes: Officers to his Grauce in Gownes.3 Trum

  3. GREAT BRITAINE ALL IN BLACKE, OR, A short Elegie written in the manner of AEquiuoques, in a sad and dutifull remembrance of the Royall Prince HENRY.

  4. THE MVSES MOVRNING: OR, FVNER ALL SONNETS ON THE Death of IOHN MORAY Esquire. TO THE WHOLE AND ENTIRE NVMBER OF THE Noble and Ancient name of Morayes, Iohn Taylor dedicates theseSonnet. 1.VVHen King Corbredus wore the Scottish Crowne,The Romanes did the Britaine Land afflict:Bu

    • Sonnet. 1.

    • Sonnet. 2.

    • Sonnets. 3.

    • Sonnet. 4.

    • Sonnet. 5.

    • Sonnet. 6.

    • Sonnet. 7.

    • Sonnet. 8.

    • Sonnet. 9.

    • Sonnet. 10.

    • Sonnet. 11.

    • Sonnet. 12.

    • Sonnet. 13.

    • Sonnet. 14.

  5. A FVNERALL ELEGY: DEPLORING THE DEATH OF THE TRVE Patterne, Patrone, and mirrour of Honour, the Right Honorable Lord, IOHN RAMSEY, Lord Discount HADINGTON, Earle of HOLDERNESSE, Who departed this life on Tuesday, the 24 of Ianuary last, and was buried in the Abby-Church of Westminster on Tuesday the last of February following.

    _ TO THE RIGHT HONOVRABLE and vertuous Lady, the LADY MARTHA, Countesse of Holdernesse.

    _ A Sonnet of true and notable obseruations, vpon feuen seuerall Teuesdayes.

    _ A FVNERALL ELEGY.

    _ IOHN RAMSEYE Anagramma. HONER'S I AYME, MY HONER'S AYE.

  6. THE WATER-CORMORANT.

    _ DEDICATED TO GENTLEMEN, AND THOSE THAT ARE GENTLE.

    _ THE VVATER-CORMORANT HIS COMPLAINT: Against a Brood of Land-CORMORANTS. Diuided into fourteene Satyres.

    • A Iesuite.

    • A Separatist.

    • A Trust-breaker.

    • A Drunkard.

    • A prodigall Country Gallant, and his new made Maddam.

    • An Extortioner and a Broaker.

    • A Basket-Iustice.

    • A Cutpurse.

    • A Good and a bad Constable.

    • A London Serieant and Taylor.

    • A Symonicall Patron, and his penny Clarke,

    • A Country Yeoman.

    • A Figure-stinger, or a cot•z'ning Cunning-man.

    • A Corrupted Lawyer, and a knauish Vndershrine.

    • EPILOGVE.

  7. TAYLORS WATER-WORKE: OR, THE SCVLLERS TRAVELS, FROM TYBER TO THAMES: WITH his Boat laden with a Hotch-potch, or Gallimawfrey of Sonnets, Satyres, and Epigrams. With an Inkhorne Disputation betwixt a Lawyer and a Poet: and a Quarterne of new-catcht Epigrams, caught the last Fishing•••: together with an addition of P•stor••• Equi•••, or the complaint of a Shepheard.

    _ DEDICATED To neither Monarch, nor Miser, Keaser nor Caitiffe, Pallatine or Plebeian; but to great Mounsier Multitude, ahas, All, or euery One; IOHN TAYLOR sends his Scull-boats lading, to be c•nsured as please their Wisedomes to screw their Lunatike opinions. To the Right Worshipfull and my euer respected Mr. IOHN MORAY Esqire.OF all the wonders this vile wo

    • To the Right Worshipfull and my euer respected Mr. IOHN MORAY Esqire.

    • To my de•re respected friend, Maister Beniamin Iehuson.

    • To my louing Friend Iohn Taylor.

    • To the one and onely water-Poet and my Friend, Iohn Taylor.

    • In laudem Authoris. VVHen Tybers siluer waues their Channel least,And louely Thames, her Wonted course fersait,Then foul

    • To my louing Friend Iohn Taylor.

    • To my Friend both by Water and Land, IOHN TAYLOR.

    • To my louing Friend IOHN TAYLOR.

    _ Prologue to the Reader.

    _ TO TOM CORIAT.

    _ The Author in his owne defence.

    _ THE SCVLLER. To the whole kennell of Anti-Christs hounds, Priests, Friers, Monkes, and Iesuites, Mastiffes, Mongrels, Islands, Spanniels, Blood-hounds, Bobtaile-tike, or Foystinghound: The SCVLLER sends greeting.

    • Epigram 1.

    • Epigram 2.

    • Epigram 3.

    • Epigram 4.

    • Epigram 5.

    • Epigram 6.

    • Epigram 7.

    • Epigram 8.

    • Epigram 9.

    • Epigram 10.

    • Epigram 11.

    • Epigram 12.

    • Epigram 13.

    • Epigram 14.

    • Epigram 15.

    • Epigram 16.

    • Epigram 17.

    • Epigram 18.

    • Epigram 19.

    • Epigram 20.

    • Epigram 21.

    • Epigram 22.

    • Epigram 23.

    • Epigram 24.

    • Epigram 25.

    • Epigram 26.

    • Epigram 27.

    • Epigram 28.

    • Epigram 29.

    _ To his approued good friend, Master Robert Branthwayt.

