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README.md

README.md

#The works of our ancient, learned, & excellent English poet, Jeffrey Chaucer as they have lately been compar'd with the best manuscripts, and several things added, never before in print : to which is adjoyn'd The story of the siege of Thebes, by John Lidgate ... : together with The life of Chaucer, shewing his countrey, parentage, education, marriage, children, revenues, service, reward, friends, books, death : also a table, wherein the old and obscure words in Chaucer are explained, and such words ... that either are, by nature or derivation, Arabick, Greek, Latine, Italian, French, Dutch, or Saxon, mark'd with particular notes for the better understanding of their original. Works. 1687#

##Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400.## The works of our ancient, learned, & excellent English poet, Jeffrey Chaucer as they have lately been compar'd with the best manuscripts, and several things added, never before in print : to which is adjoyn'd The story of the siege of Thebes, by John Lidgate ... : together with The life of Chaucer, shewing his countrey, parentage, education, marriage, children, revenues, service, reward, friends, books, death : also a table, wherein the old and obscure words in Chaucer are explained, and such words ... that either are, by nature or derivation, Arabick, Greek, Latine, Italian, French, Dutch, or Saxon, mark'd with particular notes for the better understanding of their original. Works. 1687 Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400.

##General Summary##

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##Content Summary##

#####Front##### THE PROGENIE OF GEFFREY CHAUCERThe true portraiture of GEFFREY CHAUCEER the famous English poet as b

  1. TO THE Right Honourable Sir ROBERT CECIL, Knt. PRINCIPAL SECRETARY To the QUEEN's Moſt Excellent Majeſty, Maſter of the Court of Wards and Liveries, one of her Highneſs's moſt Honourable Privy Council, and Right Worthy Chancellor of the Vniverſity of CAMBRIDGE.

  2. To the Readers.

  3. TO HIS Very Loving and aſſured Good Friend, Mr. THOMAS SPEGHT.

  4. THE READER TO Geffrey Chaucer.

  5. Vpon the Picture of Chaucer.

  6. Of the Animadverſions upon Chaucer.

  7. THE LIFE Of Our Learned Engliſh Poet, Geffrey Chaucer.

    _ His Country.

    _ His Parentage.

    _ His Education.

    _ His Marriage.

    _ Stemma peculiare Gaufredi Chauceri Poetae celeberrimi.

    _ His Children, with their Advancement.

    _ His Revenues.

    _ His Service.

    _ His Rewards.

    _ His Friends.

    _ His Books.

    _ His Death.

  8. ADVERTISEMENT TO THE READER. THE Works of Ieffrey Chaucer, With Additions. Alſo the Siege and Deſtruction of the worthy City of T

  9. To the KING's HIGHNESS, My moſt Gracious Soveraign Lord, HENRY the Eighth, By the Grace of God, King of England, and of France, Defenſor of the Faith, and Lord of Ireland, &c.

  10. A TABLE of the Principal Matters Contained in this VOLUME; Which you may find by the Folio's, as follows.

  11. Eight goodly Queſtions, with their Anſwers.

  12. To the King's moſt noble Grace, and to the Lords and Knights of the Garter. WHen faith fayleth in Prieſtes ſawes,And lords heſtes are holden for lawes,And robberie is holden pu #####Body##### The Argument to the Prologues.THE Author, in theſe Prologues to his Canterbury Tales, doth deſcribe _ The Argument to the Prologues. WHen that Aprill with his ſhours ſote,The drought of March had pierced to the rote,And bathed every

    • ¶The Knight. 1.

    • ¶The Squire. 2.

    • ¶The Squires Yeoman. 3.

    • ¶The Prioreſſe. 4.

    • ¶The Monke. 5.

    • ¶The Frere. 6.

    • ¶The Marchaunt. 7.

    • ¶The Clerke of Oxenford. 8.

    • ¶The Sergeant at Law. 9.

    • ¶The Frankelein. 10.

    • ¶The Haberdaſher. 11.

    • ¶The Coke. 12.

    • ¶The Shipman. 13.

    • ¶The Doctor of Phiſike. 14.

    • ¶The Wife of Bathe. 15.

    • ¶The Parſone. 16.

    • ¶The Plowman. 17.

    • ¶The Miller. 18.

    • ¶The Mancile. 19.

    • ¶The Reue. 20.

    • ¶The Sompnour. 21.

    • ¶The Pardoner. 22. The Knight's Tale.PAlamon and Arcite, a pair of Friends and Fellow-priſoners, fight a Combat before

    • The Knight's Tale.

    • The MILLERS Tale.

¶The Millers Prologue. ¶The Reues Prologue.WHen folke had laughed at this nice caasOf Abſolon and Hende Nicholas,Diuers fol ¶The Reues Prologue. ¶The Cookes Prologue.THe Cooke of London, while the Reue ſpake,For joy he thought, he claude him ont ¶The Cookes Prologue. ¶The man of Lawes Prologue.OUr hoſt ſaw well, how that the bright SunneThe arke of his artificial da ¶The man of Lawes Prologue. ¶The Squires Prologue.OUR hoſt on his ſtirrops ſtoode anon,And ſaid: good men hearkeneth euerichon,T ¶The Squires Prologue.

  * ¶Here followeth the words of the Marchaunt

to the Squier, and the words of the Hoſt to the Marchaunt. The Marchants Prologue.WEeping and wailing, care and otherſorrowI haue ynow, both euen and eke a mor The Marchants Prologue. The wife of Bathes Prologue.Experience, though none authoritieWere in this world, is right ynow for The wife of Bathes Prologue. ¶The Friers Prologue.THis worthy limitour, this noble FrereHe made alway a maner louring chereVpon t ¶The Friers Prologue. ¶The Sompners Prologue.THis Sompner in his ſtirrops high ſtood,Vpon this Frere his hert was ſo wood, ¶The Sompners Prologue. ¶The Clerke of Oxenfords Prologue.SIr Clerke of Oxenford our hoſt ſaid,Ye ride as ſtill and coy, as ¶The Clerke of Oxenfords Prologue.

  * ¶Here follow the words of our Hoſt.

¶The Frankeleins Prologue.THeſe old gentle Britons in her dayes,Of divers auentures maden layes,Rime ¶The Frankeleins Prologue. ¶The Second Nonnes Prologue.THe miniſter & the norice vnto vices,Which yt men clepen in Engliſh idle ¶The Second Nonnes Prologue. ¶The Chanons Yeomans Prologue.WHen ended was the life of ſaint Cecile,Ere we fully ridden had five m ¶The Chanons Yeomans Prologue. ¶The Doctor of Phyſicks Prologue.WHen this yeoman his tale ended hadOf this falſe Chanon, which was ¶The Doctor of Phyſicks Prologue.

  * ¶The words of the Hoſt.

¶The Pardoners Prologue.LOrdings (qd. he) in chirch when I preche,I paine mee to haue an hauteine ſp ¶The Pardoners Prologue. ¶The Shipmans Prologue.NOw friendes ſaid our hoſt ſo dere,How liketh you by Iohn ye Pardonere?He hat ¶The Shipmans Prologue.

  * ¶Here followeth the wordes of

our Hoſte. ¶The Prioreſſes Prologue.Domine dominus noſter: quam admirable eſt nomen tuum in univerſa terra.LOrd ¶The Prioreſſes Prologue.

  * ¶Here followeth the wordes of the

Hoſte to Chaucer.

  * ¶Here followeth the Rime of Sir Thopas.

  * ¶The words of our Hoſte.

  * ¶Chaucers Tale of Melibeus.

¶The Monkes Prologue.WHen ended was the tale of MelibeeAnd of Prudence, and her benignite,Our hoſt ſ ¶The Monkes Prologue. ¶Here ſtinteth the Knight the Monke of his Tale, and here followeth the Prologue of the Nonnes Prieſ ¶Here ſtinteth the Knight the Monke of his Tale, and here followeth the Prologue of the Nonnes Prieſt. ¶The Manciples Prologue.SIr Nonnes Prieſt, our hoſt ſaied anone,I bleſſed be thy brech and euerie ſt ¶The Manciples Prologue. ¶The Plowmans Prologue.THe Plowman plucked up his plowe,When Midſummer Moone was comen in,And ſayed ¶The Plowmans Prologue. ¶The Parſons Prologue.BY that the Plowman had his tale ended,The ſunne fro ye ſouth ſide is deſcende ¶The Parſons Prologue.

