No description, website, or topics provided.
Switch branches/tags
Nothing to show
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
A54745.xml
README.md

README.md

#The mysteries of love & eloquence, or, The arts of wooing and complementing as they are manag'd in the Spring Garden, Hide Park, the New Exchange, and other eminent places : a work in which is drawn to the life the deportments of the most accomplisht persons, the mode of their courtly entertainments, treatments of their ladies at balls, their accustom'd sports, drolls and fancies, the witchcrafts of their perswasive language in their approaches, or other more secret dispatches ...#

##Phillips, Edward, 1630-1696?## The mysteries of love & eloquence, or, The arts of wooing and complementing as they are manag'd in the Spring Garden, Hide Park, the New Exchange, and other eminent places : a work in which is drawn to the life the deportments of the most accomplisht persons, the mode of their courtly entertainments, treatments of their ladies at balls, their accustom'd sports, drolls and fancies, the witchcrafts of their perswasive language in their approaches, or other more secret dispatches ... Phillips, Edward, 1630-1696?

##General Summary##

Links

TCP catalogueHTMLEPUBPage images (Historical Texts)

Availability

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. This Phase I text is available for reuse, according to the terms of Creative Commons 0 1.0 Universal. The text can be copied, modified, distributed and performed, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.

Major revisions

  1. 2004-07 TCP Assigned for keying and markup
  2. 2004-07 Apex CoVantage Keyed and coded from ProQuest page images
  3. 2004-09 Mona Logarbo Sampled and proofread
  4. 2004-09 Mona Logarbo Text and markup reviewed and edited
  5. 2004-10 pfs Batch review (QC) and XML conversion

##Content Summary##

#####Front##### THE Misteries of LOVE and ELOQVENCE The Arts of Wooing and ComplementingLOVEELOQVENCETheater of Cour

  1. The Preface To the Youthful Gentry.

  2. To those Cruel Fair ones, that triumph over the distresses of their loyal Lovers, the Auther wisheth more Clemency; and to their afflicted Servants, more magnanimity and Roman Fortitude.

  3. A short Advertisement to the Reader, by way of introduction, for his better understanding of the Mysteries of Eloquence and Complementing.

#####Body#####

  1. THE MYSTERIES OF Love and Eloquence; OR, The Arts of WOOING and COMPLEMENTING, &c.

    _ The Mode of Hide Park.

    • In the Ring.

    • The next variety is that of the Horse-Races, the general Terms of which Art, are exprest in these following Dialogues.

The Gentlemen to the Jocky.

Gentlemen.

After Starting.

The Loser.

  * Upon the fatal disaster that befell the Gallants upon May-day last in Hide-Park.

_ The Mode of Balls.

  * At the entry of the Ladies, the Master of the Ball thus accosts them one by one.

  * To another.

  * To another.

  * To another.

  * To another.

  * To another.

  * To another.

  * To the Musick.

  * To a Lady taking her forth to Dance.

  * To a Gentleman, desiring him to take out his Lady.

  * The Applause at the end of the Dance.

  * At their going to dance Countrey Dances.

  * To his Lady, desiring her to name her Dance.

  * An offer to give over.

  * At giving over.

  * Answer.

  * Return of Thanks.

  * Answer.

  * Questions and Commands.

  * Their Commands consisted more of Unluckiness then Wit.

  * The Gentlemen were commanded,

  * By this time 'tis very late, and they resolve all to depart, which makes the Master of the Ball put on all his gravity, with which he thus accosts his departing guests.

  * Reply.

  * An address to a Company of Ladies.

  * To enter into Discourse with a Lady being in Company.

  * An Address, to make known an Affection for his Mistriss.

  * Addresses of Salutation.

  * On her Face.

  * On her Eyes and Lips.

  * On her Beauty.

  * On her Hair.

  * Her Locks

  * Her Forehead

  * Her Face

  * Her Looks

  * Her Eyes

  * Her Smiles

  * Her Cheeks

  * Her Breath

  * Her Lips

  * Her Chin

  * Her Tongue

  * Her Brow

  * Her Neck

  * Her Words

  * Her Voice

  * Her Arms

  * Her Hands

  * Her Breasts

  * Briefly, in the Abstract of her Self.

  * An Address of Courtship to his Mistress.

  * To discourse concerning the noise of a Match.

  * Several Addresses of perfect Courtship.

  * The Departure.

  * The Return.

  * Demand of Assurance.

  * The Trial.

  * Full Satisfaction.

  * An Amorous Complement.

  * The Discourse of a Gentleman bringing his Friend into Company.

  * The Company.

  * The Stranger Replies.

  * The Ladies.

  * To them the Stranger.

  * The Ladies.

  * The Stranger.

  * Another Gentleman.

  * The Stranger.

  * The Ladies.

  * The Stranger.

  * A Lady.

  * The Stranger.

  * To him one of the company answers.

  * The Stranger.

  * The Ladies.

  * The Stranger.

  * To offer Service and to begin a Friendship

  * To make an Acquaintance

  * A Visit.

  * To request a Courtesie.

  * To give thanks for a Courtesie received.

  * To invite a Friend to Dinner.

  * Another form of Invitation.

  * Before Dinner.

  * After Dinner.

  * To take leave of his Friends Wife.

  * To take leave of a Lady with whom you are familiar.

  * A Private Intercourse between the Trunk-breech'd Page and the waiting Gentlewoman in her Ladies Chamber.

_ Mock-Complements, or Drolling-Complements.

  * A Horse Courser courting a Parsons Widow.

  * An Apprentice and a young Lady at a Boarding-School.

  * At the Cake-house.

  * At Parting.

  * A Passado Complement between a Gentleman and a Lady, meeting in two several Coaches in the High-way going to Hide-Park.

  * Between a Gentlemam and a Sempstress.

  * Then the Gentleman •olling over the Counter thus proceds.

  * Between a Journeyman-Haberdasher of small Wares, and a Ladies Chamber-maid.

  * Between a Gentleman Usher, and a Waiting Gentlewoman.

  * Between a Lawyers Clerk and his Masters Daughter.

  * Between the Countrey Bumkin and his Mistriss going to a Fair.

  * In the Fair.

  * At the Inn.

  * Between the Coach-man and the Kitehin-maid.

  * The Picture of the Poets Mistress.

  * The Choice of a Gentleman Usher.

  * How he must be fitted for Service.

  * His Behaviour in the House.

  * His Dressings.

  * The Diseases incident to Gentlemen Ushers, and their Cures.

_ To his Mistriss.

_ Song.

_ Plurality in Love.

_ A description of his Mistriss.

_ The Melancholy Lover.

_ To his Mistriss falsly accusing him.

_ To his false Mistriss.

_ Resolution to Love.