    _ To his well esteemed friend, Master Maximilian Waad.

    _ To my friend Master William Sherman. Epigram 1.ALl you that stedfastly doe fixe your eye,Vpon this idle issue of my braine,Who void of an

    • Epigram 1.

    • Epigram 2.

    • Epigram 3.

    • Epigram 4.

    • Epigram 5.

    • Epigram 6.

    • Epigram 7.

    • Epigram 8.

    • Epigram 9.

    • Epigram 10.

    • Epigram 11.

    • Epigram 12.

    • Epigram 13.

    • Epigram 14.

    • Epigram 15.

    • Epigram 15.

    • Epigram 17.

    • Epigram 18.

    • Epigram 19.

    • Epigram 20.

    • Epigram 21.

    • Epigram 22.

    • Epigram 23.

    • Epigram 24.

    • Epigram 25.

    • Epigram 26.

    • Epigram 27.

    • Epigram 28.

    • Epigram 29.

    • Epigram 30.

    • Epigram 31.

    • Epigram 32.

    • Epigram 33.

    • Epigram 34.

    • Epigram 35.

    • Epigram 36.

    • Epigram 37.

    • Epigram 38.

    • Epigram 29.

    • Epigram 40.

    • Epigram 41.

    • Epigram 42.

    • Epigram 43.

    • Epigram 44.

    • Epigram 45.

    • Epigram 46.

    _ Satyre.

    _ Satyre.

    _ Pastorall Equiuokes, or a Shepheards complaint.

    _ Epitaph.

    _ Sonnet. In trust lyes Treason.

    _ Death, with the foure Elements.

    _ An Inkhorne Disputation, or Mungrell conference, betwixt a Lawyer and a Poet. Epigram 1.Vpon the world, Notwithstanding.TOm swore to Kate, he neuer more would wooe her,Kate wish'

    • Epigram 1.

    • Epigram 2.

    • Epigram 3.

    • Epigram 4.

    • Epigram 5.

    • Epigram 6.

    • Epigram 7.

    • Epigram 8.

    • Epigram 9.

    • Epigram 10.

    • Epigram 11.

    • Epigram 12.

    • Epigram 13. On Mistresse Charitie.

    • Epigram 14.

    • Epigram 15.

    • Epigram 16. On Madam Temperance.

    • Epigram 17.

    • Epigram 18.

    • Epigram 19. Light vanitie.

    • Epigram 20.

    • Epigram 21.

    • Epigram 22.

    • Epigram 23.

    • Epigram 24.

    • Epigram 25.

    • Ep••••••

  8. THE DOLPHINS DANGER: AND DELIVERANCE. Being a Ship of 220. Tunhauing in her but 36. men and 2. Boyes who were on the 12. of lanuary 1616. set vpon by 6 Men of Warre of the Turkes, hauing at the least 1500. Men in them, who fought with them the space of 5 houres and a halfe, yet to the glory •f God and the honour of our English Nation, both Ship and goods safely brought vp the Riuer of Thames and deliuered. Truely set forth by the appointment of Master EDVVARD NICHOLS, being Master of the said Ship.

    _ The names of such men as were in the sayd Ship. These men were kild out-right, and buried a shore.

    _ A FIGHT AT SEA. Famously fought by the Dolphin of London, against fiue of the Turkes men of Warre and a Sa•tie, the 12. of L••••, Anno Dom. 1616.

  9. A FAMOVS FIGHT AT SEA. Where foure English Ships vnder the command of Captaine IOHN WEDDELL, and foure Dutch Ships, fought three dayes in the Gulph of Persia neere Ormus, against 8. Portugall Gallio•s, and 32. F••gots. As also, the memorable Fight and losse of the good Ship called the Lyon, with the barbaron• Crueltie of the En••• truly declared.

    _ DEDICATED To the right Worthy, Generous, and well experienced Commander Captaine IOHN WEDDELL, late Generall of the East-India Fleet.

    _ TO THE COVRTEOVS READER.

    _ A BRAVE SEA-FIGHT in the Gulph of PERSIA.

    • The Royall Iames with the rest were forced to giue ouer the Chase for these reasons.

    • A note of the mens Names slaine in these three seuerall fights with the Portugals, out of the English Fleet. Slaine in the Royall Iames.

    • A Relation by Peter Hillion a Frenchman, of the force of the eight Portugal Gallions, which fought with the English and Dutch Fleet, in the Gulph of Persia; as also the spoyle they receiued by them, with their number of men slain, on the 13. and 14. of February,1624. himselfe being then in the Admirall, which afterwards riding with three more of her Fleet at the Riuers mouth of Surat, be escaped from her, and ran to the English, which were then riding in the Barre of Surat.

    • A briefe description of the Disaster of the goodship called the Lyon, one of our English ships trading to the East India, who was lost in fight with the Portugals, neere Gombroone in the Gulph of Persia, on the eighth of Nouember, 1625.

    _ A farewell and hearty well-wishing to the noble attempts of our English Sea and Land forcas, with their Allies and Consederates.

  10. TAYLORS PASTORALL, BEING BOTH HISTORICALL AND SATYRICALL. OR, The noble Antiquitie of Shepheards, with the profitable vse of Sheepe: With a small touch of a scabbed Sheepe, and a C•ueat against that Infection.

