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#Primordia, or, The rise and growth of the first church of God described by Tho. Tanner ... ; to which are added two letters of Mr. Rvdyerd's, in answer to two questions propounded by the author, one about the multiplying of mankind until the flood ; the other concerning the multiplying of the children of Israel in Egypt.#

##Tanner, Thomas, 1630-1682.## Primordia, or, The rise and growth of the first church of God described by Tho. Tanner ... ; to which are added two letters of Mr. Rvdyerd's, in answer to two questions propounded by the author, one about the multiplying of mankind until the flood ; the other concerning the multiplying of the children of Israel in Egypt. Tanner, Thomas, 1630-1682.

##General Summary##

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This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. This Phase I text is available for reuse, according to the terms of Creative Commons 0 1.0 Universal. The text can be copied, modified, distributed and performed, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.

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  2. 2003-05 SPi Global Keyed and coded from ProQuest page images
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##Content Summary##

#####Front#####

#####Body#####

  1. TO THE Much Honoured IAMES RVDYERD, of Winchfield,Esq

  2. PRIMORDIA: OR, THE Rise and Growth Of the FIRST CHURCH of GOD.

    _ CHAP. I. Introduction. Adam why Created out of Paradise, and after brought in? Our first Parents Created in perfection, yet never offered to couple in their innocency, though they had such a command, with a blessing; and why? Why, also, they coveted Children after their fall? wherein their outward state of misery is pointed out.

    _ CHAP. II. That our first Parents repented, and believed. That in token thereof they sacrificed, and taught their Children so. That Sacrifices were not of the light of Nature, against Pelagius; but of institution; though not to be proved but by inference, as the Lords Supper it self, and Infant-Baptism, and the Lords Day, and single Marriages.

    _ CHAPTER. III. The subtilty of the modern Socinians. An abstract of their chief Tenents, and the main design to which they are all •ccommodated, noted. A ground-work laid against them in order to prove, That Sacrifices were offered by revelation, and not according to any possible invention of man.

    _ CHAP. IV. That the Arguments of Socinians are taken from two of the weakest Topicks. A distinction offered to detect the first fallacy, betwixt a Law imperative and indicative. That Sacrifices were of the latter sort, proved, first, Because in all Ages God prescribed his own worship, and accepted no other. Secondly, Because illumination (in this case) preceded Sacrifice, shewed, 1. By the manner of acceptation of Cain's Offering.

    _ CHAP. V. The 2. way laid down to shew an indicative Command, viz. Abel's Offering by a twofold Faith, First, Of the Object, viz. his Duty to sacrifice, which faith he had in common with Cain. Secondly, Of the promise, which was siducial, wherein his Sacrifice excelled, as being offered with bloud (which Cain's was not) and with respect to Christ. The Socinian varnish washed off. The second Head proved, viz. That Sacrifices were by a certain Law ab origine, because a certain penalty accrued to the omission of them before the Law of Moses.

    _ CHAP. VI. Socinus's second Topick propounded to be examined, viz. Whether, because men might possibly invent Sacrifices, as not against the Law of Nature, it must needs follow that they had their rise from thence. A contrary way of arguing propounded, by way of demonstration, and the subtilty of his way noted. That there were divers other Laws before Moses, in force; shewed also that he did not record the Laws, but the practice only.

    _ CHAP. VII. What maketh the Socinians talk so sleightly of Sacrifices. The inconcinnity and implications of their opinion, in part detected.

    _ CHAP. VIII. The summ of our opinion related in the words of Eusebius Caesariensis. Sleight exceptions against them noted. Our opinion stated more at large. That it implies an inconvenience to oppose Socinus, and our opinion too. The Subject of the next Chapter laid down.

    _ CHAP. IX. The Offering of Sacrifice revealed, 1. By the light of Grace. The ends of Sacrifice shewed, and the true reason of consuming it by fire. 2. By the light of Prophecy, as the Day of Christ to Abraham. That hereupon our first Parents must needs obey.