_ Tyranny in Love.

_ Against Love.

_ The Maiden-head.

_ A Fond Design.

_ On his Mistress Singing.

_ Parting.

_ Not to be Alter'd.

_ Loves Martyr.

_ Protestation of Love.

_ The Golden Age.

_ On the perfections of his Mistress.

_ Her Chastity.

_ On her Beauty.

_ On a fair and richly attir'd Lady at a Mask.

_ Song.

_ The Queen of Fairies.

_ Cupid Contemn'd.

_ Bootless Complaint.

_ The Departure.

_ To a Lady in Prison.

_ To Sorrow.

_ Constancy resolved.

_ Lose no time.

_ Song.

_ Song.

_ Dying to Live.

_ Who his Mistress is.

_ In praise of Fools.

_ The Impolitick Beauty.

YOU must suppose it to be Easter Holy-days: for now Sisly and Dol, Kate and Peggie, Moll and Nan are _ The Hector's Farewell. GOod people all, I pray give ear,my words concern ye much,I will relate a Hector's life,pray God ye * The Second Part.

_ On the Death of Jo. W.

_ The Song of the Caps.

_ The Jolly Ale-Drinker.

_ The Shepherd's Song in praise of his God Pan, who prefers him before the Sun.

_ Song on Women.

_ On an Excellent Race-Horse.

_ The Clown's Description of his Mistress.

_ The Watch-mens Song.

_ The Jovial Companion.

_ A New Ballad of St. George for England, and the Dragon.

_ New Song. In Defiance of Drinking-sack

_ The OLD GILL.

_ The PUDDING.

_ A Parly, between two WEST-COUNTRIMEN on sight of a WEDDING.

_ The OLD and NEW COURTIER.

_ The FRYER and the MAID.

_ TOM a BEDLAM.

_ Alas poor Scholar, Whither wilt thou go? OR Strange Alterations which at this time be, There's many did think they never should see.

_ Superscriptions for Letters.

  * In the writing of familiar Epistles, there are sundry varieties, which ingenuity will easily apply to his occasion.

  * Forms for the concluding of Letters.

  * To his Mistriss recover'd from an Ague.

  * To his retired Mistriss.

  * To his Mistriss, being disoblig'd by her.

  * To his Mistress, acknowledging the kindness of her Letters.

  * To excuse to his Mistress his too easie believing of false Reports,

  * To his Mistriss thanking her for the acceptance of his Service.

  * To his Mistriss, desiring her Picture.

  * The Reply.

  * To his Mistriss, desiring a Lock of Hair from her.

  * The Reply.

  * To his Mistress, an Acknowledgment for being belov'd by her.

  * A Lady to her Servant accusing him of Inconstancy.

  * To request a Favour from his Mistress.

  * To his long absented Mistress.

  * To his Mistriss upon the death of her Brother.

  * To her Servant accepting his Service,

  * The Answer.

  * From a Lady consenting to her Servants Requests.

  * To her Servant, resolving not to Marry.

  * To his Mistress, Sick.

  * To his Mistriss, despairing of her Favour, though unjustly offended against her.

  * A Letter of Consolation to a Mistress, upon the death of her Servant.

  * Letters.

  * To his Absent Friend.

  * To his Friend complaining of Neglect.

  * The Answer.

  * Return of Thanks.

  * The Answer.

  * To desire a Curtesie.

  * The Answer.

  * On the same Subject.

  * The Answer.

  * To congratulate the good Fortune of his Friend.

  * The Answer.

  * To his Accomplish'd Friend.

  * To his Learned Friend.

  * To his Friend at Court.

  * To his Friend, upon the renewing of their Correspondence.

  * A Familar Return of Thanks.

  * To his Friend, inviting him into the Country.

  * To his sick Friend.

  * A Letter of Resolution.

  * To his Mistress, desiring Enjoyment.

  * A Letter from a Lady with Child.

  * A Perswasive Letter to his Mistress.

  * Best Wishes from a Lady.

  * A Letter of Acceptance from his Mistress.

  * Taffy to his Mistress.

  * Superscription for the Drolling-Letters.

  * Subscriptions.
  1. MOCK LETTERS And Drolling Letters.

    _ A Souldier to his Mistress.

    _ A Pedagogue to his Mistress.

    _ A Cockney to his Mistress

    _ A Sea-man to his delight in Wapping.

    _ A Hector to his Mistress.

    _ A Lawyer to his Young Mistress.

    _ A Passionate Love Letter.

    _ The Mountebank's Letter to the Chyrurgeons.

    _ A Broom-man in Kent-street, to a young Lay of quality, whom he fell in Love withall, beholding her in a Belcony.

    _ The Ladies Answer

    _ A Country Parson to a rich Farmers Daughter in the same Village.

    _ A Letter of Smiles from a young conceited Scrivener to his beloved Mistress, Mistress D. C. Spinster.

    _ A Countrey Bumpkin to his Mistress.

  2. Posies for RINGS. THou wert not handsom, wise, but rich,'Twas that which did my eyes bewitch.What God hath joyn'd, let no man put asunder.Divinely knit by God are we,Late one, now two, the pledge you see,We strangely met, and so do many;But now as true as ever any.As we began, so let's continue.My Beloved is mine, and I am his.True blew will never stain.No money shall buy my—.No horns good Wife.Against thou goest, I will provide another.Let him never take a Wife,That will not love her as his life.In loving thee, I love my self.A heart contentCannot repent.I do not repent,That I gave my consent.No gift can show,The love I ow.What the eye saw, the heart hath chosen.More faithful then fortunate.I'le ring thy thumb,Then clap thy bum.Hab nab; yet happy be lucky.Love me little, but love me long.'Tis a good Mare, that ne're tripsLove him that gave thee this Ring of gold;'Tis he must kiss thee when th' art old.Now I know moreThen I knew before.I long'd to lose, and now have lost;I am contented, farewel frost.This Circle, though but small about,The Devil, jealousie, shall keep out.If I think my Wife is fair,What need other people care.Now do I find,Why men are kind.'Tis in vain for to resist,Women will do what they list.This Ring as a token I give to thee,That thou no tokens do change for me.One begs enough, ne're fear,To a small closet door my Dear.Sarah, I do love thee so,Cause thou didst not say me No.My dearest Betty,Is good and pretty.I did then commit no folly,When I married my sweet Molly.Dorothy this Ring is thine,And now thy bouncing body's mine.'Tis fit men should not be alone,Which made Tom to marry Jone.Peg, if thou art a Peg for me,Then I will have a Peg for thee.Su is bonny, blithe, and brown,This Ring hath made her now my own.Katie, I chose with hair so red,For the fine tricks she plays abed.Nan with her curl'd locks I spy'd,And would never be deny'd.Prances is a name that's commonBut H. W. made me a woman.Tabitha's a name that sounds not ill,She was bid rise, but I bid mine lie still.Ursula her name sounds rough,I warrant she'l give thee enough.Dorcas she made coats for Children.But we'l make Children to wear coats.Like Phyllis there is none,She truly loves her Choridon.Leonora's fair, well bred;Yet I had her Maiden-head.Ellen, all men commend thy eyes;Onely I commend thy thighes.I have a John as true as steel,I do believe, because I feel.Robert, thou art a man of mettle,Thy string is sweet, yet doth it nettle.My Henry is a rousing blade,I lay not long by him a maid.My William with his wisp,He loves me well, although I lisp.I love James for Scotlands sake,Where so many bellies ake.I love the name that conquer'd France,Which made me yield to Edwards Lance.Thomas is fit a Cuckold to be,For he will not believe unless he see.I love Abraham above any,Because he was the father of many.

