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README.md

README.md

#A shorte and briefe narration of the two nauigations and discoueries to the northweast partes called Newe Fraunce: first translated out of French into Italian, by that famous learned man Gio: Bapt: Ramutius, and now turned into English by Iohn Florio; worthy the reading of all venturers, trauellers, and discouerers Voyages. 1 and 2. English#

##Cartier, Jacques, 1491-1557.## A shorte and briefe narration of the two nauigations and discoueries to the northweast partes called Newe Fraunce: first translated out of French into Italian, by that famous learned man Gio: Bapt: Ramutius, and now turned into English by Iohn Florio; worthy the reading of all venturers, trauellers, and discouerers Voyages. 1 and 2. English Cartier, Jacques, 1491-1557.

##General Summary##

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This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. This Phase I text is available for reuse, according to the terms of Creative Commons 0 1.0 Universal. The text can be copied, modified, distributed and performed, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.

Major revisions

  1. 2005-11 TCP Assigned for keying and markup
  2. 2006-03 SPi Global Keyed and coded from ProQuest page images
  3. 2006-04 Andrew Kuster Sampled and proofread
  4. 2006-04 Andrew Kuster Text and markup reviewed and edited
  5. 2006-09 pfs Batch review (QC) and XML conversion

##Content Summary##

#####Front#####

  1. ¶TO THE RIGHT VVORſhipful Edmond Bray Eſquire, High Sherife within hir Maiesties Countie of Oxenford: I. Florio vviſheth much encreaſe of worſhip in this life, and in the Worlde to come, eternall happineſſe.

  2. ¶To all Gentlemen, Merchants, and Pilots.

#####Body#####

  1. ¶ The firſt relation of Iames Carthier of the new land called New Fraunce, nevvly diſcouered in the yeare of oure Lorde, 1534.

    _ ¶How Maiſter Iames Carthier departed from the Port of S. Malo, with two Ships, and came to the new land, and howe he entred into the Porte of Buona Vista.

    _ ¶ Howe we came to the Ilande of Byrdes, and of the greate quantitie of Byrdes that there be.

    _ ¶ Of two ſortes of Byrdes, the one called Godetz, the other Margaulz: and how we came to Carpunt.

    _ ¶ The deſcription of the newe founde lande, from Cape Razo, to the Cape of Degrade.

    _ ¶ Of the Ilande whiche now is called Saint Katherins Ilande.

    _ ¶ Of the place called White Sandes: of the Ilande of Breſt, and of the Ilande of Byrdes: the ſortes and quantitie of Byrdes that there are founde: and of the Porte called the Iſlettes.

    _ ¶ Howe we wyth our Shippes entred into the Porte of Breſt, and ſayling onwarde towarde the Weaſt, we paſt amidſt the Iſlettes, which were ſo many in number, that it was not poſsible to tel them: and how we named thē the Iſlettes.

    _ ¶ Of the Porte called S. Antonies Porte, S. Seruans Porte, Iames Carthiers Porte: of the riuer called S. Iames: of the cuſtomes and apparell of the inhabitors in the Iland of White Sandes.

    _ ¶ Of certaine Capes, that is to ſay, the double Cape, the pointed Cape, Cape Roiall, and the Cape of Milke: of the Mountaines of Barnes: of the Ilandes of Do•e▪ houſes; and of the greate fiſhing of Cods.

    _ ¶ Of certayne Ilands that lie betweene Cape Roiall, and the Cape of Milke.

    _ ¶ Of the Iland called S. Iohn.

    _ ¶ Of certayne Ilands called the Ilands of Margaulz, and of the kinds of beaſtes and birds that there are found. Of the Iland of Brion, and Cape Dolphin.

    _ ¶ Of the Iland called Alezai, and of S. Peeters Cape.

    _ ¶Of the Cape called Orleans Cape: of the Riuer of Boates: of wild mens Cape: and of the qualitie and temperature of the Countrey.

    _ ¶Of the Baie called Saint Lunario, and other notable Baies, and Capes of lande, and of the qualitie, and goodneſſe of thoſe groundes.

    _ ¶Of the Cape of Hope, and of Saint Martins Creeke, & howe ſeuen boats ful of wilde men, came to our boate, wold not retire themſelues, but being terrified with our Colubrins and lanches we ſhot at them, they fled with great haſt.

    _ ¶How the ſayde men commming to our ſhippes, and our men going toward them, both parties went on land, and how the ſaide wilde men with great ioye beganne to traficke with our men.

    _ ¶How that we hauing ſent two of our men on lande with wares, there came about .300. wilde mē with great gladnes. Of the quality of the Country, what it bringeth forth, and of the Baie called The Baie of heate.

    _ ¶Of another nation of wilde men: of their maners, liuing and clothing.

    _ ¶ How our men ſet vp a great Croſſe vpon the poynt of the ſayd Porte, and the Captayne of thoſe wild men, after a long Oration, was by our Captayne appeaſed, and contented that two of his Children ſhould goe with him.

    _ ¶ How after we were departed from the ſaide porte, following our voiage along the ſayd coaſt, we went to diſcouer the land lying South-eaſt, and North-weaſt.