  1. THE Romaunt of the Roſe.

    _ ¶Coment Raiſon vient a Lamant.

    _ ¶Raiſoun.

    _ ¶Lamaunt.

    _ ¶Raiſoun.

    _ ¶Lamaunt.

    _ ¶Lamant.

    _ ¶Raiſon.

    _ ¶Comment Raiſon diffiniſt Aunſete. In this excellent Book is ſhewed the fervent love of Troylus to Creiſeid, whom he enjoyed for a time _ In this excellent Book is ſhewed the fervent love of Troylus to Creiſeid, whom he enjoyed for a time: and her great untruth to him again in giving herſelf to Diomedes, who in the end did ſo caſt her off, that ſhe came to great miſery. In which diſcourſe Chaucer liberally treateth of the divine purveyance. OVt of theſe black wawes let vs for to ſail,O wind, now the weather ginneth clere:For in the ſea theOVt of theſe black wawes let vs for to ſail,O wind, now the weather ginneth clere:For in the ſea theIN May, y• mother is of moneths glade,That y• freſh floures, both blew, white, & redeBen quick ayen,O Blisfull light, of which the bemes clereAdorneth all the third heaven faireO ſonnes lefe, O Ioues O Blisfull light, of which the bemes clereAdorneth all the third heaven faireO ſonnes lefe, O Ioues

    • Incipit Liber Tertius. BVt all too little, welaway the whileLaſteth ſuch ioy, ithonked bee fortune,That ſeemeth trueſt, wheBVt all too little, welaway the whileLaſteth ſuch ioy, ithonked bee fortune,That ſeemeth trueſt, whe
    • Incipit liber quartus.

    _ Incipit Liber Quintus.

  2. The Teſtament of Creſeide.

    _ The Complaint of Creſeide.

  3. The Legend of good Women. A Thouſand times I have heard men tell,That there is joy in heaven, & pain in hell,And I accord it w _ ¶Here beginneth the legende of Cleopatras Queene of Egipt.

    _ ¶The Legend of Tisbe of Babilon.

    _ ¶The Legend of Dido, Queene of Cartage.

    _ ¶The Legend of Hipſiphile and Medea.

    _ ¶The Legende of Lucrece of Rome.

    _ ¶The Legend of Ariadne of Athens.

    _ ¶The Legende of Philomene.

    _ ¶The Legende of Phillis.

    _ ¶The Legende of Hypermeſtre.

  4. ¶A goodly Ballade of Chaucer.

    _ ¶Lenuoye.

  5. Boecius de Conſolatione Philoſophiae.

    _ Carmina qui quondam ſtudio florenti peregi Flebilis heu moeſtos coger inire modos.

    • Haec dum mecum tacitus ipſe reputarem, querimoniamque lacrimabilem ſtili Officio deſignarem; aſtitiſſe mihi ſupra verticem viſa eſt mulie• reverendi admodum vultus, oculis ardentibus, & ultra communem, &c.

    • Heu quam praecipiti merſa profundo. Mens habet, & propria luce relicta. Tendit ad externas ire tenebras. Terrenis quoties flatibus acta. Creſcit in immenſum noxia cura. Hic quondam coelo liber aperto, &c.

    • Sed magis medicinae (inquit) tempus eſt quam querelae. Boe. Tum vero totis in me intenta luminibus. Philo. Tu ne ille es (ait) qui noſtro quondam lacte nutritus, noſtris educatus alimentis, in virilis animi robur evaſeras, &c.

    • Tunc me diſcuſſa liquerunt nocte tenebre, Luminibuſque prior redit vigor. Ut cum praecipiti glomerantur ſidera choro. Nimboſiſque polus ſtetit imbribus. Sol later, ac nondum coelo venientibus aſtris, &c.

    • Haud aliter triſtitiae nebulis diſſolutis, hauſi coelum, & ad cognoſcendam medicantis faciem, mentem recepi. Itaque ubi in eam deduxi oculos, intuitumque defixi, reſpicio nutricem meam, in cujus ab adoleſcentia, &c.

    • Quiſquis compoſito ſerenus evo, Fatum ſub pedibus egit ſuperbum: Fortunamque tuens utramque rectus, Invictum potuit tenere vultum, &c.

    • Sentis ne (inquit) haec? Atque animo illabuntur tuo? Expers ne es lyrae? Quid fles? Quid lachrimis manas? Si operam medicantis expectas, oportet ut vulnus detegas tuum, &c.

    • O ſtelliferi Conditor Orbis, Qui perpetuo nixus ſolio, Rapido Coelum turbine verſas, Legemque pati ſidera cogis, ut nunc pleno lucida cornu. Totis fratris obvia flammis. Condat ſtellas Luna minores: Nunc obſcuro pallida cornu Phoebo proprior lumina perdat, &c.

    • Haec ubi continuato dolore delatravi: illa vultu placido, nihilque meis queſtubus mota. Phi. Cum te (inquit) moeſtum, lachrymantemque vidiſſem: illico miſerum exulemque cognovi. Sed quam id longinquum eſſer exilium.

    • Cum Phoebi radiis grave Cancri ſidus inaeſtuat, Tum qui largo negantibus, Sulcis ſemina credidit, Eluſus Cereris fide, Quarnas pergat ad arbores. Nunquam purpureum nemus lecturus violas petas, &c.

    • Primum igitur, pateris ne me pauculis rogationibus ſtatum tuae mentis attingere, atque tentare? ut quis modus ſit tuae curationis intelligam, &c.

    • Nubibus atris condita nullum fundere poſſunt ſidera lumen. Si mare voluens turbidus auſter miſceat eſtum: Vitrea dudum, Parque ſerenis, &c.

    _ Poſt haec pauliſper obticuit, atque ubi attentionem meam modeſta taciturnitate collegit, ſic exhorſa eſt. Si poeuitus egritudinis tuae cauſas, habitumque, &c.

    • Haec cum ſuperba verterit vices dextra, Ex aeſtuantis more fertur Euripi. Dudum tremen dos ſeva proterit reges, Humilemque victi ſublevat fallax vultum. Non illa dura miſeros audit, haud curat flerus, &c.

    • Vellem autem pauca tecum, Fortunae ipſius verbis agitare. Tu igitur an jus poſtulet animadverte. P. Quid tu ô homo ream me agis quotidianis querelis, &c.

    • Si quantas rapidis flatibus incitus Pontus verſat arenas. Aut quot ſtellifei is edita noctibus Coelo Sidera fulgent: Tantas fundat opes, nec retrahat manum pleno copia cornu: Humanum miſeras haud ideo genus ceſſet flere querelas, &c.

    • His igitur, ſi pro ſe tecum, verbis fortuna loqueretur, quid profecto contrahiſceres, non haberes. At ſi quid eſt, quo querelam tuam jure tuearis, proferas oportet.

    • Cum polo Phebus, roſeis quadrigis Lucem ſpergere caeperit, Pallet albentes hebetara vultus Flammis ſtella permentibus, &c.

    • Tum ego, vera inquam, commemoras ô virtutum omnium nutrix: nec inficiati poſſum proſperitatis meae velociſſimum curſum. Sed hoc eſt, quid, &c.

    • Sed quoniam rationum jam in te mearum fomenta diſcendunt, paulo validioribus utendum puto. Age enim. Si jam caduca ac momentaria fortunae, &c.

    • Foelix nimium prior aetas, Contenta fidelibus arvis. Nec inerti perdita luxu. Facilique ſera ſolebat Jejunia ſolvere glande. Nec bacchia munera norat liquido confundere melle. Nec lucida vellera ſerum, &c.

    • Quid autem de dignitatibus, potentiaque diſſeram, quas vos, vere dignitatis, ac poteſtatis inſcii, Coelo exaequatis? Quae ſi in improbiſſimum quemque ceciderint, &c.