  3. PROVERBS.

    _ The Text.

    • Comment. Womens actions are like their wombs, not to be fathomed.And therefore he that deals with them ought And therefore he that deals with them ought to be a man of a deep reach.Love though he be blind can smell.This is the reason, that a man that runs passionately after a womaThis is the reason, that a man that runs passionately after a woman, is said to have his nose in herNothing venture, nothing have.Yet he that ventures too far loses all.Now the question will be in these two Proverbs, Whether it beNow the question will be in these two Proverbs, Whether it be better for a man to lose nothing, thouThe gentle Ewe is suckt by many Lambs.And so is a kind woman butted at by many Rams.And so is a kind woman butted at by many Rams.Love and Knowledge live not together.That is to say, they live asunder.That is to say, they live asunder.They love too much who die for love.For as Aristotle says, Every excess destroys; and therefore he iFor as Aristotle says, Every excess destroys; and therefore he is a fool what will do so, seeing a mA fat Wife never lov'd a •aint Husband.And there's good reason for it, the Devil ought to have his dAnd there's good reason for it, the Devil ought to have his due.Love me and love my dog.To this Proverb are the Ladies beholding for all the verses made upon their To this Proverb are the Ladies beholding for all the verses made upon their Beag•es.He that loves another better then himself, starves in a Cooks shop.And ought to be buried under the And ought to be buried under the Gallows.Every one is not merry that dances.Neither does every one dance that is merry.Neither does every one dance that is merry.'Tis a trouble to ride, and death to go on foot.What a devilish lazy fellow was he that invented thiWhat a devilish lazy fellow was he that invented this Proverb.He incurs no danger, that comes not where it is.That's very certain.That's very certain.He that goes far, gains much.That's a lie, witness Thom. Coriat.That's a lie, witness Thom. Coriat.When a man is dead, his Friends forsake him.That's because he forsakes his Friends.That's because he forsakes his Friends.Blows makes love decay.And therefore he that beats his Wife, is sure to be a Cuckold.And therefore he that beats his Wife, is sure to be a Cuckold.Rome was not built in a day.That every body knows, but can any man tell us how many days 'twas a buiThat every body knows, but can any man tell us how many days 'twas a building.Love makes men marry, money makes them angry.That's when they cannot get their wives portions.That's when they cannot get their wives portions.He that cannot pay let him pray.With all my heart, if he can meet with those that will say, Amen to With all my heart, if he can meet with those that will say, Amen to his requests.Nothing but money is money worth.Very true, for here's knavery in all Trades.Very true, for here's knavery in all Trades.Claw an Ass by the breech and h〈…〉l bewray your fingers.One good turn requires another.One good turn requires another.He that believes a woman, and leads an Ass, will never be in quiet.Then he that believes this ProverThen he that believes this Proverb, is an Ass. that will do either.He hath enough that's pleas'd.But can any body tell when he hath enough to please him.But can any body tell when he hath enough to please him.A man may well call till his heart ake, if no body will hear him.Right Roger, your Sow's good MuttonRight Roger, your Sow's good Mutton.One Barber trims another.'Tis very kindly done of them'Tis very kindly done of themHe that means to pay gives good security.Because he intends his security shall pay.Because he intends his security shall pay.A man may lead his Horse to water, but he cannot make him drink unless he list.Otherwise he would inOtherwise he would infringe the liberty of the Subject.He must needs go whom the Divel drives.For the Divel's a notable whipster.For the Divel's a notable whipster.Fast bind, fast find.This Proverb caused the invention of the Italian Padlocks.This Proverb caused the invention of the Italian Padlocks.There's many a one sings that is full sorry.This Proverb i• verified by those that sing upon the GalThis Proverb i• verified by those that sing upon the Gallows.He's sure of a Cat that hath her skin.Would I were as sure of an hundred pound.Would I were as sure of an hundred pound.A man may easily finde a stick to beat a Dog.Gentlemen, I hope you know the meaning of this Proverb Gentlemen, I hope you know the meaning of this Proverb without expounding it, if you do not, you shaA Dog will endure no companion in the Kitchin.For Dogs are like Usurers, they love to eat by themselFor Dogs are like Usurers, they love to eat by themselves.A fat Kitchin makes a lean Testament.Very likely, for a man cannot eat his Cake, and have his Cake.Very likely, for a man cannot eat his Cake, and have his Cake.The Lady kisses her man for his masters sake.Neither do I see how his master can be angry, 'tis one Neither do I see how his master can be angry, 'tis one part of his duty to man his Mistress.He that spends beyond his ability,May hang himself with great agility.For he is lighter then he was For he is lighter then he was by many a pound.Every truth is not to be told.And therefore Scogan's wife, when her husband as'kd her whether he wheAnd therefore Scogan's wife, when her husband as'kd her whether he where a Cuckold or no, deny'd to He that begins a matter untowardly, ends it ill-favouredly.This Proverb concerns Courters of MistresThis Proverb concerns Courters of Mistresses and getters of Maidenheads.The Divel is known by his Claws.How can that be, when some Authors affirm he hath no Claws.How can that be, when some Authors affirm he hath no Claws.An ill wife that grows not worse, is not the worst of wives.A bad excuse is better then none at all.A bad excuse is better then none at all.Women weep and sicken when they li•t.But let the Cock crow, and you shall presently perceive change But let the Cock crow, and you shall presently perceive change of weather. On my word 'tis time to sThe Wife that bites her lips and treads askue,Is to her Husband, or her self, untrue.Gentlemen, foreGentlemen, forewarn'd forearm'd. These are signs easie enough to be seen, take notice of themA Woman and a melon are both alike.For till they are broke up, no body knows what is in them.For till they are broke up, no body knows what is in them.'Tis no great matter though a woman drown her self.For there are flesh-pots enough in Egypt.For there are flesh-pots enough in Egypt.A gadding hen and a gadding wife will be soon lost.But here's the mischief on't, that the gadding wiBut here's the mischief on't, that the gadding wife knows the way home, and the hen does not.He that loses his wife and six pence loses by the money.Let him that can finde the six pence take thLet him that can finde the six pence take the wife for his pains.A man of straw is worth a woman of gold.Nay, here Ile be sworn, the Proverb-monger was out. For a whNay, here Ile be sworn, the Proverb-monger was out. For a whole Seraglio of