    _ ¶ Of the Cape S. Aluiſe, and Momorancies Cape, and certayne other lands, and how one of our Boates touched a Rocke and ſuddainely went ouer it.

    _ ¶ How after we had agreed and conſulted what was beſt to bee done, wee purpoſed to returne from S. Peeters ſtraight, and from Tiennots Cape.

    _ ¶ How that vpon the ninth of Auguſt we entred within White Sands, and vpon the fifth of September we came to the port of S. Malo.

  2. ¶ A ſhorte and briefe narration of the Nauigation cauſed to be made by the King of France, to the Ilands of Canada, Hochelaga, Saguenay, and diuers others, which now are called New France, vvith a diſcourſe of the particulars, cuſtomes, and manners of the inhabitoures therein.

    _ Chap. 1.

    _ ¶ How our Captain cauſed the ſhippes to retourne backe again, only to know if in Saint Laurence gulfe there were any paſſage towarde the North. CHAP. 2.

    _ ¶ How our Captayne went to ſee and note the bigneſſe of the Iland, and the nature of it, and then returned to the Shippes, cauſing them to be brought to the Riuer of the holy Croſſe. CHAP. 3.

    _ ¶ Howe Donnacona, Taignoagny, with others, deuiſed a prettie ſlight or pollicie: for they cauſed three of theyr men to be attyred like Diuels, fayning to be ſent from theyr God Cudruaigny, onely to hinder our voyage to Hochelaga. CHAP. 4.

    _ ¶ Howe oure Captayne▪ wyth all his Gentlemenne, and fiftie Marriners, departed wyth oure Gallion, and the two boates of Canada to go to Hochelaga, and alſo there is deſcribed, what by the way and vppon the riuer was ſeene. CHAP. 5.

    _ ¶ Howe our Captaine cauſed our Boates to be mended and dreſſed to goe to Hochelaga: and bycauſe the way was ſomewhat difficult and harde, we left our Gallion behinde: and howe we came thither, and what entertainement wee had of the people. CHAP. 6.

    _ ¶How our Captayne with fiue Gentlemen, and twentie armed men, all well in order, went to ſee the Towne of Hochelaga, and the ſcituation of it. CHAP. 7.

    _ ¶ How we came to the Towne of Hochelaga, and the entertaynemente there we had, and of certayne giftes oure Captayne gaue them, with diuers other things. CHAP. 8.

    _ ¶ Howe wee came to the Port of the Holie Croſſe, and in what ſtate we founde our ſhippes: and howe the Lorde of the Countrey came to viſite oure Captaine, and oure Captain him: and of certaine particular cuſtomes of the people. CHAP. 9.

    _ ¶ The manner how the people of that Country liue: and of certaine conditions: of their Faith, manners, and cuſtomes. CHAP. 10.

    _ ¶ Of the greatneſſe and deapth of the ſayd Riuer, and of the ſortes of Beaſtes, Birdes, Fiſhes, and other things that we haue ſeene, with the ſcituation of the place. CHA. 11.

    _ ¶ Of certayne aduertiſements and notes giuen vnto vs by thoſe Countreymen, after our returne from Hochelaga. CHAP. 12.

    _ ¶ Of a ſtrange and cruell diſeaſe that came to the people of Stadagona, wherwith bycauſe we did haunt their company, we wer ſo infected, that there died 25. of our companye. CHAP. 13.

    _ ¶ How long we ſtayed in the Porte of the holy Croſſe amidſt the Snow and Yſe, and how many dyed of the ſaid diſeaſe, from the beginning of it, to the midſt of March. CHAP. 14.

    _ ¶ How by the grace of God we had notice of a certayne tree, wherby we all recouered our health: and the maner how to vſe it. CHAP. 15.

    _ ¶ Howe the Lorde Donnacona accompanyed with Taignoagny and dyuers others, fayning that they woulde goe to hunt Stags, and other wilde Deere, taryed out twoo moneths, and at theyr returne broughte a greate multitude of people with them, that we were not wont to ſee before. CHAP. 16.

    _ ¶ How Donnacona came to Stadagona againe with a greate number of people, and bycauſe he would not come to viſite our Captaine, fayned himſelfe to be ſore ſicke, whiche he did onely to haue the Captaine come and ſee him. CHAP. 17.

    _ ¶Howe that vpon Holyroode day our Captaine cauſed a Croſſe to be ſet vp in our Forte: and howe the Lord Donnacona, Taignoagny, Domagaia, and others of theyr company came: and of the taking of the ſaide Lorde. CHAP. 18.

    _ ¶How the ſaide Canadians the night following came before our Ships to ſeeke their men, crying and howling al night like Wolues: of the talke and concluſion they agreed vpon the next day: and of the giftes which they gaue our Captaine. CHAP. 19.

    _ ¶How that the nexte daye, beeing the fifth of May, the ſayde people came agayne to ſpeake vnto theyr Lorde, and howe that foure Women came to the Shoare to bring him Victualles. CHAP. 20.

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