    • Novimus, quantas dederit ruinas. Urbe flammata, patribuſque caeſis. Fratre qui quondam ferus interempto, matris effuſo maduit cruore. Corpus & viſu gelidum pererrans, ora non tinxit lachrimis: ſed eſſe, Cenſor extincti potuit decoris, &c.

    • Tunc ego. Scis (inquam) ipſa, minimam nobis ambitionem mortalium rerum fuiſſe dominatam. Sed materiam gerendis rebus optavimus, quo ne virtus cacita conſeneſceret. P. Et illa. Atqui hoc unum eſt, &c.

    • Quicunque ſolam mente praecipiti petit, ſummumque credit gloriam, Lace patentes aetheris cernat plagas, Artumque terrarum ſitum, Brevem replere non valentis ambitum, &c.

    • Sed ne me inexorabile contra fortunam gerere Bellum putes, eſt aliquando, cum de hominibus fallax illa non nihil bene mereatur: tum ſcilicet cum ſe aperit, &c.

    • Quod mundus ſtabili fide, concordes variat vices, quod pugnantia ſemina, Faedus perpetuum tenet, &c.

    _ Jam cantum illa finierat, cum me audiendi avidum, ſtupentemque arrectis adhuc auribus carminis dulcedo defixerat. Itaque paulo poſt, O inquam ſummum laſſorum ſolamen animorum, quantum me, &c.

    • Qui ſerere ingenuum volet agrum, liberat arva prius fruticibus, falce rubos, filicemque reſecat, &c.

    • Tum defixo paululum viſu, & velut in anguſtam ſuae mentis ſedem recepta: ſic cepit. P. Omnis mortalium cura quam multiplicium ſtudiorum labor exercet, &c.

    • Quantas rerum flectit habenas Natura potens, quibus immenſum, Legibus orbem provida ſervet, ſtringatque ligans irreſoluto. Singula nexu, placet arguto, fidelibus lentis promere cantu, &c.

    • Vos quoque ô terrena animalia, tenui licet imagine, veſtrum tamen principium ſomniatis. Verumque illum beatitudinis finem, licet minime perſpicaci, &c.

    • Quamvis fluente dives auri gurgite. Non expleturas cogat avarus opes, &c.

    • Sed dignitatis honorabilem, reverendumque cui provenerint, reddunt. Num vis ea eſt magiſtratibus, ut utentium mentibus vi•tutes inſerant, vicia depellant, &c.

    • Quamvis ſe Tyrio ſuperbus oſtro comeret & niveis lapillis, &c.

    • An vero regna, regnumque familiaritas efficere potentem valent? Quidni, &c.

    • Qui ſe volet eſſe potentem, Animos domet ille feroces: Nec victa libidine colla, &c.

    • Gloria vero quam fallax ſaepe, quam turpis eſt; Unde non injuria tragicus exclamat. O gloria, gloria, millibus mortalium nihil aliud facta, niſi aurium inflatio magna, &c.

    • Omne hominum genus in terris Simili ſurgit ab hortu. Unus enim rerum pater eſt. Unus cuncta miniſtrat, &c.

    • Quid autem de corporis voluptatibus loquar, quarum appetentia quidem plena eſt anxietatis, &c.

    • Habet hoc voluptas omnis ſtimulis agit fruentes: Apiumque par volantium ubi gratia mella ſudit. Fugit & nimis tenaci ferit icta corda morſu, &c.

    • Nihil igitur dubium eſt, quin hae ad beatitudinem viae devia quaedam ſint, nec perducere eo quenquam valeant, &c.

    • Heu heu quae miſeros tramite devios abducit ignorantia, non aurum in viridi quaeritis, arbore, &c.

    • Hactenus mendacis formam faelicitatis oſtendiſſe ſufficerit, quod ſi perſpicaciter intuearis, ordo eſt deinceps, &c.

    • O qui perpetua mundum ratione gubernas, Terrarum caelique ſator, qui tempus ab aevo, Ire jubes, ſtabiliſque manens dans cuncta moveri: Quem non externae pepulerunt fingere cauſae, &c.

    • Quoniam igitur, quae ſit imperfecti, quae etiam perfecti boni forma vidiſti, nunc demonſtrandum reor, &c.

    • Huc omnes pariter venite capti. Quos fallax ligat improbis catenis. Terrenas habitans libido mentes. Hic erit vobis requies laborum, &c.

    • Aſſentior (inquam) cuncta enim firmiſſimis nexa rationibus conſtant. Tum illa, quanti, inquit, tu aeſtimabis, ſi bonum ipſum, quid ſit, agnoveris, &c.

    • Quiſquis profunda mente veſtigat verum. Cupitque nullis ille deviis falli, in ſe revolvat intimi lucem viſus, &c.

    • Tum ego, Platoni (inquam) vehementer aſſentior. Nam me horum jam ſecundo commemoras. Primum quod memoriam corporea contagione, &c.

    • Felix qui potuit boni, Fontem viſere lucidum. Felix qui potuit gravis, &c.

    _ Haec cum Philoſophia dignitate vultus, & oris gravitate ſervata, leviter ſuaviterque ceciniſſet, Tum ego nondum penitus inſiti maeroris oblitus, &c.

    • Sunt enim pennae volucres mihi, Quae celſa conſcendunt poli, Quas ſibi cum velox mens induit, &c.

    • Turn ego pape inquam, ut magna promittis. Nec dubito, quin poſſis efficere, tu modo quem excitaveris, ne moreris, &c.

    • Quos vides ſedere celſos, Solii culmine reges, Purpura claros nitente, &c.

    • Vides ne igitur quanto in coeno probra volvantur, qua probitas luce reſplendeat? in quo perſpicuum eſt nunquam bonis praemia, &c.

    • Vela Naricii ducis, & vagas pelago rates, Eurus appulit inſulae, pulchra qua reſidens dea, Solis edita ſemine, &c.

    • Tu ego fateor, inquam, nec injuria dici video vitioſos, tam & ſi humani corporis ſpeciem ſervent, &c.

    • Quid tantos juvat excitare motus. Et propria fatum ſollicitate manu? Si mortem petitis, propinquat ipſa ſponte ſua, volucres nec remoratur equos, &c.

    • Hinc ego video inquam, quae ſit vel felicitas vel miſeria in ipſis proborum atque improborum meritis conſtituta. Sed in hac ipſa fortuna populari, &c.

    • Si quis Arcturi ſidera neſcit. Mergatque ſeras aequore flammas. Propinqua ſummo cardine labi. Cum nimis ſceleris explicet ortus. Cur legat tardus plauſtra Bootes, &c.

    • Ita eſt inquam. Sed cum tui muneris ſit latentium rerum cauſas evolvere, velataſque caligine explicare rationes: quaeſo uti hinc decernas, &c.

    • Si vis oelſi jura tonantis. Plura ſolers cernere mente. Aſpice ſummi culmina coeli.

    • Jam ne igitur vides quid haec omnia quae diximus conſequantur. Quid nam inquit. Omnem inquit, &c.

    • Bella bis quinis operatus annis. Ultor Atrides phrygiae ruinis, &c.

    _ Dixerat, orationiſque curſum ad alia quaedam tractanda atque expedienda vertebat. B. Tum ego, recta quidem inquam, &c.

    • Rupis Achimeniae ſcopulis ubi verſa ſequentum. Pectoribus figit ſpicula, &c.

    • Animadverto inquam, idque uti tu dicis ita eſſe, conſentio. Sed in hac haerentium, &c.

    • Puro clarum lumine Phoebum. Melliflui canit oris Homerus, &c.

    • Tum ego: en inquam difficiliori rurſus ambiguitate confundor, &c.

    • Quae nam diſcors federa rerum, Cauſa reſolvit? Quis tanta deus, &c.

    • Tum illa. Vetus inquit, haec eſt de providentia querela: Marco Tullio, &c.

    • Quondam porticus attulit, Obſcuros nimium ſenes, &c.

    • Quod ſi in corporibus ſentiendis quamvis efficiant Inſtrumenta ſenſuum, &c.

    • Quam variis terras animalia permeant figuris. Namque alia extento ſunt corpore, &c.

    • Quoniam igitur uti paulo ante monſtratum eſt, omne quod ſcitur, &c.