such Concubines would doFall back, fall edge.Some thing I would say to this Proverb, but I cannot tell what, and therefore ISome thing I would say to this Proverb, but I cannot tell what, and therefore I care not what becomeFarewell frost.So said the Maid, and then she sighed.So said the Maid, and then she sighed.Every day is not Sunday.No, for then people would be weary of going to Church.No, for then people would be weary of going to Church.Every woman hath her wanton fit.I, and will have it in spite of the Devil.I, and will have it in spite of the Devil.A gazing, gadding maid seldom proves a good liuswise.'Tis much they should not prosper when they loo'Tis much they should not prosper when they look so well about them.He is a fool that loses flesh for bones.That is to say, he is a fool that refuses a fine plump GirleThat is to say, he is a fool that refuses a fine plump Girle for a lean one.Let him that fears the wagging of feathers fear to go among wilde fowl.But now a dayes a man may walBut now a dayes a man may walk among the wild fowl, and ever fear their feathers,Such as the tree, such is the fruit.That's not alwayes so, for there's many proper women have ho•gobThat's not alwayes so, for there's many proper women have ho•goblins to their Children.Many a little makes a mickle, Light gains makes heavy purses.Ha! well said, old true Penny.Ha! well said, old true Penny.Fine feathers make fine birds,As you may see in Hide Park.As you may see in Hide Park.He repents too late that repents at the gallows.Therefore he had as good let it alone.Therefore he had as good let it alone.He's an ill cook that licks not his own fingers.Doubtless the light of Nature hath taught every man Doubtless the light of Nature hath taught every man this Proverb.A sack full of holes can hold no corn.Even so there be some women that cannot hold their water.Even so there be some women that cannot hold their water.A little rain allays a very great winde.So said a mad fellow when he bepist his wives farting hole.So said a mad fellow when he bepist his wives farting hole.The longest dayes have evenings.Who can help it, Ladies!Who can help it, Ladies!A low man can fell a tall oak.If a tall oak, much more a tall woman; therefore maidens despise not lIf a tall oak, much more a tall woman; therefore maidens despise not little men.Too much scratching hurts the skin.But say the women there's a difference between scratching and rubBut say the women there's a difference between scratching and rubbing.Of idleness comes no goodness.For that's the reason so many maids have the green sickness.For that's the reason so many maids have the green sickness.Good at meat, good at work.Therefore 'tis the best way alwayes to eat stoutly in the company of womeTherefore 'tis the best way alwayes to eat stoutly in the company of women.Grass grows not in hot ovens.He that made this Proverb, was bound sure to speak truth for a wager.He that made this Proverb, was bound sure to speak truth for a wager.Ill weeds grow apace.That's always the answer of an old woman, when you tell her she has a proper maThat's always the answer of an old woman, when you tell her she has a proper maid to her daughter.Good clothes hide much deformity.What rare men Taylors are.What rare men Taylors are.Men may meet, but not mountains.Therefore you see when Mahomet bid the Hill come to him it would notTherefore you see when Mahomet bid the Hill come to him it would not stir, 'twas so lazie.He that wants shame shall never win credit.How is that great vertue impudence here abused?How is that great vertue impudence here abused?He that is ashamed to eat, is ashamed to live.If a man could live as long as he could eat, I make noIf a man could live as long as he could eat, I make no question but that he might easily be perswadeAs shamefac't as a sow that slaps up a sillabub,Those are your Whitson-Holiday sows, that swill up wThose are your Whitson-Holiday sows, that swill up whole milk-pails in the field, till you may folloHe never goes out of his way that goes to a good house.This was a maxim observed by Taylor the WaterThis was a maxim observed by Taylor the Water-Poet in his long vacation voyages.He that cannot fight let him run.'Tis a notable piece of Matchavilian policy.'Tis a notable piece of Matchavilian policy.A fools bolt is soon shot.That made the Gentlewoman shit in the Exchange.That made the Gentlewoman shit in the Exchange.A gentle shepherd makes the wolf shite wool.'Tis a very fine way to be eased of the trouble of sheep'Tis a very fine way to be eased of the trouble of sheep-shearingGood words cost nothing.Unless it be Dedications and Love Verses, for some men do pay for them.Unless it be Dedications and Love Verses, for some men do pay for them.Better may a mans foot slip then his tongue trip.Commonly the tripping of the tongue and the slippinCommonly the tripping of the tongue and the slipping of the foot happen both together. Now if a man Some men may better steal a horse then others look on.For 'tis fit that he that took least pains shoFor 'tis fit that he that took least pains should have least profit.When thieves fall out true men come by their own.For as Philip the great King of Macedon well said, For as Philip the great King of Macedon well said, Concord upholdeth all societies: Therefore 'tis hA liquorish huswife seldom makes thick pottage.For she puts all her Oatmeal in Caudles.For she puts all her Oatmeal in Caudles.Hungry dogs love dirty puddings.There's many a man hath lost his Nose by verifying this Proverb.There's many a man hath lost his Nose by verifying this Proverb.He'l make you believe a Hare lays eggs.See Brown's vulgar Errors.See Brown's vulgar Errors.'Tis an ill winde blows no body good.After meat comes mustard.For their teeth watered so much after the meat, that it was impossible theiFor their teeth watered so much after the meat, that it was impossible their eyes should water afterHe that holds a frying-pan by the tail may turn it which way he lists.See more of this in Alexius hiSee more of this in Alexius his secrets, or in Aristotles book of the dyet of the Phisolophers, cap.Better no pies, then pies made with scabby hands.Wink and all's well, for what the eye sees not, theWink and all's well, for what the eye sees not, the heart never rues.He that is born to be hang'd shall never be drown'd.VVell fare him that is born to be hang'd say I, VVell fare him that is born to be hang'd say I, for he goes to heaven in a string, when he that is dA wary father has a prodigal son.He is to be commended for not letting his fathers estate lie fallowHe is to be commended for not letting his fathers estate lie fallow; for if he will not sow again afA man cannot make a cheverel purse of a sow's ear.Ye cannot tell what a man may do, there are very nYe cannot tell what a man may do, there are very notable projectors living now adays.Like will to like, quoth the Devil to the Collier.Gentlemen, ye need not wonder how the Collier and Gentlemen, ye need not wonder how the Collier and the Devil came to be familiar, for he is fain to k
  4. MISCELANIA.