    _ DEDICATED TO THE RIGHT WORSHIP FVLL, I Vdicious, and truly Generous, my well approued good friend, Mr. THOMAS DOVE, Archdeacon of Northampton, the accomplishment of his worthy desires Temporall and Eternall.

    _ All those that will not reade this plaine Epistle, Lay downe the Booke, on Gods name, and goe whistle.

    _ TAYLORS PASTORALL, BEING BOTH HISTORICALL AND SATYRICALL OR, The noble Antiquitie of Shepheards; with the profitable vse of Sheepe.

    _ A.E.I.O.V. two Anagrams of the fiue Vowels, the one serues for the glorious name GOD, and the other in the Spanish tongue is a Sheepe, which name the Prophet Esay doth figuratiuely or mystically call our Creator IEOVA, or IEHOVAH, OVEIA, is a sheepe.

    _ Sonnet.

    _ These good deeds following were done by others of the said company, who were not Lord Maiors.

    _ Here fokoweth a touch of paultry Scabbed and infectious kinds of Sheepe, which I thinke sit to place by themselues in the lagge end of my Booke, as farre •• I can from the cleane, sound and profitable Sheepe before mentioned, for feare the bad should infect the good.

  11. THE PRAISE OF HEMP-SEED. WITH The Voyage of Mr. Roger Bird and the Writer hereof, in a Boat of browne-Paper, from London to Quinborough in Kent. As also, a Farewell to the matchlesse deceased Mr. THOMAS CORIAT.

    _ DEDICATED TO THE RIGHT WORSHIP FVLL, PAternes and Patrons of honest endeuours, Sir THOMAS HOVVET, and Sir ROBERT WISEMAN Knights: And to the worthy Gentleman, Mr. IOHN WISHMAN, Health, Mirth, and Happinesse, be euer attendants.

    _ THE CONTENTS OF THIS BOOKE.

    _ A. Preamble, Preatrot, Preagallop, Preauick, Preapace, or Preface; and Proface my Masters, if your stomackes serue.

    _ THE PRAISE OF HEMP-SEED: WITH The Voyage of Mr. Roger Bird and the Writer hereof, in a Boat of browne-Paper, from London to Quinborough in Kent.

    • The Originall of Paper.
  12. TAYLORS TRAVELS To Hamburgh in Germanie.

    _ DEDICATED To the Cosmographicall, Geographicall describer, Geometricall measurer; Historiographicall Calligraphicall Relater and Writer; Enigmaticall, Pragmaticall, Dogmaticall Obseruer, Ingrosser, Surueyer and Eloquent Brittish Graecian Latinist, or Latine Graecian Orator, the Odcombyan Deambulator, Perombulator, Ambler, Trotter, or untyred Traueller, Sir THO: CORIAT, Knight of Troy, and one of the dearest darlings to the blind Goddesse Fortune.

    _ TAYLORS TRAVELS. Three VVeekes, three Dayes, and three Houres Obseruations, from LONDON to HAMBVRGH in ••• Amongst Iemes and Gentiles, with Descriptions of Townes and Towers, Castles and Cittadels, artificiall G••lowies, Naturall Hangmen: And Dedicated for the present, to the absent Odcombian Knight Erra•t, Sr. THOMAS CORIAT, Great Brittaines Error, and the worlds Mirror.

  13. TAYLORS TRAVELS TO PRAGVE IN BOHEMIA.

    _ Reader, take this in your way.

    _ TAYLORS TRAVELS From the Cittie of LONDON in England, to the Cittie of PRAGVE in Bohemia. WITH The manner of his abode there three Weekes, his Obseruations there, and his returne from thence. AS ALSO, How hee past 600. Miles downe the Riuer of Elue, through Bohemia, Saxonie, Anhalt, the Byshopricke of Magdenburg, Brandenburg, Hamburgh, and so to England. With many Relations worthy of note. Sunday the 26. August of wee set sayle from Graus end, and with various win les same large and some

  14. PRINCE CHARLES HIS VVEL COME FROM SPAINE: Who Landed at Portsmouth on Sunday the 5. of October, and came safely to London on Munday the 6. of the same, 1623. WITH The Triumphs of LONDON for the same his happie Arriuall. And the Relation of such Townes as are scituate in the wayes to take post-horse at, from the Citie of London to Douer: and from Callice through all France and Spaine, to Madrid, to the Spanish-Court.

  15. AN ENGLISH-MANS LOVE TO BOHEMIA.

    _ DEDICATED To the Honourable, well approued, and accomplisht Souldier, Sir ANDREVV GRAY Knight, Colonell of the Forces of Great Britaine, in this Noble Bohemian Preparation.

    _ AN ENGLISH-MANS LOVE TO BOHEMIA. With a friendly Farewell to all the noble Souldiers that goe from great Britaine to that honourable Expedition. As ALSO, The most part of the Kings, Princes, Dukes, Marquisses, Earles, Bishops, and other friendly Confederates, that are combined with the Bohemian part.

    _ A briefe Description of BOHEMIA.

  16. Honour Conceal'd; Strangely Reveal'd: OR, The worthy Praise of the Vnknowne Merits of the Renowmed Archibald Armestrong, who for his vnexpected Peace-making in France, betwixt the King and the Rochellers, hath this Poem Dedicated as a Trophee, to his matchlesse Vertues• This being done in the yeare of our Lord, 1623. Written by him whose Name Annagramatiz'd, is LOYOL IN HART.

    _ Dedicated to the Reader or Vnderstander, or both, or either, or neither.