    _ CHAP. X. The last shift of the Socinians discussed, wherein is shewed, That Sacrifices, neither probably nor (morally) possibly could be invented by men, so as to be approved by God. And that they had been unnatural, if they had not been ordained towards a mystery. Socinus not so pious as Pelagius, or Homer.

    _ CHAP. XI. Why Abel cut off, and why without issue, viz. That the curse and the promise might obtain their respective turns. The Sentence of the Woman, as the weaker Vessel, lightest; and a blessing restored to her in the birth of the Seed promised. That Cain inherited Adam's curse, by his own choice. Of the City that he built, and how it might be peopled, so as to leave retinue enough to his Father Adam, and Brother Seth, besides.

    _ CHAP. XII. Why God preserved Cham and Japhet in the Ark, as well as Sem. That though they followed the way of the old World, yet they were encreased in dominion (which was not the blessing promised) more than .Sem Nay, that he himself was greater in temporal accessions by other Sons, than by Eber.

    _ CHAP. XIII. The knowledge of God dispersed in other Families, besides Sem's : but corruption in his also occasioned the Call of Abram. Why Lot came with him, and why he was driven into Egypt, and brought back so soon. Piety in Canaan while Sem lived there. Nor was the whole election at first restrained to the House of Abraham.

    _ CHAP. XIV. That God's Command to Abram might not seem too hard, it pleased him to mollifie it with an ample Promise, only general at the first: Which he delayed about twenty eight years to exercise the faith of Abram, and repeated with some variety to the sixth time, after long intervals, Abram running divers hazards between. Abram is terrified by seeking of a sign, and why. Sarai thinking the promise not to be to her, weakly giveth Hagar to her Husband: yet divers mysteries in the coming of Ishmael betwixt the promise and the Son of promise.

    _ CHAP. XV. At the fifth renewal of the promise God augmented the names of Abram and Sarai. And required a Covenant from Abraham and his Seed; the effect of which was, That he would be their God, and they should be his people. Why God required such a sign as Circumcision to be the token of the Covenant. Wherein the Glosses of Philo and Maimonides are detected. How Circumcision came to be in use in Egypt, and who of them received it. The right state propounded, as it was to be accommodated to the times of the Old Testament.

    _ CHAP. XVI. The true ends of Circumcision, I. Civil, to distinguish them from other Heathen people or corrupted Worshippers; which was a Bridle to them, as restraining them from mixt marriages and fornication, and given as a mark to make them odious to the Gentiles, and the Gentiles an abhorrency to them. 2. Moral, to put them in mind of purity of heart. 3. Spiritual and Mystical, in respect, First, Of Abraham; Secondly, Of his Seed, and thirdly, houshold. 4. Of the whole Church. Why Ishmael must be circumcised, Arminius taxed; why the Sons of Keturah were also to be circumcised, and in fine all the Servants.

    _ CHAP. XVII. Abraham's obedience so acceptable unto God, that he maketh himself known to him in a more familiar way than ever before. That Abraham knew nothing to the contrary why there might not be more righteous people in Sodom than his Brother Lot. His various peregrinations are recounted, and further Questions propounded to be enquired into.

    _ CHAP. XVIII. Letters and Writing (most probably) from Adam, as also Altars. Of Cain and Abel, and the difference of Sacrifices; and of theirs in particular. Whether they offered in one place; and whether Adam offered for them, or they for themselves: Why Abel more accepted, and how Cain knew it.

    _ CHAP. XIX. Altars of Monument for mercies and deliverances. Of Tokens for a Testimony or a Covenant betwixt God and man, and man and man. Of service for adoration, vows and sacrifices. Of the matter and form of them. Of those which Abraham made at Sichem, Mamre and Beersheba, with his Grove there, which was drawn into an ill example, and the like afterwards forbidden.

    _ CHAP. XX Abraham had many Tents, and, as a Prince, had a Despotick Power over them, that (through all their Tents) were born in his house. That the Patriarchs occupied much Land, and were no burthen, but a profit to the Countries wherein they sojourned, viz. Freely in the wasts, where the Pasture was; and by Purchase, Covenant and Compromise, when they pitched near to any great City, or populous place. Of Abraham's purchase of a Field, and Jacob's of a parcel of one.