    _ Davus es huc venias mox eris Oedipus alter.

  5. Wit and Language.

  6. Select Sentences.

  7. A DICTIONARY FOR The more expeditious finding out of any Rime, being useful for that pleasing Passtime called CRAMBO.

  8. THE ART of REASON IN THE ART of LOGICK.

    _ The first Book of the Art of Logick.

    • CAP. 1. What Logick is.

    • CAP. 2. The parts of Logick, and kinds of Arguments.

    • CAP. 3. The Efficient, Procreant, and Conservant Cause.

    • CAP. 4. The Efficient alone and with others

    • CAP. 5. The Efficient by it self or an Accident.

    • CAP. 6. The Matter.

    • CAP. 7. The Form.

    • CAP. 8. The End.

    • CAP. 9. The Effects.

    • CAP. 10. The Subject.

    • CAP. 11 The Adjunct.

    • CAP. 12. Diverses.

    • CAP. 13. Disparates.

    • CAP. 14. Relates.

    • CAP. 15. Adverses.

    • CAP. 16. Contradicents.

    • CAP. 17. Privants.

    • CAP. 18. Equalls.

    • CAP. 18. Greaters.

    • CAP. 20. Lessers

    • CAP. 21. Likes

    • CAP. 22. Dislikes.

    • CAP. 23. Conjugates.

    • CAP. 24. Notations.

    • CAP. 25. Distribution.

    • CAP. 26. The distribution from the Cause.

    • CAP. 27. The distribution from the effects, also the genus and species.

    • CAP. 28. Distribution from the Subject.

    • CAP. 29. Distribution from Adjuncts

    • CAP. 30. Definition.

    • CAP. 31. Description.

    • CAP. 32. Divine Testimony,

    • CAP. 33. Testimony from humane Law and Sentences.

    _ THE SECOND BOOK OF THE Art of Logick.

    • CAP. 1. What Judgement is.

    • CAP. 2. An affirmative or negative axioma.

    • CAP. 3. True and false.

    • CAP. 4. The Simple Axioma.

    • CAP. 5. The copillative Axioma.

    • CAP. 6. The Connexed Axioma.

    • CAP. 7. The Discreet Axioma

    • CAP. 8. The disjunct Axioma.

    • CAP. 9. The Syllogism and its parts.

    • CAP. 10. The simple contracted syllogism.

    • CAP. 11. The first kind of the simple explicated Syllogism.

    • CAP. 12. The second kind of the simple explicate syllogism.

    • CAP. 13. The first connexed Syllogism.

    • CAP. 14. The second Connexive Syllogism.

    • CAP. 15. The first disjunct Syllogism

    • CAP. 16. The second disjunct syllogism.

    • CAP. 17. The only method according to Aristotle.

    • CAP. 18. The first illustration of methods by illustration of arts.

    • CAP. 19. The second example of Method by example of Poets, Orators, Historiographers.

    • CAP. 20. The Secrets of Method.

  9. GENEROSI LUDENTES A Description of those Joviall al-amode sports and games, that are most celebrated by Persons of Honor.

    _ A brief Description of the sport of Cross Purposes.

    _ The Description of the sport called the Lovers Alphabet.

    _ The Description of the sport of the Bird in a Tree.

    _ The Description of the sport of Gliphing.

    _ A Description of a sport, called the Crab, or a thing done, and who did it.

    _ A Description of the witty sport of Substantives and Adjectives.

    _ The Triall of wits, a new invented Alphabet of Epithets, properly applyed to their severall subjects, that they may be rendered no lesse usefull on the suddain occasions of discourse, or writing; then delightfully pleasant in the witty sport commonly named Substantives and Adjectives.

    • Aspect.

    • Allurements.

    • Affections.

    • Aire.

    • Absence.

    • Apparell.

    • Accomplishment.

    • Adeiu.

    • Bawd.

    • Breath.

    • Body.

    • Breasts.

    • Beauty.

    • Coynesse.

    • Courtier.

    • Cruelty.

    • Charmes.

    • Cheeks.

    • Complaint.

    • Complement.

    • Chinne.

    • Comedy.

    • Cherries.

    • Countenance.

    • Curles.

    • Destiny.

    • Delay.

    • Dove.

    • Desires.

    • Danceing.

    • Delights.

    • Disdaine.

    • Despair.

    • Dreames.

    • Eloquence.

    • Extasie.

    • Eares.

    • Elegie.

    • Eunuch.

    • Entertainment

    • Eyes

    • Embraces.

    • Farewell.

    • Feet

    • Fancy.

    • Forehead

    • Fairies.

    • Fortune.

    • Fountain.

    • Frencie.

    • Flower.

    • Face.

    • Fate.

    • Fingers.

    • Fruit.

    • Frowne.

    • Glory.

    • Grass.

    • Grape.

    • Grove.

    • Honor.

    • Heart.

    • Haire.

    • Handes.

    • Happiness.

    • Harmony.

    • Head.

    • Hate

    • Jealousie.

    • Flattery.

    • Fields.

    • Flames.

    • Flea.

    • Forrest.

    • Feare.

    • Gentleman.

    • Garden.

    • Gesture.

    • Griefe.

    • Gloves.

    • Ingratitude.

    • Instrument.

    • Jewels.

    • Insolence.

    • Innocencie.

    • Importunity.

    • Inconstancy.

    • Influence.

    • Impudence.

    • Joy.

    • Knee.

    • Kisses.

    • Lute.

    • Looking-glass.

    • Lust.

    • Logick.

    • Labyrinth.

    • Language.

    • Lustre.

    • Lullaby.

    • Lilly.

    • Loadstone.

    • Longing.

    • Laughter.

    • Lethargy.

    • Love.

    • Lover vide love.

    • Lookes.

    • Lockes.

    • Lips.

    • Limbs.

    • Marigold.

    • Marble.

    • Magick

    • Magazia.

    • Metaphors.

    • Melancholy.

    • Melody.

    • Martyr.

    • Marmoset.

    • Mind.

    • Marriage.

    • Mirth.

    • Madness.

    • Mistery.

    • Moon.

    • Moore.

    • Modesty.

    • Monkey.

    • Mirtle.

    • Musick.

    • Multitude.

    • Nimph.

    • Navel.

    • Nuptials vide marriage.

    • Night.

    • Nox.

    • Nightingale.

    • Nature.

    • Nose.

    • Obsequies.

    • Orange.

    • Orator vide Eloquence.

    • Odours or Smels.

    • Oath.

    • Ornament.

    • Ode.

    • Obleigment.

    • Obsequiousness.