    _ THE PEACE OF FRANCE, With the Praise of ARCHY.

  17. HEAVENS BLESSING, AND EARTHS IOY. OR, A true relation, of the supposed Sea-fights and Fire-workes, as were accomplished, before the Royall Celebration of the all-beloued Marriage, of the two peerelesse Paragons of Christendome, FREDERICKE and ELIZABETH. With Triumphall Encomiasticke Verses, consecrated to the Immortall memory of those happie and blessed Nuptials. DEDICATED To the illustrous Lampe of true VVorth, the noble, Ingenious, judicious, and vnderstanding _ THE FIGHT BETWEENE the Ships and Galleyes.

    • The true description of such part of the Fire-workes as were deuised and accomplished by Mr. Iohn Nodes Gunner, and Seruant to the Kings most excellent Maiestie.

    • A true discription of the Platforme of a part of the fire-workes, deuised and made by Mr. Thomas Butler Gunner, and seruant to the Kings Royall Maiestie.

    • VVilliam Bettis his inuention, of such part of the fireworkes as were performed by him at the Royall Celebration: which hee had contriued in such sort, that if the weather had beene Rainy or Windy, yet his designements should haue beene accamplished.

    • Master Iohn Tindale Gunner and seruant to the Kings Royall Maiestie, The true description of such part of the Fire-workes as were by him deuised and performed at this Royall Tryumphs.

    • The description of such part of the Fire workes as were deuised and accomplished by Master William Fishenden Gunner, and Seruant to his Maiestie.

  18. EPITHALAMIES. OR, Encomiasticke Triumphall Verses, Consecrated to the Immortall memory, of the royall Nuptials of the two Parragons of Christendome FREDERICKE and ELIZABETH.

    _ A Sonnet to the Imperious Maiestick mirrour of King Iames, great Britaines Monarch.

    • To Life.

    • To Death.

    • To Eternity.

  19. TAYLORS FAREVVELL, TO THE TOWER BOTTLES.

    _ THE ARGVMENT. BY your leaue Gentlemen, Ile make some sport,Although I venture halfe a hanging for't:But yet I will

  20. VERBVM SEMPITERNVM.

    _ DEDICATED TO THE MOST GRACIOVS AND ILLVSTRIOVS KING CHARLES

    _ To the Reader. Genesis.IEhouah heere of nothing, all things makes,And man before all things his God forsakes.Yet by

    • Genesis.

    • Exodus.

    • Leniticus.

    • Numbers.

    • Deut•ronomy.

    • Ioshua.

    • Iudges.

    • Ruth.

      1. Samuel.
      1. Samuel.
      1. Kings.
      1. Kings.
      1. Chronicles.
      1. Chronicles.
    • M•••ss••• Pra•er.

    • Ezrs.

    • Nehemiah.

    • Esther.

    • Iob.

    • Ps•lmes.

    • Prouerbs.

    • Ecclessiastes.

    • Salomons song.

    • Isa•ah.

    • Ieremy.

    • Lamentations.

    • Eze•hiel.

    • Daniel.

    • Hosea.

    • Ioel.

    • Amos.

    • Obadiah.

    • Ionah.

    • Micah.

    • Nah•m.

    • Habakkuk.

    • Zephania•.

    • Haggay.

    • Zachariah.

    • Malachi.

    • Ap••ryph•.

  21. SALVATOR MVNDI.

    _ DEDICATED. TO THE HIGH MAIESTIE OF QVEENE MARY.

    _ To the Reader. Mathew.LOe here the blessed Sonne of God and Man(New borne) who was before all worlds began,Of heau'

    • Mathew.

    • Marke.

    • S. Luke.

    • B. Iohn.

    • Acts.

    • Acts.

    • Romanes.

      1. Corinth•.
      1. Corinths.
    • Galathians.

    • Ephesians.

    • Philippians.

    • Colossians.

      1. Thessalonians.
      1. Thessalonians.
      1. and 2. to Timothy.
    • Titus.

    • Philemon.

    • Hebrewes.

    • S. Iames.

    • I. and 2. to Peter.

    • 1, 2, and 3. of Iohn.

    • S. Iude.

    • Reuelation.

    • A Prayer.

  22. THE BOOKE OF MARTYRS.

    _ DEDICATED TO THE RIGHT HONOVRABLE, WILLIAM, EARLE OF PEMBROOKE, &c. I Sing their deaths (who dying made death yeeldBy Scriptures sword, and faiths vnbattered shieldWhom

  23. THE BOOKE OF MARTYRS. The Second Part.

    _ DEDICATED TO THE RIGHT HONOVRABLE, PHILLIP, EARLE OF MONTGOMERIE, &c. VVHen the 7 Henry in his graue was laid,And the eight Henry, Englands Scepter sway'd,Romes bloudy pe

  24. GODS MANIFOLD MERCIES IN THESE MIRACVLOVS DELIverances of our Church of England, from the yeare

  25. vntill this present, 1630. particularly and briefly Described.

Types of content

  • There are 31192 verse lines!
  • Oh, Mr. Jourdain, there is prose in there!