    _ CHAP. XXI. Why the Patriarchs made it their first Work to erect Altars whereever they came. What their outward form of Worship was. Of the restraints and incommodities of the Patriarchs, as living in Tents, frugality of Diet, pa•city of entertainments, want of Fields, Gardens, Vineyards; whereby being hindred from sowing for themselves, they were ost distressed through Famine, if there was any scarcity abroad.

    _ CHAP. XXII. Adam and Eve earnestly looked towards the promised Seed. Enoch lived an heavenly life, and Noah. Abraham, Isaac and Jacob much in private devotions. The Saints of the Old Testament lived not by temporal promises, nor rested in them: But they lived, and were saved by faith in Christ; Proved out of both Testaments, and one Objection answered.

    _ CHAP. XXIII. The Church of the Old and New Testament but one. Christ made known in all his Offices before his incarnation. That he was King and Captain of his people, 1 Cor. 10. illustrated. That Christ was Mediator also of the first Covenant delivered by Moses.

    _ CHAP. XXIV. It was necessary by reason of the Curse annexed to the first Covenant, that it should be delivered in the hands of a Mediator, who could be no other than Christ himself. God caused the Covenant of Works to be shut in a Chest under the Mercy-seat, and why? The benefit of Christ's mediation otherwise. The Vnity of the Spirit in both Testaments.

    _ CHAP. XXV. Second Objection propounded, How that little which they knew could answer unto that justifying faith which we have now. First, The things that they believed considered, and shewed, That they amounted to as much as our Creed, less than which may be a ground of justifying faith. Secondly, For the manner of their faith, it was explicit. The distinction of explicit and implicit weighed; How much faith in them. Fiducial faith.

    _ CHAP. XXVI. That the Israelites were not saved by a blind obedience, or any mere implicit faith only; but by a fiducial trust in the mercies of God, as they were exhibited in the Ark of the Covenant, and the Mercy-seat erected over it. That the Cherubims, erected at either end, represented the same Church, of one piece, of either Testament, looking towards Christ; who really dwelt (by his Divine presence) betwixt them, and so shewed himself their King and Prophet. The Argument of the next Chapter propounded.

    _ CHAP. XXVII. The Kingdom given unto Christ for his Priesthood-sake; who as of the order of Melchizedek had an inner house and Altar, to which the house of Aaron owed reverence: That it was not properly an Altar, but bore some analogy; and was needful for the people. That the promises of God before the Law were virtually concealed in the Ark. A new Objection started.

    _ CHAP. XXVIII. What resemblance the Ark bore unto an Altar; and how the Altar of Burnt-Offering was sanctified by it. That a Censer was only a necessary Vtensil, belonging to the Holy of Holies, to be used once a Year. That the whole Temple was hallowed by the Còvenant and Mercy-seat, shewed by Solomon's Dedication of it.

    _ CHAP. XXIX. They intended t•at Covenant which God had made with Abraham, Isa•c and Jacob, by the sign of Circumcision, (and not that which they consented •o when they received the Law) upon which fundamental Covenant it was that God proclaim•d his Attributes of mercy to them; yet they were bound •o renew their own Covenant wh•n •hey sought for mercies. The presence of God in the Temple an Object of their faith; of which presence Christ was the Angel, otherwise known by the name of the loving kindness or tender mercies of God, to which they trusted more than to any of their services.

    _ CHAP. XXX. Christ cloathed in his Word and promises, the adequate Object of saving faith; which he was to them as well as unto us: No naked Christ without these: No plerophory without them. So much of any promise as the Ancients laid hold of, so much of Christ they received in an implicit manner. There is somewhat implicit in faith, even in these days too.