    • Oblivion.

    • Opinion.

    • Opportunity.

    • Paradise.

    • Pace.

    • Pallace.

    • Purple.

    • Phantasies.

    • Pitty.

    • Poison.

    • Poetry, Poesy, Poet.

    • Pomander.

    • Pomgranate.

    • Parke.

    • Page.

    • Paradox.

    • Paleness.

    • Palate.

    • Prejudice.

    • Praise.

    • Pride.

    • Presumption.

    • Pretence.

    • Proportion.

    • Picture.

    • Pardon.

    • Plays, Sports, Games, Pastimes.

    • Passion.

    • Pastorals.

    • Plaines.

    • Parasite.

    • Parrat.

    • Pandar.

    • Pyramid.

    • Pomp.

    • Perswasion

    • Periwig.

    • Perfume.

    • Pen.

    • Pelican.

    • Pearle.

    • Pleasure.

    • Patron.

    • Perjury.

    • Perfection.

    • Qualme.

    • Quiver.

    • Quince.

    • Queen.

    • Question.

    • Quick-silver.

    • Renegado.

    • Rusticity.

    • Rose.

    • Race.

    • Rock.

    • Rape.

    • Rainbow.

    • Recreation.

    • Repulse.

    • Request.

    • Rapture.

    • Reproose.

    • Ruby.

    • River.

    • Revenge.

    • Rites.

    • Rivall.

    • Rigour.

    • Riddle.

    • Reverence.

    • Rhetorick, vide Eloquence.

    • Repose.

    • Simpathy.

    • Symetry.

    • Suspition.

    • Summer.

    • Strawberry.

    • Straines.

    • Stile.

    • Stoick.

    • Sacrifice.

    • Saint.

    • Silk-worm.

    • Silence.

    • Sighs.

    • Strumpet.

    • Streames.

    • Servant.

    • Service, Servitude.

    • Sence.

    • Secret.

    • Sea.

    • Sparrow.

    • Spaniell.

    • Squirrell.

    • Scold or Shrew.

    • Sycophant, vide Parasite.

    • Soule.

    • Slye.

    • Slave.

    • Sleep.

    • Smell.

    • Snow.

    • Sorrow.

    • Speech.

    • Spheares.

    • Solemnity.

    • Song.

    • Shade, shadow.

    • Shame.

    • Shepheard, swaine.

    • Snare.

    • Sunne.

    • Sport.

    • Springs.

    • Stallion.

    • Starre.

    • Stranger.

    • Spring-time.

    • Skin.

    • Smile.

    • Tragedy.

    • Treachery.

    • Theater.

    • Temptation.

    • Temper.

    • Tast.

    • Thoughts.

    • Touch.

    • Tongue.

    • Teeth.

    • Teares.

    • Thighes.

    • Turtle.

    • Tyrant.

    • Trihumps, Trophies.

    • Tresses.

    • Trees.

    • Tune.

    • Tobacco.

    • Teats.

    • Tennis

    • Thanks.

    • Tiger.

    • Time.

    • Twilight.

    • Virago.

    • Vesture vide Garment.

    • Verdure.

    • Violet.

    • Verse.

    • Vertue.

    • Vow.

    • Urne.

    • Voice.

    • Veines.

    • Vales, Vallies.

    • Virgin.

    • Vaile.

    • Vulgar vide Multitude.

    • Unicorne.

    • Wife.

    • Widdow.

    • Whore.

    • Women.

    • Whisper.

    • Welcome.

    • Will.

    • Wanton, wantonness.

    • Wish.

    • Wrest.

    • Wonder.

    • Womb.

    • Wine.

    • Wit.

    • Youth.

  10. A GARDEN of TULIPS OR, The Pleasant Prospect.

#####Back#####

  1. A general Table of the Contents of this Book.

  2. Books Printed for Obadiah Blagrave at the Black Bear in St. Pauls Church-Yard.

    _ Excellent Tracts in Divinity, Controversie and Sermons.

    _ Admirable and Learned Treatises in Occulpt Sciences, Philosophy, Astronomy, Physick, Astrology, Navigation and Military Discipline.

    _ Excellent and approved Treatises in Physick, Chyrurgery and other more familiar experiments in Cookery, and preserving Husbandry and Horsmanship.

    _ Books of Ingenuity whether Romances, Satyrical, Poetry, or pleasant for diversion.

    _ PLAYS.

    _ Excellent Tracts in Humanity, History, State-Affairs, and Description of Countries.

    _ Very useful Books of Law.

    _ Excellent Tracts for the use of Scholars and Schools.

    _ Mapps.

    _ An Advertisement of a most Excellent Water for the Preservation of the Eyes.

Types of content

  • There are 3170 verse lines!
  • Oh, Mr. Jourdain, there is prose in there!

There are 188 ommitted fragments! @reason (188) : illegible (187), foreign (1) • @resp (187) : #APEX (187) • @extent (187) : 1 letter (136), 1 word (13), 2 letters (16), 1 span (20), 2 words (2)

Character listing

Text string(s) codepoint(s)
Latin-1 Supplement éè 233 232
General Punctuation •—… 8226 8212 8230
Geometric Shapes 9674
CJKSymbolsandPunctuation 〈〉 12296 12297

##Tag Usage Summary##

###Header Tag Usage###

No element name occ attributes
1. author 2
2. availability 1
3. biblFull 1
4. change 5
5. date 8 @when (1) : 2004-11 (1)
6. edition 2
7. editionStmt 2
8. editorialDecl 1
9. extent 2
10. idno 6 @type (6) : DLPS (1), STC (2), EEBO-CITATION (1), OCLC (1), VID (1)
11. keywords 1 @scheme (1) : http://authorities.loc.gov/ (1)
12. label 5
13. langUsage 1
14. language 1 @ident (1) : eng (1)
15. listPrefixDef 1
16. note 6
17. notesStmt 2
18. p 11
19. prefixDef 2 @ident (2) : tcp (1), char (1) • @matchPattern (2) : ([0-9-]+):([0-9IVX]+) (1), (.+) (1) • @replacementPattern (2) : http://eebo.chadwyck.com/downloadtiff?vid=$1&page=$2 (1), https://raw.githubusercontent.com/textcreationpartnership/Texts/master/tcpchars.xml#$1 (1)
20. projectDesc 1
21. pubPlace 2
22. publicationStmt 2
23. publisher 2
24. ref 2 @target (2) : https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (1), http://www.textcreationpartnership.org/docs/. (1)
25. seriesStmt 1
26. sourceDesc 1
27. term 2
28. textClass 1
29. title 3
30. titleStmt 2