  6. The Book commonly entituled, Chaucer's Dream. MY maſter, &c. When of Chriſt our king,Was asked, what is troth or ſothfaſtneſſe,He not a worde anſw

  7. The Aſſembly of Fowls.

  8. The Floure of Courteſie.

    _ ¶Ballade ſimple.

    • ¶Lenuoye. PIty that I have ſought ſo yore ago,With hert ſore, and full of buſie paine,That in this worlde was
  9. La belle Dame ſans Mercie.

    _ Lenuoy.

  10. Of Queen Annelida and falſe Arcite.

    _ The complaint of Annelida to falſe Arcite.

  11. The Aſſembly of Ladies.

    _ Diſcrecion, Purueiour.

    _ Acquaintance, Herbyger.

    _ Countenaunce, Porter.

    _ Largeſſe, Steward.

    _ Remembraunce chamberlaine.

  12. The Concluſions of the Aſtrolabie. LIttle Lowis my ſonne, I perceiue well by certaine euidences, thine abilitie to learne ſciences, touThe firſt Party.THe firſt party of this Treatiſe ſhall rehearſe the figures, and the members of thin

    • The firſt Party.

    • The ſecond Party.

    • The third Party.

    • The fourth Party.

    • The fifth Party. The Ring.THy Aſtrolabie hath a ringe to putten on thy thombe, on thy right honde, in taking of the h

    • The Ring.

    • The Turet.

    • The Moder.

    • Of the four Lines.

    • Of four Lines, Eaſt, Weſt, North, and South.

    • Which is the right ſide, and which is the left.

    • The degrees fro the Eaſt line to the South.

    • Of the twelve Signs, Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, and the others.

    • The Cercle of the Days.

    • The Cercle of the twelve Months.

    • The Names of the holy days.

    • The Scale of the Aſtrolabie.

    • The Rule.

    • The Pin, which is imagined to be Pole artike, and the Horſe.

    • For lines on the Womb ſide.

    • The degrees of the Womb ſide.

    • Of the principal Cercles.

    • Of the Almicanteras, the ſignet, and what is thine Orizont.

    • What been thine Azimutes.

    • Of the Twelve Hours of the Planets.

    • Thy Reete, or elſe thy Zodiake.

    • The Labell.

    • The Almury, the denticle of Capricorne, or elſe the calculere. Here beginneth the Concluſions of thine Aſtrolaby, to find the degree in the which the Sun is day by

    • Here beginneth the Concluſions of thine Aſtrolaby, to find the degree in the which the Sun is day by day, after his courſe about.

    • To know the altitude of the Sun, either of celeſtiall bodies.

    • To know the degree of the Sun, and of thy Zodiake, by the days in the backſide of thine Aſtrolabie.

    • To know every time of the day, by light of the Sun, and every time of the night by the Stars fixe, and eke to know by night or by day the degree of the Sign that aſcendeth on the Eaſt Orizont, which is cleped commonly aſcendent.

    • To know the degree of the Sun in thy Zodiake, by the days, in the backſide of thine Aſtrolabie.

    • Speciall declaration of the Aſcendent.

    • To know the very equacion of the degrees of the Sun, if it ſo be that it fall betwixt two almicanteras.

    • To know the ſpring of the dawning, and the end of the evening, the which been cleaped the two coepuſculis.

    • To know the Arch of the Day, that ſome folk callen the Day artificial, fro the Sun riſing, till it go down.

    • To turn the hours inequals, and the hours equals.

    • To know the quantity of the day vulgare, that is to ſay, fro ſpring of the day unto the very Night.

    • To know the Hours inequals by Day.

    • To know the quantity of hours equales.

    • Special declaration of the Hours of the Planets.

    • To know with which degree of the Zodiack any Star fix in thine Aſtrolabie, ariſeth upon the Eaſt Orizont, although the Orizont be in another Sign.

    • To know the declination of any Degree in the Zodiack, fro the equinoctiall Circle.

    • To know for what latitude in any Region the Almicanteras in my Tables been compouned.

    • To know the latitude of the Sun, in the midſt of the day, that is cleped the altitude Meridian.

    • To know the degree of the Sun, by the Reet, for a manner coryoſyte.

    • To know which day is like to other in length throughout the year. This Chapter is a manner declaration to Concluſions that followeth.UNderſtand well, that thy Zodiake

    • This Chapter is a manner declaration to Concluſions that followeth.

    • To know the very degree of any manner Star ſtrange after his latitude, though he be indeterminate in thy Aſtrolabie, ſoothly to the truth thus he ſhall be known.

    • To know the degrees of Longitudes of fixe Stars, after that they been determinate in thine Aſtrolabie, if it ſo be that they been truely ſet.

    • To know in ſpecial the Latitude of our Center, I mean after the altitude of Oxenford, and the heighth of our Pole.

    • To prove the Latitude of any place in a Region, by the proof of the heighth of the Pole artike in that ſame place.

    • Another Concluſion to prove the heighth of the Pole artike from the Orizont.

    • Another Concluſion to prove the Latitude of a Region that ye been in.

    • Declaration of the aſcenſion of Signs, as well in the Circle direct, as in oblique.

    • This is the Concluſion to know the aſcenſions of Signs in the right Circle, that is, Circulus directus.

    • To know the aſcenſions of Signs in the embolyfe Circle in every Region, I mean, in circulo obliquo.

    • To know juſtly rhe four Quarters of the World, as Eaſt, Weſt, South, and North.

    • To know the altitude of Planets from the way of the Sun, whether they been North or South from the way aforeſaid.

    • For to know the Signet for the ariſing of the Sun, this is to fain, the party of the Orizont in which the Sun ariſeth.

    • The manner of diviſion of thine Aſtrolabie, is thus enjoyned, as in this caſe.

    • To know in which party of the Firmament is the Conjunction.

    • To know the Signet of the altitude of the Sun.

    • To know ſothly the longitude of the Moon, or any Planet that hath no Latitude, from the time of the Ecliptike Line.

    • This is the werching of the Concluſions to know whether any Planet be direct or retrograde.

    • The concluſion of equacions of Houſes after the Aſtrolaby.

    • Another maner of equacions of Houſes, by the Aſtrolaby.

    • To find the line Meridional, to dwell fix in any certain place.

    • Deſcription of the Meridional line, and of the longitudes and latitudes of cities and towns, as well as of climates.

    • To know with what degree of the Zodiack, that any Planet aſcendeth on the Orizont, where his Latitude be North or South.

    • Vmbra recta.

    • Vmbra verſae.

    • Vmbra recta.

    • Vmbra recta.

    • Vmbra verſa.

    • Vmbra recta.

    • Vmbra verſa.

  13. The Complaint of the Black Knight.

    _ ¶Lenuoye.

  14. A Praiſe of Women.

  15. The Houſe of Fame.

    _ In this Book is ſhewed how the Deeds of all Men and Women, be they good or bad, and carried by Report to Poſterity. NOw hearken euery manner man,That Engliſh vnderſtand can,And liſteth of my dreame to here,For nowe aGOd of Science and of light,Apollo through thy great might,This littell laſt booke now thou gie,Now The Prologue of the Teſtament of Love.MAny men there been, that with eres openly ſprad, ſo moch ſwal _ The Prologue of the Teſtament of Love.

    _ The Teſtament of Love. VEry wealth may not be founden in all this world, and that is well ſeene: Lo how in my moſte comfortOF nombre ſain theſe clerks that it is naturell ſome of diſcrete thinges, as in telling one, two, thThe Lamentation of Mary Magdalen.This Treatiſe is taken out of S. Origen, wherein Mary Magdalen lame _ The Lamentation of Mary Magdalen. The Prologue to the Remedy of LOVE.SEeing the manifolde inconuenienceFalling by vnbrideled proſperit

    • The Prologue to the Remedy of LOVE.

    • The Remedy of Love.

    _ The Complaint of Mars and Venus.

    _ The Complaint of Mars.

    _ The Complaint of Venus.

    • ¶Lenuoy.

    _ The Letter of Cupid.

    _ A Ballade in Commendation of our Lady.