    _ CHAP. XXXI. Wherein the Saints of the Old Testament could not attain to so much as hath been since revealed. That the generality of them were blinded most (1.) by God's Providence, who would have 'Christ to come in the worst times, that he might be crucified; and so obtain his Kingdom. And that the Disciples themselves should be held in like obscurity with other misled Disciples of the Scribes, lest they should indis•r•etly offer to hinder the ministry of Christ. (2.) By Satan's malice, to work the destruction of the Jewish Church and people; chie•ly by the perverseness of the Pharisees. Different apprehensions concerning Jewish Learning. The close of this Argument.

    _ CHAP. XXXII. Shewing the providence of God over his people Israel, according to the Blessing promised of their multiplying; in respect of fruitfulness, and of protection in Egypt (however hardly used otherwise) from Famine, War and Pestilence. That the indulgence of Concubines might contribute much to the number of their encrease. That in an ordinary way of computatio• (without flying unto Twins, or any other miracles) out of seventy persons only, the Muster-Roll of Moses might easily arise.

    _ CHAP. XXXIII. That a great number came along with the house of Jacob; for Abraham had a great Train, Isaac more, Jacob all they left, and such as he brought with him from Padan-aram. Six Objections propounded: And two fundamental Arguments for the Thesis.

    _ CHAP. XXXIV. Certain Corollary Rules preliminary to the answering of the first Objection. That Jacob sent his Sons to Joseph, as a foreign Prince, for a favour; but not unaccompanied; considering, 1. Their concern; 2. What weight of money they might take with them in so many Bundles, if only to lade ten Asses. 3. What the length and hazard of the way. The four next Objections briefly answered.

    _ CHAP. XXXV. The last Objection answered, by shewing, That the circumcised Servants were part of Jacob's household, that could not be parted withal, without loss, scandal and prejudice to the Church of God; as being, 1. Children of the faith of Abraham. 2. Graffed into his Seed by intermarriages. 3. Distinct in Genealogy. 4. Yet (possibly) some snare unto the Israelites, by retaining a smack of their old Idolatry.

    _ CHAP. XXXVI. That the simplicity of the Scripture (contrary to the Romances of the Heathen Writers) maketh little state of great Secular matters, relating to the Church; Shewed by instances of Abraham and Jacob; yet Joseph (as a Statesman in Egypt) observed Ceremonies in the reception and introduction of his Father and Brethren. That the Israelites built not in Egypt, but by constraint.

    _ CHAP. XXXVII. Th• Israelites had toleration in Egypt, as to offer Sacrifices during Ioseph's life; Afterwards, denied them. That contrary Religions are sooner tolerated than diversities of the same. That there was but one Religion in Satan's Kingdom, how many Gods soever the Heathen worshipped. Jews (at this day) tolerated much at the like rate that they were before.

    _ CHAP. XXXVIII. How Joseph might live in Pharaoh's house, And be free from Egyptian superstition. What private Religion he might have; What godly people near him? What Vnion he had with the Church Catholick, or his Fathers house. That he lived by faith, like Daniel in Babylon; yet the want of Ordinances such a trouble to him as to David.

    _ CHAP. XXXIX. Of the Vnity of the Church in respect to Election, in the general (perplexities noted) more especially in respect to the house of Jacob, wherein all were chosen; whereas in the house of Abraham and Isaac, there was but one received as Heir of the promise. Reasons to be given for their rejection: and so, might have been in Jacob's house too, whose errours are recorded.

    _ CHAP. XL. The Sons of Jacob compared in their vertues and vices: The latter aggravated, and excused. Why Pharez, born of incest, should be so great in Judah, and inherit the promise at the last.

    _ CHAP. XLI. Pursuing the same Argument, and opening the Law of Leviration, by which Pharez was restored. Other marked persons not blot to the Genealogy of Christ.

  3. A LETTER In ANSWER to a QUESTION Propounded by the Authour, viz. CONCERNING The multiplying of the Children of Israel in Egypt.

  4. A SECOND QUESTION Propounded by the Author, viz. CONCERNING The multiplying of Mankind until the Floud.

  5. MrRUDYERD's ANSWER TO THE Second Question.

  6. Books Printed for, and Sold by RICHARD CHISWELL.

    _ Books lately Printed for Richard Chiswell.