There are 8837 ommitted fragments! @reason (8837) : illegible (8827), foreign (6), duplicate (4) • @resp (8827) : #TECH (8827) • @extent (8831) : 1 letter (3584), 2 letters (2102), 3 letters (2106), 6 letters (74), 5 letters (209), 4 letters (581), 1 span (78), 1+ letters (92), 1 page (4), 1 paragraph (1)

Character listing

Text string(s) codepoint(s)
Latin-1 Supplement ¹²éèòàóëâùôäáúÀ ü 185 178 233 232 242 224 243 235 226 249 244 228 225 250 192 160 252
Combining Diacritical Marks ̄ 772
General Punctuation •…— 8226 8230 8212
CJKSymbolsandPunctuation 〈〉 12296 12297

##Tag Usage Summary##

###Header Tag Usage###

No element name occ attributes
1. author 3
2. availability 1
3. biblFull 1
4. change 7
5. date 10 @when (1) : 2005-12 (1)
6. edition 1
7. editionStmt 1
8. editorialDecl 1
9. extent 2
10. idno 6 @type (6) : DLPS (1), STC (2), EEBO-CITATION (1), PROQUEST (1), VID (1)
11. label 7
12. langUsage 1
13. language 1 @ident (1) : eng (1)
14. listPrefixDef 1
15. note 8
16. notesStmt 2
17. p 11
18. prefixDef 2 @ident (2) : tcp (1), char (1) • @matchPattern (2) : ([0-9-]+):([0-9IVX]+) (1), (.+) (1) • @replacementPattern (2) : http://eebo.chadwyck.com/downloadtiff?vid=$1&page=$2 (1), https://raw.githubusercontent.com/textcreationpartnership/Texts/master/tcpchars.xml#$1 (1)
19. projectDesc 1
20. pubPlace 2
21. publicationStmt 2
22. publisher 2
23. ref 2 @target (2) : https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (1), http://www.textcreationpartnership.org/docs/. (1)
24. seriesStmt 1
25. sourceDesc 1
26. title 5
27. titleStmt 2