    _ John Gower unto the Noble King Henry the Fourth. Electus Chriſti, pie rex Henrici fuiſtiQui bene veniſti, cum propria regna petiſtiTu mala viciſtique _ ¶A Saying of Dan Iohn.

    • ¶Yet of the ſame.

    • Balade de bon conſail.

    _ Of the Cuckow and the Nightingale. O Leud book with thy foule rudeneſſe,Sith thou haſte neither beauty ne eloquence,Who hath thee cauſe

    • Lenuoye.

    _ Scogan unto the Lords and Gentlemen of the Kings Houſe.

  • SOmetime the world ſo ſtedfaſt was and ſtable,That mans word was an obligatioun,And now it is ſo f * Lenvoye.

    _ Good Counſail of Chaucer.

    _ A Ballade of the Village without Painting.

    * Plaintife to Fortune.
    
    * The anſwer of Fortune.
    
    * The anſwer to Fortune.
    
    * Fortune.
    
    * The Plaintife.
    
    * Thenuoye of Fortune.
    

Lenuoy.

  • GO forth King, rule thee by Sapience,Biſhop be able to miniſter doctrine,Lorde to true counſaile y _ Th. Occleve to his empty Purſe.

    _ Occleve unto the King.

    _ A Ballad of good counſail, tranſlated out of Latin verſes into Engliſh by Dan John Lidgate, cleped the Monk of Bury.

    _ A Ballad in the Praiſe and Commendation of Maſter Geffery Chaucer, for his golden Eloquence.

  1. Here followeth certain Works of Geffrey Chaucer, annexed to the Impreſſions printed in the Years 1561, and 1602. All collected and adjoyned to his former Works by John Stowe. A Ballad made by Chaucer, teaching what is gentilneſs, or whom is worthy to be called gentill.THE fi _ A Proverb againſt Covetiſe and Negligence.

    _ A Ballad which Chaucer made againſt Women unconſtant.

    _ Here followeth a Ballad which Chaucer made in the Praiſe, or rather Diſpraiſe, of Women, for their Doubleneſs.

    • Lenuoye.

    _ This Work following was compiled by Chaucer, and it is called the Craft of Lovers.

    _ A Ballad.

    _ The Ten Commandments of Love.

    • Faith.

    • Entencion.

    • Diſcrecion.

    • Pacience.

    • Secretneſſe.

    • Prudence.

    • Perſeueraunce.

    • Pity.

    • Meaſure.

    • Mercy.

Lenuoye.

_ The Nine Ladies worthy.

  * Queene Sinope.

  * Lady Ipolite.

  * Lady Deifile.

  * Lady Teuca.

  * Queene Pantaſile.

  * Queene Thamiris.

  * Lady Lampedo.

  * Queene Semiramys.

  * Lady Menalip.

ALone walkingIn thought plainingAnd ſore ſighingAll deſolate.Me remembringOf my liuingMy death wiſhi _ A Ballad.

_ A Ballad.

_ Here followeth how Mercury with Pallas, Venus,

and Minerva, appeared to Paris of Troy, he ſleeping by a Fountain.

  * Pallas loquitur ad Pariſum de Troiae.

  * Pallas loquitur primo.

  * Venus loquitur ad Pariſum.

  * Minerva loquitur ad Pariſum.

_ A Ballad pleaſant.

_ Another Ballad.

_ A Ballad, warning men to beware of deceitful

women.

_ Theſe Verſes next following

were compiled by Geffrey Chaucer, and in the written Copies follow at the end of the Complaint of Pity.

_ A Ballad, declaring that Womens chaſtity

Doth much excell all treaſure worldly.

_ The Court of Love.

_ Chaucer's DREAM, never Printed before the Year 1597.

That which heretofore hath gone under the name of his Dream, is the Book of the Dutcheſs: or the Death of Blanch, Dutcheſs of Lancaſter.

_ The Flower and the Leaf.

_ Chaucers A. B. C. called

La Priere de noſtre Dame.

_ Jack Upland.

_ Chaucer's Words unto his own

Scrivener.

  1. THE Story of THEBES, Compiled by John Lidgate, Monk of Bury.

    _ The Prologue to the Story of THEBES.

    _ Here beginneth the Hiſtory of the Deſtruction of the City of THEBES.

    • What the goodlihead of a Prince availeth, to win the hearts of his People.

    • Example good of King Amphion.

    • How, after the opinion of ſome Authours, King Cadmus built firſt the city of Thebes.

    • How the Country of Boece took firſt its name of a Bulls skin, and after called Thebes. And how King Cadmus was exiled out of Thebes, by Proweſs of King Amphion.

    • How the Line of Amphion by deſcent was conveyed to King Laius.

    • Here beginneth the Story of King Laius, and Iocaſta his Wife.

    • How the Aſtronomiens and Philoſophers of Thebes calcled out the fate of Edippus.

    • The curſed Conſtellation and Diſpoſition of the Heaven at the Nativity of Edippus.

    • How the fate of Edippus diſpoſed, that he ſhould ſlea his own Father.

    • How the hunts of King Polibon found the child in the forreſt, and preſented him unto the King.

    • The requeſt of Edippus unto the King Polibon.

    • The Anſwer of the King unto Edippus.

    • How Edippus ſlough his Father by ignorance, at the Caſtle of Pilotes.

    • How Edippus paſſed by the hill where the Monſter lay, that was called Sphinx.

    • The deſtruction of the foul Monſter.

    • The words of the foul Monſter.

    • The Probleme that Sphinx put to Edippus.

    • How Edippus expounded the Probleme that Sphinx put to him.

    • The Names of the People, being at the Wedding of the King Edippus, and of Jocaſta the Queen.

    • Tragediae Senecae de Egypto Reg. Thebax.

    • How every Man ought of Duty, to do Reverence to his Father and Mother, or elſe there will fall Vengeance.

    • Immediate ſequitur ſecunda pars ejuſdem.

    • How the Sons of Edippus, debated for the Crown.

    • The controverſie of the two Brethren.

    • The common Union between theſe two Brethren.

    • How Polimite firſt came into the Lond of Arge.

    • Argiue and Deiphile, the doughters tweine of King Adraſtus.

    • The Dream of King Adraſtus of a wild Boar and a fers Lion.

    • How Tideus and Polimite ſtriuen for her Lodging.

    • How Adraſtus ſpake to the Knights in ſecret touching the marriage of his Daughters.

    • Commendation of Trouth.

    • How Trouth is preferred in the Book of Eſdre aforne Kings, Women, and Wine.

    • Trouth and Mercy preſerven a King from all Adverſity.

    • Chaunge nor doubleneſs ſhould not be in a King.

    • The Counſell of falſe Flatterers.

    • How the year was come out that Ethiocles reigned in Thebes.

    • How Tideus took upon him to do the meſſage of Polimite his Brother.

    • The ſorrow of Deiphile, when Tideus went toward Thebes the City.

    • How wiſely and how knightly Tideus did his meſſage.

    • The requeſt that Tideus made in the name of Polimite, under the title of Convention.

    • The Anſwer of King Ethiocles.

    • The knightly Anſwer that Tideus yaue ayeine to the King.

    • How manly Tideus departed from the King.

    • How falſely Ethiocles laid an Ambuſhment in the way to have ſlain Tideus in his repair.

    • How worthy Tideus outrayed fifty Knights, lying in await for to ſlaen him.

    • How Truth with little Multitude hath ever in the fine, Victory of Falſhood.

    • How Tideus all to wounded, came into Ligurgus lond.

    • How Ligurgus Doughter found Tideus ſleeping in the Herber, all forwounded.

    • How womanly the Lady acquit her to Tideus in his Diſeaſe.

    • How Tideus was refreſhed in the Caſtle of the Lady.

    • How Tideus repeired is home to Arge.

    • How Ethiocles ſore was aſtonied, when he heard the death of his Knights.

    • Finitur Pars ſecunda, ſequitur Pars tertia.

    • The great purveyaunce of King Adraſtus toward the City of Thebes.

    • The Kings and Princes that come to Adraſtus.

    • That it availeth a King to pay his People truely her fond.

    • How love availeth more to a King, than Gold or Riches.

    • How Ethiocles made him ſtrong ayenſt the coming of the Greeks.