###Text Tag Usage###

No element name occ attributes
1. abbr 4
2. argument 1
3. cell 2
4. closer 45
5. dateline 1
6. desc 188
7. div 898 @type (898) : title_page (1), illustration (1), preface (1), dedication (1), to_the_reader (1), etiquette-book (1), part (22), section (482), subsection (4), poem (55), song (9), superscripts (1), subscriptions (1), letters (1), letter (13), inscriptions (1), inscription (54), proverbs (1), proverb (93), commentary (91), miscellany (1), forms_of_expression (1), maxims (1), rhyming_dictionary (1), manual_of_logic (1), book (2), chapter (53), compendium_of_games (1), collection_of_similies (1), index (1), publishers_advertisement (1) • @n (57) : 1 (4), 2 (4), 3 (2), 4 (2), 5 (2), 6 (2), 7 (2), 8 (2), 9 (2), 10 (2), 11 (2), 12 (2), 13 (2), 14 (2), 15 (2), 16 (2), 17 (2), 18 (3), 20 (2), 21 (1), 22 (1), 23 (1), 24 (1), 25 (1), 26 (1), 27 (1), 28 (1), 29 (1), 30 (1), 31 (1), 32 (1), 33 (1), 19 (1)
8. figure 1
9. g 1437 @ref (1437) : char:EOLhyphen (1437)
10. gap 188 @reason (188) : illegible (187), foreign (1) • @resp (187) : #APEX (187) • @extent (187) : 1 letter (136), 1 word (13), 2 letters (16), 1 span (20), 2 words (2)
11. head 1043 @type (6) : sub (6)
12. hi 4829 @rend (71) : sup (71)
13. item 4450
14. l 3170 @n (3) : 2 (1), 3 (1), 4 (1)
15. label 8
16. lg 488 @n (10) : 2 (4), 3 (4), 4 (2)
17. list 384
18. note 4 @place (4) : margin (4)
19. opener 40
20. p 3913 @n (15) : 1 (7), 2 (5), 3 (3)
21. pb 441 @facs (441) : tcp:42260:1 (1), tcp:42260:2 (2), tcp:42260:3 (2), tcp:42260:4 (2), tcp:42260:5 (2), tcp:42260:6 (2), tcp:42260:7 (2), tcp:42260:8 (2), tcp:42260:9 (2), tcp:42260:10 (2), tcp:42260:11 (2), tcp:42260:12 (2), tcp:42260:13 (2), tcp:42260:14 (2), tcp:42260:15 (2), tcp:42260:16 (2), tcp:42260:17 (2), tcp:42260:18 (2), tcp:42260:19 (2), tcp:42260:20 (2), tcp:42260:21 (2), tcp:42260:22 (2), tcp:42260:23 (2), tcp:42260:24 (2), tcp:42260:25 (2), tcp:42260:26 (2), tcp:42260:27 (2), tcp:42260:28 (2), tcp:42260:29 (2), tcp:42260:30 (2), tcp:42260:31 (2), tcp:42260:32 (2), tcp:42260:33 (2), tcp:42260:34 (2), tcp:42260:35 (2), tcp:42260:36 (2), tcp:42260:37 (2), tcp:42260:38 (2), tcp:42260:39 (2), tcp:42260:40 (2), tcp:42260:41 (2), tcp:42260:42 (2), tcp:42260:43 (2), tcp:42260:44 (2), tcp:42260:45 (2), tcp:42260:46 (2), tcp:42260:47 (2), tcp:42260:48 (2), tcp:42260:49 (2), tcp:42260:50 (2), tcp:42260:51 (2), tcp:42260:52 (2), tcp:42260:53 (2), tcp:42260:54 (2), tcp:42260:55 (2), tcp:42260:56 (2), tcp:42260:57 (2), tcp:42260:58 (2), tcp:42260:59 (2), tcp:42260:60 (2), tcp:42260:61 (2), tcp:42260:62 (2), tcp:42260:63 (2), tcp:42260:64 (2), tcp:42260:65 (2), tcp:42260:66 (2), tcp:42260:67 (2), tcp:42260:68 (2), tcp:42260:69 (2), tcp:42260:70 (2), tcp:42260:71 (2), tcp:42260:72 (2), tcp:42260:73 (2), tcp:42260:74 (2), tcp:42260:75 (2), tcp:42260:76 (2), tcp:42260:77 (2), tcp:42260:78 (2), tcp:42260:79 (2), tcp:42260:80 (2), tcp:42260:81 (2), tcp:42260:82 (2), tcp:42260:83 (2), tcp:42260:84 (2), tcp:42260:85 (2), tcp:42260:86 (2), tcp:42260:87 (2), tcp:42260:88 (2), tcp:42260:89 (2), tcp:42260:90 (2), tcp:42260:91 (2), tcp:42260:92 (2), tcp:42260:93 (2), tcp:42260:94 (2), tcp:42260:95 (2), tcp:42260:96 (2), tcp:42260:97 (2), tcp:42260:98 (2), tcp:42260:99 (2), tcp:42260:100 (2), tcp:42260:101 (2), tcp:42260:102 (2), tcp:42260:103 (2), tcp:42260:104 (2), tcp:42260:105 (2), tcp:42260:106 (2), tcp:42260:107 (2), tcp:42260:108 (2), tcp:42260:109 (2), tcp:42260:110 (2), tcp:42260:111 (2), tcp:42260:112 (2), tcp:42260:113 (2), tcp:42260:114 (2), tcp:42260:115 (2), tcp:42260:116 (2), tcp:42260:117 (2), tcp:42260:118 (2), tcp:42260:119 (2), tcp:42260:120 (2), tcp:42260:121 (2), tcp:42260:122 (2), tcp:42260:123 (2), tcp:42260:124 (2), tcp:42260:125 (2), tcp:42260:126 (2), tcp:42260:127 (2), tcp:42260:128 (2), tcp:42260:129 (2), tcp:42260:130 (2), tcp:42260:131 (2), tcp:42260:132 (2), tcp:42260:133 (2), tcp:42260:134 (2), tcp:42260:135 (2), tcp:42260:136 (2), tcp:42260:137 (2), tcp:42260:138 (2), tcp:42260:139 (2), tcp:42260:140 (2), tcp:42260:141 (2), tcp:42260:142 (2), tcp:42260:143 (2), tcp:42260:144 (2), tcp:42260:145 (2), tcp:42260:146 (2), tcp:42260:147 (2), tcp:42260:148 (2), tcp:42260:149 (2), tcp:42260:150 (2), tcp:42260:151 (2), tcp:42260:152 (2), tcp:42260:153 (2), tcp:42260:154 (2), tcp:42260:155 (2), tcp:42260:156 (2), tcp:42260:157 (2), tcp:42260:158 (2), tcp:42260:159 (2), tcp:42260:160 (2), tcp:42260:161 (2), tcp:42260:162 (2), tcp:42260:163 (2), tcp:42260:164 (2), tcp:42260:165 (2), tcp:42260:166 (2), tcp:42260:167 (2), tcp:42260:168 (2), tcp:42260:169 (2), tcp:42260:170 (2), tcp:42260:171 (2), tcp:42260:172 (2), tcp:42260:173 (2), tcp:42260:174 (2), tcp:42260:175 (2), tcp:42260:176 (2), tcp:42260:177 (2), tcp:42260:178 (2), tcp:42260:179 (2), tcp:42260:180 (2), tcp:42260:181 (2), tcp:42260:182 (2), tcp:42260:183 (2), tcp:42260:184 (2), tcp:42260:185 (2), tcp:42260:186 (2), tcp:42260:187 (2), tcp:42260:188 (2), tcp:42260:189 (2), tcp:42260:190 (2), tcp:42260:191 (2), tcp:42260:192 (2), tcp:42260:193 (2), tcp:42260:194 (2), tcp:42260:195 (2), tcp:42260:196 (2), tcp:42260:197 (2), tcp:42260:198 (2), tcp:42260:199 (2), tcp:42260:200 (2), tcp:42260:201 (2), tcp:42260:202 (2), tcp:42260:203 (2), tcp:42260:204 (2), tcp:42260:205 (2), tcp:42260:206 (2), tcp:42260:207 (2), tcp:42260:208 (2), tcp:42260:209 (2), tcp:42260:210 (2), tcp:42260:211 (2), tcp:42260:212 (2), tcp:42260:213 (2), tcp:42260:214 (2), tcp:42260:215 (2), tcp:42260:216 (2), tcp:42260:217 (2), tcp:42260:218 (2), tcp:42260:219 (2), tcp:42260:220 (2), tcp:42260:221 (2) • @rendition (1) : simple:additions (1) • @n (390) : 1 (2), 2 (2), 3 (2), 4 (2), 5 (2), 6 (2), 7 (2), 8 (2), 9 (2), 10 (2), 11 (2), 12 (2), 13 (2), 14 (2), 15 (2), 16 (2), 17 (2), 18 (2), 19 (2), 20 (2), 21 (2), 22 (2), 23 (2), 24 (2), 25 (2), 26 (2), 27 (2), 28 (2), 29 (2), 30 (2), 31 (2), 32 (2), 33 (2), 34 (2), 35 (2), 36 (2), 37 (2), 38 (2), 39 (2), 40 (2), 41 (2), 42 (2), 43 (2), 44 (2), 45 (2), 46 (2), 47 (2), 48 (2), 49 (2), 50 (2), 51 (2), 52 (2), 53 (2), 54 (2), 55 (2), 56 (2), 57 (2), 58 (2), 59 (2), 60 (2), 61 (2), 62 (2), 63 (2), 64 (2), 65 (2), 66 (2), 67 (2), 68 (2), 69 (2), 70 (2), 71 (1), 72 (1), 73 (1), 74 (1), 75 (1), 76 (1), 77 (1), 78 (1), 79 (1), 80 (1), 81 (1), 82 (1), 83 (1), 84 (1), 85 (1), 86 (1), 87 (1), 88 (1), 89 (1), 90 (1), 91 (1), 92 (1), 93 (1), 94 (1), 95 (1), 96 (1), 97 (1), 98 (1), 99 (1), 100 (1), 101 (1), 102 (1), 103 (1), 104 (1), 105 (1), 106 (1), 107 (1), 108 (1), 109 (1), 110 (1), 111 (1), 112 (1), 113 (1), 114 (1), 115 (1), 116 (1), 117 (1), 118 (1), 119 (1), 120 (2), 121 (2), 124 (2), 125 (2), 128 (1), 129 (1), 130 (1), 131 (1), 132 (1), 133 (1), 134 (1), 135 (1), 136 (1), 137 (1), 138 (1), 139 (1), 140 (1), 141 (1), 142 (1), 143 (1), 144 (1), 145 (1), 146 (1), 147 (1), 148 (1), 149 (1), 150 (1), 151 (1), 152 (1), 153 (1), 154 (1), 155 (1), 156 (1), 157 (1), 158 (1), 159 (1), 160 (1), 161 (1), 162 (1), 163 (1), 164 (1), 165 (1), 166 (1), 167 (1), 168 (1), 169 (1), 170 (1), 171 (1), 172 (1), 173 (1), 174 (1), 175 (1), 176 (1), 177 (1), 178 (1), 179 (1), 180 (1), 181 (1), 182 (1), 183 (1), 184 (1), 185 (1), 186 (1), 187 (1), 188 (1), 189 (1), 190 (1), 191 (1), 192 (1), 193 (1), 194 (1), 195 (1), 196 (1), 197 (1), 198 (1), 199 (1), 200 (1), 201 (1), 202 (1), 203 (1), 204 (1), 205 (1), 206 (1), 207 (2), 208 (2), 209 (1), 210 (1), 211 (1), 212 (1), 213 (1), 214 (1), 215 (1), 216 (1), 217 (1), 218 (1), 219 (1), 220 (1), 221 (1), 222 (1), 223 (1), 224 (1), 225 (1), 226 (1), 227 (1), 228 (1), 229 (1), 230 (1), 231 (1), 232 (1), 233 (1), 234 (1), 235 (1), 236 (1), 237 (1), 238 (1), 239 (1), 240 (1), 241 (1), 242 (1), 243 (1), 244 (1), 245 (1), 246 (1), 247 (1), 248 (1), 249 (1), 250 (1), 251 (1), 252 (1), 253 (1), 254 (1), 255 (1), 256 (1), 257 (1), 258 (1), 259 (1), 260 (1), 261 (1), 262 (1), 263 (1), 264 (1), 265 (1), 266 (1), 267 (1), 268 (1), 269 (1), 270 (1), 271 (1), 272 (1), 273 (1), 274 (1), 275 (1), 276 (1), 277 (1), 278 (1), 279 (1), 280 (1), 281 (1), 282 (1), 283 (1), 284 (1), 285 (1), 286 (1), 287 (1), 288 (1), 289 (1), 290 (1), 291 (1), 292 (1), 293 (1), 294 (1), 295 (1), 296 (1), 297 (1), 298 (1), 299 (1), 300 (1), 301 (1), 302 (1), 303 (1), 304 (1), 305 (1), 306 (1), 307 (1), 308 (1), 309 (1), 310 (1), 311 (1), 312 (1), 313 (1), 314 (1), 315 (1), 316 (1), 317 (1), 318 (1)
22. postscript 1
23. q 3
24. row 1
25. salute 64
26. signed 44
27. table 1 @rend (1) : braced (1)
28. trailer 6