###Text Tag Usage###

No element name occ attributes
1. argument 14
2. bibl 1
3. byline 1
4. cell 41 @role (1) : label (1) • @cols (1) : 4 (1)
5. closer 106
6. desc 8837
7. div 1030 @type (1030) : title_page (2), dedication (49), encomia (2), encomium (27), table_of_contents (4), errata (1), poem (53), section (319), argument (6), poetry (110), to_the_reader (19), essay (14), prose (67), to_printer (1), preface (5), epitaph (2), conclusion (1), epilogue (9), bibliography (1), prologue (2), translation (2), prayer (1), epigraph (2), sonnet (22), epigram (142), part (3), biography (164) • @n (303) : 1 (8), 2 (8), 3 (7), 4 (7), 5 (7), 6 (7), 7 (7), 8 (7), 9 (6), 10 (6), 11 (6), 12 (6), 13 (6), 14 (6), 15 (5), 16 (5), 17 (5), 18 (5), 19 (5), 20 (5), 21 (5), 22 (5), 23 (5), 24 (5), 25 (5), 26 (5), 27 (4), 28 (4), 29 (4), 30 (3), 31 (3), 32 (3), 33 (3), 34 (3), 35 (3), 36 (3), 37 (3), 38 (3), 39 (3), 40 (3), 41 (3), 42 (2), 43 (2), 44 (2), 45 (2), 46 (2), 47 (1), 48 (1), 49 (1), 50 (1), 51 (1), 52 (1), 53 (1), 54 (1), 55 (1), 56 (1), 57 (1), 58 (1), 59 (1), 60 (1), 61 (1), 62 (1), 63 (1), 64 (1), 65 (1), 66 (1), 67 (1), 68 (1), 69 (1), 70 (1), 71 (1), 72 (1), 73 (1), 74 (1), 75 (1), 76 (1), 77 (1), 78 (1), 79 (1), 80 (1), 81 (1), 82 (1), 83 (1), 84 (1), 85 (1), 86 (1), 87 (1), 88 (1), 90 (1), 91 (1), 92 (1), 93 (1), 94 (1), 95 (1), 96 (1), 97 (1), 98 (1), 99 (1), 100 (1), 101 (1), 102 (1), 103 (1), 104 (1), 105 (1), 106 (1), 107 (1), 108 (1), 109 (1), 110 (1), 111 (1), 112 (1), 113 (1), 114 (1), 115 (1), 116 (1), 117 (1), 118 (1), 119 (1), 120 (1), 121 (1), 122 (1), 123 (1), 124 (1), 125 (1), 126 (1), 127 (1), 128 (1), 129 (1), 130 (1), 131 (1), 132 (1), 133 (1), 134 (1), 135 (1), 136 (1), 137 (1), 138 (1)
8. epigraph 1
9. figure 156
10. g 3914 @ref (3914) : char:EOLhyphen (3694), char:cmbAbbrStroke (212), char:EOLunhyphen (8)
11. gap 8837 @reason (8837) : illegible (8827), foreign (6), duplicate (4) • @resp (8827) : #TECH (8827) • @extent (8831) : 1 letter (3584), 2 letters (2102), 3 letters (2106), 6 letters (74), 5 letters (209), 4 letters (581), 1 span (78), 1+ letters (92), 1 page (4), 1 paragraph (1)
12. head 1164 @type (16) : sub (16)
13. hi 14059 @rend (81) : sup (81)
14. item 527
15. l 31192
16. label 27 @type (17) : milestone (17)
17. lg 1003 @type (2) : to_the_reader (1), introduction (1) • @n (103) : 1 (2), 2 (2), 3 (2), 4 (2), 5 (2), 6 (2), 7 (2), 8 (2), 9 (2), 10 (2), 11 (2), 12 (2), 13 (2), 14 (2), 15 (2), 16 (2), 17 (2), 18 (2), 19 (1), 20 (1), 21 (1), 22 (1), 23 (1), 24 (1), 25 (1), 26 (1), 27 (1), 28 (1), 29 (1), 30 (1), 31 (1), 32 (1), 33 (1), 34 (1), 35 (1), 36 (1), 37 (1), 38 (1), 39 (1), 40 (1), 41 (1), 42 (1), 43 (1), 44 (1), 45 (1), 46 (1), 47 (1), 48 (1), 49 (1), 50 (1), 51 (1), 52 (1), 53 (1), 54 (1), 55 (1), 56 (1), 57 (1), 58 (1), 59 (1), 60 (1), 61 (1), 62 (1), 63 (1), 64 (1), 65 (1), 66 (1), 67 (1), 68 (1), 69 (1), 70 (1), 71 (1), 72 (1), 73 (1), 74 (1), 75 (1), 76 (1), 77 (1), 78 (1), 79 (1), 80 (1), 81 (1), 82 (1), 83 (1), 84 (1), 85 (1)
18. list 46
19. note 510 @n (509) : a (51), b (40), * (277), c (30), d (25), e (15), f (11), g (6), h (7), i (5), k (5), l (5), m (6), 1 (2), n (4), o (2), p (2), q (2), r (2), s (2), t (2), u (2), x (2), y (2), z (2) • @place (510) : bottom (495), margin (15)
20. opener 11
21. p 1355
22. pb 638 @facs (638) : tcp:18299:1 (2), tcp:18299:2 (2), tcp:18299:3 (2), tcp:18299:4 (2), tcp:18299:5 (2), tcp:18299:6 (2), tcp:18299:7 (2), tcp:18299:8 (2), tcp:18299:9 (2), tcp:18299:10 (2), tcp:18299:11 (2), tcp:18299:12 (2), tcp:18299:13 (2), tcp:18299:14 (2), tcp:18299:15 (2), tcp:18299:16 (2), tcp:18299:17 (2), tcp:18299:18 (2), tcp:18299:19 (2), tcp:18299:20 (2), tcp:18299:21 (2), tcp:18299:22 (2), tcp:18299:23 (2), tcp:18299:24 (2), tcp:18299:25 (2), tcp:18299:26 (2), tcp:18299:27 (2), tcp:18299:28 (2), tcp:18299:29 (2), tcp:18299:30 (2), tcp:18299:31 (2), tcp:18299:32 (2), tcp:18299:33 (2), tcp:18299:34 (2), tcp:18299:35 (2), tcp:18299:36 (2), tcp:18299:37 (2), tcp:18299:38 (2), tcp:18299:39 (2), tcp:18299:40 (2), tcp:18299:41 (2), tcp:18299:42 (2), tcp:18299:43 (2), tcp:18299:44 (2), tcp:18299:45 (2), tcp:18299:46 (2), tcp:18299:47 (2), tcp:18299:48 (2), tcp:18299:49 (2), tcp:18299:50 (2), tcp:18299:51 (2), tcp:18299:52 (2), tcp:18299:53 (2), tcp:18299:54 (2), tcp:18299:55 (2), tcp:18299:56 (2), tcp:18299:57 (2), tcp:18299:58 (2), tcp:18299:59 (2), tcp:18299:60 (2), tcp:18299:61 (2), tcp:18299:62 (2), tcp:18299:63 (2), tcp:18299:64 (2), tcp:18299:65 (2), tcp:18299:66 (2), tcp:18299:67 (2), tcp:18299:68 (2), tcp:18299:69 (2), tcp:18299:70 (2), tcp:18299:71 (2), tcp:18299:72 (2), tcp:18299:73 (2), tcp:18299:74 (2), tcp:18299:75 (2), tcp:18299:76 (2), tcp:18299:77 (2), tcp:18299:78 (2), tcp:18299:79 (2), tcp:18299:80 (2), tcp:18299:81 (2), tcp:18299:82 (2), tcp:18299:83 (2), tcp:18299:84 (2), tcp:18299:85 (2), tcp:18299:86 (2), tcp:18299:87 (2), tcp:18299:88 (2), tcp:18299:89 (2), tcp:18299:90 (2), tcp:18299:91 (2), tcp:18299:92 (2), tcp:18299:93 (2), tcp:18299:94 (2), tcp:18299:95 (2), tcp:18299:96 (2), tcp:18299:97 (2), tcp:18299:98 (2), tcp:18299:99 (2), tcp:18299:100 (2), tcp:18299:101 (2), tcp:18299:102 (2), tcp:18299:103 (2), tcp:18299:104 (2), tcp:18299:105 (2), tcp:18299:106 (2), tcp:18299:107 (2), tcp:18299:108 (2), tcp:18299:109 (2), tcp:18299:110 (2), tcp:18299:111 (2), tcp:18299:112 (2), tcp:18299:113 (2), tcp:18299:114 (2), tcp:18299:115 (2), tcp:18299:116 (2), tcp:18299:117 (2), tcp:18299:118 (2), tcp:18299:119 (2), tcp:18299:120 (2), tcp:18299:121 (2), tcp:18299:122 (2), tcp:18299:123 (2), tcp:18299:124 (2), tcp:18299:125 (2), tcp:18299:126 (2), tcp:18299:127 (2), tcp:18299:128 (2), tcp:18299:129 (2), tcp:18299:130 (2), tcp:18299:131 (2), tcp:18299:132 (2), tcp:18299:133 (2), tcp:18299:134 (2), tcp:18299:135 (2), tcp:18299:136 (2), tcp:18299:137 (2), tcp:18299:138 (2), tcp:18299:139 (2), tcp:18299:140 (2), tcp:18299:141 (2), tcp:18299:142 (2), tcp:18299:143 (2), tcp:18299:144 (2), tcp:18299:145 (2), tcp:18299:146 (2), tcp:18299:147 (2), tcp:18299:148 (2), tcp:18299:149 (2), tcp:18299:150 (2), tcp:18299:151 (2), tcp:18299:152 (2), tcp:18299:153 (2), tcp:18299:154 (2), tcp:18299:155 (2), tcp:18299:156 (2), tcp:18299:157 (2), tcp:18299:158 (2), tcp:18299:159 (2), tcp:18299:160 (2), tcp:18299:161 (2), tcp:18299:162 (2), tcp:18299:163 (2), tcp:18299:164 (2), tcp:18299:165 (2), tcp:18299:166 (2), tcp:18299:167 (2), tcp:18299:168 (2), tcp:18299:169 (2), tcp:18299:170 (2), tcp:18299:171 (2), tcp:18299:172 (2), tcp:18299:173 (2), tcp:18299:174 (2), tcp:18299:175 (2), tcp:18299:176 (2), tcp:18299:177 (2), tcp:18299:178 (2), tcp:18299:179 (2), tcp:18299:180 (2), tcp:18299:181 (2), tcp:18299:182 (2), tcp:18299:183 (2), tcp:18299:184 (2), tcp:18299:185 (2), tcp:18299:186 (2), tcp:18299:187 (2), tcp:18299:188 (2), tcp:18299:189 (2), tcp:18299:190 (2), tcp:18299:191 (2), tcp:18299:192 (2), tcp:18299:193 (2), tcp:18299:194 (2), tcp:18299:195 (2), tcp:18299:196 (2), tcp:18299:197 (2), tcp:18299:198 (2), tcp:18299:199 (2), tcp:18299:200 (2), tcp:18299:201 (2), tcp:18299:202 (2), tcp:18299:203 (2), tcp:18299:204 (2), tcp:18299:205 (2), tcp:18299:206 (2), tcp:18299:207 (2), tcp:18299:208 (2), tcp:18299:209 (2), tcp:18299:210 (2), tcp:18299:211 (2), tcp:18299:212 (2), tcp:18299:213 (2), tcp:18299:214 (2), tcp:18299:215 (2), tcp:18299:216 (2), tcp:18299:217 (2), tcp:18299:218 (2), tcp:18299:219 (2), tcp:18299:220 (2), tcp:18299:221 (2), tcp:18299:222 (2), tcp:18299:223 (2), tcp:18299:224 (2), tcp:18299:225 (2), tcp:18299:226 (2), tcp:18299:227 (2), tcp:18299:228 (2), tcp:18299:229 (2), tcp:18299:230 (2), tcp:18299:231 (2), tcp:18299:232 (2), tcp:18299:233 (2), tcp:18299:234 (2), tcp:18299:235 (2), tcp:18299:236 (2), tcp:18299:237 (2), tcp:18299:238 (2), tcp:18299:239 (2), tcp:18299:240 (2), tcp:18299:241 (2), tcp:18299:242 (2), tcp:18299:243 (2), tcp:18299:244 (2), tcp:18299:245 (2), tcp:18299:246 (2), tcp:18299:247 (2), tcp:18299:248 (2), tcp:18299:249 (2), tcp:18299:250 (2), tcp:18299:251 (2), tcp:18299:252 (2), tcp:18299:253 (2), tcp:18299:254 (2), tcp:18299:255 (2), tcp:18299:256 (2), tcp:18299:257 (2), tcp:18299:258 (2), tcp:18299:259 (2), tcp:18299:260 (2), tcp:18299:261 (2), tcp:18299:262 (2), tcp:18299:263 (2), tcp:18299:264 (2), tcp:18299:265 (2), tcp:18299:266 (2), tcp:18299:267 (2), tcp:18299:268 (2), tcp:18299:269 (2), tcp:18299:270 (2), tcp:18299:271 (2), tcp:18299:272 (2), tcp:18299:273 (2), tcp:18299:274 (2), tcp:18299:275 (2), tcp:18299:276 (2), tcp:18299:277 (2), tcp:18299:278 (2), tcp:18299:279 (2), tcp:18299:280 (2), tcp:18299:281 (2), tcp:18299:282 (2), tcp:18299:283 (2), tcp:18299:284 (2), tcp:18299:285 (2), tcp:18299:286 (2), tcp:18299:287 (2), tcp:18299:288 (2), tcp:18299:289 (2), tcp:18299:290 (2), tcp:18299:291 (2), tcp:18299:292 (2), tcp:18299:293 (2), tcp:18299:294 (2), tcp:18299:295 (2), tcp:18299:296 (2), tcp:18299:297 (2), tcp:18299:298 (2), tcp:18299:299 (2), tcp:18299:300 (2), tcp:18299:301 (2), tcp:18299:302 (2), tcp:18299:303 (2), tcp:18299:304 (2), tcp:18299:305 (2), tcp:18299:306 (2), tcp:18299:307 (2), tcp:18299:308 (2), tcp:18299:309 (2), tcp:18299:310 (2), tcp:18299:311 (2), tcp:18299:312 (2), tcp:18299:313 (2), tcp:18299:314 (2), tcp:18299:315 (2), tcp:18299:316 (2), tcp:18299:317 (2), tcp:18299:318 (2), tcp:18299:319 (2) • @n (620) : 1 (3), 2 (3), 3 (3), 4 (4), 5 (4), 6 (3), 7 (3), 8 (3), 9 (3), 10 (3), 11 (3), 12 (3), 13 (4), 14 (4), 15 (3), 16 (3), 17 (3), 18 (3), 19 (3), 20 (3), 21 (3), 22 (3), 23 (3), 24 (3), 25 (3), 26 (4), 27 (3), 28 (3), 29 (2), 30 (3), 31 (3), 32 (3), 33 (3), 34 (3), 35 (3), 36 (3), 37 (3), 38 (3), 39 (3), 40 (3), 41 (3), 42 (3), 43 (3), 44 (3), 45 (3), 46 (3), 47 (3), 48 (3), 49 (3), 50 (3), 51 (3), 52 (3), 53 (3), 54 (3), 55 (3), 56 (3), 58 (3), 59 (4), 60 (4), 61 (4), 62 (4), 63 (2), 64 (2), 65 (3), 66 (3), 67 (2), 68 (3), 69 (2), 70 (3), 71 (3), 72 (3), 73 (3), 74 (3), 75 (3), 76 (3), 77 (3), 78 (3), 79 (3), 80 (3), 81 (4), 82 (3), 83 (2), 84 (3), 87 (4), 86 (3), 88 (3), 89 (3), 90 (3), 91 (3), 92 (4), 93 (4), 94 (3), 95 (3), 96 (3), 97 (3), 98 (3), 99 (3), 100 (3), 101 (3), 102 (3), 103 (3), 104 (3), 105 (3), 106 (3), 107 (3), 108 (3), 109 (3), 110 (3), 111 (3), 112 (2), 113 (2), 114 (4), 115 (4), 116 (3), 117 (3), 118 (3), 119 (3), 120 (3), 121 (3), 122 (3), 123 (3), 124 (3), 125 (4), 126 (3), 127 (4), 128 (2), 129 (4), 130 (3), 131 (3), 132 (3), 133 (3), 134 (3), 135 (2), 136 (2), 137 (3), 138 (3), 139 (4), 140 (3), 142 (3), 143 (3), 144 (3), 145 (3), 146 (3), 147 (2), 148 (2), 57 (2), 85 (2), 141 (2), 149 (1), 150 (1), 151 (1), 152 (1), 153 (1), 154 (1), 155 (2), 156 (1), 157 (1), 158 (1), 159 (1), 160 (1), 161 (1), 162 (1), 163 (1), 165 (1), 166 (1), 167 (1), 168 (1), 169 (1), 170 (1), 171 (1), 172 (1), 173 (1), 174 (1), 175 (1), 176 (1), 177 (1), 178 (1), 179 (1), 180 (1), 181 (1), 182 (1), 183 (1), 184 (1), 185 (1), 186 (1), 187 (1), 188 (1), 189 (1), 190 (1), 191 (1), 192 (1), 193 (1), 194 (1), 195 (1), 196 (1), 197 (1), 198 (1), 199 (1), 200 (1), 225 (1), 226 (1), 227 (1), 228 (1), 229 (1), 230 (1), 231 (1), 232 (1), 233 (1), 234 (1), 235 (1), 236 (1), 237 (1), 238 (1), 239 (1), 240 (1), 241 (1), 242 (1), 243 (1), 244 (1), 245 (1), 246 (2), 247 (2), 248 (1), 249 (1), 250 (1), 251 (1), 252 (1), 253 (1), 254 (1), 255 (1), 256 (1), 257 (1), 258 (1), 259 (1), 260 (1), 261 (1), 262 (1), 263 (1), 264 (1), 265 (1), 266 (1), 267 (1), 268 (1), 269 (1), 270 (1), 271 (1), 272 (1), 273 (1), 274 (1), 275 (1), 276 (1), 277 (1), 278 (1), 279 (1), 280 (1), 281 (1), 282 (1), 283 (1), 284 (1), 285 (1), 286 (1), 287 (1), 288 (1), 298 (2), 290 (1), 291 (1), 292 (1), 293 (1), 294 (2), 295 (1), 297 (1), 299 (1), 300 (2), 301 (1), 302 (1), 303 (1), 304 (1), 305 (1), 306 (1), 307 (1), 308 (1), 309 (1), 311 (1), 312 (1), 313 (1), 314 (1), 315 (1), 316 (1), 317 (1), 318 (1), 319 (1), 320 (1), 321 (1), 322 (1), 323 (1), 324 (1), 325 (1), 326 (1), 327 (1), 328 (1), 329 (1), 330 (1), 331 (1), 332 (1), 333 (1), 334 (1), 335 (1), 336 (1), 337 (1), 338 (1), 339 (1), 340 (1), 341 (1), 342 (1), 343 (1)
23. q 5
24. row 11
25. salute 11
26. seg 17 @type (17) : milestoneunit (17)
27. signed 104
28. table 1
29. trailer 64