    • How the Biſhop Amphiorax was ſent for to come unto the Greeks.

    • The Prophecy of Amphiorax the Biſhop.

    • How the Wife of Amphiorax, of conſcience to ſave her Oath, diſcured her Husband.

    • How Age and Youth been of diverſe Opinions.

    • How that Wiſdom without Supportation availeth little or nought.

    • The great Miſchief that the Greeks had for default of Water.

    • How Tideus complained to the Lady in the Herber for Water.

    • How the Lady courteouſly taught Tideus to the Well.

    • How the Child was ſlain of a foul Serpent in the Herber.

    • How Adraſtus and all the ſtates of Grekes preiden Ligurgus for the life of Iſophile.

    • The ſorow that King Ligurgus made for the death of his Child, and the lamentation of the Queen.

    • How the Queen will algate have the Serpent dead.

    • How Parthonolope ſlew the Serpent.

    • Nota, de Ligurgo Rege Traceae.

    • Baccus, Deus Vini.

    • Nota, de duodecim arboribus in libra Bochacii de genealogia Deorum.

    • The Forrey that the Greeks made in the Countrey about Thebes.

    • The variaunce in Thebes among hemſelfe.

    • The words of the worthy Queen Jocaſta unto Ethiocles.

    • The Treaty that Ethiocles ſent unto his Brother.

    • The knightly Anſwer of worthy Tideus.

    • Of a tame Tygre dwelling in Thebes.

    • How the Biſhop Amphiorax fell down into Hell.

    • How the Greeks choſen a new Divinour in ſteed of Amphiorax.

    • How pitiouſly this worthy Tideus was ſlain with a quarrel.

    • How each of the Theban Brethren ſlough other, even tofore the Citee.

    • How all the royal blood both of Grekes ſide, and on the City ſide, iſlain were upon o day.

    • How Creon the old tyrant ychoſen was to be King of Thebes.

    • How all the Ladies of Graece arrayed hem toward Thebes.

    • How the old curſed Creon will not ſuffer the bodies neither to be brent nor buried.

    • How the final deſtruction of Thebes is compendiouſly rehearſed in the Knights tale.

    • How that Duke Theſeus delivered to the Ladies the Bodies of their Lords.

    • How King Adraſtus, with the Ladies, repaired home ayen to Arge.

    • Four hundred year tofore the foundation of Rome was the City of Thebes deſtroyed.

    • How all the worthy Blood of Greece deſtroyed was at ſiege, and the City brought to nought, to final loſs of both parties.

    • Bellona goddeſſe is of battaile.

    • How that War firſt began in Heaven, by the high Pride and Surquedy of Lucifer.

    • Surget gens contra gentem. Luc. xxi.

  2. The Old and Obſcure Words in Chaucer explained,

  3. So much of the Latin in Chaucer tranſlated, as is not by himſelf Engliſhed

  4. The French in Chaucer tranſlated.

  5. The Authors cited by G. Chaucer in his Works, by Name declared.

  6. ADVERTISEMENT.

    _ Immediately after what you find of the Cooks Tale, add this:

    _ Immediately after theſe words, at the end of the Squires Tale,

    • Let this be added,

Types of content

  • There are 59840 verse lines!
  • There are 77 drama parts! This is verse drama.
  • Oh, Mr. Jourdain, there is prose in there!