    _ Books in the Press.

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(2), tcp:49846:111 (2), tcp:49846:112 (2), tcp:49846:113 (2), tcp:49846:114 (2), tcp:49846:115 (2), tcp:49846:116 (2), tcp:49846:117 (2), tcp:49846:118 (2), tcp:49846:119 (2), tcp:49846:120 (2), tcp:49846:121 (2), tcp:49846:122 (2), tcp:49846:123 (2), tcp:49846:124 (2), tcp:49846:125 (2), tcp:49846:126 (2), tcp:49846:127 (2), tcp:49846:128 (2), tcp:49846:129 (2), tcp:49846:130 (2), tcp:49846:131 (2), tcp:49846:132 (2), tcp:49846:133 (2), tcp:49846:134 (2), tcp:49846:135 (2), tcp:49846:136 (2), tcp:49846:137 (2), tcp:49846:138 (2), tcp:49846:139 (2), tcp:49846:140 (2), tcp:49846:141 (2), tcp:49846:142 (2), tcp:49846:143 (2), tcp:49846:144 (2), tcp:49846:145 (2), tcp:49846:146 (2), tcp:49846:147 (2), tcp:49846:148 (2), tcp:49846:149 (2), tcp:49846:150 (2), tcp:49846:151 (2), tcp:49846:152 (2), tcp:49846:153 (2), tcp:49846:154 (2), tcp:49846:155 (2), tcp:49846:156 (2), tcp:49846:157 (2), tcp:49846:158 (2), tcp:49846:159 (2), tcp:49846:160 (2), tcp:49846:161 (2), tcp:49846:162 (2), tcp:49846:163 (2), tcp:49846:164 (2), tcp:49846:165 (2), tcp:49846:166 (2), tcp:49846:167 (2), tcp:49846:168 (2), tcp:49846:169 (2), tcp:49846:170 (2), tcp:49846:171 (2), tcp:49846:172 (2), tcp:49846:173 (2), tcp:49846:174 (2), tcp:49846:175 (2), tcp:49846:176 (2), tcp:49846:177 (2), tcp:49846:178 (2), tcp:49846:179 (2), tcp:49846:180 (2), tcp:49846:181 (2), tcp:49846:182 (2), tcp:49846:183 (2), tcp:49846:184 (2), tcp:49846:185 (2), tcp:49846:186 (2), tcp:49846:187 (2), tcp:49846:188 (2), tcp:49846:189 (2), tcp:49846:190 (2), tcp:49846:191 (2), tcp:49846:192 (2), tcp:49846:193 (2), tcp:49846:194 (2), tcp:49846:195 (2), tcp:49846:196 (2), tcp:49846:197 (2), tcp:49846:198 (2), tcp:49846:199 (2), tcp:49846:200 (2), tcp:49846:201 (2), tcp:49846:202 (2), tcp:49846:203 (2), tcp:49846:204 (2) • @rendition (3) : simple:additions (3) • @n (379) : 2 (2), 3 (2), 4 (2), 5 (2), 6 (2), 7 (2), 8 (2), 9 (2), 10 (2), 11 (2), 12 (2), 13 (2), 14 (2), 15 (2), 16 (2), 17 (2), 18 (2), 19 (2), 20 (2), 21 (2), 22 (2), 23 (2), 24 (2), 25 (2), 26 (2), 27 (2), 28 (2), 29 (2), 30 (2), 31 (2), 32 (2), 33 (2), 34 (2), 35 (2), 36 (2), 37 (2), 38 (2), 39 (2), 40 (2), 41 (2), 42 (2), 43 (2), 44 (2), 45 (2), 46 (2), 47 (2), 48 (2), 49 (2), 50 (2), 51 (2), 52 (2), 53 (2), 54 (2), 55 (1), 56 (2), 57 (2), 58 (2), 59 (2), 60 (2), 61 (2), 62 (2), 63 (2), 64 (2), 65 (2), 66 (2), 67 (2), 68 (2), 69 (2), 70 (1), 71 (1), 72 (1), 73 (1), 74 (1), 75 (1), 76 (1), 77 (1), 78 (1), 79 (1), 80 (1), 81 (1), 82 (1), 83 (1), 84 (1), 85 (1), 86 (1), 87 (1), 88 (1), 89 (1), 90 (1), 91 (1), 92 (1), 93 (1), 94 (1), 95 (1), 96 (1), 97 (1), 98 (1), 99 (1), 100 (1), 101 (1), 102 (1), 103 (1), 104 (1), 105 (1), 106 (1), 107 (1), 108 (1), 109 (1), 110 (1), 111 (1), 112 (1), 113 (1), 114 (1), 115 (1), 116 (1), 117 (1), 118 (1), 119 (1), 120 (1), 121 (1), 122 (1), 123 (1), 124 (1), 125 (1), 126 (1), 127 (1), 128 (1), 129 (1), 130 (1), 131 (1), 132 (1), 133 (1), 134 (1), 135 (1), 136 (1), 137 (1), 138 (1), 139 (1), 140 (1), 141 (1), 142 (1), 143 (1), 144 (1), 145 (1), 146 (1), 147 (1), 148 (1), 149 (1), 150 (1), 151 (1), 152 (1), 153 (1), 154 (1), 155 (1), 156 (1), 157 (1), 158 (1), 159 (1), 160 (1), 161 (1), 162 (1), 163 (1), 164 (1), 165 (1), 166 (1), 167 (1), 168 (1), 169 (1), 170 (1), 171 (1), 172 (1), 173 (1), 174 (1), 175 (1), 176 (1), 177 (1), 178 (1), 179 (1), 180 (1), 181 (1), 182 (1), 183 (1), 184 (1), 185 (1), 186 (1), 187 (1), 188 (1), 189 (1), 190 (1), 191 (1), 192 (1), 193 (1), 194 (1), 195 (1), 196 (1), 197 (1), 198 (1), 199 (1), 200 (1), 201 (1), 202 (1), 203 (1), 204 (1), 205 (1), 206 (1), 207 (1), 208 (1), 209 (1), 210 (1), 211 (1), 212 (1), 213 (1), 214 (1), 215 (1), 216 (1), 217 (1), 218 (1), 219 (1), 220 (1), 221 (1), 222 (1), 223 (1), 224 (1), 225 (1), 226 (1), 227 (1), 228 (1), 229 (1), 230 (1), 231 (1), 232 (1), 233 (1), 234 (1), 235 (1), 236 (1), 237 (1), 238 (1), 239 (1), 240 (1), 241 (1), 242 (1), 243 (1), 244 (1), 245 (1), 246 (1), 247 (1), 248 (1), 249 (1), 250 (1), 251 (1), 252 (1), 253 (1), 254 (1), 255 (1), 256 (1), 257 (1), 258 (1), 259 (1), 260 (1), 261 (1), 262 (1), 263 (1), 264 (1), 265 (1), 266 (1), 267 (1), 268 (1), 269 (1), 270 (1), 271 (1), 272 (1), 273 (1), 274 (1), 275 (1), 276 (1), 277 (1), 278 (1), 279 (1), 280 (1), 281 (1), 282 (1), 283 (1), 284 (1), 285 (1), 286 (1), 287 (1), 288 (1), 289 (1), 290 (1), 291 (1), 292 (1), 293 (1), 294 (1), 295 (1), 296 (1), 297 (1), 298 (1), 299 (1), 300 (1), 301 (1), 302 (1), 303 (1), 304 (1), 305 (1), 306 (1), 307 (1), 308 (1), 309 (1), 310 (1), 311 (1), 312 (1), 1 (1)
24. postscript 2
25. q 42
26. row 126
27. salute 8
28. seg 1 @rend (1) : decorInit (1)
29. signed 4
30. table 3
31. trailer 1
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