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22. l 59840
23. lb 2
24. lg 3612
25. list 63
26. note 29 @n (23) : 1 (7), 2 (5), 3 (3), 4 (2), 5 (1), 6 (1), 7 (1), a (1), * (2) • @place (29) : margin (29)
27. opener 1
28. p 776
29. pb 731 @facs (731) : tcp:51487:1 (2), tcp:51487:2 (2), tcp:51487:3 (2), tcp:51487:4 (2), tcp:51487:5 (2), tcp:51487:6 (2), tcp:51487:7 (2), tcp:51487:8 (2), tcp:51487:9 (2), tcp:51487:10 (2), tcp:51487:11 (2), tcp:51487:12 (2), tcp:51487:13 (2), tcp:51487:14 (2), tcp:51487:15 (2), tcp:51487:16 (2), tcp:51487:17 (2), tcp:51487:18 (2), tcp:51487:19 (2), tcp:51487:20 (2), tcp:51487:21 (2), tcp:51487:22 (2), tcp:51487:23 (2), tcp:51487:24 (2), tcp:51487:25 (2), tcp:51487:26 (2), tcp:51487:27 (2), tcp:51487:28 (2), tcp:51487:29 (2), tcp:51487:30 (2), tcp:51487:31 (2), tcp:51487:32 (2), tcp:51487:33 (2), tcp:51487:34 (2), tcp:51487:35 (2), tcp:51487:36 (2), tcp:51487:37 (2), tcp:51487:38 (2), tcp:51487:39 (2), tcp:51487:40 (2), tcp:51487:41 (2), tcp:51487:42 (2), tcp:51487:43 (2), tcp:51487:44 (2), tcp:51487:45 (2), tcp:51487:46 (2), tcp:51487:47 (2), tcp:51487:48 (2), tcp:51487:49 (2), tcp:51487:50 (2), tcp:51487:51 (2), tcp:51487:52 (2), tcp:51487:53 (2), tcp:51487:54 (2), tcp:51487:55 (2), tcp:51487:56 (2), tcp:51487:57 (2), tcp:51487:58 (2), tcp:51487:59 (2), tcp:51487:60 (2), tcp:51487:61 (2), tcp:51487:62 (2), tcp:51487:63 (2), tcp:51487:64 (2), tcp:51487:65 (2), tcp:51487:66 (2), tcp:51487:67 (2), tcp:51487:68 (2), tcp:51487:69 (2), tcp:51487:70 (2), tcp:51487:71 (2), tcp:51487:72 (2), tcp:51487:73 (2), tcp:51487:74 (2), tcp:51487:75 (2), tcp:51487:76 (2), tcp:51487:77 (2), tcp:51487:78 (2), tcp:51487:79 (2), tcp:51487:80 (2), tcp:51487:81 (2), tcp:51487:82 (2), tcp:51487:83 (2), tcp:51487:84 (2), tcp:51487:85 (2), tcp:51487:86 (2), tcp:51487:87 (2), tcp:51487:88 (2), tcp:51487:89 (2), tcp:51487:90 (2), tcp:51487:91 (2), tcp:51487:92 (2), tcp:51487:93 (2), tcp:51487:94 (2), tcp:51487:95 (2), tcp:51487:96 (2), tcp:51487:97 (2), tcp:51487:98 (2), tcp:51487:99 (2), tcp:51487:100 (2), tcp:51487:101 (2), tcp:51487:102 (2), tcp:51487:103 (2), tcp:51487:104 (2), tcp:51487:105 (2), tcp:51487:106 (2), tcp:51487:107 (2), tcp:51487:108 (2), tcp:51487:109 (2), tcp:51487:110 (2), tcp:51487:111 (2), tcp:51487:112 (2), tcp:51487:113 (2), tcp:51487:114 (2), tcp:51487:115 (2), tcp:51487:116 (2), tcp:51487:117 (2), tcp:51487:118 (2), tcp:51487:119 (2), tcp:51487:120 (2), tcp:51487:121 (2), tcp:51487:122 (2), tcp:51487:123 (2), tcp:51487:124 (2), tcp:51487:125 (2), tcp:51487:126 (2), tcp:51487:127 (2), tcp:51487:128 (2), tcp:51487:129 (2), tcp:51487:130 (2), tcp:51487:131 (2), tcp:51487:132 (2), tcp:51487:133 (2), tcp:51487:134 (2), tcp:51487:135 (2), tcp:51487:136 (2), tcp:51487:137 (2), tcp:51487:138 (2), tcp:51487:139 (2), tcp:51487:140 (2), tcp:51487:141 (2), tcp:51487:142 (2), tcp:51487:143 (2), tcp:51487:144 (2), tcp:51487:145 (2), tcp:51487:146 (2), tcp:51487:147 (2), tcp:51487:148 (2), tcp:51487:149 (2), tcp:51487:150 (2), tcp:51487:151 (2), tcp:51487:152 (2), tcp:51487:153 (2), tcp:51487:154 (2), tcp:51487:155 (2), tcp:51487:156 (2), tcp:51487:157 (2), tcp:51487:158 (2), tcp:51487:159 (2), tcp:51487:160 (2), tcp:51487:161 (2), tcp:51487:162 (2), tcp:51487:163 (2), tcp:51487:164 (2), tcp:51487:165 (2), tcp:51487:166 (2), tcp:51487:167 (2), tcp:51487:168 (2), tcp:51487:169 (2), tcp:51487:170 (2), tcp:51487:171 (2), tcp:51487:172 (2), tcp:51487:173 (2), tcp:51487:174 (2), tcp:51487:175 (2), tcp:51487:176 (2), tcp:51487:177 (2), tcp:51487:178 (2), tcp:51487:179 (2), tcp:51487:180 (2), tcp:51487:181 (2), tcp:51487:182 (2), tcp:51487:183 (2), tcp:51487:184 (2), tcp:51487:185 (2), tcp:51487:186 (2), tcp:51487:187 (2), tcp:51487:188 (2), tcp:51487:189 (2), tcp:51487:190 (2), tcp:51487:191 (2), tcp:51487:192 (2), tcp:51487:193 (2), tcp:51487:194 (2), tcp:51487:195 (2), tcp:51487:196 (2), tcp:51487:197 (2), tcp:51487:198 (2), tcp:51487:199 (2), tcp:51487:200 (2), tcp:51487:201 (2), tcp:51487:202 (2), tcp:51487:203 (2), tcp:51487:204 (2), tcp:51487:205 (2), tcp:51487:206 (2), tcp:51487:207 (2), tcp:51487:208 (2), tcp:51487:209 (2), tcp:51487:210 (2), tcp:51487:211 (2), tcp:51487:212 (2), tcp:51487:213 (2), tcp:51487:214 (2), tcp:51487:215 (2), tcp:51487:216 (2), tcp:51487:217 (2), tcp:51487:218 (2), tcp:51487:219 (2), tcp:51487:220 (2), tcp:51487:221 (2), tcp:51487:222 (2), tcp:51487:223 (2), tcp:51487:224 (2), tcp:51487:225 (2), tcp:51487:226 (2), tcp:51487:227 (2), tcp:51487:228 (2), tcp:51487:229 (2), tcp:51487:230 (2), tcp:51487:231 (2), tcp:51487:232 (2), tcp:51487:233 (2), tcp:51487:234 (2), tcp:51487:235 (2), tcp:51487:236 (2), tcp:51487:237 (2), tcp:51487:238 (2), tcp:51487:239 (2), tcp:51487:240 (2), tcp:51487:241 (2), tcp:51487:242 (2), tcp:51487:243 (2), tcp:51487:244 (2), tcp:51487:245 (2), tcp:51487:246 (2), tcp:51487:247 (2), tcp:51487:248 (2), tcp:51487:249 (2), tcp:51487:250 (2), tcp:51487:251 (2), tcp:51487:252 (2), tcp:51487:253 (2), tcp:51487:254 (2), tcp:51487:255 (2), tcp:51487:256 (2), tcp:51487:257 (2), tcp:51487:258 (2), tcp:51487:259 (2), tcp:51487:260 (2), tcp:51487:261 (2), tcp:51487:262 (2), tcp:51487:263 (2), tcp:51487:264 (2), tcp:51487:265 (2), tcp:51487:266 (2), tcp:51487:267 (2), tcp:51487:268 (2), tcp:51487:269 (2), tcp:51487:270 (2), tcp:51487:271 (2), tcp:51487:272 (2), tcp:51487:273 (2), tcp:51487:274 (2), tcp:51487:275 (2), tcp:51487:276 (2), tcp:51487:277 (2), tcp:51487:278 (2), tcp:51487:279 (2), tcp:51487:280 (2), tcp:51487:281 (2), tcp:51487:282 (2), tcp:51487:283 (2), tcp:51487:284 (2), tcp:51487:285 (2), tcp:51487:286 (2), tcp:51487:287 (2), tcp:51487:288 (2), tcp:51487:289 (2), tcp:51487:290 (2), tcp:51487:291 (2), tcp:51487:292 (2), tcp:51487:293 (2), tcp:51487:294 (2), tcp:51487:295 (2), tcp:51487:296 (2), tcp:51487:297 (2), tcp:51487:298 (2), tcp:51487:299 (2), tcp:51487:300 (2), tcp:51487:301 (2), tcp:51487:302 (2), tcp:51487:303 (2), tcp:51487:304 (2), tcp:51487:305 (2), tcp:51487:306 (2), tcp:51487:307 (2), tcp:51487:308 (2), tcp:51487:309 (2), tcp:51487:310 (2), tcp:51487:311 (2), tcp:51487:312 (2), tcp:51487:313 (2), tcp:51487:314 (2), tcp:51487:315 (2), tcp:51487:316 (2), tcp:51487:317 (2), tcp:51487:318 (2), tcp:51487:319 (2), tcp:51487:320 (2), tcp:51487:321 (2), tcp:51487:322 (2), tcp:51487:323 (2), tcp:51487:324 (2), tcp:51487:325 (2), tcp:51487:326 (2), tcp:51487:327 (2), tcp:51487:328 (2), tcp:51487:329 (2), tcp:51487:330 (2), tcp:51487:331 (2), tcp:51487:332 (2), tcp:51487:333 (2), tcp:51487:334 (2), tcp:51487:335 (2), tcp:51487:336 (2), tcp:51487:337 (2), tcp:51487:338 (2), tcp:51487:339 (2), tcp:51487:340 (2), tcp:51487:341 (2), tcp:51487:342 (2), tcp:51487:343 (2), tcp:51487:344 (2), tcp:51487:345 (2), tcp:51487:346 (2), tcp:51487:347 (2), tcp:51487:348 (2), tcp:51487:349 (2), tcp:51487:350 (2), tcp:51487:351 (2), tcp:51487:352 (2), tcp:51487:353 (2), tcp:51487:354 (2), tcp:51487:355 (2), tcp:51487:356 (2), tcp:51487:357 (2), tcp:51487:358 (2), tcp:51487:359 (2), tcp:51487:360 (2), tcp:51487:361 (2), tcp:51487:362 (2), tcp:51487:363 (2), tcp:51487:364 (2), tcp:51487:365 (2), tcp:51487:366 (1) • @rendition (5) : simple:additions (5) • @n (664) : 1 (1), 2 (1), 3 (1), 4 (1), 5 (1), 6 (1), 7 (1), 8 (1), 9 (1), 10 (1), 11 (1), 12 (1), 13 (1), 14 (1), 15 (1), 16 (1), 17 (1), 18 (1), 19 (1), 20 (1), 21 (1), 22 (1), 23 (1), 24 (1), 25 (1), 26 (1), 27 (1), 28 (1), 29 (1), 30 (1), 31 (1), 32 (1), 33 (1), 34 (1), 35 (1), 36 (1), 37 (1), 38 (1), 39 (1), 40 (1), 41 (1), 42 (1), 43 (1), 44 (1), 45 (1), 46 (1), 47 (1), 48 (1), 49 (1), 50 (1), 51 (1), 52 (1), 53 (1), 54 (1), 55 (1), 56 (1), 57 (1), 58 (1), 59 (1), 60 (1), 61 (1), 62 (1), 63 (1), 64 (1), 65 (1), 66 (1), 67 (1), 68 (1), 69 (1), 70 (1), 71 (1), 72 (1), 73 (1), 74 (1), 75 (1), 76 (1), 77 (1), 78 (1), 79 (1), 80 (1), 81 (1), 82 (1), 83 (1), 84 (1), 85 (1), 86 (1), 87 (1), 88 (1), 89 (1), 90 (1), 91 (1), 92 (1), 93 (1), 94 (1), 95 (1), 96 (1), 97 (1), 98 (1), 99 (1), 100 (1), 101 (1), 102 (1), 103 (1), 104 (1), 105 (1), 106 (1), 107 (1), 108 (1), 109 (1), 110 (1), 111 (1), 112 (1), 113 (1), 114 (1), 115 (1), 116 (1), 117 (1), 118 (1), 119 (1), 120 (1), 121 (1), 122 (1), 123 (1), 124 (1), 125 (1), 126 (1), 127 (1), 128 (1), 129 (1), 130 (1), 131 (1), 132 (1), 133 (1), 134 (1), 135 (1), 136 (1), 137 (1), 138 (1), 139 (1), 140 (1), 141 (1), 142 (1), 143 (1), 144 (1), 145 (1), 146 (1), 147 (1), 148 (1), 149 (1), 150 (1), 151 (1), 152 (1), 153 (1), 154 (1), 155 (1), 156 (1), 157 (1), 158 (1), 159 (1), 160 (1), 161 (1), 162 (1), 163 (1), 164 (1), 165 (1), 166 (1), 167 (1), 168 (1), 169 (1), 170 (1), 171 (1), 172 (1), 173 (1), 174 (1), 175 (1), 176 (1), 177 (1), 178 (1), 179 (1), 180 (1), 181 (1), 182 (1), 183 (1), 184 (1), 185 (1), 186 (1), 187 (1), 188 (1), 189 (1), 190 (1), 191 (1), 192 (1), 193 (1), 194 (1), 195 (1), 196 (1), 197 (1), 198 (1), 199 (1), 200 (1), 201 (1), 202 (1), 203 (1), 204 (1), 205 (1), 206 (1), 207 (1), 208 (1), 209 (1), 210 (1), 211 (1), 212 (1), 213 (1), 214 (1), 215 (1), 216 (1), 217 (1), 218 (1), 219 (1), 220 (1), 221 (1), 222 (1), 223 (1), 224 (1), 225 (1), 226 (1), 227 (1), 228 (1), 229 (1), 230 (1), 231 (1), 232 (1), 233 (1), 234 (1), 235 (1), 236 (1), 237 (1), 238 (1), 239 (1), 240 (1), 241 (1), 242 (1), 243 (1), 244 (1), 245 (1), 246 (1), 247 (1), 248 (1), 249 (1), 250 (1), 251 (1), 252 (1), 253 (1), 254 (1), 255 (1), 256 (1), 257 (1), 258 (1), 259 (1), 260 (1), 261 (1), 262 (1), 263 (1), 264 (1), 265 (1), 266 (1), 267 (1), 268 (1), 269 (1), 270 (1), 271 (1), 272 (1), 273 (1), 274 (1), 275 (1), 276 (1), 277 (1), 278 (1), 279 (1), 280 (1), 281 (1), 282 (1), 283 (1), 284 (1), 285 (1), 286 (1), 287 (1), 288 (1), 289 (1), 290 (1), 291 (1), 292 (1), 293 (1), 294 (1), 295 (1), 296 (1), 297 (1), 298 (1), 299 (1), 300 (1), 301 (1), 302 (1), 303 (1), 304 (1), 305 (1), 306 (1), 307 (1), 308 (1), 309 (1), 310 (1), 311 (1), 312 (1), 313 (1), 314 (1), 315 (1), 316 (1), 317 (1), 318 (2), 319 (2), 320 (1), 321 (1), 322 (1), 323 (1), 324 (1), 325 (1), 326 (1), 327 (1), 328 (1), 329 (1), 330 (1), 331 (1), 332 (1), 333 (1), 334 (1), 335 (1), 336 (1), 337 (1), 338 (1), 339 (1), 340 (1), 341 (1), 342 (1), 343 (1), 344 (1), 345 (1), 346 (1), 347 (1), 348 (1), 349 (1), 350 (1), 351 (1), 352 (1), 353 (1), 354 (1), 355 (1), 356 (1), 357 (1), 358 (1), 359 (1), 360 (1), 361 (1), 362 (1), 363 (1), 364 (1), 365 (1), 366 (1), 367 (1), 368 (1), 369 (1), 370 (1), 371 (1), 372 (1), 373 (1), 374 (1), 375 (1), 376 (1), 377 (1), 378 (1), 379 (1), 380 (1), 381 (1), 382 (1), 383 (1), 384 (1), 385 (1), 386 (1), 387 (1), 388 (1), 389 (1), 390 (1), 391 (1), 392 (1), 393 (1), 394 (1), 395 (1), 396 (1), 397 (1), 398 (1), 399 (1), 400 (1), 401 (1), 402 (2), 403 (2), 404 (1), 405 (1), 406 (1), 407 (1), 408 (1), 409 (1), 410 (1), 411 (1), 412 (1), 413 (1), 414 (1), 415 (1), 416 (1), 417 (1), 418 (1), 419 (1), 420 (1), 421 (1), 422 (1), 423 (1), 424 (1), 425 (1), 426 (1), 427 (1), 428 (1), 429 (1), 430 (1), 431 (1), 432 (1), 433 (1), 434 (1), 435 (1), 436 (1), 437 (1), 438 (1), 439 (1), 440 (1), 441 (1), 442 (1), 443 (1), 444 (1), 445 (1), 446 (1), 447 (1), 448 (1), 449 (1), 450 (1), 451 (1), 452 (1), 453 (1), 454 (1), 455 (1), 456 (1), 457 (1), 458 (1), 459 (1), 460 (1), 461 (1), 462 (1), 463 (1), 464 (1), 465 (1), 466 (1), 467 (1), 468 (1), 469 (1), 470 (1), 471 (1), 472 (1), 473 (1), 474 (1), 475 (1), 476 (1), 477 (1), 478 (1), 479 (1), 480 (1), 481 (1), 482 (1), 483 (1), 484 (1), 485 (1), 486 (1), 487 (1), 488 (1), 489 (1), 490 (1), 491 (1), 492 (1), 493 (1), 494 (1), 495 (1), 496 (1), 497 (1), 498 (1), 499 (1), 500 (1), 501 (1), 502 (1), 503 (1), 504 (1), 505 (1), 506 (1), 507 (1), 508 (1), 509 (1), 510 (1), 511 (1), 512 (1), 513 (1), 514 (1), 515 (1), 516 (1), 517 (1), 518 (1), 519 (1), 520 (1), 521 (1), 522 (1), 523 (1), 524 (1), 525 (1), 526 (1), 527 (1), 528 (1), 529 (1), 530 (1), 531 (1), 532 (1), 533 (1), 534 (1), 535 (1), 536 (1), 537 (1), 538 (1), 539 (1), 540 (1), 541 (1), 542 (1), 543 (1), 544 (1), 545 (1), 546 (1), 547 (1), 548 (1), 549 (1), 550 (1), 551 (1), 552 (1), 553 (1), 554 (1), 555 (1), 556 (1), 557 (1), 558 (1), 559 (1), 560 (1), 561 (1), 562 (1), 563 (1), 564 (1), 565 (1), 566 (1), 567 (1), 568 (1), 569 (2), 570 (1), 571 (1), 572 (1), 573 (1), 574 (1), 575 (1), 576 (1), 577 (1), 578 (1), 579 (1), 580 (1), 581 (1), 582 (1), 583 (1), 584 (1), 585 (1), 586 (1), 587 (1), 588 (1), 589 (1), 590 (1), 591 (1), 592 (1), 593 (1), 594 (1), 595 (1), 596 (1), 597 (1), 598 (1), 599 (1), 600 (1), 601 (1), 602 (1), 603 (1), 604 (1), 605 (1), 606 (1), 607 (1), 608 (1), 609 (1), 610 (1), 611 (1), 612 (1), 613 (1), 614 (1), 615 (1), 616 (1), 617 (1), 618 (1), 619 (1), 620 (1), 621 (1), 622 (1), 623 (1), 624 (1), 625 (1), 626 (1), 627 (1), 628 (1), 629 (1), 630 (1), 631 (1), 632 (1), 633 (1), 634 (1), 635 (1), 636 (1), 637 (1), 638 (1), 639 (1), 640 (1), 641 (1), 642 (1), 643 (1), 644 (1), 645 (1), 646 (1), 647 (1), 648 (1), 649 (1), 650 (1), 651 (1), 652 (1), 653 (1), 654 (1), 655 (1), 656 (1), 657 (1), 658 (1), 660 (1)
30. q 34
31. salute 1
32. signed 6
33. sp 77
34. speaker 77
35. trailer 87